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Whither Afghanistan? Getting Out Is Harder Than Getting In
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Given the lack of any deep thinking going on in the White House, Americans could easily find themselves in yet another Afghanistan.

The inability of the United States to comprehend what it was becoming involved in when, in the wake of 9/11, it declared a Global War on Terror, has to be reckoned one of the singular failures of national security policy over the past twenty years. Not only did the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq make bad situations worse, but the fact that no one is Washington was able to define “victory” and think in terms of an exit strategy has meant that the wars and instability are still with us. In their wake has been hundreds of thousands of deaths and trillions of dollars spent to accomplish absolutely nothing.

As a result, Iraq is unstable and leans more heavily towards America’s adversary Iran than it does to Washington. The Iraqi Parliament has, in fact, asked U.S. forces to leave the country, a request that has been ignored both by Donald Trump and Joe Biden. Trump actually threatened to freeze Iraqi bank assets to pressure the Iraqis into accepting the continued U.S. occupation. At the same time, American troops illegally present in neighboring Syria, continue to occupy that country’s oil fields to deprive the government in Damascus of much needed resources. Neither Iraq nor Syria threatens the United States in any way.

Given that history, it should be no surprise that the withdrawal from the twenty year-long nation building project in Afghanistan, long overdue, is not quite going as smoothly as the Pentagon and White House apparently planned. U.S. forces pulled out of their principal base in the country, Bagram Air Base, in the middle of the night without informing the incoming Afghan base commander. A frenzy of looting of the left behind equipment followed.

The Taliban are racking up victory after victory against U.S. and NATO trained Afghan government forces who have the disadvantage of having to defend everywhere, making them vulnerable to attacks on an opportunity basis. The Taliban now plausibly claim to control 85% of the countryside, to include crossing points into Pakistan and several important towns and provinces. They recently shocked observers by executing 22 Afghan Army commandos who had run out of ammunition and surrendered. The U.S. government is quietly expecting a similar fate for the thousands of Afghans who collaborated with the regime installed by Washington and is hurriedly arranging for visas to get the most vulnerable out, eventually seeking to resettle them in friendly Middle Eastern countries as well as in the U.S..

By one estimate as many as 18,000 Afghans worked for U.S. forces and they also have families that will have to go with them. There is particular concern that former interpreters, who would have been privy to decision making by Washington, will be most particularly targeted. The Biden White House has responded finally to the urgency of the issue – lives are at stake – by approving special flights to remove the most vulnerable to a third country for processing before determining if they can be allowed to take up residence in the United States or elsewhere.

To be sure, the struggle to rid the world of the wrong kind of terrorists has left the United States weaker and more unfocused than it was in 2001. China, Russia and Iran are already maneuvering to fill the impending power vacuum in Central Asia by coming to terms with the likely Taliban takeover, which might come sooner that Joe Biden expects. If some kind of Afghan coalition government does emerge, it will belong to Russia and China, not the U.S..

Meanwhile, the U.S. military itself, under the Biden Administration, is weaker and more riven by controversy than ever before. A recent 23-page report suggests that since Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin’s February order to “stand down” the entire U.S. military for commanders to address “extremism” in its ranks morale has sunk and many top soldiers have either retired or quit in disgust. During his confirmation hearings, Austin pledged that he would “rid our ranks of racists and extremists” but the reality is quite different, with the witch hunt in the ranks and endless promotion of diversity even hurting normal military readiness training.

By next month the U.S. military presence in Afghanistan will be reduced to a battalion of infantry to guard the Embassy and CIA station in Kabul, which is itself not sustainable unless some kind of workable Afghan government coalition can be achieved. Given the recent Taliban successes, that outcome appears to be increasingly unlikely. Maintaining the Embassy will also require a viable lifeline to the city’s airport and talks are underway with Turkey to determine if Ankara will be willing to base a stay behind battalion to maintain the air link. The Taliban have already announced that a Turkish presence at the airport will be unacceptable and warned Turkey that there would be revenge attacks against any remaining NATO troops after the U.S. pulls out. Their spokesman issued a statement declaring that “The continuation of Turkey’s occupation will provoke feelings of hatred and enmity in our country towards Turkish officials, and will harm bilateral relations.”

The U.S. is also seeking an over the horizon offensive capability once the military has formally left Afghanistan. The intention would be to be able to strike targets in Afghanistan if a new government forms any alliances with terrorist groups that potentially threaten the United States, as unlikely as that might be. At the present time, there are few options as the U.S. would not be able to launch cruise missile or airstrikes through the neighboring countries that surround Afghanistan to the south, east and west, though a long-distance strike from warships in the Persian Gulf is technically possible.

To the north there are, however, former Soviet central Asian states, the so-called “‘Stans,” that might be suitable for hosting some arrangement to base American equipment, aircraft and a caretaker force. Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, or Uzbekistan might be amenable to such a development, but both Tajikistan and Kazakhstan are members of the Russian-led Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO). On Monday, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said that any U.S. presence in a CSTO country would need the approval of the alliance, which the Kremlin will veto. One might suggest that there is mistrust about the reliability of Joe Biden and company as a strategic partner, even though there is widespread concern that Afghanistan might become a rogue state. Nevertheless, Washington’s bullying in Iraq, Syria and also against Iran has failed to convince anyone that the U.S. Air Force would make a good neighbor.

So getting out of Afghanistan will be a lot trickier than going in. The U.S. clearly wants to have some ability to intervene using air resources if the Taliban take over and misbehave, but that just might be a fantasy as the door is closing on options while China is waiting for its own door to open to bring the Afghans into their New Silk Road. And there is no escaping the fact that the entire Afghan adventure was one hell of a waste of lives and resources. Next time, maybe Washington will hesitate to charge in, but given the lack of any deep thinking going on in the White House, I suspect we Americans could easily find ourselves in yet another Afghanistan.

Philip Giraldi, Ph.D. is Executive Director of the Council for the National Interest.

(Republished from Strategic Culture Foundation by permission of author or representative)
 
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  1. Yee says:

    What is so hard? Transport the ISIS head-choppers to Afghanistan, make it another Syria. Turn Central Asia to another Middleast, this time right next to China and close to Russia.

    Turkey troops are staying and taking over the airport from the US, shouldn’t be any problem to move the ISIS…

  2. Phipps says:

    Osama Bin Laden made it clear that his main beef with the U.S. government was its support for Israeli occupation in Palestine. The Jew-owned media and the Jew-owned government in Washington D.C. ignored this main plank in Bin Laden’s anger. Indeed, most Muslims are angry over the U.S. kowtowing to Israeli land theft, human rights abuses and terrorism. The point is, as long as we Gentiles remain under Israeli occupation in America, we can expect more wars because of Israel (Afghanistan) or for Israel (Gulf War Two). Next up: a war with Iran to benefit Israel.

  3. Jim H says:

    ‘The U.S. clearly wants to have some ability to intervene using air resources if the Taliban take over and misbehave.’ — Philip Giraldi

    Setting aside why it’s any business of the United States if the Taliban ‘misbehave,’ aerial bombing has been a dysfunctional idée fixe of the US military since WW II.

    Bombing the hell out of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia, which unlike rich industrial countries had few targets of any military value, accomplished nothing. By the early 1970s the Viet Cong controlled most of the countryside, just as the Taliban does in Afghanistan.

    But the highly-decorated losers and olive-drab wankers in the Pentagon want to retain the option of bombing wedding parties and suspicious-looking hajis in Toyota pickups, in the deluded belief that this accomplishes something other than serving as a recruitment poster for jihadist militants.

    America — which on the high-tech front is falling decades behind Russian aircraft and missiles — is virtually too incapacitated to feed itself, much less ‘project power’ onto a developing world that sees China as a far more productive partner in building infrastructure than America, which wants only to hijack color-revolution ‘elections’ and install its seditious stooges to loot assets.

  4. Notsofast says:
    @Yee

    the hasty withdrawal, leaving the country littered with weapons and equipment seems to indicate that is the plan. this wasn’t a failure or lack of policy as their intention is to sow the seeds of chaos in the area and keep the opium ratlines funding their dark agenda.

    • Agree: Gidoutahere
    • Replies: @Gidoutahere
  5. The inability of the United States to comprehend what it was becoming involved in when, in the wake of 9/11, it declared a Global War on Terror, has to be reckoned one of the singular failures of national security policy over the past twenty years.

    Imperial war crimes including 9/11 are never failures or mistakes. Deep State criminals are not stupid. They are evil.

    • Agree: Notsofast, R.C.
    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    , @animalogic
  6. Anonymous[278] • Disclaimer says:
    @Phipps

    “Osama Bin Laden made it clear that his main beef with the U.S. government was its support for Israeli occupation in Palestine.”

    Actually not true. He was equally if not more concerned with the presence of U.S. troops in Saudi Arabia. He was okay with Palestine when he was getting U.S. assistance.

    “American troops illegally present in neighboring Syria” is too gently phrased. The United States invaded Syria under the Obama administration, Trump and Biden continued the act of war. It’s a shanda.

    • Agree: Jim Christian
    • Replies: @Z-man
  7. A123 says: • Website

    “American troops illegally present in neighboring Syria” is too gently phrased. The United States invaded Syria under the Obama administration,

    The obvious way to wrap up Syria is for all foreign (except Russia) troops and their militias to leave. Right now the #1 obstacle to peace is Iran.

    No one is foolish enough to trust sociopath Khamenei. He has been caught red handed violating JCPOA while Obama was still in office (1). The provocative presence of Iranian, hezbollah & regular, military forces guarantees that Turkey and the U.S. will stay in Syria. The Israeli airstrikes against Iranian offensive forces will also continue.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) From 2019 — https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/14910/iran-nuclear-deal-violations

    • Disagree: Ann Nonny Mouse, Tjoe
    • Troll: Alfred, moi, Ariadna, Sarah
    • Replies: @moi
    , @Justrambling
    , @anon
  8. SafeNow says:
    @Jim H

    “aerial bombing has been a dysfunctional idée fixe of the US military since WW II.”

    My father was with the Army Air Force in WWII, in intelligence. His job was he briefed and debriefed bomber crews. The targets were railroads, factories, industrial districts, and harbors. He never talked about any “strategic” bombing to try to terrorize civilians, and I never asked. He got that job in intelligence because he was very smart. But the clincher was he had a knack for refolding maps. Remember roadmaps? 25 cents at the Texaco gas station. Challenging to re-fold for me, but Dad had a knack for it.

    • Replies: @Curmudgeon
    , @Hibernian
  9. Anonymous[132] • Disclaimer says:

    Afgan collaborators should be left to face the fate they deserve. They’re traitors who supported the destruction and slaughter inflicted on their own. People who disagree with this are those who believe that the US was there to breed rainbow unicorns of democracy.

