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Being an editor of the New York Times opinion section used to be considered one of the top jobs in daily journalism, so there wasn’t much turnover. But now in the age of Woke Newsrooms … So, from the New York Times’ Job Openings webpage:

Deputy Opinion Editor
New York, NY

Job Description

The New York Times is looking for a proactive, creative, digitally-experienced editor to shape its Opinion report and help lead the department. Responsibilities will include helping set a strategy for the department’s signature coverage and then directing day-to-day implementation of that strategy, directing a team of editors and visual and audio journalists. The deputy editor has excellent news judgment and takes ownership of, and pride in what we publish. You will help recruit and edit new team members and Opinion columnists and contributors. You will represent Times Opinion in conversation with journalistic and business leaders across the Times.

We’re looking for an editor with a sense of humor and a spine of steel, a confident point of view and an open mind, an appetite for risk and exacting standards for excellence in writing and visual presentation. We’re looking for someone who wants to grow big ideas to make the world a better place, and to have fun doing it.

The Times Opinion team aims to promote the most important and provocative debate across a range of subjects – including politics, global affairs, technology, culture, and business – and is passionate about including a vast array of diverse voices and perspectives. You have curiosity and an understanding of the opinion ecology of the Web and of how to interpret and apply digital metrics. And this editor must be a sensitive and deft manager who is committed to advancing a workplace and culture that is inclusive, open and fair.

The application deadline for this position is March 17th, 2021.

The New York Times is committed to a diverse and inclusive workforce, one that reflects the varied global community we serve. Our journalism and the products we build in the service of that journalism greatly benefit from a range of perspectives, which can only come from diversity of all types, across our ranks, at all levels of the organization. Achieving true diversity and inclusion is the right thing to do. It is also the smart thing for our business. So we strongly encourage women, veterans, people with disabilities, people of color and gender nonconforming candidates to apply.

The New York Times Company is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of an individual’s sex, age, race, color, creed, national origin, alienage, religion, marital status, pregnancy, sexual orientation or affectional preference, gender identity and expression, disability, genetic trait or predisposition, carrier status, citizenship, veteran or military status and other personal characteristics protected by law. All applications will receive consideration for employment without regard to legally protected characteristics.

For some reason, this makes me think of the screwball comedy His Girl Friday with Cary Grant as hard-boiled newspaper editor-in-chief Walter Burns.

I can picture Walter dictating this Deputy Opinion Editor ad:

“OK, take this down: ‘Wanted: A fall-guy, a chump, a sap, a scapegoat, a Grade-A patsy, a nimrod who will never know what hit him.’ Now, just clean that up a little — you know, the usual — and stick it in the Help Wanted section.”

 
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  1. You will represent Times Opinion in conversation with journalistic and business leaders across the Times.

    Prepositions. We’re not your father’s prepositions any more.

    We’re looking for an editor with a sense of humor and a spine of steel, a confident point of view and an open mind, an appetite for risk

    Check on the sense of humor. You’ll need it. You’ll also need to keep it very secret.

    We’re looking for someone who wants to grow big ideas to make the world a better place, and to have fun doing it.

    Good God, NYT. Just STFU.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Polistra

    Well at least they didn't "ax" for a new guy.

    , @Father O'Hara
    @Polistra

    That last bit sounds like the ad for editor of 16 Magazine.

    , @Richard B
    @Polistra


    NYT. Just STFU.
     
    Absolutely!

    The #1 Takeaway after reading that Job Description is that The New York Times is literally insane.
  2. anon[167] • Disclaimer says:

    We’re looking for an editor with a sense of humor and a spine of steel, a confident point of view and an open mind, an appetite for risk and exacting standards for excellence in writing and visual presentation.

    This your guy?

    Nah. Too white!

    • LOL: Alden
    • Replies: @p38ace
    @anon

    He does have journalism experience at the Daily Planet. Don't forget he is a legal alien.

    , @Charles
    @anon

    Superman in front of a 48-star flag absolutely rules.

  3. lol. That would’ve fit in with his character.

    A good play satirizing woke modern newspaper rooms or woke national TV news rooms in such a way would make boffo dollars these days touring the provinces….until it is protested as a “Nazi play” right out of existence.

    For some reason, however, left wing playwrights just can’t figure out why making fun of a roomful of Marxist Dick Thornbergs would be hilarious.

  4. HELP WANTED

    • Replies: @Prof. Woland
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The last real barn burner show trial before Stalin's death ended up being know as the Russian Doctor's Plot. Called Stalin's last crime, it started off with a fake accusation of a Soviet doctor (Jewish) killing his patient who was a high ranking apparatchik. It expanded by forcing confessions to where the USSR was getting ready to imprison or deport most of Moscow's Jewish population to the Far East. The capstone of the trial and the real piece de resistance was when the prosecutor, Viktor Abakumov, ended up getting accused of being part of the plot and was executed. He was formerly the head of SMERSH and the man who Stalin personally sent to Berlin to find Hitler was brought down by being accused of being the ring leader. Of course it was just a convenient and tidy way of getting rid of the one person who knew everything including that the Jewish Doctors plot was fake. Fortunately, Stalin croaked ending the deportations but once Abakumov was gone, it was all over.

    Replies: @JMcG

    , @mmack
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Lenin knew what he wanted in a lackey. The last line of his original “Hanging Order” https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenin%27s_Hanging_Order:

    “P.S. Use your toughest people for this."

