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Universities Get More Donations from Chad Bro Alumni
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I’ve long argued that you can’t understand the contentious topic of college admissions without understanding which type of alumni are more likely to donate to their dear old alma maters.

In 2011, I read about a man in the metal bending business donating $200 million to USC:

David Dornsife is Chairman of the Board of the Herrick Corporation, a California based steel fabrication company, and its subsidiaries. A 1965 graduate of the USC Marshall School of Business, he was a shot-putter on the University’s track team that won two national championships.

David Dornsife’s parents, Harold and Ester, were USC alumni and longtime supporters of their alma mater. The elder Dornsifes gave the lead gift for the HEDCO Neuroscience Building, which helped establish USC’s position as a pioneering and important leader in the emerging field of neuroscience. Dornsife’s mother, Ester, a pre-med major in the College, maintained a lifelong interest in the medical field, and in particular its neuroscience program.

From Wikipedia:

At USC, he was a member of the Kappa Alpha Order fraternity.[4]

I believe some of his children have gone to USC as well. And he donates to Republican candidates.

In other words, the kind of guy who is most likely to someday write a $200 million check to his alma mater is exactly the type of chad bro — a white man, jock, frat boy, Republican, legacy, father of legacies, business major — that is most hated by the academic establishment. But they can’t do without his ability to make huge piles of money and his loyal generosity.

I then got a comment by somebody who claimed, credibly, to have done statistical modeling for a famous university’s development office. He said I was right on the money.

Since then I’ve been looking for an academic study of who donates to their colleges. I’ve finally found one. Here’s a 2009 study by two economists, one from Princeton and one from Stanford, of an unnamed top research university’s development office database of 32,000 alumni who graduated from 1972-2005.

Which college? Average SAT score of alumni is 1400 (in post 1995 scoring). 13% of alumni went to high school at a boarding school. And it was all-male “until the 1970s,” So it’s probably Princeton (or Yale, both of which went coed in 1969).

Altruism and the Child Cycle of Alumni Donations

By Jonathan Meer and Harvey S. Rosen*

We study alumni contributions to an anonymous research university. If alumni believe donations will increase the likelihood of their
child’s admission, and if this belief helps motivate their giving, then
the pattern of giving should vary systematically with the ages of their
children, whether the children ultimately apply to the university, and
the admissions outcome. We call this pattern the child cycle of alumni
giving. The evidence is consistent with the child-cycle pattern. Thus,
while altruism drives some giving, the hope for a reciprocal benefit
also plays a role. We compute rough estimates of the proportion of
giving due to selfish motives. (JEL D91, D64, I21) …

Represented here are 32,488 alumni who graduated from 1972 to 2005. …

As is typically the case, a few relatively large gifts account for a disproportionate amount of Anon U’s donations. For example, in 2006, the top 1 percent of gifts accounted for 69.2 percent of total giving. … . For example, the three largest gifts in our sample are $3.1 million, $6 million, and $31.1 million.

The problem is that the researchers are scared of the tiny sample size of huge donors, even though they are of greatest interest to universities. So the paper focuses on likelihood of donation per year, even though at this hyper-loyal college with the most famous reunions, an incredible 56% of alumni donate each year.

Table 1 shows that about 55.6 percent of the giving opportunities result in a donation to the university. Relative to other schools, this is a high participation rate. Indeed, Anon U is at the edge of the right tail with respect to the proportion of alumni who make contributions

The authors are mostly interested in the question of altruism and show that alumni parents ramp up their donations to their alma mater while their child is applying and especially after their child is accepted by Dear Old Princeton (or Yale). On the other hand if their kid is rejected, screw you, Princeton.

While 59% of the alumni’s children apply for admission, 41% are accepted. But the parents of the unaccepted kids are not pleased.

The oldest child’s rejection reduces the amount given by 14.5 percent (imprecisely estimated), while the second child’s rejection reduces the amount given by a statistically significant 39 percent. The first and second child’s acceptances increase the amount given by 134 percent and 118 percent, respectively, and both figures are statistically significant.

But I’m more interested in who donates to colleges by demographic groups:

For example, in our basic model, being an economics major

I.e., a Republican who wants to work on Wall Street

increases the amount of giving by about 85 percent. Once we take occupation into account, however, this figure drops to 37 percent. In part, the coefficient in the basic model reflects the fact that Anon U’s economics majors are particularly likely to go into the field of finance which, by itself, increases the amount of giving by about 75 percent, ceteris paribus.