    But who am I kidding – there are plenty of white countries that already imported millions of dark doctors and engineers but desperately need people capable of translating all that immense accumulated knowledge. Swedes will probably volunteer. Their women are getting kinda’ tired of keeping them occupied while they waiting.

    Not only did the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq make bad situations worse, but the fact that no one is Washington was able to define “victory” and think in terms of an exit strategy has meant that the wars and instability are still with us. In their wake has been hundreds of thousands of deaths and trillions of dollars spent to accomplish absolutely nothing.

    It accomplished massive destruction among certain Israel’s neighbours, no? Just ask Philip Gi… oh, nevermind.

  10. “Get out—- simply march out single file to the music of John Philip Souza —-and when King Cotton plays everyone salute—-20 years and another clear cut victory and only costing 4 trillion–show me any other countyr who can do better !!” and Sergeant Major Tomko knows his strut……

  11. @Anonymous

    Yep, Israel will mark down the last 20-yrs as a strategic triumph. The entire middle-east is one or more of bankrupt, in flames or allied with the US. There’s no significant threat coming from that direction for the next century.

  12. @WorkingClass

    ‘Evil’ is an entirely unhelpful term, because it stinks of dualist religiosty.

    It’s far more informative to view ‘Deep State’ actors as having different objectives and motivations to ‘normal’ people.

    The simplest possible explanation is that they are extremely motivated by the wealth gap between themselves and the median or average person. That’s literally all it takes (as far as ‘ends’ are concerned); then it becomes a question of ‘means’ to achieve the desired ends, and there is no easier way to do so than the political means (i.e., through State coercion rather than through offering a product at a competitive price).

    In general it’s not a bad assumption that a person with normal preferences would prefer to be better off than average (‘more is better’). However, members of the political class are best explained by a pathological, almost obsessive preference for widening the gap between themselves and the masses. There’s no need to try to formulate a supernatural-adjacent “evil” motivation: obsessive desire for the biggest gap possible, and indifference to everyone else, is more than enough.

    Membership of the political class above the very lowest levels (i.e., minor apparatchiki) is generally associated with highly-subsidised material consumption – so the senior political-bureaucratic cadre understands that they will continue to have super-normal consumption even if the society is collapsing.

    So they will – again, generally – accept a reduction in aggregate wealth, so long as their share of total wealth increases. That is an observable regularity throughout history: the political class will continue to behave in ways predicted by an obsessive wealth-gap-focus , even as the economy collapses around their ears. No ‘evil’ required.

    Note that anyone who relies on the political class to furnish legislated benefits – IP protection, licensure and other artificial barriers to competition, for example – is a beneficiary of the political means… more so than some low-rent state functionary.

    Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk, Jack Dorsey, Eric Schmidt, Mark Zuckerberg, George Soros, Warren Buffet etc are properly viewed as members of the political class- as much as Lagarde and the rest of the bureaucratic and officeholding sub-classes.

    • Agree: Alfred, Kolya Krassotkin
    • Thanks: Joe Levantine
    • LOL: Thim
  13. @Anonymous

    It’s not necessary for quislings to die if they move to another nation. There, they’re no longer a threat to their own country. That’s a more civilised option.

    Actually, I doubt that the Taliban leadership has any interest in killing them if they’re normal troops, interpreters, cooks, clerks etc. Afghanistan has traditionally been ruled by concensus among the most powerful tribes. That means accepting that your enemy today isn’t necessarily your enemy tomorrow. That’s the same as the traditional British belief that nations have permanent interests but no permanent friends. My father fought against the Japanese in New Guinea for 4 years but thought those who still hated them after they became British allies again, just as they were in the First World War, were being silly.

    That’s the same as the US affection for Al Qaeda who were US allies in Afghanistan against the USSR and in Libya against their own government. They’re US allies in Syria today and the USA is still trying to establish an alliance with them in China and Russia. No leader in the USA takes any notice of anybody who dislikes Al Qaeda and no leader ever will because those people are being silly and don’t understand US values. Yes, there were and are minor disagreements but so what? The same holds true for any relationship. How many US citizens and US allies has Al Qaeda ever killed? A few thousand? How many people have they killed in alliance with the USA? A few hundred thousand?

    If blood debts are owed, it’s probably different in local Afghan areas, whether suburbs or villages, because they’re more likely to lead to family or tribal vendettas. Those people sometimes don’t share the general US and British and the Afghan ruling class values. They’re not as civilised and mistake the normal behaviour of enemies for the behaviour of evil people instead of people like ourselves who aren’t always kind to the people we select as enemies.

    The best approach is to be more like the Chinese and to be less enthusiastic to make enemies. It’s not true that the Chinese must hate people if they’ve never bombed them. donthomson1@hotmail.com

  14. RobinG says:

    Drone whistleblower Daniel Hale to be sentenced Tues. in Alexandria.

    Hale said when he was deployed to Afghanistan in 2012, his job was to track cellphone signals of people believed to be enemy combatants. He described horror over the way drone strikes often kill their targets as they go about their daily lives, rather than on a traditional battlefield, and sometimes unintentionally take innocents as collateral damage

    Hale said his conscience drove him to share top-secret details, including that the drone program was not as adept at avoiding civilian deaths as the government claimed.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/daniel-hale-drone-secret-leaker-says-he-was-exposing-obama-s-false-statements/ar-AAMsogj?ocid=msedgntp

    • Thanks: Notsofast, RichardDuck
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    , @RobinG
  15. @Anonymous

    I disagree. Members of the population who needed income went to work for the de-facto government, the rulers of the country. Nothing wrong with that.

    Okay, the rulers were the USA and its sluts. Okay, a complication. But the Taliban needs to call a general amnesty or publish rules of amnesty and lead in making peace. May not apply to all military combatants trying to kill them, defeated in battle, when they surrender. May not.

    But this would quickly end if they did that.

  16. @Jim H

    ‘…Bombing the hell out of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia, which unlike rich industrial countries had few targets of any military value, accomplished nothing. By the early 1970s the Viet Cong controlled most of the countryside, just as the Taliban does in Afghanistan….’

    Airpower’s great, but there have to be boots on the ground — even if only to fix the enemy in position and expose him to airstrikes. Airpower alone never wins; certainly not against a target like Afghanistan.

    That’s been demonstrated over and over.

    So who are we going to use as boots on the ground? Until that’s answered, we won’t be able to influence the Afghans at all.

  17. anonymous[384] • Disclaimer says:

    many top soldiers have either retired or quit in disgust.

    I don’t think this is true. People need their paychecks. Over the last 18 months, the retention of officers has been very high. The Air Force even tried to cut the intake this year but Congress critters made them reverse.

    The Air Force reversed its decision to dismiss hundreds of reserve officer training cadets and restored nearly 130 scholarships, officials said, after a lobbying effort assailed the decision as a punishment for many qualified cadets that would create catastrophic financial problems.

    That said. Patriotic people should be encouraged to leave the military.

    • Replies: @Sarah
  18. @WorkingClass

    “Deep State criminals are not stupid. They are evil.”
    Agreed.
    The basis of this evil ?
    They are legion. But over-weening conceit & hubris (& drooling greed & power lust) come to mind.

  19. “Bombing the hell out of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia, which unlike rich industrial countries had few targets of any military value, accomplished nothing. By the early 1970s the Viet Cong controlled most of the countryside, just as the Taliban does in Afghanistan.”

    Demonstrably false. And the clearest case was the attempt by the North to invade after US forces pulled out in 1973. Air and naval support were key factors in preventing that effort.

    • Disagree: St-Germain
    • Replies: @EliteCommInc.
    , @Sarah
  20. @EliteCommInc.

    After the first Gulf War, allied use of air power to contain Iraq was effective. Your general indictment is incorrect.

    Certainly, the matter is situational, but air support can be effective.

    • Replies: @WJ
  21. anonymous[379] • Disclaimer says:

    Please don’t do the Buchanan we-thing, it makes me cheese sour lumpy chyme up in my mouth and make little smacking noises with my tongue. Nobody asked us whether we should go in there. DO decided.

    I distinctly recall thinking at the time, everybody knows they got 40 war plans on the shelf – What’s the chance that they won’t fuck this up? By my clandestinely-developed remote vision powers I see you too making that circle with your thumb and forefinger. Zero.

    The main thing is, you guys ramped up poppy production 40X and topped up the pedo blackmail slush fund! You don’t need opium when you got this. This is some good shit.

    https://storage.googleapis.com/plos-corpus-prod/10.1371/journal.pone.0108250/1/pone.0108250.pdf?X-Goog-Algorithm=GOOG4-RSA-SHA256&X-Goog-Credential=wombat-sa%40plos-prod.iam.gserviceaccount.com%2F20210723%2Fauto%2Fstorage%2Fgoog4_request&X-Goog-Date=20210723T121229Z&X-Goog-Expires=86400&X-Goog-SignedHeaders=host&X-Goog-Signature=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

  22. TG says:

    The Afghanis who ‘helped’ us during the war were just doing it for a paycheck, and I expect that many – perhaps most – of our ‘allies’ were working for the other side. Not to worry, we are letting them all immigrate into the United States no questions asked. Never mind that the American people were not responsible for this stupid war, and never mind that the people who are really responsible would never let Afhgani refugees resettle within a hundred kilometers of their walled estates and private islands, and will not sacrifice anything competing with all that lovely cheap labor – nay, the people in charge will profit from cheap labor, even as the rest of us are faced with falling wages, and rising rents and prices as more and more people are jammed in.

    The Iron Law of Economics states that if there isn’t an open frontier, then if people breed like rodents they and their children will soon live and die like rodents. Right now the population of Afghanistan is about 40 million. It could easily double to 80 million by 2040, and 160 million by 2060. And they will remain miserably poor no matter what the Taliban do or do not do. And “we” will have to let them all move in with us, because “we” owe them – “we” meaning those Americans that had no part in this fiasco.

    • Agree: Old and Grumpy, TKK
    • Thanks: Etruscan Film Star
    • Replies: @Robert Bruce
  23. Alfa158 says:
    @RobinG

    One of the related article links in that msn article says that the US is issuing 34,500 immigration visas for Afghan allies. I presume those visas will also cover their immediate families so how many Afghans have to be evacuated before the Taliban march in: 100,000? More? And that would be just people with official visas. How many others will try to get out without visas?
    I don’t know if US ieven has plans to get that many people out that fast. Afghanistan doesn’t have a coast so they can’t pile into boats like the Vietnamese and head out to sea. It would require the Air Force to start a massive airlift and start it soon.

  24. Rahan says:

    • Thanks: GomezAdddams
    • LOL: Exile, Bill
    • Replies: @TKK
  25. Neither Iraq nor Syria threatens the United States in any way.

    LOL! What does that matter to the tribe! If Lord Beaverbrook could describe the US as a subjugated country run by the tribe in 1946 then it surely it has only got far more advanced and blatant 70 years later.