    , @MBlanc46
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Very well done, Buzz, very well done.

  5. We’re looking for an editor with a sense of humor and a spine of steel

    Can woke fuel melt steel spines?

  6. We’re looking for an editor with a sense of humor and a spine of steel, a confident point of view and an open mind, an appetite for risk and exacting standards for excellence in writing and visual presentation. We’re looking for someone who wants to grow big ideas to make the world a better place, and to have fun doing it.

    Hello NYT ! Here’s my portfolio:

    https://www.unz.com/comments/all/?commenterfilter=Jenner+Ickham+Errican

    • LOL: JMcG
  7. We’re looking for an editor with a sense of humor and a spine of steel, a confident point of view and an open mind, an appetite for risk and exacting standards for excellence in writing and visual presentation. We’re looking for someone who wants to grow big ideas to make the world a better place, and to have fun doing it.

    C’mon Steve, if this isn’t you, who is it?

    Come out of the closest. If nothing else you can tell ’em you’ll get people talking and stimulate traffic.

  8. I can picture Walter dictating this Deputy Opinion Editor ad:

    Hey, if the Times actually employed reporters who looked like Rosalind Russell………….I’d subscribe.

    • Replies: @ManhattanBorn
    @Mr. Anon

    My late mother and Rosalind Russell were classmates in Waterbury, CT. I don't know Rosalind's birth name. She was the daughter of Italian immigrants. Always kind, courteous, and beautiful as well!

  9. Funny that the Times will hire you if you are a “carrier” or have a genetic predisposition for something (things they would not know about) but they do not promise not to discriminate on the basis of political group or opinion.

    So you can be a progressive Democrat of any kind but you do need to be a progressive Democrat. So much for their openness to diverse opinions and diversity.

    It seems maybe the more people talk about diversity the less they want true diversity.

    • Replies: @Not Only Wrathful
    @notsaying


    It seems maybe the more people talk about diversity the less they want true diversity
     
    Reifying the metrics (e.g number of black people in key roles) while forgetting the target (people feeling aligned with life while living) is ordinary.

    Partly because they confuse the target (people feeling aligned with life while living) with the destination (an imagined and abstract utopia re-constructed from the vague metrics, which were themselves badly constructed from the now forgotten target/journey), when it should always be the journey (as the real destination is always heat death/death/lifetimes away.)

    They then make the metrics the journey, in a moment of total betrayal of the f*cking point, and feel accomplished in hyper-focusing on whatever inadequate metrics they've concocted.

    Even writing about this stuff is confusing, so no idea how anyone will follow it (-:

    Replies: @Not Only Wrathful

  10. @Buzz Mohawk
    HELP WANTED


    https://media1.britannica.com/eb-media/49/149849-004-EA9FDE62.jpg

    Replies: @Prof. Woland, @mmack, @MBlanc46

    The last real barn burner show trial before Stalin’s death ended up being know as the Russian Doctor’s Plot. Called Stalin’s last crime, it started off with a fake accusation of a Soviet doctor (Jewish) killing his patient who was a high ranking apparatchik. It expanded by forcing confessions to where the USSR was getting ready to imprison or deport most of Moscow’s Jewish population to the Far East. The capstone of the trial and the real piece de resistance was when the prosecutor, Viktor Abakumov, ended up getting accused of being part of the plot and was executed. He was formerly the head of SMERSH and the man who Stalin personally sent to Berlin to find Hitler was brought down by being accused of being the ring leader. Of course it was just a convenient and tidy way of getting rid of the one person who knew everything including that the Jewish Doctors plot was fake. Fortunately, Stalin croaked ending the deportations but once Abakumov was gone, it was all over.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Prof. Woland

    I’ve read a couple of Stalin biographies, neither of which mentioned any assassination attempts against Stalin. It’s hinted that he might have been poisoned at the end, but not stated as such. Is it true that no individual or group of conspirators ever attempted to kill him while he was in power?

    Replies: @Prof. Woland, @J.Ross

  11. @Polistra

    You will represent Times Opinion in conversation with journalistic and business leaders across the Times.
     
    Prepositions. We're not your father's prepositions any more.

    We’re looking for an editor with a sense of humor and a spine of steel, a confident point of view and an open mind, an appetite for risk
     
    Check on the sense of humor. You'll need it. You'll also need to keep it very secret.

    We’re looking for someone who wants to grow big ideas to make the world a better place, and to have fun doing it.

     

    Good God, NYT. Just STFU.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Father O'Hara, @Richard B

    Well at least they didn’t “ax” for a new guy.

  12. Steve,

    When I download your articles I notice you are among the minority of journalists who use the default lower-case (for 1st letters in title line words).

    As we see here, it makes your rationed use of the upper case more revealing:

    “What’s the Over-Under Line for how long NYT’s next Deputy Opinion Editor will last”

    I expect to get amusingly unfiltered news here, thanks to Ron Unz & his merry band of conspiracy theorists. And I am never disappointed.

    (PS: Your editing is superb — when you occasionally reject a comment of mine, I realize you did me a favor.)

  13. Hopefully the hopeful pretendant wanders in with the mobile switched to “recording”.

    Slight typo here:

    – “a nimrod who will never know what him.”
    – “a nimrod who will never know what HIT him.”

    Nimrod: a descendant of Ham represented in Genesis as a mighty hunter and a king of Shinar

    Can one still use this name in a deprecating & racist way?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @El Dato

    Slight typo here:

    – “a nimrod who will never know what him.”
    – “a nimrod who will never know what HIT him.”