Then they redo the analysis with alumni going all the way back to 1914 (for whom they don’t have SAT scores):

The results are reported in Table A1. The coefficients on the linear and quadratic terms for years since graduation imply that the probability of making a gift falls for about the first 20 years after graduation, and then turns upward. With respect to gender, men are 4.6 percentage points less likely to donate in a given year, ceteris paribus.

Interesting, but I’d like to see this evaluated on amount donated rather than merely whether you donate.

Whites are more likely to contribute than American Indians, African Americans, Hispanics, and Asians.

My anecdotal impression is that South Asians are pretty generous toward educational institutions, while East Asians are not. But I could be wrong.

The gap is largest with African Americans, who are 16 percentage points less likely to make a gift than are whites. These gender and ethnic/racial differentials are similar to those reported in previous studies (Monks 1993). Alumni who attended boarding or private schools are somewhat more likely to contribute than those who attended public schools. There is no discernible impact of home or alternative schooling on the probability of giving relative to public school attendees.

As noted above, the admissions office produces summary evaluations of applicants on the basis of both academic and nonacademic criteria, such as musical talent, athletic ability, volunteer work, and so on. An A is the highest score and an E is the lowest score. Alumni who received the lowest nonacademic ratings at the time of admissions are 6.9 percentage points less likely to make donations. On the other hand, students in the highest academic category are somewhat less likely to make donations than those with lower ratings. SAT scores do not appear to have any statistically significant impact on the probability of giving.

Eggheads aren’t that loyal but lower scoring people who got in because somebody favored them are more generous.

We now turn from variables that are known before matriculation at Anon U to those that reflect the alumnus’s undergraduate experiences. Involvement in a varsity sport increases the probability of giving by about 5 percentage points, and membership in one of Anon U’s fraternities or sororities increases giving by 13 percentage points. These results are consistent with previous findings that students who were actively engaged in extracurricular activities as undergraduates are more likely to make donations as alumni (Dugan et al. 1999). With respect to academic performance, receiving honors has no effect on the probability of giving. However, the probability of giving increases with grade point average (GPA). Those in the bottom quartile of the GPA distribution were 5.7 percentage points less likely to make a gift, while those in the third quartile were 2.1 percentage points less likely. There is no significant difference in giving between the second and top quartiles. Consistent with earlier studies, giving patterns differ substantially by course of study (Dugan, et al. 1999, Monks 2003). Alumni who majored in engineering, economics, and public policy have relatively high probabilities of making a gift later in life. Those who majored in the small social sciences (such as sociology) and small humanities departments (such as linguistics) tend to have relatively low probabilities of making a gift later in life. Students with minors in finance are more likely to make subsequent gifts (by about 9 percentage points), while those with minors in theater are less likely (by about 7 percentage points).

Note that the biggest increase in likelihood to donate is becoming an MBA, followed by earning a law degree, spouse is an alumni too, belonging to a fraternity/sorority, and doctors, then small engineering majors, finance minors, American studies majors (Tom Wolfe earned his Ph.D. in American studies at Yale), and econ majors.

The worst traits for being a donor are being black, Hispanic, Asian, a theater major, and having the lowest “nonacademic” rating.

Turning to schooling after Anon U, alumni who continue their education are more likely to make donations than those who do not, a finding consistent with previous studies (Dugan et al., 1999, Monks 2003). Finally, we note that, consistent with previous research (James H. Grant and David L. Lindauer 1986, Olsen, Smith, and Wunnava 1989) the likelihood of giving increases substantially during reunion years, with the probability increasing by 6.3 percentage points.

In other words, to get more donations, you want to admit Republican Chad Bros.

Keep in mind that they are just measuring propensity to be a donor per year at a college where 88% of grads are likely to be donors over their lifetimes. (Princetonians tend to love Princeton. E.g., Republican Secretary of State George Shultz had a Princeton Tiger tattoo.)

My guess would be that the really big donors tend to be even more skewed toward the Chad Bro demographic.

 
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  1. For decades, Harvard and other Ivies have had and used formulas that map a generic applicant’s likelihood of being a big time donator based on ethnicity, place of origin, etc. Some people donate a lot.