    • Agree: Exile, InnerCynic
  26. Anon[398] • Disclaimer says:

    We can’t accept defeat that is why we are still there. We got played. We can not bear the thought of losing control. China has a wonderful strategy that they call the cabbage strategy. They don’t fight. They let you do the fighting, focus on trade and diplomacy as much as possible, and surround the geopolitical targets until the moment is right. We need to get out. We need to get out of a lot of places. The military cares nothing for America anyway. The only thing an officer cares about is their honor and retirement. This is why they throw the American taxpayer money around to everyone else in the world because, they have no regard for the Americans they presume to serve. They don’t even think about them when they act. The pentagon is the most corrupt institution in America, and they intentionally do not use traditional accounting standards to avoid their accountability. Get out. Stay out. Use this as a textbook lesson and a prop to change strategy.

    • Replies: @FLgeezer
  27. anon[812] • Disclaimer says:

    1-BBC has uncovered a secret deal that let hundreds of IS and their families escape under the gaze ofUS and UK led coalition –https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-sh/raqqas_dirty_secret

    2 Is U.S-NATO Collaborating With Islamic State IS-Daesh In Afghanistan? Russia’s Foreign Ministry
Facts point to interaction between US, Islamic State in Afghanistan — Russian diplomat

    https://www.globalresearch.ca/is-u-s-nato-collaborating-with-islamic-state-is-daesh-in-afghanistan-russias-foreign-ministry/5750942

    3 A year ago, Russian foreign ministry and special envoy for Afghanistan repeatedly warned of mysterious aircrafts flying over the skies of northern Afghan provinces, especially Jawzjan. Moscow had realized that the helicopters were dropping cases of arms and foods down to the terrorist training areas to gear up anti-Russian radicalization.

    Russian foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova had said that Russian Government closely monitors the armament and transportation of the ISIS fighters into eastern parts of Afghanistan. In May 2017, the ministry in a statement asked for the US and NATO’s accounts about the unidentified aircrafts. It stated that they [the US and NATO] have been deployed in Afghanistan for over 15 years and they should find about vague flights in the airspace of Afghanistan. https://www.globalresearch.ca/isis-daesh-is-on-the-rise-in-afghanistan-why-whos-supporting-them-afghanistans-rare-earth-elements/5623182

    Former Afghan president Hamid Karzai pointed at West being behind the momentum of the ISIS in Afghanistan. In October 2017, he blamed the US for supplying weapons to Daesh or ISIS in Afghanistan. He maintained that the US army helicopters were being used to supply weapons to the group. He even went on to say that the militant group emerged in the country over the past three to four years under the watch of US military and intelligence agencies.

    https://www.globalresearch.ca/isis-daesh-is-on-the-rise-in-afghanistan-why-whos-supporting-them-afghanistans-rare-earth-elements/5623182

    Question is will MbS or MbZ get into the passenger seats again?

    They are mortally wounded at home, in Yemen, in Jordan, and in Syria .

    https://www.middleeasteye.net/opinion/mbs-mbz-losers-after-trump-netanyahu-exit

    Taliban doesn’t deny of their part in the action they have executed .Recent killings and attacks on civilians are the handiworks of IS. Another reason for China Russia and Iran to bury the hatchet with Taliban and one more reason for Taliban not to allow another Bin Laden on their soil. USA is running out of the toolkit .It thinks the Afghan is still mired in the naivety , cave dwelling ,and beholden to Saudi.
    Russia China cant afford this part become Somalia or Syria . Turkey will play hardball but it wont fall victim to Western -MbS-MbZ agenda. Multiple stakeholders will possibly guarantee Afghanistan ‘s disengagement from USA . It doesn’t mean USA wont bomb Afghanistan again and again or create another outfit with esoteric chilling name allowing only certain types of beard and white dress.

    Taliban has fought well and has routed US supported Government -Militia . Its no small feat despite some claiming that Taliban cant fight .

    • Thanks: RichardDuck
  28. Exile says:

    U.S. foreign policy errors in the Middle East are not the result of a lack of deep thinking. We charge in where Israel demands.

    There are no Zio-skeptics with any influence left in or around Washington D.C. to nay-say our colonial masters when they demand their giant colony spend its blood and treasure for their benefit.

    This won’t stop until White Americans overthrow their foreign colonial overlords again. That’s a multi-generational task. In those terms, we’re the generations that lived before 1776. It’s our job to properly instruct and provide for the generations who will fight and win the struggle against Zionist occupation of the American government.

    • Replies: @2stateshmustate
  29. This rapid retreat makes no sense given that President Biden is a solid neocon. The only theory I can devise is that in a war with Iran, American bases in Afghanistan would be overrun. The Iranians must have plans for this. American bases in Iraq have already been consolidated for security, bases in Qatar are moving to Jordan, and now they are going away in Afghanistan. Or perhaps this is a move to redirect resources to confront China, or to attack Syria. Biden is taking a lot of heat to pull this off. I doubt he’s doing it for the national good.

    Read this disturbing article for a clue. https://www.stripes.com/branches/army/2021-07-01/us-military-closes-qatar-camps-in-move-that-could-play-into-iran-policy-2009140.html

    The US Army is moving its logistics hub outside the range of most Iranian missiles to Jordan, where it can better support the planned overthrow of the Syrian government. Afghanistan was never part of the plan to destroy “seven countries in five years”. Syria remains on that hit list and Israel already bombs it twice a week. The UN and the American press raise no objection.

  30. Irwin says:

    Removed from YouTube, watched by virtually nobody.

    https://rumble.com/vk1bku-fatal-distraction.html

  31. @Yee

    Afghans are not Syrians, to let psycho foreigners do inhuman things to them. Reading English accounts of Afghanistan in the 19th Century might help. In the retreat from Kabul, a British Indian army of 16,000 left for India; one week later, only one English doctor and a handful of Sikh sepoys reached Jalalbad alive, a distance of some 70 km. If any enemy soldier is unfortunate enough to be caught by the Afghans, he would face the cruellest tortures… Any ISIS may expect a similar treatment.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1842_retreat_from_Kabul

  32. @Jim H

    Bombing the hell out of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia, which unlike rich industrial countries had few targets of any military value, accomplished nothing. By the early 1970s the Viet Cong controlled most of the countryside, just as the Taliban does in Afghanistan.

    Vietnam and Afghanistan are completely different theaters of war.

    The former is covered in jungle foliage which makes it easy for troops to move undetected.

    Afghanistan is open desert and can be monitored with satellites. Drone technology is a lot more advanced compared to when the war started. Targeting Taliban leaders is done using drones with pilots in Nevada.

    The real problem is that America is too nice in this type of war. Our leaders don’t have the guts to find a permanent solution. They play this tit for tat game and get understandably frustrated.

    They aren’t thinking in terms of demoralizing the enemy. All they have to do is take cues on what is happening within America to understand how it is done. Bring in a few competing ethnic groups and encourage various vices. Confuse the enemy and divide their focus. It’s really not that complicated.

    • Replies: @gotmituns
    , @ka
    , @nsa
  33. Tom Welsh says:

    “… Iraq is unstable and leans more heavily towards America’s adversary Iran than it does to Washington”.

    Good heavens! You don’t say!

    Imagine leaning more heavily towards a neighbouring country whose people share the same religion and have traditionally been closely linked for thousands of years.

    Just because the USA attacked Iraq without the slightest provocation, occupied it, destroyed its government, civil infrastructure and civic order, and killed a few million Iraqis.

    Some people just can’t take a joke.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • LOL: Old and Grumpy
  34. anonymous[139] • Disclaimer says:

    They could have used those trillions to fix things up here at home but instead squandered it all in overseas adventures. Shows how the leadership of the US cares not a bit about the American people who are just cash cows. Things are falling apart domestically even as they go about aggressing against other countries. It doesn’t seem feasible that there would be a coalition government there containing anyone tainted by being former puppets of the US. People who had jobs as “translators” were probably involved in the torture of prisoners for information, not a good recommendation for them.

  35. Ed Case says:

    They recently shocked observers by executing 22 Afghan Army commandos who had run out of ammunition and surrendered.

    Perhaps, but it reads like Propaganda to me.

  36. The false flag Gulf of Tonkin event lead to the massive failure of the Vietnam war with incredible waste of resources and lives. One might say we’ve never recovered from that loss. I’m dumbfounded at the parallels to the Vietnam war that Afghanistan represents. The loss of lives and resources from the false flag event of 9/11 is mindboggling. No military higher ups will ever be held responsible of course however.

  37. onebornfree says: • Website

    Giraldi: “Not only did the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq make bad situations worse, ”

    This just in:

    “Everything government touches turns to crap” Ringo Starr

    Giraldi: “In their wake has been hundreds of thousands of deaths and trillions of dollars spent to accomplish absolutely nothing”

    Wrong. As per usual , it accomplished the further enrichment of the arms manufacturers, the banks and corporations etc.

    It also expanded. ,er, “employment” opportunities for those dullards who can’t make it in the private sector and who are therefore anxious to get a cushy fake job (e.g. as a “security and terrorism expert”), inside government and prefer to live as parasites off of those productive individuals outside of government.

    And I’m sure there are more examples I’ve missed.

    “The kind of man who wants the government to adopt and enforce his ideas is always the kind of man whose ideas are idiotic” H.L.Mencken

    Regards, onebornfree

    • Agree: HdC
  38. polistra says: • Website

    If getting out is “hard”, it means we’re not really getting out.

    When you’re committed to leaving a place, leaving is EASY. Get in the car or plane. Go. Don’t look back.

    This reminds me of divorces where the idiot husband hasn’t figured out that he’s better off without the bitch. He fusses and fights about every tiny item of furniture. You can’t have the vacuum, but you can have the power cord for the vacuum. You can’t have the refrigerator, but you can have the milk and butter but not the frozen hamburger.

  39. “In their wake has been hundreds of thousands of deaths and trillions of dollars spent to accomplish absolutely nothing.”

    We killed all those Muslims to please Israel and fattened the bank accounts of the Zionists at home. Now that is something!

    • Replies: @anonymous
  40. whodat says:

    The people who make it “hard” to get out are the career former military , current contractors, who make it their life to promote the world view that the “big one” is coming, toe to toe with the peer military enemies China or Russia, and we need troops “forward positioned” to advance our fortunes when it starts. They know a victory in civil terms, on the ground in Afghanistan is a fools errand- they don’t care. Their world view and their career are advanced by US armed forces deployed just miles from China, Russia, Iran … and if you believe the “BIG ONE” is right over the horizon, well there we go. This is nothing to do, in their mind, with advancing a socialist western democratic world in some third world culture which just wants us gone. Scott Horton, in his excellent book about Afghanistan spends time to convince us that the civil program is and was always seen as a endless mess. THEY DON’T CARE. The people who have our troops over there DON’T CARE about that. The military industrial complex may have complex ties with these contractors and share fortunes with them,
    and preparing for THE BIG ONE means they need lots of peer to peer high tech weapons with going toe to toe with the Ruskies. – Part of the same boogie man.