    Thanks. I looked over that post a dozen times and never saw my typo.

    Replies: @El Dato

    , @Steve Sailer
    @El Dato

    I vaguely recall that a 1970s National Lampoon High School Yearbook featured the star basketball player Nimrod Jones.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    , @Known Fact
    @El Dato

    The most famous and noble Nimrod would be the friend who inspired the mighty Nimrod passage, in Elgar's Enigma Variations (1899):

    The name refers to Augustus J. Jaeger, a music editor and close friend of Elgar's, who gave him useful advice and encouragement but also severe criticism, something Elgar greatly appreciated. Nimrod is described in the Old Testament as "a mighty hunter before the Lord," and Jäeger happens to be German for hunter.

  14. Deputy Opinion Editor

    To edit deputy opinions?

  15. I stumbled over the part where they take pride in, and ownership of what they glom together with great smears of non-toxic paste.

  16. Anon[970] • Disclaimer says:

    Wouldn’t this sort of a job at the New York Times normally be filled from within? If so, the fact that they are looking outside the organization is telling.

    Better to keep a less high profile Times position, and stay off of Slack and Zoom as much as possible; let some new guy who doesn’t know the corporate culture and internal morale take the deputy opinion editor job.

  17. The NYT is in it’s “eating the seed corn” phase. They are doing well financially for now because they are firing the old expensive white dudes who actually wrote real stories and replacing them with low-paid ditzy 20 something bimbos who write buzzfeed-level clickbait about their hair. It works for now because they’re coasting on their old reputation. People love clickbait stories embedded in a prestige publication–it allows them to indulge their desire to read childish drivel without feeling like they’ve debased themselves. But as the years roll by the reputation of the publication changes, and then stuff that used to work doesn’t work anymore.

    Ron should give that McNeil guy a call, maybe he’d like to write for Unz. 🙂

    • Replies: @SimpleSong
    @SimpleSong

    Of course, the U.S. as a whole has been in its 'eating the seed corn' phase for about 40 years and things are just now starting to go sideways, so it will probably be a while before the Gray Lady falls and breaks a hip.

  18. @SimpleSong
    The NYT is in it's "eating the seed corn" phase. They are doing well financially for now because they are firing the old expensive white dudes who actually wrote real stories and replacing them with low-paid ditzy 20 something bimbos who write buzzfeed-level clickbait about their hair. It works for now because they're coasting on their old reputation. People love clickbait stories embedded in a prestige publication--it allows them to indulge their desire to read childish drivel without feeling like they've debased themselves. But as the years roll by the reputation of the publication changes, and then stuff that used to work doesn't work anymore.

    Ron should give that McNeil guy a call, maybe he'd like to write for Unz. :)

    Replies: @SimpleSong

    Of course, the U.S. as a whole has been in its ‘eating the seed corn’ phase for about 40 years and things are just now starting to go sideways, so it will probably be a while before the Gray Lady falls and breaks a hip.

  19. Soon they’ll have to force reluctant people to take the job, like Claudius trembling as he hides from the Praetorian Guard behind a curtain.

  20. I read the screed waiting for the inevitable declaration of wokeness to appear. It did halfway through after the usual bunch of buzzwords and self-congratulatory backslapping. One has to wonder the amount of proofreading (wokereading) necessary before releasing this “Wanted” add on NYT’s vigilant readers.

  21. The job description reads like “You will be the fall guy so the Opinion Editor does not lose his job.”

  22. The real job qualification is to understand that they want the opposite of all the traits they evoke in the 2nd and 3rd paragraphs. (Except for the visual presentation, they do care about that.)

    As for “interpreting and applying digital metrics”, the qualified applicant is skilled in distorting and falsifying numbers to make them seem to represent any desired outcome.

    The New York Times Company is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of … genetic trait

    Does this mean they promise not to discriminate against those who refuse the gene-engineering injections? Naw, I doubt that.

  23. We’re looking for an editor with a sense of humor and a spine of steel….

    That’s rich, to be frank.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @The Alarmist

    > to be frank

    That's antisemitic.

    Replies: @dvorak

    , @Dissident
    @The Alarmist


    That’s rich, to be frank.
     
    Frank Rich? You would characterize him as having a sense of humor and a spine of steel?
    ~ ~ ~
    As for Charles Blow, one can certainly disagree with, and even take umbrage at his views. But the man has some serious writing ability. At least give him that much.
    [/sarcasm]

    Replies: @The Alarmist

  24. @The Alarmist

    We’re looking for an editor with a sense of humor and a spine of steel....
     
    That’s rich, to be frank.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Dissident

    > to be frank

    That’s antisemitic.

    • Replies: @dvorak
    @El Dato


    That’s rich, to be frank.

    > to be frank

    That’s antisemitic.
     

    Frank Rich's son managed to mine the ol' immigrant story for surprisingly fresh laughs in the New Yorker:
    https://www.newyorker.com/humor/daily-shouts/sell-out-part-one

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

  25. Will this new deputy opinion editor have the authority to fire Charles Blow for his silly piece on Dr. Seuss? If so, what better way to demonstrate one’s sense of humor, spine of steel and exacting standards for excellence in writing? I mean, these days, gay Negros are a dime a dozen: look at the swish the WSJ has writing its morning “Notes on the News,” one Tyler Blint-Welsh. Makes Blow look like a Marine drill sergeant.

