The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
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Robert E. Lee Statue, Charlottesville, VA.  2006
The states of the old Confederacy, of the old South, have been for four decades strongholds of GOP politics. Since the 1970s those states have been, with few exceptions (e.g., Virginia), reliably Republican. The GOP depends on Southern voters for national victory. While Republicans tout the forward-looking “conservatism” of Southern senators like Tim Scott of... Read More
Though Flannery O’Connor didn’t live long, she left us some of the best stories ever written. It’s impossible to overpraise “A Good Man Is Hard to Find,” “The Life You Save May Be Your Own,” “The Displaced Person,” “The Artificial Nigger,” “Good Country People,” “Everything That Rises Must Converge” and “Revelation.” O’Connor’s liberal usage of... Read More
Recently, I reported on my most widely read columns ( ). The rankings are based on my worldwide audience. Many of my American readers, judging by their emails, enjoy most my remembrances of the civilized times in America’s past. My column, “I have outlived my country,” on March 16 reminded many Americans of the civilized... Read More
Until very recently, most Northern cities enjoyed overwhelming white majorities. Southern cities haven’t been so lucky because most blacks stayed in the region until the Great Migration. However, Richmond was a white-majority city until desegregation. Today, blacks and deracinated whites in the city are destroying monuments to Southern resistance, finally consolidating their cultural as well... Read More
This is the first in a series about the continuing disappearance of whites from American cities. Many people still pretend that The Great Replacement is a myth or a conspiracy theory, but the graphs that accompany each article in this series prove them wrong. Every city has a different story but all have seen a... Read More
A World No Longer in Supply
The road, little trafficked, ran past the college post office, past my grandfather’s house, and through a stretch of woods to Lanc’s store. Then it wound off through wooded Virginia countryside. Hampden-Sydney was one of the small Southern colleges founded well before modern times--1776 for Hampden-Sydney--offering liberal arts schooling of remarkably good academic quality. Many... Read More
smithsonian
See, earlier: Time, Once Again, To Rethink Martin Luther King Day–The 2019 Edition If you want to know what our Ruling Class wants us to think, an excellent resource is Smithsonian Magazine. The May 2, 2019 issue features an article titled “A New Civil War Museum Speaks Truths in the Former Capital of the Confederacy.”... Read More
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I must confess that I feel a bit awkward about reviewing Dr. Boyd Cathey’s outstanding anthology, The Land We Love: The South and its Heritage. I am, as the reader may notice, mentioned in the preface, along with Clyde Wilson, as one of the author’s two most significant guides in preparing these essays. And despite... Read More
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Editor’s Note: This is the transcript of my speech delivered at the 2018 League of the South National Conference. I would like think I stand before you today older and wiser than I was three years ago. I want to talk to you today about my experience as a member of the League of the... Read More
I recently traveled to Texas to speak about South Africa, at the Free Speech Forum of the Texas A & M University. To travel from the Pacific Northwest all the way to College Station, Texas, without experiencing more of the "Lone Star State" was not an option. So, after driving from Austin eastward to College... Read More
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No discussion of Southern conservatism, its history and its relationship to what is termed broadly the “American conservative movement” would be complete without an examination of events that have transpired over the past fifty years and the pivotal role of the powerful intellectual current known as Neoconservatism. From the 1950s into the 1980s Southerners who... Read More
Dark Spots in a Shining Sea of Twaddle
Much is written about slavery and its aftermaths. A large part of this is frenetically modified history issuing from people both excited and poorly read, a comic-book version apparently intended to support agendas of the impenetrably adolescent Left. A few points: First, slavery was always bad, frequently hideous, much worse in the Deep South than... Read More
"I will never be able to hold her again, but I forgive you." So said Nadine Collier, who lost her mother in the massacre at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, offering forgiveness to Dylann Roof, who confessed to the atrocity that took the lives of nine churchgoers at that Wednesday night prayer... Read More
An Excursion into Northern Politics of Race
Race riot in he South, 1863. Wikipedia: "Rioters subjected black men to the most brutal violence: torture, hanging, and burning." Eleven were lynched. The Southern mob depicted here were afraid that if the North won the Civil War, freed slaves would take the jobs of whites. Virginian though I am, a son of the Shenandoah,... Read More
Portrait of Nathaniel Macon, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives
Back in 1975 the Warren County [N.C.] Historical Association initiated a comprehensive project to study the life and legacy of Nathaniel Macon. As a part of this project, both archaeological and architectural studies of his old Buck Spring plantation, near the Roanoke River, were commissioned. Working with the professional staff of the North Carolina Division... Read More
In 1956, 19 Democratic Senators and 82 Democratic House members signed a Southern Manifesto pledging to resist the integration of Southern public schools as ordered by Earl Warren's Supreme Court. Only two GOP House members, both from Virginia, signed. The American South was as solidly Democratic as it was solidly segregationist. The break in the... Read More
A Confession
The Rappahannock. ViFoto My sins creep up on me, sent by the Devil, and beset me by surprise. I know not what to do. A month ago, in Fredericksburg, Virginia, I sat on the banks of the Rappahannock River, upon which as a stripling I had canoed and fished, and reflected on how much I... Read More
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Introduction Most Americans who know anything of Robert Lewis Dabney (1820-1898) know him only as the stern chaplain of General “Stonewall” Jackson and the author of a classic biography of the general. Yet, after the War Between the States Dabney became one of the most intransigent and impressive American critics of industrial capitalism of the... Read More
Continuing my series on the American nations (see also A Tentative Ranking of the Clannishness of the “Founding Fathers”; Flags of the American Nations; Sound Familiar?), I take a look at the Cavaliers. The founders of the U.S. Tidewater and Deep South were people of noble blood that originated primarily from southwestern England, in an... Read More
The Confederate flag has become identified not only with a lost cause but with a now publicly condemned one. Confederate flags have been removed from government and educational buildings throughout the South, while Confederate dignitaries whose names and statues once adorned monuments and boulevards are no longer deemed fit for public mention. The ostensible reason... Read More
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Confederate Flag Day, State Capitol, Raleigh, N.C. -- March 3, 2007
[A major oration, previously unpublished, by Prof. Paul Gottfried] Those Southern secessionists whose national flag we are now celebrating have become identified not only with a lost cause but with a now publicly condemned one. Confederate flags have been removed from government and educational buildings throughout the South, while Confederate dignitaries whose names and statues... Read More
The South remains a breed apart. You really have to tip your hat to American academics, who display an imperishable talent for rediscovering the obvious. The major discovery announced this week comes from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where an erudite soul named Scott Keeter, speaking at the school's Center for the... Read More
Topic Classics
Confederate Flag Day, State Capitol, Raleigh, N.C. -- March 3, 2007