  41. tyrone says:

    OH NO!, we won’t be able to bomb Afghanistan !….this is intolerable!, the U.S.A. MUST be able to bomb any country in the world at any time……why?, you may ask……uh,uh , uh…..REASONS!!……look at me mom,I work at a neo-con think tank.

  42. moi says:
    @Phipps

    No worries! Mr. Blinken will straighten things out–as he’s done with Palestinian-Israeli issue. Oops, and also with China…

  43. moi says:
    @A123

    Have you considered making aliyah….?

  44. Shitghanistan and Shitraq were both Forever Wars™ with a main objective of keeping themselves going as long as possible.

    It’s pointless to discuss strategy of a fight that was thrown from the start, a costly reflection of Business As Usual here at home: gopertard quislings pretending to oppose their uniparty shitlib near-twins then taking a dive.

  45. Afghanistan is where empires go to die.

  46. BL says:

    The inability of the United States to comprehend what it was becoming involved in when, in the wake of 9/11, it declared a Global War on Terror, has to be reckoned one of the singular failures of national security policy over the past twenty years.

    Unfortunately, no. It would have been nice if the powers that be had told us beforehand that they expended all their efforts post-Vietnam learning not how to fight and win, but a better way for them to lose the next war(s).

    Given the lack of any deep thinking going on in the White House . .

    Alas, it isn’t just the White House. After “Trump Must Go!” succeeded (after a fashion), neutralizing any reckoning for the GWOT became a whole of government and allied media effort. It’s impossible to over stress how dangerous and damaging it is for not just the US but the entire globe that rather than right the ship of state (and civil society) instead those responsible continue to give away the national interest to protect themselves.

    It seems we always end up at the same point. The American people, who are never asked, have the filthy finger of blame pointed at them for lost wars. With Trump in the lead, patriotic MAGA refused to take one for the team. And, of course, what passes for the left/progressives these days had evolved under Obama to protect themselves from being labeled the dirty dogs this time by supporting existing and added regime change wars and the cover-ups of anything and everything.

    You really can’t make this up. What could have and should have been a let it all hang out reckoning of what a gaggle of Neocon filth had wrought with their bright ideas, was neutralized when Obama entered the presidency with a secret plan to be Bush 3.0 on foreign policy.

  47. Z-man says:

    The inability of the United States to comprehend what it was becoming involved in when, in the wake of 9/11, it declared a Global War on Terror, has to be reckoned one of the singular failures of national security policy over the past twenty years.

    It’s the greatest blunder in American foreign policy since WWII. While Vietnam impacted more Americans personally these recent entanglements have gutted America fiscally and morally more. If you add the internal decay including destroying the middle class by the elite and importing millions of unqualified immigrants into the country to replace them, try to anyway, this country is cooked.
    And we all know who perpetrated this. ‘Nuff said.’

  48. gotmituns says:
    @John Johnson

    . Our leaders don’t have the guts to find a permanent solution
    —————————————————————————
    The whole thing is based on never finding a “solution.” If a solution is found and implemented, it means the big military contractors lose out on their stupid contracts – read Gen. (USMC) Smedley Butler’s, “War is a Racket.”

  49. @TG

    We had a part alright! We sat on our butts and let it happen with nary a word said about it. Where were the protests like in 1968? Dumb wars, which were totally unnecessary, and a huge waste of taxpayer \$\$\$, along with the dead and maimed US troops coming back home. What did we do? We virtue signalled our patriotism, telling every poor shmuck in camouflage ” Thank you for your service!” and went along with the program. The worst part was we were dumb enough to keep supporting the totally corrupt political system with not demanding real choices every even numbered year every first Tuesday in November.

  50. Ariadna says:

    “no one is Washington was able to define “victory” and think in terms of an exit strategy”
    The author does not take into account the most probable reason for the total lack of interest in thinking of an exit strategy, the same reason why Israel does not have an “exit strategy” with the respect to the occupied territories: they planned on staying for ever.

    “The Biden White House has responded finally to the urgency of the issue – lives are at stake – by approving special flights to remove the most vulnerable to a third country for processing before determining if they can be allowed to take up residence in the United States or elsewhere”
    Is is compassion? No such urgency was felt when American POW were left behind in Vietnam, likely a lot fewer than 18,000 “lives at stake.” More likely it is concern with what they call “bad optics.” A human catastrophe when the Taliban executes all the collaborators, real or suspected, also bodes ill for the US future recruitment success in other places.

  51. Yippee. More immigrants that justifiably hate us moving in. Sometime it really seems all these conflicts are really backhanded assault on the US homeland. So what did we do to piss off the CEO’s and bankers? Seems to me we were manipulated to serve them quite well. We’re all coalition serving Afghanis now.

  52. KenH says:

    This may come as a shock to head n*gger in charge Lloyd Austin and other people but there are black nationalists in the military whose primary purpose for joining is to acquire experience with firearms in preparation for a race war with whitey. But we never hear about that extremism since it doesn’t fit the Jewish far left narrative.

    The House just passed a bill allowing for over 35K Afghans to be resettled in America.

  53. Z-man says:
    @Anonymous

    He might have been ‘equally concerned’ about American troops in Saudi Arabia but the catalyst for 911 was the Second Intifada going on in Palestine. Mohammed Atta and the rest of the hijackers were ‘triggered’ by that.

  54. Giraldi talks about the lack of an exit strategy. But an exit strategy only makes sense if one plans to exit. Amerikastan did not plan to exit. It intended to colonise Afghanistan forever, for these reasons:

    1. To occupy a strategic nation in Russia’s underbelly and bordering China on the East (from which it could be spied on and Turkistani terrorists sent into Xinjiang) and Iran to the west (remember Iran was scheduled to be invaded after Iraq and Iraq was already planned for invasion before the first bomb was dropped on Afghanistan).

    2. To secure the opium production for CIA destabilisation efforts in such countries as Russia and to get slush funds.

    3. To loot Afghan minerals for Wall Street.

    None of these, you’ll note, had anything to do with “fighting terrorism”, and all had everything to do with occupying Afghanistan forever.

    Ironically, it wasn’t the Taliban that destroyed this plan; it was the anonymous Iraqi resistance fighter. He, with his old AK 47 and his cheap IED, his motorcycle-borne nightly raids, his refusal to give up despite the massive obliteration and occupation of his country, derailed the plans to invade Iran, and gave the Taliban the time they needed to regroup and recover. Once invading Iran was no longer a realistic option, occupying Afghanistan suddenly lost one of its major rationales. With China now being more attractive as an economic ally to any Afghan regime rather than an enemy, and Russia orders of magnitude stronger than in 2001, two other reasons went by the board.

    The Taliban meanwhile were now strong enough to stop minerals from being looted, and, far from the opium poppy ban of Mullah Omar’s time, actually began taxing poppy cultivation. So not one of the planned reasons for the invasion was still valid, but the costs were still piling up. Thus it is that the occupation is being reluctantly disinvestment, with plans to continue it with a mercenary army being as much fantasy as those flowers the people of Baghdad were supposed to throw before George W Bush’ invading Wallen Street Stormtroopers.

    As for the 22 Quislings who were alleged to have been “murdered” after surrendering, the Taliban claim it is a morphed video, but, even if not, the same puppet child sex slaver Quisling warlord regime murdered thousands of Taliban prisoners after capture, especially in 2001, including Erdoğan’s Afghan puppet Abdul Rashid Dostum locking them in steel shipping containers and allowing them to suffocate to death. It would be ridiculous to assume the Taliban wouldn’t take revenge on the perpetrators of that kind of crime now. In contrast, ordinary Afghan soldiers who surrendered are being sent home by the Taliban with money to pay for their journey.

    And as for the translators and other collaborators: why should anyone shed a tear for these traitorous vermin? No imperialist occupation in history could ever succeed a minute without collaborators. Eliminating them isn’t just understandable, it’s laudable. Nobody shed a tear for Vidkun Quisling or Artur Seyss Inquart as far as I can recall.

    • Thanks: RichardDuck
    • Replies: @Agent76
  55. @Robert Bruce

    There were no protests because there was no conscription. I was not alive in 1968 but it’s pretty obvious to me that there wouldn’t have been any protests then either if a volunteer army had been packed off to Vietnam.

    • Replies: @Marcaurelius
  56. AnoNymous[152] • Disclaimer says:
    @Phipps

    Phipps is correct.
    The solution to this problem is very simple.
    Bomb israel to dust and arrest and prosecute for treason, ALL those “American” bastards they support this terrorist nest in the Middle East.

  57. @Notsofast

    Fallow the money. No deep thinking needed.

  58. @Ed Case

    The Taliban denied it killed them. There has been a lot of other lies coming out of the beleaguered Ghani regime, such as the claim that the Taliban are making lists of 15 tear old girls and widows to take as wives. No such thing ever happened.

  59. BorisMay says:

    The only rogue state in the world is the USA and it misbehaves where ever it goes.

    Ask the Okinawans about the rapes and murders they have to endure at the hands of the immoral servicemen they are forced, against their will, to host.

    Look at the illegal rogue occupation of Syria by the corrupt US cowboys who steal Syria’s oil and food and give it to the illegal state of Israel.

    Look at the interference in the democratic process in Ukraine by the US and ‘F*ck the EU’ Victoria Nuland goose stepping around Kiev handing out cookies like a prostitute handing out free condoms.

    The US is the rogue state. Please get your facts straight.

    To suggest that the Taliban are somehow unsuitable because they committed a war crime executing surrendered Afghan soldiers while ignoring the daily war crimes of the US such as starving Syrian children, bombing weddings and supporting the genocide of the Palestinians does suggest the author is totally brainwashed by Establishment propaganda.

    I imagine he thinks the BBC broadcasts the truth!

    • Replies: @TGD
  60. Too bad Facebook won’t allow this discussion to gravitate to Facebook.

  61. @Fiendly Neighbourhood Terrorist

    I was alive back during the Vietnam War.

    I was a senior in high school when there were mass protests on college campuses against the Vietnam War.

    During the summer of my high school graduation the draft effectively ended.

    By the time I started my freshman year at Ohio State the protests had been reduced to a trickle.

  62. … hundreds of thousands of deaths and trillions of dollars spent to accomplish absolutely nothing.

    The trillions of dollars that changed hands in this absurd Afghan caper and all the rest of “our” wars of choice is certainly not Nothing. This 13+-digit nothing is the consistent — and deliberate –outcome of the same policy that long ago became the main pillar of the post-WWII U.S. economy.