  26. @Buzz Mohawk
    HELP WANTED


    https://media1.britannica.com/eb-media/49/149849-004-EA9FDE62.jpg

    Replies: @Prof. Woland, @mmack, @MBlanc46

    Lenin knew what he wanted in a lackey. The last line of his original “Hanging Order” https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenin%27s_Hanging_Order:

    “P.S. Use your toughest people for this.”

  27. @notsaying
    Funny that the Times will hire you if you are a "carrier" or have a genetic predisposition for something (things they would not know about) but they do not promise not to discriminate on the basis of political group or opinion.

    So you can be a progressive Democrat of any kind but you do need to be a progressive Democrat. So much for their openness to diverse opinions and diversity.

    It seems maybe the more people talk about diversity the less they want true diversity.

    Replies: @Not Only Wrathful

    It seems maybe the more people talk about diversity the less they want true diversity

    Reifying the metrics (e.g number of black people in key roles) while forgetting the target (people feeling aligned with life while living) is ordinary.

    Partly because they confuse the target (people feeling aligned with life while living) with the destination (an imagined and abstract utopia re-constructed from the vague metrics, which were themselves badly constructed from the now forgotten target/journey), when it should always be the journey (as the real destination is always heat death/death/lifetimes away.)

    They then make the metrics the journey, in a moment of total betrayal of the f*cking point, and feel accomplished in hyper-focusing on whatever inadequate metrics they’ve concocted.

    Even writing about this stuff is confusing, so no idea how anyone will follow it (-:

    • Replies: @Not Only Wrathful
    @Not Only Wrathful

    Perhaps maturing is going from aiming for metrics, to aiming for a destination, to feeling aligned as you live.

  28. @El Dato
    Hopefully the hopeful pretendant wanders in with the mobile switched to "recording".

    https://twitter.com/GraduatedBen/status/1366428185953501186

    Slight typo here:

    - "a nimrod who will never know what him."
    - "a nimrod who will never know what HIT him."

    Nimrod: a descendant of Ham represented in Genesis as a mighty hunter and a king of Shinar

    Can one still use this name in a deprecating & racist way?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Known Fact

    Slight typo here:

    – “a nimrod who will never know what him.”
    – “a nimrod who will never know what HIT him.”

    Thanks. I looked over that post a dozen times and never saw my typo.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Steve Sailer

    I gathered lots of survival skills for grade passing in high school.

  29. @El Dato
    Hopefully the hopeful pretendant wanders in with the mobile switched to "recording".

    https://twitter.com/GraduatedBen/status/1366428185953501186

    Slight typo here:

    - "a nimrod who will never know what him."
    - "a nimrod who will never know what HIT him."

    Nimrod: a descendant of Ham represented in Genesis as a mighty hunter and a king of Shinar

    Can one still use this name in a deprecating & racist way?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Known Fact

    I vaguely recall that a 1970s National Lampoon High School Yearbook featured the star basketball player Nimrod Jones.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Steve Sailer

    Nimrod is an odd case, in that the Biblical reference is to a king who was also a famous hunter, so an Alpha male all the way, but now its colloquial connotation and use are just about the opposite.

    Nimrod Jones might have had a church lady mother who hewed closely to the traditional meaning of the name.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  30. @Not Only Wrathful
    @notsaying


    It seems maybe the more people talk about diversity the less they want true diversity
     
    Reifying the metrics (e.g number of black people in key roles) while forgetting the target (people feeling aligned with life while living) is ordinary.

    Partly because they confuse the target (people feeling aligned with life while living) with the destination (an imagined and abstract utopia re-constructed from the vague metrics, which were themselves badly constructed from the now forgotten target/journey), when it should always be the journey (as the real destination is always heat death/death/lifetimes away.)

    They then make the metrics the journey, in a moment of total betrayal of the f*cking point, and feel accomplished in hyper-focusing on whatever inadequate metrics they've concocted.

    Even writing about this stuff is confusing, so no idea how anyone will follow it (-:

    Replies: @Not Only Wrathful

    Perhaps maturing is going from aiming for metrics, to aiming for a destination, to feeling aligned as you live.

  31. Google came up with “Sasha” as the strongest candidate for the open NYT position. Here is her application.

    hi im looking to get into venomous snakes but dont want to jump straight in the DEEP end i have worked with some pretty fisty non venomous snakes such as annacodas, african rocks, ect

    but nothing venomous as yet i was reading up on the (mangrove snake) Boiga dendrophila dendrophila but i wondered if any one had any surgestions on what i could get im only 16 so i cant get a DWA for a couple of years but do plan on doing so later on.

    AND has anyone been bitten by a mangrove how bad can it be ?

    The Times should also solicit applications from writers who have recently moved to Substack. One essayist, Bari Weiss, looks like a particularly good fit.

  32. The New York Times is committed to a diverse and inclusive workforce, one that reflects the varied global community we serve.

    I suspect the Times’ readership is still overwhelmingly white.

    • Replies: @notsaying
    @International Jew

    I was wondering that myself -- what the demographics of the NYT are today. For their American readers I would say still very white living in white neighborhoods. But with their digital subscriptions they have a worldwide audience today that they didn't used to have even when they used to publish the International Herald Tribune.

    I have no idea who subscribes to the digital NYT overseas and what their demographics are.