  2. And to think, ex-con Lori Laughlin and her ex-con hubby had the nerve to think they could bypass the official university money-laundering alumni office.

    • Thanks: JimDandy
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @The Alarmist

    Lori Laughlin did nothing wrong.

    Replies: @0, @guest007

    , @Bill Jones
    @The Alarmist


    ex-con Lori Laughlin
     
    Why the "ex-con" ? Was she pardoned? If not, the conviction still stands and she's still a con, just not still a prisoner.
  3. In the book “Paying for the Party” by Elizabeth A. Armstrong and Laura T. Hamilton and the follow up book “Parenting to a Degree” there was a long discussion that the sorority, business lite white girl were the type of students who paid full retail for college, did not make huge demands on the university, and would help the cash flow of the university. The downside was that the sorority member, business-lite degree (think hospitality, sports management) are a horrible influence of many of the other female students on campus.

    One can assume that the frat pros on most campuses are also paying full retail and also not worried about their grades that much.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @guest007

    Elaborate on why they are a bad influence.

    Replies: @guest007

  4. Maybe universities should try to make college a more enjoyable experience filled with more fond memories for the types of non-chads who tend to earn lots of money?

    From my understanding of stereotypes though, that wouldn’t really be worth it for the Ivy’s since their chads tend to be the ones who go into Wall Street and make god-like amounts of money.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Altai

    The establishment hates white non-Chads too

    , @guest007
    @Altai

    How many students have fond memories of being a chemical engineering major versus a business management majors. Considering how many colleges of engineering still use the weed-out method of education, many engineers were not that fond of college.

    Replies: @Mike_from_SGV

  5. I have never donated to any of my schools. I have donated a lot of money (it is my only charity) to the people who gave me a scholarship to college. Then again they put on really awesome golf outings so it is a two way street.

    • Replies: @ex-banker
    @Hodag

    Evans or Ouimet? Both great organizations that reward hard-working kids as caddies or in other golf-related jobs.

  6. If this is true then the Chads are providing to the university industrial complex the rope with which Chad progeny and culture will be hung. It perfectly explains why America is in the sorry state it is today. The future social architects of a breakaway white province within the US should take careful note of this phenomenon.

    • Replies: @AnonymousNameChange
    @Torn and Frayed

    The "Chad" categorization obscures the often more meaningful ethnic distinctions. If you're thinking in terms of the traditional WASP Chad stereotype, you're missing what's actually happening in many cases.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Torn and Frayed


    If this is true then the Chads are providing to the university industrial complex the rope with which Chad progeny and culture will be hung. It perfectly explains why America is in the sorry state it is today. The future social architects of a breakaway white province within the US should take careful note of this phenomenon.
     
    Spot on T&F.

    These folks are funding people, who--beyond just being a bunch of bloated bureaucratic trough feeders--teach/harangue everyone's kids to hate you.

    Amazing how oblivious normies--granted busy with jobs/careers/family/life--are to how nasty and toxic our "academic" institutions are now with thoroughly entrench minoritartianism.
    , @AnotherDad
    @Torn and Frayed


    If this is true then the Chads are providing to the university industrial complex the rope with which Chad progeny and culture will be hung. It perfectly explains why America is in the sorry state it is today. The future social architects of a breakaway white province within the US should take careful note of this phenomenon.
     
    This point, and peterike's similar one below remind me that one of the key things conservatives must push--in the pre-separation world we live in--is some sort of competency testing work around to college.

    Granted it's down the list

    #1 -- immigration moratorium; everything else pales behind that

    #2 -- educational choice for regular elementary/secondary school; give deplorables an opportunity to have deplorable education for our kids; (separation piece by piece)

    but probably

    #3 -- a regime of competency testing for basic skills and knowledge of specific academic/technical disciplines;

    We don't need a Fordist--everyone in class, turn the crank--model. Let students self-teach, with on-line, with books, any way they want. Education should actually be one of the things where the Internet dramatically lowers costs. Disruptive. Let's blow up the credentialism, let the disruption happen and reap the reduced costs and other benefits.

    I've written on this in more detail before, but the benefits of popping the "Yale or Jail" paradigm are many:
    -- defunding the blob and their toxic indoctrination; and turfing a bunch of those folks out, making them get real jobs
    -- giving young people--even in HS--specific useful "academic"/study goals that they control
    -- removing parent worry/obsession over college costs--giving modest fertility boost
    -- removing student's debts, letting them get to adult life faster--also creating fertility boost


    (Beyond those there are a bunch of measures to push eugenic fertility both on the welfare side and the tax incentives side.)