    Eisenhower warned about the potential danger of a thoroughly militarized economy at a time when a credible foreign enemy could still be cited by our imperial policy elite as some justification for their ever increasing military outlays. But the Soviet Union disappeared 30 years ago and the unbridled spending binge goes on and on. Now that “our” country is technically bankrupt, those “defense” outlays, now just future taxpayer IOUs, still take about three-fifth all discretionary federal spending for which there is a huge wealthy constituency. The grossly distorted domestic economy would probably collapse overnight without it.

    This “nothing” makes perfect sense to those who have long since jettisoned fanciful notions of vital national defense but know that the Pentagon is the hub of our most vital economic policy. Look at the military & security establishment as a giant conduit of wealth methodically extracted from the bottom and middle of the U.S. social pyramid and automatically redistributed to the thousands of plush entitled military contractors and their bankers right at the top.

    The gravest post-WWII threat to that comfortable arrangement was not the presence of foreign enemies but the sudden absence of the only credible one in 1990. The emergency policy fix for that was clearly the 911 caper needed to launch the Neocon/Bush’s War on Terrror. Our policy mandarins simply recognized that the invention of a bogus new foreign threat was a pressing imperative to sustain the vast MIC conduit for bottom-to-top wealth transfers that have become the mainspring of the American economy. Such circulation simply can’t be maintained without the excuse of incessant wars, whether they are won or lost. Political philosopher Randolph Bourne was right when he observed that “war is the health of the state.”

    • Agree: Agent76
  63. FLgeezer says:
    @Anon

    Well said Anon[398]. Thanks.

  64. ka says:
    @John Johnson

    Despite stark differnces in terrains between Vietnam and Afghanistan and despite unimaginable pool of supports from 4 corners of the world inlcuding Afghanistan, America couldn’t win the war .
    Did Taliban defeat ? Absolutely . Was it a foregone conclusion? No. Lies,hubris,loot,profit,evasion,totrture and total lack of accountability have informed and defined and described American way of wars. These attributes or the features are inconsistent with stability , ,cooperation,progress,or developments of inststutions. In this kind of extractive,exploitative,racist war there are two outcomes– chronic ,endemic ,aimless, disprganized, unproductive violence or determined, organized ,and inspired – religious or nationalistic or both- resistance against the invaders. Former was the fate of African places like Congo , experinces of Hondurus ,El Salvador, and Amazonian tribes , later describes Vietnam , Iraq, and Afghanistan.
    America is not nice . It is opportunistic and it avoids harm to self while expecting that the rest of the world be ready to be ruled,degraded,and endlaved by USA the way Native Indian, African, Amazonian or Central American had.
    When faced with defeat ,America seeks explanation and justufican in areas that have no relevance to winning war but have impact to justify its next war or its self- anoninted role of ownershipof the world to its admirerers across the world and to the gullible American looking to the opportunitues to feel good and respected .

    American war is war without accountability, occupation is occupation without responisibility . It wants to recreate and re-renact the world it built on Native American and African- total submission and dehumanization .
    Unfortunately there are players who think otherwise and who can draw inspiration from their past, traditions,religions,and could ignore the pains,sufferrrings ,death and deprivations to achieve what they think human being has a right to.

    Human loses the awareness of its dark depravity if crimes when committed again and again.
    American crimes have become its defining nature and charecter.
    It doesnt mean that silence of today wont be shattered oneday.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  65. Jim H says:

    ‘Getting out of Afghanistan will be a lot trickier than going in. The U.S. clearly wants to have some ability to intervene using air resources.’ — Philip Giraldi

    Prophetic words, Mr Giraldi:

    ‘The US launched several airstrikes in Afghanistan against the Taliban this week, the Pentagon said on Thursday.

    ‘Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid condemned the new airstrikes as a violation of prior Doha agreements, vowing “consequences” after multiple Taliban fighters were killed:

    “We confirm these air strikes and we condemn this in strongest terms, it is a clear attack and violation of the Doha deal as they can’t have operations after May.”

    “If they conduct any operation then they will be responsible for the consequences.” — ZH

    Had the Taliban a more subtle sense of humor, they might post this epic rant for the edification of the United States, which seems not to understand the concepts of ‘game over’ and ‘abject defeat.’

    “It’s ALL there, black and white, clear as crystal. You get NOTHING. You LOSE. Good day, sirs!”

  66. Agent76 says:

    Jul 18, 2021 Taliban says it doesn’t has ties with Pak Based Terror groups like LeT, JeM

    Taliban has said that it has sent a “message” to international terror groups like Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT), Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) that the soil of Afghanistan will not be used against “any other country”. Speaking to our diplomatic correspondent Sidhant Sibal, the Taliban’s Spokesman for International Media Suhail Shaheen has said that they “don’t have any ties with” the 2 Pakistan-based terror groups.

    Apr 28, 2021 After 20 years, the USA retreats from its failed Afghan war From Press TV, Chicago, 27 April 2021.

  67. @ka

    I certainly don’t support the neocon/globalist belief in nation building but the war was started and it should be finished without insulting the men and women that served there.

    Handing over the country to the Taliban shows cowardice and a lack of resolve.

    The worst days of fighting with the Taliban are long gone but they certainly don’t fear Afghan troops without US support.

    Announcing a full withdrawal was a poor move on the part of Biden. It only encouraged the Taliban and they have taken vast amounts of territory and imposed harsh reprisals on the people.

    • Replies: @KA
    , @WJ
  68. TKK says:
    @Rahan

    Male to male butt sex is rampant in the Middle East, especially Afghanistan, and has been for thousands of years.

    Is it “legal”? No. It’s worse – it is seen as a normal thing for older men to “indulge” in with young POOR boys. A boys will be boys, wink wink understanding.

    While in country in Afghanistan, KBR contract workers were “educated” with emails that were locked – could not be forwarded or printed or screen shot- about the need for sensitivity of the male to male sexual dynamic the local workers “enjoyed.”

    Ridiculing them was grounds for termination.

    Pederasty is the national hobby in Afghanistan. Then, after they ruin these young boys, they beat them. Too pretend that Afghanis are some noble desert warriors is insane.

    They offer nothing to the world but violence and degradation and their country should be turned into the largest wildlife sanctuary on the planet.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  69. Next time, maybe Washington will hesitate to charge in, but given the lack of any deep thinking going on in the White House, I suspect we Americans could easily find ourselves in yet another Afghanistan.

    I recall G.W. Bush saying “the US won’t be involved in nation building” (loosely quoted). Trump wanted to get out of Syria and Afghanistan. And in the end the US gets involved anyway! There are so many groups of foreign nationals living in exile who lobby the US to help them restore or instore “democracy” (the magic word) in their country; there is always a group of naive senators willing to fall in the trap. Next crusade is leaving soon …

  70. Agent76 says:
    @Fiendly Neighbourhood Terrorist

    Good post and this is what so few know or realize.

    Robin Cook: The struggle against terrorism cannot be won by military means

    Al-Qaida, literally “the database”, was originally the computer file of the thousands of mujahideen who were recruited and trained with help from the CIA to defeat the Russians.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2005/jul/08/july7.development?CMP=share_btn_link

  71. KA says:
    @John Johnson

    Taliban looks not photogenic .It does influence our attitude to Taliban . Similar optical impression have influenced all the previous wars and all over the world .

    Lack of information from Afghanistan and poisoned news whose sole aim was to portray Taliban as bad guy and cheerlead for war have not helped us develop a more balanced nuanced inclusive views on the struggle .

    Taliban did not appear in 1980 . The religion was used by irreligious warlords,USA, Saudi and Pakistan back then and supported by China Iran Gulf.

    Taliban learned the religion in Madrassa and felt in 1994 that they had an obligation to fight for the common folks whose lives had been turned upside down and for the society that was on the brink of collapse from the corrupting ,punitive, torture-prone immoral and depraved behaviors of the feuding warlords .

    Taliban melted away by few weeks in Nov 2001 . America imposed a figure out of nowhere as president in the name of democracy . If it had some sense of responsibility it would have asked Zahir She to assume kingship and then arrange election . America deals with and UK has created so many kings in 20th century . This was not a rocket science .

    Taliban did not rise or organize for next 6-7 years . America frittered away the opportunity . This was not intended and not explicitly intentional but was already built in the framework America works . It can be compared to the wet wishes of the street gangs that they not be busted or caught or suspected. America thought it could do whatever it wanted .

    America was much longer in power than was Taliban .. Taliban survived despite sanction from 1996 to 2001and despite opposition from Iran China and Stan plus India and despite their military supports to the opposition forcers .
    American Afghanistan was soaked in the dollars and was turned into a fortress by the military .

    How did Taliban get where its today needs deeper analysis more than we are sincerely ready to engage to . Afghanistan was pretty peaceful from 1920 to 1980 . Life went on with some drab routine but there was no regions fanaticism and no grandstanding about woman’s rights or democracy or drug trafficking . Afghanistan was poor but it was not repressive anti Shia anti Sikh anti Hindu country . That is the result fo the US intervention and the US’s policy of using Afghanistan for its geo strategic gains ( Hitler and Timur Lane should have found right words like Domino effect, or war on drugs or fight for values to flummox their useful idiots ) with no regard for the wellbeing of common Afghan .

    Taliban as a response to social meltdown can be understood . Its fight for identity’s survival. Without identity, people can be atomized enslaved and fragmented into many pieces . No common bond will galvanize people against exploitation, abuses ( using Afghan woman for Epstein club and then getting them visited by .. ),or tortures or turning them into slavery .

    Taliban dogma was the response .
    This price is high for otherwise true secular well-off ,rich, democratic forward looking Afghan. But you can count them in one hand . there are more traditional Afghan who doesn’t share Taliban’s rough handedness and emphasis on Shariah . But they sure can live and work around it . Harshness is also not biological. It will change unless world repeats the mistake of 1- sending ISIS and 2 balling Taliban for ISIS 3 imposing sanctions on Taliban.

    May be Bush jr Biden and those who championed the war for democracy would bring them in this country for renewable long term visa until the country settles in new and in improved normalcy .

    • Agree: Badger Down
    • Replies: @2stateshmustate
  72. Dubya said US would fight them over there so they wouldn’t have to fight them in US …

    Hmm … so of course the Afghans they bring back will be loyal to the globo-homo values of their new country, listen avidly to Gen Milli-Vanilli and co, 100% support for Israel …

    You can count on it.
    What (else) can possibly go wrong ?
    World-class intellects forming/driving US erm policy …

  73. These wars will never end as long as the zionists have control of America, they first began their control with The Act of 1871, that turned the US into a zionist controlled corporation and then they completed their control with their privately owned IRS and the FED in October 1913 and December 1913, and with that America was placed under zionist control and then came the wars perpetrated by the zionist owned FED and IRS, 2 of the 10 planks of the communist manifesto.

    Americans live in a zionist prison and now they want to kill us off with their covid-19 scam and psyop and the injections of mRNA which alters the DNA and destroys the immune system and acts as a depopulation agent, which is the bottom line, end game.

  74. @A123

    PEACE 😇

    Did you mean to say shalom?