    It is clear though that they feel obliged to cater to their ultra-touchy woke readers; I wonder how many of their total readers that actually includes. If all their job ads are as woke as this one, it would seem anybody they hire today has to be woke or pretends to be.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Luzzatto

    , @Luzzatto
    @International Jew

    The vast majority of African Americans prefer The Root over The New York Times. The Root is The New York Times for Black folks. Even within The Democratic Party, Black Democrats get their news from different sources than White Democrats!

  33. @Steve Sailer
    @El Dato

    Slight typo here:

    – “a nimrod who will never know what him.”
    – “a nimrod who will never know what HIT him.”

    Thanks. I looked over that post a dozen times and never saw my typo.

    Replies: @El Dato

    I gathered lots of survival skills for grade passing in high school.

  34. @Prof. Woland
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The last real barn burner show trial before Stalin's death ended up being know as the Russian Doctor's Plot. Called Stalin's last crime, it started off with a fake accusation of a Soviet doctor (Jewish) killing his patient who was a high ranking apparatchik. It expanded by forcing confessions to where the USSR was getting ready to imprison or deport most of Moscow's Jewish population to the Far East. The capstone of the trial and the real piece de resistance was when the prosecutor, Viktor Abakumov, ended up getting accused of being part of the plot and was executed. He was formerly the head of SMERSH and the man who Stalin personally sent to Berlin to find Hitler was brought down by being accused of being the ring leader. Of course it was just a convenient and tidy way of getting rid of the one person who knew everything including that the Jewish Doctors plot was fake. Fortunately, Stalin croaked ending the deportations but once Abakumov was gone, it was all over.

    Replies: @JMcG

    I’ve read a couple of Stalin biographies, neither of which mentioned any assassination attempts against Stalin. It’s hinted that he might have been poisoned at the end, but not stated as such. Is it true that no individual or group of conspirators ever attempted to kill him while he was in power?

    • Replies: @Prof. Woland
    @JMcG

    You might be right, I cannot think of it ever happening either now that you mention it. Of course part of the doctors plot was the false accusation that Stalin's doctor tried to kill him but that was preposterous.

    I once was at a private party at the Blackhawk Auto Museum and when things quieted down I asked the docent about Stalin's limousine which was on display at the time. To my delight he took me back to the car and showed it to me including letting me sit inside. It was a hodgepodge of Packard and Buick parts connected to a Zil frame if memory serves me. They did not make limos in the USSR but needed something fit to drive around the second most powerful man in the world. I believe there were about 5 of them made and they were careful to not always put Stalin in the lead car. They were also careful to use different routes when driving him back and forth from the Kremlin to his Dachas. He also loaned his car to Zhukov and others perhaps with the intent of letting them know they might be the ones getting it in the neck if there was an assignation plot against him.

    , @J.Ross
    @JMcG

    You will recall the chaos of the early years, which no Bolshevik could ever get over. Not only was Lenin shot but, what is far worse, he was stopped multiple times by extragovernmental picketts whose men didn't recognize him until he held up a newspaper or an official photo. You will now recall that every Communist space is always decorated with an official picture of the current leader. Their reason for keeping bread available and cheap was the memory of the French Revolution.

  35. We’re looking for an editor with a sense of humor and a spine of steel, a confident point of view and an open mind, an appetite for risk and exacting standards for excellence in writing and visual presentation.

    “We’re looking for an editor who will consummately, universally and instantly acquiesce to all our wokescold reporters, journalists and writers.”

    FIFY.

    • Agree: photondancer
  36. @anon
    We’re looking for an editor with a sense of humor and a spine of steel, a confident point of view and an open mind, an appetite for risk and exacting standards for excellence in writing and visual presentation.

    This your guy?

    https://bestgifs.makeagif.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/superman.gif

    Nah. Too white!

    Replies: @p38ace, @Charles

    He does have journalism experience at the Daily Planet. Don’t forget he is a legal alien.

  37. Sounds like one of those classy personals at the back of New York Magazine

    “ME: Attractive, articulate Jewish divorcee, in love with life and passionate about social justice. YOU: Ready for caring, sharing and long diverse walks along the beach. Non-smokers only, please.”

  38. @International Jew

    The New York Times is committed to a diverse and inclusive workforce, one that reflects the varied global community we serve.
     
    I suspect the Times' readership is still overwhelmingly white.

    Replies: @notsaying, @Luzzatto

    I was wondering that myself — what the demographics of the NYT are today. For their American readers I would say still very white living in white neighborhoods. But with their digital subscriptions they have a worldwide audience today that they didn’t used to have even when they used to publish the International Herald Tribune.

    I have no idea who subscribes to the digital NYT overseas and what their demographics are.

    It is clear though that they feel obliged to cater to their ultra-touchy woke readers; I wonder how many of their total readers that actually includes. If all their job ads are as woke as this one, it would seem anybody they hire today has to be woke or pretends to be.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @notsaying


    It is clear though that they feel obliged to cater to their ultra-touchy woke readers;
     
    This is not necessarily what is going on at the Sulzberger house. You need to see the NYT and all other parts of Our American Pravda as tools of the powers that be. They do not cater to their readers; they shape the thoughts of their readers.

    They reinforce what is acceptable current discourse and cultural memory. They have mastered this practice while holding onto their subscribers and convincing them that the NYT is simply a "newspaper."

    They are not a business, per se, but a top-down instrument of thought control.

    , @Luzzatto
    @notsaying

    Internationally The New York Times has to be way more popular with Europeans than it is with Asians and Africans. So even on an international level I doubt most readers of The New York Times are People Of Color!