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    , @Corvinus
    @Torn and Frayed

    "The future social architects of a breakaway white province within the US should take careful note of this phenomenon."

    LOL, its always in the future. Listen, why can't you be this "social architect" NOW? I suggest you seek the advice of James Bowery and his vision of Sortocracy.

  7. Your examples are getting pretty dated. Schultz and Wolfe were there nearly a century ago. It still had a pretty good culture at the turn of the Millennium but it would be hard to miss the cracks forming even then. South Asians are Indo-European. Loyalty is what we do.

    The question is loyalty to whom.

    I donated a lot early but then again I worked in development myself while in undergrad. Since then my support has become more discerning.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Desiderius

    I have a hard time understanding the notion of giving money to my old school at any level below hundreds of millions of dollars. Harvard’s most recent financial report values the University’s endowment at $41.9 billion, so even a million-dollar donation fails to move the needle at all really: it’s like the rounding error on a day’s fluctuations in the financial markets. But with their endlessly grotesque wheedling the development office sure does work hard at trying to convince my (alumna) wife and me otherwise.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Desiderius


    getting pretty dated.
     

    loyalty to whom.
     
    Obviously, most universities today are doing the exact opposite of what they would do if they were actually interested in getting donations. They are actively discriminating against the people most likely to benefit them reputationally and financially. There are two possible conclusions:

    1) This confirms the thesis that Wokism is a terminal disease with no brakes, no remission, and no endpoint before total annihilation. There is no adult in the room who can turn off the woke sh*tshow before someone (the university) really gets hurt.

    And/or

    2) To the extent they plan their financial future at all, universities plan to rely on Federal largesse, which is now mostly a euphemism for some variation of grifting from the Federal Reserve's Mass Global Looting Regime. Besides sluicing more cash than any combination of donors ever could, the FRMGLR offers the benefit of requiring no gratitude whatsoever to one's benefactors. In fact, contempt toward those they loot from seems to be the rule.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Wency, @Desiderius

  8. These “chad bros” sound like a bunch of cucks.

    And there’s the vanity of it all. They couldn’t care less what poison academia pushes with their money as long as they get their name on something.

    • Agree: Polistra
  9. @Desiderius
    Your examples are getting pretty dated. Schultz and Wolfe were there nearly a century ago. It still had a pretty good culture at the turn of the Millennium but it would be hard to miss the cracks forming even then. South Asians are Indo-European. Loyalty is what we do.

    The question is loyalty to whom.

    I donated a lot early but then again I worked in development myself while in undergrad. Since then my support has become more discerning.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Almost Missouri

    I have a hard time understanding the notion of giving money to my old school at any level below hundreds of millions of dollars. Harvard’s most recent financial report values the University’s endowment at $41.9 billion, so even a million-dollar donation fails to move the needle at all really: it’s like the rounding error on a day’s fluctuations in the financial markets. But with their endlessly grotesque wheedling the development office sure does work hard at trying to convince my (alumna) wife and me otherwise.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @slumber_j

    People who do give small amounts do so to feel like they're a part of the prestigious thing moreso than to make an appreciable difference.

    I'm almost convinced that that particular brand of wheedling is some kind of shit test psyop to let you know you're not in the in-crowd* to get people to step up their game in order to stop the abuse. RNC/Trump does the same thing. Probably works about as well as advertising for the expressed purpose but serves some sort of (likely unhealthy) psychological need somewhere in that ecology.

    Giving to Steve feels so much better all around.

    * - I've done major donor fundraising. The treatment they get is (of course) the exact opposite.

    Replies: @Wency, @The Germ Theory of Disease

  10. Typical. Stupid rich white people giving vast amounts of money to institutions that hate them and are actively trying to dispossess whites of everything they’ve built. But muh college! White people are their own worst enemy. This is yet another in an endless list of examples.

    “My anecdotal impression is that South Asians are pretty generous toward educational institutions, while East Asians are not. But I could be wrong.”

    That’s because South Asians are much more like Jews, and really, really like having their name on the building. They’re show offs. Chinese not so much.

    • Agree: Currahee
    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @peterike

    "South Asians are much more like Jews, and really, really like having their name on the building."