  75. nsa says:
    @John Johnson

    Still fighting the big one with Rich from high atop your barstool perches at the VFW lounge in between complaining about your prostate woes? Those \$5 doubles going down smooth?

  76. TGD says:
    @BorisMay

    Look at the illegal rogue occupation of Syria by the corrupt US cowboys who steal Syria’s oil and food and give it to the illegal state of Israel.

    According to a BBC report, the Syrian oil revenue currently goes to the “Syrian Democratic Forces,” made up mostly of Syrian Kurds.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/50464561

    This doesn’t means that Jews and Zionists don’t extract a profit from Syrian oil production. The SDF probably relies on international oil traders like Glencore to process and distribute Syria’s oil. Glencore was founded by the late super scumbag, (((Marc Rich))) (who bought a pardon from Bill Clinton in 2001), and the company had revenues of US\$142 billion in 2020.

  77. @Phipps

    But, Osama Bin Laden had nothing to do with the implosion of the World Trade Center, that was an Israeli operation.

  78. Rich says:
    @Jim H

    Not sure where you got your ideas. The Viet Cong were destroyed as a fighting force by the end of 1969. Nixon’s bombing campaign forced the North Vietnamese to the negotiating table and if not for Watergate, the South would have remained free. Bombing campaigns work fine as long as they’re used properly with an understanding of what they do accomplish. The US could, for instance, destroy most of Iran’s infrastructure as well as cripple their military with a properly run aerial campaign. The real problem is that the Army generals want medals, too and want to get in on the action. Air superiority was a major factor in the Allied defeat of Nazi Germany.

  79. @KA

    Remember in 2001 the Taliban said they would happily extradite Osama Bin Laden to the US for trial if the US would only follow international law and submit evidence of Osama Bin Laden’s involvement in the 911 attacks.
    Well, we all know what happened after that.

    The stupidity and cowardice of Americans allowing their country to travel to the other side of the world to invade a land locked country is beyond comprehension.

  80. @Exile

    It may take generations, but the joker in the deck is when millions of brainwashed Americans can’t get enough to eat. That could speed things up. This could happen sooner than later with the debasement of the dollar.

  81. @SafeNow

    Did he ever mention the flyovers of the “death camps” which were industrial targets? What were the strategic sites in Zurich? Were the fighter planes machine gunning civilians escaping the inferno in Dresden strategic, or was it just the zoo?

  82. anonymous[108] • Disclaimer says:
    @A Half Naked Fakir

    We killed all those Muslims…

    The ancient euRapeans had a saying, which is still gleefully voiced by their whitevil Americunt cousins… kill them all, let God sort them out!

    Indeed!!

    The One and only will sort out the true monotheists on one side, and every rabid pagan mangods-worshipping vermin on the other.

    • Replies: @A Half Naked Fakir
  83. @TKK

    They sent every Superpower to its grave in human history.

    Maybe the hick holy rollers on this site can tell me why their regions-the most pious-are the Afghanistan of North America with lot’s of consanguine marriages, oversexed Springer type poor whites, sexual abuse, single teen mothers, ignorance, low educational standards.

    Who cares about homosexuality?

    A number of men don’t reproduce & their genes are out of the planet earth.

    Gay males usually have a whole host of other issues: sadism (Anybody who’s met a nasty little queer knows this one), lack of moral sense (Obvious), rampant promiscuity (Obvious AIDS), drug abuse etc.

    At any rate, who cares if Afghanis are gay.

    Ten days after the USA leaves the country it will be a backwater for another 10, 50, 200 years until the next Superpower like China gets mixed up in a Civil War there & loses their ass like the USA, the Russians, the Brits, the Greeks…

    I myself am an Upper Midwestern Canadian border centrist, politically.

    But I cannot understand how the hicks elect Bush, support the wars, then get surprised at the cost.

    What do they expect?

    • Replies: @Malla
  84. Abbybwood says:
    @Phipps

    OBL also didn’t like the cozy military relationship the US had/has with Saudi Arabia.

  85. roberto1 says:
    @Yee

    I have a better idea. Get the F *** out of there and let them do what they like. Not out problem. Just keep them out of the US. Of course our brilliant strategic thinkers will have all kinds of reasons why we must spend trillions of dollars screwing around in foreign countries, all while our own country goes to shit.

    • Agree: St-Germain
    • Replies: @slorter
  86. WJ says:
    @EliteCommInc.

    There was no need to contain Iraq of PGW 1. They were weakened so badly that in PGW 2 the invasion as total cakewalk . The guerilla later was a different story. The air patrols were keeping Saddam from reclaiming his Kurdish territory.

  87. WJ says:
    @John Johnson

    Fear of insulting the men and women who served in the Afghanistan war is certainly a valid reason for wasting additional billions of US dollars , killing more Americans and Afghans, for no purpose. That’s a good foreign policy goal. How about instead, we just leave, just like we did in VN and things turned out alright.

  88. Hibernian says:
    @SafeNow

    The targets were railroads, factories, industrial districts, and harbors.

    This was pretextual.

  89. aandrews says:

    “At the present time, there are few options as the U.S. would not be able to launch cruise missile or airstrikes through the neighboring countries that surround Afghanistan to the south, east and west, though a long-distance strike from warships in the Persian Gulf is technically possible.”

    Of course, there’s always spaced-based “UFOs”.

  90. Some Americans speak and write English very well. A lot of them don’t, and it leads them to understand things poorly. Take the caption of the top photo in the article above.

    Americans could easily find themselves in yet another Afghanistan.

    It should say:
    Militant USers could easily find themselves in yet another war in Asia.

    Repeat after me:
    The US war in Vietnam
    The US bombing of Cambodia
    The US war in Iraq
    The US bombing of Laos

    Dismissed!

    • Replies: @Badger Down
  91. @Badger Down

    Oh yes, and in answer to the question in the title, Afghanistan will stay where it has always been: in Asia. Slap dab in the middle of the continent that the US appears to hate. A better question is “Whither USer militants?” It means: “Where will the US military bomb next?”

  92. Sarah says:
    @EliteCommInc.

    And the clearest case was the attempt by the North to invade after US forces pulled out in 1973. Air and naval support were key factors in preventing that effort.

    Not to “invade” but to reunite Vietnam.
    Preventing that effort ?
    By killing more Vietnamese who wanted to reunify and live in peace and independence?

    The US killed 3.7 million Vietnamese in this war. And don’t forget the mutilated, the intoxicated, the burned, the hereditary deformities, the thousands of cities and villages destroyed.

    • Agree: St-Germain
    • Replies: @John Johnson
    , @St-Germain
  93. slorter says:
    @roberto1

    Simple enough ! Get out!!

  94. slorter says:

    We reap what we sow!

    We planted the seeds of discontent in so many places before and after the second world war because we thought we were top dog !

    The US is not alone in that endeavour past empires did exactly the same thing!

    General Smedley Butler qualifies empire well –

    In 1935, he told the magazine Common Sense: “I spent 33 years and four months in active military service and during that period I spent most of my time as a high class muscle man for Big Business, for Wall Street and the bankers. In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for capitalism.

    • Thanks: St-Germain
  95. @Ed Case

    commandos who had run out of ammunition

    You mean they were trying to kill their fellow Afghans?
    I guess that warrants the death penalty.

  96. Sarah says:
    @anonymous

    That said. Patriotic people should be encouraged to leave the military.

    Totally agree; a patriot has the duty to defend his homeland, i.e. the territory of the USA against a possible invader.

    A patriot does not have to be killed or maimed in distant wars, to leave his family in mourning, for interests foreign, even hostile, to his homeland.

    A patriot has no business being cannon fodder for the MIC, billionaires, philanthropists, psychopaths, war mongers.

    Indeed, leave the army, especially the Whites, since they have become the Nr 1 enemy of the government of Washington: they would not miss, on top of that, to be killed for a government which is hostile to them !!!

  97. Athena says:

    At the same time, American troops illegally present in neighboring Syria, continue to occupy that country’s oil fields to deprive the government in Damascus of much needed resources.

    Their spokesman issued a statement declaring that “The continuation of Turkey’s occupation will provoke feelings of hatred and enmity in our country towards Turkish officials, and will harm bilateral relations.”

    NATO MONSTERS, MANIPULATORS, BACK AND ARM ISIS and Al Qaeda. TERRORISTS. MONTERS

    Canadian journalist Vanessa Beeley witnessed the atrocities committed against civilians by NATO-backed terror:

    https://off-guardian.org/2021/07/23/syrian-civilians-attacked-by-terrorists-using-american-weapons/

    • Replies: @anon
  98. Athena says:

    Syrian Civilians Attacked by Terrorists using American Weapons

    NATO illegal arms trade in Syria:

    ”The Pentagon is buying \$2.8 billion worth of weapons for conflict zones around the world. Most of the weapons are destined for Syria.”

    US fuels Syrian war with new arms supplies to Al Qaeda terrorists

    By Dilyana Gaytandzhieva -June 22, 2021
    http://dilyana.bg/us-fuels-syrian-war-with-new-arms-supplies-to-al-qaeda-terrorists/

    • Replies: @RobinG
  99. Anon[121] • Disclaimer says:
    @Phipps

    The “Jew-owned media” and the “Jew-owned government”? Are you serious? It’s 2021, and I can’t believe there are still people who engage in this kind of anti-Semitic hate speech. Are you some kind of Nazi? After reading your post, I can no longer believe in free speech.

    • LOL: Biff
  100. Z-man says:
    @Anon

    Okay Hershel go home, you’ve been at your troll station in the bunker outside Tel Aviv for over 12 hours.

  101. @Anon

    You do indeed desrcibe a common viewpoint but for the benefit of any innocent newbie to Unz who happens to read your post and does not understand your intended humour or trolling:

    The owner of this site is a Jew by birth – so I am told. He wrote recently

    “Throughout the second half of the twentieth century, our understanding of the world was overwhelmingly shaped by our centralized electronic media, which was almost entirely in Jewish hands during this period, with all three television networks and eight of nine major Hollywood studios being owned or controlled by such individuals, along with most of our leading newspapers and publishing houses.”
    https://www.unz.com/runz/american-pravda-mossad-assassinations/

    A Jewish writer in the LA Times:
    “Only 22% of Americans now believe “the movie and television industries are pretty much run by Jews,” down from nearly 50% in 1964. The Anti-Defamation League, which released the poll results last month, sees in these numbers a victory against stereotyping. Actually, it just shows how dumb America has gotten. Jews totally run Hollywood.”
    https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2008-dec-19-oe-stein19-story.html

    The Times of Israel:
    “Jews DO Control The Media!” and “The Jews Control Washington!”
    https://www.21cir.com/2018/05/the-times-of-israel-jews-do-control-the-media/

    The original poster alludes to the so called ZOG and this snap shot taken a few years ago (using reliable sources) illustrates the point.
    “Who Controls America?”
    https://thezog.wordpress.com/

    If I may say so your own reply, even though it be humour or trolling, fits a pattern of one section of modern Jewish thought which seeks to suppress the truth by abolishing what very little is left of a free press by the introduction of so called hate crime laws. Truth does not need such props but banishes the darkness of falsehood with light. How about shining such light here?