  39. @El Dato
    Hopefully the hopeful pretendant wanders in with the mobile switched to "recording".

    https://twitter.com/GraduatedBen/status/1366428185953501186

    Slight typo here:

    - "a nimrod who will never know what him."
    - "a nimrod who will never know what HIT him."

    Nimrod: a descendant of Ham represented in Genesis as a mighty hunter and a king of Shinar

    Can one still use this name in a deprecating & racist way?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Known Fact

    The most famous and noble Nimrod would be the friend who inspired the mighty Nimrod passage, in Elgar’s Enigma Variations (1899):

    The name refers to Augustus J. Jaeger, a music editor and close friend of Elgar’s, who gave him useful advice and encouragement but also severe criticism, something Elgar greatly appreciated. Nimrod is described in the Old Testament as “a mighty hunter before the Lord,” and Jäeger happens to be German for hunter.

  40. laughed my ass off at that last part

  41. @anon
    We’re looking for an editor with a sense of humor and a spine of steel, a confident point of view and an open mind, an appetite for risk and exacting standards for excellence in writing and visual presentation.

    This your guy?

    https://bestgifs.makeagif.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/superman.gif

    Nah. Too white!

    Replies: @p38ace, @Charles

    Superman in front of a 48-star flag absolutely rules.

  42. @notsaying
    @International Jew

    I was wondering that myself -- what the demographics of the NYT are today. For their American readers I would say still very white living in white neighborhoods. But with their digital subscriptions they have a worldwide audience today that they didn't used to have even when they used to publish the International Herald Tribune.

    I have no idea who subscribes to the digital NYT overseas and what their demographics are.

    It is clear though that they feel obliged to cater to their ultra-touchy woke readers; I wonder how many of their total readers that actually includes. If all their job ads are as woke as this one, it would seem anybody they hire today has to be woke or pretends to be.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Luzzatto

    It is clear though that they feel obliged to cater to their ultra-touchy woke readers;

    This is not necessarily what is going on at the Sulzberger house. You need to see the NYT and all other parts of Our American Pravda as tools of the powers that be. They do not cater to their readers; they shape the thoughts of their readers.

    They reinforce what is acceptable current discourse and cultural memory. They have mastered this practice while holding onto their subscribers and convincing them that the NYT is simply a “newspaper.”

    They are not a business, per se, but a top-down instrument of thought control.

    • Agree: Polemos
  43. Let me resurrect a much needed word for these times. The Times Ad should be two words

    Wanted Scapegrace

  44. We’re looking for someone who wants to grow big ideas to make the world a better place

    Once upon a time journalism was about reporting events, preferably with as few adjectives as possible. Now it’s about making the world a better place. Why don’t they just hire Greta Thunberg ( or her dad or the Czech guy who ghosted her website ) and be done. Hopefully, NYT readers would then realise they’re being spoon fed propaganda. Given how brainwashed most of them are, probably not.

  45. @notsaying
    @International Jew

    I was wondering that myself -- what the demographics of the NYT are today. For their American readers I would say still very white living in white neighborhoods. But with their digital subscriptions they have a worldwide audience today that they didn't used to have even when they used to publish the International Herald Tribune.

    I have no idea who subscribes to the digital NYT overseas and what their demographics are.

    It is clear though that they feel obliged to cater to their ultra-touchy woke readers; I wonder how many of their total readers that actually includes. If all their job ads are as woke as this one, it would seem anybody they hire today has to be woke or pretends to be.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Luzzatto

    Internationally The New York Times has to be way more popular with Europeans than it is with Asians and Africans. So even on an international level I doubt most readers of The New York Times are People Of Color!

  46. @Polistra

    You will represent Times Opinion in conversation with journalistic and business leaders across the Times.
     
    Prepositions. We're not your father's prepositions any more.

    We’re looking for an editor with a sense of humor and a spine of steel, a confident point of view and an open mind, an appetite for risk
     
    Check on the sense of humor. You'll need it. You'll also need to keep it very secret.

    We’re looking for someone who wants to grow big ideas to make the world a better place, and to have fun doing it.

     

    Good God, NYT. Just STFU.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Father O'Hara, @Richard B

    That last bit sounds like the ad for editor of 16 Magazine.

  47. @International Jew

    The New York Times is committed to a diverse and inclusive workforce, one that reflects the varied global community we serve.
     
    I suspect the Times' readership is still overwhelmingly white.

    Replies: @notsaying, @Luzzatto

    The vast majority of African Americans prefer The Root over The New York Times. The Root is The New York Times for Black folks. Even within The Democratic Party, Black Democrats get their news from different sources than White Democrats!

  48. I can’t imagine what would be worth a job in which a 95 I.Q. solipsist who looks like Pennywise the Clown has a veto over your continued employment.

  49. @The Alarmist

    We’re looking for an editor with a sense of humor and a spine of steel....
     
    That’s rich, to be frank.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Dissident

    That’s rich, to be frank.

    Frank Rich? You would characterize him as having a sense of humor and a spine of steel?
    ~ ~ ~
    As for Charles Blow, one can certainly disagree with, and even take umbrage at his views. But the man has some serious writing ability. At least give him that much.

    [MORE]

    [/sarcasm]

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Dissident

    I meant to characterise the opposite.

    Replies: @Dissident

  50. @El Dato
    @The Alarmist

    > to be frank

    That's antisemitic.

    Replies: @dvorak

    That’s rich, to be frank.

    > to be frank

    That’s antisemitic.