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Jack McArthur
  102. Killers, whether others or ours, are in danger from Hell fire, and I don’t mean missiles, but the Judgement to come.

  103. anon[161] • Disclaimer says:
    @Athena

    Vanessa is British. (Eva Bartlett is Canadian-American.)

  104. RobinG says:
    @Athena

    Latest aid consignment for the Syrian people from Russia – 160 tonnes of basic and medical supplies, including SputnikV vaccine doses. But tell us again about those NATO “humanitarian corridors” to resupply only the AlQaeda groups in Idlib?

    Russia Sends 160 Tonnes of Humanitarian Aid to Syria

    https://english.almayadeen.net/news/miscellaneous/1496438/russia-sends-tonnes-of-humanitarian-aid-to-syria

  105. @Sarah

    Not to “invade” but to reunite Vietnam.
    Preventing that effort ?
    By killing more Vietnamese who wanted to reunify and live in peace and independence?

    Is that what they taught you in public schools?

    US peace proposals left North Vietnam alone. You can go dig up the actual proposals if you don’t believe me.

    The Communists didn’t want South Vietnam to have a choice. There was never to be a vote on if they wanted to take orders from the North.

    Communists have always been that way. They know they would lose in elections which is why they don’t support them. The Soviets considered democratic leftists to be useful idiots.

    The only way the Communists win is by force. Even in the Russian Revolution they were a small minority.

    Modern liberals and leftists don’t like talking about this as they want you to view Vietnam as a war of freedom fighters vs imperialism. But only one side wanted South Vietnam to have a choice.

    • Replies: @Sarah
  106. The Communists didn’t want South Vietnam to have a choice. There was never to be a vote on if they wanted to take orders from the North.

    LIES! The communists DID want the South Vietnamese to have a choice. It was murrika, and its lackey in the south, that did NOT want them to have a choice:

    For the Indochina side, the Accords were between France, the Viet Minh, the USSR, the PRC, the US, the United Kingdom and the future states being made from French Indochina.[3] The agreement temporarily separated Vietnam into two zones, a northern zone to be governed by the Viet Minh and a southern zone to be governed by the State of Vietnam, then headed by former emperor Bảo Đại. A Conference Final Declaration, issued by the British chairman of the conference, provided that a general election be held by July 1956 to create a unified Vietnamese state. Despite helping create some of the agreements, they were not directly signed onto nor accepted by delegates of both the State of Vietnam and the United States. The State of Vietnam, under Ngo Dinh Diem, subsequently refused to allow elections, leading to the Vietnam War.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1954_Geneva_Conference

    • Thanks: Sarah
    • Replies: @Malla
    , @anon
    , @Sarah
  107. @anonymous

    Sir Thomas Browne (19 October 1605 – 19 October 1682), Religio Medici, Part I, XXIII…

    “The Alcoran of the Turks (I speak without prejudice,) is an ill composed Piece, containing in vain and ridiculous Errors in Philosophy, impossibilities, fictions, and vanities beyond laughter, maintained by evident and open Sophisms, the Policy of Ignorance, deposition of Universities, and banishment of Learning, that hath gotten Foot by Arms and violence: this without a blow hath disseminated it self through the whole Earth.”

  108. Sarah says:
    @John Johnson

    But only one side wanted South Vietnam to have a choice.

    The “one side” you are talking about is USA. The only “choice” you are talking about was to remain a US colony with a puppet government and a US puppet at its head.

    This is still the case for Asian countries still under US occupation, like Japan, South Kora and Taiwan. The US will not allow these countries to become independent and free to be governed by local patriots working for the interests of their own people.

    • Replies: @antibeast
    , @John Johnson
  109. anon[159] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack McArthur

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/24/world/europe/spain-jews-citizenship-reparations.html

    A citizenship law that is being seen as victim of failure and inertia but is not scrutinized by NYTimes against the reality- why Israel takes away citizenship of people born and raised in Israel and why it denies right of return to those it threw out decades ago .

    Why does Israel still think that jews could return to theses 2 countries same time- Israel; and Spain and claim citizenship?

    Why doesn’t Spain accord same privilege to Moroccan ?

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/7/23/can-israel-criminalise-ben-jerrys-ice-cream-in-the-us

    Boycott and sanction are Israeli weapons and arsenals They have perfected it from 1933. Occupied Territories under in international law is not subject to Israel or US law . B\$G can decide not to participate into the silent crime .

    By the way can Arab bring lawsuit in USA against Israel and this like Kushner who support building in WB ?

    Can they sue IDF for atrocities and for facilitating the violence mounted by the settler -fanatic complex ?

    Can they sue AIPAC and ADL and JINSA bribed and bought congressmen and senators for being the movers and shakers behind the atrocities committed against Palestinian ? Can Arab sue the companies who sponsor the events of AIPAC or similar outfits whose name and letter -head description keep on changing ?

  110. anon[159] • Disclaimer says:
    @A123

    Can Pegasus help ?

    “Pegasus: NSO Group boss says Qatar or BDS behind spyware scandal
    ‘There are people who don’t want ice cream to be imported to Israel or for technology to be exported,’ says Shalev Hulio”–https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/pegasus-spyware-nso-says-qatar-bds-behind-investigation

    Israel- ” Iran is who doesn’t want Israel’s ice cream to be dropped on Lebanon and Syria from the sky and doesn’t want Lebanon and Syria receive the Israeli technological gift of spectacle of the firework.

  111. antibeast says:
    @Sarah

    This is still the case for Asian countries still under US occupation, like Japan, South Kora and Taiwan.

    There are no US troops in Taiwan today, as they left in 1975.

    The US will not allow these countries to become independent and free to be governed by local patriots working for the interests of their own people.

    Taiwan is an island province of China, similar to Hainan, albeit under the rule of the Republic of China (Taiwan).

    Other than those two clarifications, I agree with your point that Japan and South Korea remain occupied by the US military.

    • Thanks: Sarah
  112. Malla says:
    @Deep Thought

    Ngo Dinh Diem was not a lackey. He was far less of a lackey than Ho Chi Mihn. And Vietnamese nationalists never trusted elections with Communists because of a long history of voter fraud.

  113. Malla says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    until the next Superpower like China gets mixed up in a Civil War there & loses their ass like the USA, the Russians, the Brits, the Greeks…

    Firstly, the Brits did not lose their ass there. They kinda kicked ass, far better the USSR and USA.
    Secondly, the CCP is not stupid, they watch and learn from the mistakes of other. At least I hope.

    But come to think of it, Afghanistan and China were going to war…..centuries ago! That too it was maybe related to Xinjiang. During the time of Afghan warrior King Ahmed Shah Durrani (Abdali), founder of the Durrani Empire

    Alarmed by the expansion of China’up to the western border of Kazakhstan, Afghan Padshah Ahmad Shah Durrani (Abdali) attempted to rally neighbouring Muslim khanates and the Kazakhs to unite and attack China, to liberate its western Muslim subjects (Uyghurs) from Chinese control. The Afghan Durrani Empire was the second largest empire, behind the Ottoman Empire in the entire Islamic World, at that time. According to the report of Valikhanov, the famous Kazakh scholar, ethnographer and historian such Central Asian rulers as Irdana of Khokand and Tashkent, Fadil Bi of Khojent and Uratepe, and a Sultan of the Kazaks, had earlier sent a letter to Ahmad Shah Duranni to ask him “to deliver the Muslim world from attack of non-believers” here referring to the Chinese expansion into Central Asian Muslim territory. Ahmad Shah banned trade with China and dispatched troops to Kokand. Ahmad Shah Durrani was extremely upset at the murder of Muslim saints, the Kashghar Khojas. In the spring of 1763 Afghan troops were deployed in the area between Khokand and Tashkent, and Ahmad shah dispatched letters to many leaders of Islamic countries urging them to join in the holy war against the Chinese kaffirs. According to Valikhanov this provoked at least one revolt in 1765 in a town called Ush within Kashgharia itself where Muslims had risen against the Chinese with expectation of receiving help from the wider Muslim world.

    This plan for a coordinated attack against Chinese territory also appears in Russian records. According to their reports , Irdana had sent letter to Kazak sultan, Ablai, notifying him that Ahmad shah’s emissary has arrived in Khokand with a message that Ahmad Shah has agreed to aid Khokand in case of a Chinese attack. A merchant from Khojent who visited Orenburg in January 1764 informed the Russians that Ahmad Shah has concentrated one hundred thousand troops to the north of Kandahar in case of war against the Chinese non-believers.The Qing court received similar reports about such military movement in Central Asia and in response in Kashghar, Qing troops were also ready for expedition against Afghanistan.

    • Replies: @Malla
  114. Malla says:
    @Malla

    Padshah Ahmad Shah Durrani of Afghanistan was by far the strongest regional force when the Chinese conquered eastern Turkistan and his activities received in Beijing close scrutiny. Afghan Padshah Ahmad Shah Durrani sent a letter to the Qing court in 1762 demanding it withdraw from Muslim territories, and, when this ultimatum was rejected, began to assemble a huge invasion force. Central Asian and Qing sources agree that in late 1762, Ahmad shah of Afghanistan sent an embassy to Beijing with a letter. The Afghan letter stated that “Maratha khan (probably the Maratha Peshwa of India) had amassed force of several hundred thousands troops to respond to his own seizure of Delhi…… Ahmad shah defeated them, killing over a hundred thousand.”…This had overtones of a veiled threat to the Chinese from the Afghan Emperor.

    The Afghan envoy presented the emperor with four splendid horses but failed to make the good impression because he absolutely refuse to perform Kowtow to the Chinese Emperor. The Qing Dynasty Chinese Qianlong emperor dispatched a letter to Afghan ruler instructing him on folly of war with the reminder that he, the Qainlong emperor, is “lord of all under heaven who watches over every thing inside and outside the empire, and who rewards good and punishes evil”.

    Ahmad Shah of Afghanistan massed his troops and corresponded with other Central Asian rulers to raise a united resistance. These efforts came to naught when the Chinese appeared content to stop at Pamirs. but Ahmad shah , in alliance with Bukhara, invaded Badakhshan, killing its ruler Sultan Shah as punishment for betraying two Khoja brothers Burhan ud din and Khoja Jahan to the Chinese kaffirs and dispatched his head to the Qing authorities. However it is believed that Ahmed Shah did want to avoid war if possible because the wars with the Hindu Maratha Empire as well as Sikh rebellions against his rule had taken a heavy toll on his military forces and treasury. Had that not been the case, may be he would have attacked China with his huge army to liberate Eastern Turkistan.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  115. RobinG says:
    @RobinG

    “My conscience, once held at bay, came roaring back to life.”