    Frank Rich’s son managed to mine the ol’ immigrant story for surprisingly fresh laughs in the New Yorker:
    https://www.newyorker.com/humor/daily-shouts/sell-out-part-one

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @dvorak

    At least he's not named Frank Rich III.

  51. @Steve Sailer
    @El Dato

    I vaguely recall that a 1970s National Lampoon High School Yearbook featured the star basketball player Nimrod Jones.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Nimrod is an odd case, in that the Biblical reference is to a king who was also a famous hunter, so an Alpha male all the way, but now its colloquial connotation and use are just about the opposite.

    Nimrod Jones might have had a church lady mother who hewed closely to the traditional meaning of the name.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Doesn't it literally come from American audiences misunderstanding a Looney Tunes cartoon? Bugs Bunny when he first meets Elmer Fudd calls him "Nimrod" to mock his hunting prowess, but everyone inferred that it was a synonym for "idiot."

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Rex Little, @Harry Baldwin

  52. Such ads are publicly posted, due to legal requirements, and virtually never lead to a hire. They’d probably already chosen the mook.

    • Agree: Alden
  53. @JMcG
    @Prof. Woland

    I’ve read a couple of Stalin biographies, neither of which mentioned any assassination attempts against Stalin. It’s hinted that he might have been poisoned at the end, but not stated as such. Is it true that no individual or group of conspirators ever attempted to kill him while he was in power?

    Replies: @Prof. Woland, @J.Ross

    You might be right, I cannot think of it ever happening either now that you mention it. Of course part of the doctors plot was the false accusation that Stalin’s doctor tried to kill him but that was preposterous.

    I once was at a private party at the Blackhawk Auto Museum and when things quieted down I asked the docent about Stalin’s limousine which was on display at the time. To my delight he took me back to the car and showed it to me including letting me sit inside. It was a hodgepodge of Packard and Buick parts connected to a Zil frame if memory serves me. They did not make limos in the USSR but needed something fit to drive around the second most powerful man in the world. I believe there were about 5 of them made and they were careful to not always put Stalin in the lead car. They were also careful to use different routes when driving him back and forth from the Kremlin to his Dachas. He also loaned his car to Zhukov and others perhaps with the intent of letting them know they might be the ones getting it in the neck if there was an assignation plot against him.

    • Thanks: JMcG
  54. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Steve Sailer

    Nimrod is an odd case, in that the Biblical reference is to a king who was also a famous hunter, so an Alpha male all the way, but now its colloquial connotation and use are just about the opposite.

    Nimrod Jones might have had a church lady mother who hewed closely to the traditional meaning of the name.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Doesn’t it literally come from American audiences misunderstanding a Looney Tunes cartoon? Bugs Bunny when he first meets Elmer Fudd calls him “Nimrod” to mock his hunting prowess, but everyone inferred that it was a synonym for “idiot.”

    • Thanks: MEH 0910
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @J.Ross

    That's a very good possibility; thanks.

    , @Rex Little
    @J.Ross


    Doesn’t it literally come from American audiences misunderstanding a Looney Tunes cartoon? Bugs Bunny when he first meets Elmer Fudd calls him “Nimrod” to mock his hunting prowess, but everyone inferred that it was a synonym for “idiot.”
     
    According to Wikipedia (yeah, I know) this usage was popularized by Looney Tunes but didn't originate there:

    In modern American English, the term is often used sarcastically to mean a dimwitted or a stupid person, a usage first recorded in 1932 and popularized by the Looney Tunes cartoon characters Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck, who both sarcastically refer to the hunter Elmer Fudd as "nimrod"
     

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @J.Ross

    Sometimes a word or expression comes to mean its opposite. For example, the word "egregious" originally meant distinguished, but has come to mean exceptionally bad. Similarly, the expression "That's mighty white of you" used to be a compliment.

  55. @JMcG
    @Prof. Woland

    I’ve read a couple of Stalin biographies, neither of which mentioned any assassination attempts against Stalin. It’s hinted that he might have been poisoned at the end, but not stated as such. Is it true that no individual or group of conspirators ever attempted to kill him while he was in power?

    Replies: @Prof. Woland, @J.Ross

    You will recall the chaos of the early years, which no Bolshevik could ever get over. Not only was Lenin shot but, what is far worse, he was stopped multiple times by extragovernmental picketts whose men didn’t recognize him until he held up a newspaper or an official photo. You will now recall that every Communist space is always decorated with an official picture of the current leader. Their reason for keeping bread available and cheap was the memory of the French Revolution.

    • Thanks: JMcG
  56. @Buzz Mohawk
    HELP WANTED


    https://media1.britannica.com/eb-media/49/149849-004-EA9FDE62.jpg

    Replies: @Prof. Woland, @mmack, @MBlanc46

    Very well done, Buzz, very well done.

  57. “Nimrod” #actually means “mighty hunter” (from the Biblical persona of the same name). Bugs Bunny was using ironically. Only decades later, when the original meaning was forgotten, did it become a synonym for nincompoop from people not understanding the Bugs Bunny joke.

  58. @Mr. Anon

    I can picture Walter dictating this Deputy Opinion Editor ad:
     
    Hey, if the Times actually employed reporters who looked like Rosalind Russell.............I'd subscribe.

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/4f/f0/46/4ff04687a4a6d0b5631fbb694c50e9d1.png

    Replies: @ManhattanBorn

    My late mother and Rosalind Russell were classmates in Waterbury, CT. I don’t know Rosalind’s birth name. She was the daughter of Italian immigrants. Always kind, courteous, and beautiful as well!

  59. @J.Ross
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Doesn't it literally come from American audiences misunderstanding a Looney Tunes cartoon? Bugs Bunny when he first meets Elmer Fudd calls him "Nimrod" to mock his hunting prowess, but everyone inferred that it was a synonym for "idiot."

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Rex Little, @Harry Baldwin

    That’s a very good possibility; thanks.

  60. Thanks for setting me straight, I thought Bugs was George Burns.

  61. @Dissident
    @The Alarmist


    That’s rich, to be frank.
     
    Frank Rich? You would characterize him as having a sense of humor and a spine of steel?
    ~ ~ ~
    As for Charles Blow, one can certainly disagree with, and even take umbrage at his views. But the man has some serious writing ability. At least give him that much.
    [/sarcasm]

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    I meant to characterise the opposite.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @The Alarmist


    I meant to characterise the opposite.
     
    Did you even really mean to allude to former NYT columnist Frank Rich at all? I was being less-than-serious, in case that was less-than-clear. Perhaps I should have included a smiley or the like.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

  62. @The Alarmist
    @Dissident

    I meant to characterise the opposite.

    Replies: @Dissident

    I meant to characterise the opposite.

    Did you even really mean to allude to former NYT columnist Frank Rich at all? I was being less-than-serious, in case that was less-than-clear. Perhaps I should have included a smiley or the like.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Dissident

    Me too ;)

  63. @Polistra

    You will represent Times Opinion in conversation with journalistic and business leaders across the Times.
     
    Prepositions. We're not your father's prepositions any more.

    We’re looking for an editor with a sense of humor and a spine of steel, a confident point of view and an open mind, an appetite for risk
     
    Check on the sense of humor. You'll need it. You'll also need to keep it very secret.

    We’re looking for someone who wants to grow big ideas to make the world a better place, and to have fun doing it.

     

    Good God, NYT. Just STFU.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Father O'Hara, @Richard B

    NYT. Just STFU.

    Absolutely!

    The #1 Takeaway after reading that Job Description is that The New York Times is literally insane.

  64. @Dissident
    @The Alarmist


    I meant to characterise the opposite.
     
    Did you even really mean to allude to former NYT columnist Frank Rich at all? I was being less-than-serious, in case that was less-than-clear. Perhaps I should have included a smiley or the like.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    Me too 😉

    • Thanks: Dissident
  65. Being an editor of the New York Times opinion section used to be considered one of the top jobs in daily journalism

    This has never been true in my lifetime as a middle-aged man, which is why they were able to stash a nobody like Bari Weiss there for so long. There hasn’t been a point to these newspaper editorial pages in decades, as everybody with a brain has moved online to blogs and so on, so what’s left are janitors like Tom Friedman sweeping up pap for dimwits who imagine themselves midwits.

  66. @dvorak
    @El Dato


    That’s rich, to be frank.

    > to be frank

    That’s antisemitic.
     

    Frank Rich's son managed to mine the ol' immigrant story for surprisingly fresh laughs in the New Yorker:
    https://www.newyorker.com/humor/daily-shouts/sell-out-part-one

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    At least he’s not named Frank Rich III.

  67. @J.Ross
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Doesn't it literally come from American audiences misunderstanding a Looney Tunes cartoon? Bugs Bunny when he first meets Elmer Fudd calls him "Nimrod" to mock his hunting prowess, but everyone inferred that it was a synonym for "idiot."

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Rex Little, @Harry Baldwin

    Doesn’t it literally come from American audiences misunderstanding a Looney Tunes cartoon? Bugs Bunny when he first meets Elmer Fudd calls him “Nimrod” to mock his hunting prowess, but everyone inferred that it was a synonym for “idiot.”

    According to Wikipedia (yeah, I know) this usage was popularized by Looney Tunes but didn’t originate there:

    In modern American English, the term is often used sarcastically to mean a dimwitted or a stupid person, a usage first recorded in 1932 and popularized by the Looney Tunes cartoon characters Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck, who both sarcastically refer to the hunter Elmer Fudd as “nimrod”

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Rex Little

    In that case how did it originate?

  68. @Rex Little
    @J.Ross


    Doesn’t it literally come from American audiences misunderstanding a Looney Tunes cartoon? Bugs Bunny when he first meets Elmer Fudd calls him “Nimrod” to mock his hunting prowess, but everyone inferred that it was a synonym for “idiot.”
     
    According to Wikipedia (yeah, I know) this usage was popularized by Looney Tunes but didn't originate there:

    In modern American English, the term is often used sarcastically to mean a dimwitted or a stupid person, a usage first recorded in 1932 and popularized by the Looney Tunes cartoon characters Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck, who both sarcastically refer to the hunter Elmer Fudd as "nimrod"
     

    Replies: @J.Ross

    In that case how did it originate?

  69. @J.Ross
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Doesn't it literally come from American audiences misunderstanding a Looney Tunes cartoon? Bugs Bunny when he first meets Elmer Fudd calls him "Nimrod" to mock his hunting prowess, but everyone inferred that it was a synonym for "idiot."

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Rex Little, @Harry Baldwin

    Sometimes a word or expression comes to mean its opposite. For example, the word “egregious” originally meant distinguished, but has come to mean exceptionally bad. Similarly, the expression “That’s mighty white of you” used to be a compliment.

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