    Ahead of his sentencing former Air Force Intelligence Analyst Daniel Hale sent a deeply personal letter to Judge Liam O’Grady explaining why he shared US drone secrets with a reporter.

    Former Air Force Intelligence Analyst Daniel Hale Explains Why He Leaked US’ Drone Secrets
    https://sparrowmedia.net/2021/07/former-air-force-intelligence-analyst-daniel-hale-explains-why-he-leaked-us-drone-secrets/

  116. @Malla

    MALLA

    China has always had a border with Kashmir too, and was careful never to chose sides in that conflict either. One expected they might have sided with Pakistan. They didn’t. Perhaps figuring the Pakistanis were so quarrelsome they’d go after China next once they got Kashmir.

    They would rather support the Uighurs through proxy.

    The Chinese, unlike the Indians, tend to mushroom cloud. The Han Chinese would just fire a nuclear missile at Western China to kill every single Uighur & Pashtun freedom fighter & if China was uninhabitable for the next 100 years, so what?

    The Pakistanis know that. They are more interested in protracted war-as-a-way-of-life because they have no reason to live but quarrelsomeness.

    • Replies: @Deep Thought
  117. anon[346] • Disclaimer says:
    @Deep Thought

    Yes spot on : communists DID want the South Vietnamese to have a choice. It was murrika, and its lackey in the south, that did NOT want them to have a choice:

    Ho Chi Min has been fighting since 1920.

    “At the end of World War II, his hopes had been high. When the Japanese evacuated in 1945, Ho’s revolutionists held a celebration with a million people on the streets and read a declaration of independence that included (verbatim) sections from the US Declaration of Independence and the French Declaration of the Rights of Man. Ho would soon find that such principles applied only to white Westerners.

    Still, as the US was switching over to a pro-imperial policy, Ho desperately wrote eight letters to President Harry Truman begging for American support based on the superpower’s own promises in the Atlantic Charter. Truman ignored him

    The US would essentially create a new state in the south, and it backed an unpopular Catholic (most Vietnamese were Buddhists) supporter of the large landlords (most Vietnamese were peasants) named Ngo Dinh Diem, who had only recently been living in New Jersey. Diem was corrupt, authoritarian and adverse to social and economic reform. By 1960, the National Liberation Front (NLF) formed in the south and, with North Vietnamese support, waged a new guerrilla war against Diem’s regime.

    The later Pentagon Papers – a comprehensive study of US involvement in Vietnam conducted by the Department of Defense – said of this early phase of the war that “[o]nly the Vietcong [guerrillas] had any real support of influence on a broad base in the countryside.”

    https://original.antiwar.com/danny_sjursen/2019/04/24/vietnam-a-us-tragedy/

    Danny Sjursen is a retired US Army officer and regular contributor to Antiwar.com He served combat tours with reconnaissance units in Iraq and Afghanistan and later taught history at his alma mater, West Point.

    • Agree: Deep Thought
    • Thanks: Sarah
    • Replies: @Malla
    , @Deep Thought
  118. @Sarah

    The “one side” you are talking about is USA. The only “choice” you are talking about was to remain a US colony with a puppet government and a US puppet at its head.

    South Vietnam had elections:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1967_South_Vietnamese_presidential_election

    North Vietnam did not.

    This is still the case for Asian countries still under US occupation, like Japan, South Kora and Taiwan.

    Taiwan is under US control? Wow you have a lot of reading to do before coming here. You definitely have public school/media indoctrination where the US is to blame for everything. Taiwan can only dream of being under US control.

    Liberals talk a lot but don’t fact check even half of what they say.

  119. Malla says:
    @anon

    This is the dumbest bullshit I have ever heard.
    Ngo Dinh Diem was no lackey, he was an anti-colonial hero. He lived in USA, so what? Ho lived in Paris. The French hated Diem far more than they hated Ho. Ho even collaborated with the French Empire to kill off the Vietnamese Nationalists while Diem refused a position in a pro-French Government.
    The USA green lighted the assassination of Diem and then backstabbed South Vietnam to its fate to be conquered by the North. Show me one Communist movement not clandestinely supported by the US Government. Or any-anti-colonial “movement”.
    I have discussed this here.

    https://www.unz.com/pescobar/a-saigon-moment-in-the-hindu-kush/#comment-4766524
    USA killed Diem
    https://www.unz.com/pescobar/a-saigon-moment-in-the-hindu-kush/#comment-4766780
    Anti-War hippie movment was fake controlled by CIA
    https://www.unz.com/pescobar/a-saigon-moment-in-the-hindu-kush/#comment-4768804
    Vietnamese Nationalists
    https://www.unz.com/pescobar/a-saigon-moment-in-the-hindu-kush/#comment-4768836
    Ho Chi Minh US Ally and also collborated with the Frnch to crush Vietnamese Natioanlists
    https://www.unz.com/pescobar/a-saigon-moment-in-the-hindu-kush/#comment-4768916
    US troops had already left Vietnam and the USA reduced support to South Vietnam and backstabbed South Vietnam
    https://www.unz.com/pescobar/a-saigon-moment-in-the-hindu-kush/#comment-4768925
    https://www.unz.com/pescobar/a-saigon-moment-in-the-hindu-kush/#comment-4768927
    Diem the Nationalist Hero!!!!

    • Replies: @Anon
  120. @anon

    Ho would soon find that such principles applied only to white Westerners.

    Ho should have known that earlier:

    Wall Street Journal

    Friday, 11 May 2018 (Hong Kong)

    In Richard Norton Smith’s review of Patricia O’Toole’s new biography of Woodrow Wilson, “The Moralist: Woodrow Wilson and the World He Made” (Books, April 21), Mr. Smith mentions that Wilson “lamented the loss of wartime idealism and the erosion of economic democracy.”

    But Mr. Smith’s assertion the Wilson’s name is “synonymous with liberal democracy” and “self-determination” is of the mark. Wilson must, of course, be viewed in the context of the times in which he lived, but his calls to “make the world safe for democracy” and to establish a rational world orderly meant for the powerful light-skinned nations and colonial empires that ran the world in the early 1900s. Wilson did not believe for a minute that subjugated and colonial oppressed people were entitled to “self-determination.”

    At the Versailles Conference following the end of World War I, a young man presented a petition to Secretary of State Robert Lansing, seeking a meeting with President Wilson to advocate for the freedom of his people. He was abruptly turned away, as he was what we would call today a Third World native living under a French colonial regime. His name was Ho Chi Minh (he using the name Nguyen Ai Quoc).

    Wilson’s ideals– liberalism, democracy and self-determination– weren’t meant to apply to people like Ho.

    STEVEN MORRIS

    Mt. Pleasant, S.C.

    • Thanks: Sarah
  121. @Jeff Stryker

    The Chinese, unlike the Indians, tend to mushroom cloud.

    The only one who had made “mushroom clouds” were the murrikans– NOT that I oppose doing it if it is done to the Japs!

    {…The atomic bombings were an attempt by the U.S. to get the war over with before the Soviets invaded and received the spoils the Allies had promised them at Yalta and, even more consequential to human history, they were an attempt to demonstrate to the Soviets, who were well aware of Japanese desperation to end the war, that the U.S. could be completely ruthless in defending its “interests.”}

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/oliver-stone/the-us-and-japan-partners_b_3902034.html

    They also give support to the Japs to turn the Pacific Ocean radioactive.

  122. Anon[784] • Disclaimer says:
    @Malla

    This moron keeps on quoting his own bull shit argument.
    What a piece of work !

    • Replies: @Malla
  123. Malla says:
    @Anon

    LOL, facts destroy pet idiotic beliefs. Hence comments full of anger and frustration. LOL

    • Replies: @Anon
  124. Sarah says:
    @Deep Thought

    LIES! The communists DID want the South Vietnamese to have a choice. It was Murrika and its lackey in the south, that did NOT want them to have a choice:.

    Thank you for reminding us of this fact.
    Same thing for Korea:

    The US killed 4 million Korean and 1 million Chinese in Korean war. And don’t forget the mutilated, the burned, the bio war against North-Korea and China, the thousands of cities and villages destroyed and broken, dispersed, separated families.

    There was a historic meeting between North Korea’s Kim Jong-un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the demarcation line in April 2018.

    The two leaders met a second time in May 2018, where they agreed to resume talks. South Korea has also taken an active role in trying to broker talks between Pyongyang and Washington.

    But Washington broke these peace attempts a little later and restarted the Cold War between the two states and between North-Korean and USA.
    US torpedoes any attempt at peace and reunification.

  125. Anon[323] • Disclaimer says:
    @Malla

    Your moronic sources need to be updated . You a moron , can’t do it unfortunately.

    Karzai in 2001 in Afghanistan from US oil company – some faces packed with dollar in the ‘ democracy in a suitcase ‘ for Iraq , no sorry it’s the Catholic carpetbagger from New Jersey out of nowhere tried decades before actually ,
    to carry the Western (French ) mission on the back of American donkey to fruition . The difference is the donkey doesn’t bray touting Christianity or White burden any more . Otherwise same MO .

    It doesn’t mean the donkey won’t be appreciated by a moron like you .

  126. @Sarah

    Spot on, Sarah.

    @EliteCommInc. seems to be fighting a hopeless rear guard action on behalf of classical imperialism. The Korean and Vietnam wars are already sad textbook examples. Regarding the latter conflict, chapter 17 of a relatively new Vietnam book, Heavy Metal – memoir of a distant war, offers again the closest thing to an objective critique of the actual war aims of the protagonists, sourcing words right from the mouths of the main adversaries on both sides.

    • Thanks: Sarah
  127. @Anon

    I wouldn’t go as far as to say that if you are not a Jew you cannot access any media, but the fact is that in order to enjoy a certain success or popularity in that profession you have to visualize yourself as some kind of would-be Jew, either someone who identifies spontaneously, rather than with the Yankees, with the liberal or lefty Middle European culture that used to be of most Jews that migrated and integrated into the US from 1900 to 1950, or militates among the Christian Zionist extreme right and fancies himself as some Old Testament hero. As for the government you cannot deny that the US system of government is one based on lobbyism and that at lobbyism the world champions happen to be Jews or less frequently defenders of particular interests who will preferably resort to Jewish lawyers to advance their own thing.

  128. @Jack McArthur

    On Jewish Bolshevism
    “Lenin’s train had included 19 members of his Bolshevik party, several of his allies among the Mensheviks and six Jewish members of the Jewish Labor Bund. Almost half the passengers on the train were Jewish…The roughly three million Jews of the Soviet Union at the time of the revolution constituted the largest Jewish community in the world, but they were only around 2% of the USSR’s population.”
    https://www.jpost.com/Magazine/Was-the-Russian-Revolution-Jewish-514323

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