    I don't know about dot Indians, but you're definitely right about my people. HaShem undoubtedly has a wry sense of humor, since we can resist neither a sale nor a "naming opportunity."

    Replies: @BenjaminL

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @peterike


    They’re show offs. Chinese not so much.

     

    In Massachusetts:


    https://i1.sndcdn.com/artworks-000123916337-ao7cej-t500x500.jpg

    https://www.massgeneral.org/assets/MGH/images/primary-care/internal-medicine-associates-wang-exterior-600x360.jpg

    http://d279m997dpfwgl.cloudfront.net/wp/2016/09/0915_theater-district01-1000x666.jpg

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/85/ShalinLiuPerformanceCenter_Facade.jpg
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @peterike

    The Chinese (and other Asians) are huge show-offs. They love to buy name-brand everything (bags, clothing, cars, etc).

    However, a lot of them are miserly, distrusting, and misanthropic. Many of them would probably rather buy a Gucci bag than donate to their university. They may perceive donating as a scam.

    By the 2nd&3rd generation, they usually assimilate to American norms and become much "nicer." It's mainly the first generation who are tight-fisted.

    , @Shel100
    @peterike

    Same with whites who vote democrat.

  11. @Desiderius
    Your examples are getting pretty dated. Schultz and Wolfe were there nearly a century ago. It still had a pretty good culture at the turn of the Millennium but it would be hard to miss the cracks forming even then. South Asians are Indo-European. Loyalty is what we do.

    The question is loyalty to whom.

    I donated a lot early but then again I worked in development myself while in undergrad. Since then my support has become more discerning.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Almost Missouri

    getting pretty dated.

    loyalty to whom.

    Obviously, most universities today are doing the exact opposite of what they would do if they were actually interested in getting donations. They are actively discriminating against the people most likely to benefit them reputationally and financially. There are two possible conclusions:

    1) This confirms the thesis that Wokism is a terminal disease with no brakes, no remission, and no endpoint before total annihilation. There is no adult in the room who can turn off the woke sh*tshow before someone (the university) really gets hurt.

    And/or

    2) To the extent they plan their financial future at all, universities plan to rely on Federal largesse, which is now mostly a euphemism for some variation of grifting from the Federal Reserve’s Mass Global Looting Regime. Besides sluicing more cash than any combination of donors ever could, the FRMGLR offers the benefit of requiring no gratitude whatsoever to one’s benefactors. In fact, contempt toward those they loot from seems to be the rule.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Almost Missouri

    Both/and

    , @Wency
    @Almost Missouri

    The universities with big endowments basically have "F.U. money". So what you're describing is their F.U. to the chad-bros. Harvard only pulls like 5% out of its endowment each year, which a decent investment return can make up for. They could go on this way forever, if no one ever donated another dime to them.

    Universities without big endowments -- well, they don't clearly don't have that great of donors anyway and rely more on tuition, so what's the loss?

    Replies: @Giant Duck, @Polistra

    , @Desiderius
    @Almost Missouri

    Never seen a pimp go hungry. Psychological abuse can be very lucrative. Look at the Epstein case.

  12. @slumber_j
    @Desiderius

    I have a hard time understanding the notion of giving money to my old school at any level below hundreds of millions of dollars. Harvard’s most recent financial report values the University’s endowment at $41.9 billion, so even a million-dollar donation fails to move the needle at all really: it’s like the rounding error on a day’s fluctuations in the financial markets. But with their endlessly grotesque wheedling the development office sure does work hard at trying to convince my (alumna) wife and me otherwise.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    People who do give small amounts do so to feel like they’re a part of the prestigious thing moreso than to make an appreciable difference.

    I’m almost convinced that that particular brand of wheedling is some kind of shit test psyop to let you know you’re not in the in-crowd* to get people to step up their game in order to stop the abuse. RNC/Trump does the same thing. Probably works about as well as advertising for the expressed purpose but serves some sort of (likely unhealthy) psychological need somewhere in that ecology.

    Giving to Steve feels so much better all around.

    * – I’ve done major donor fundraising. The treatment they get is (of course) the exact opposite.

    • Agree: slumber_j
    • Replies: @Wency
    @Desiderius

    Giving smaller amounts can also open up doors in some cases. Of course, it doesn't have to be your alma mater. My business is located in another city from my alma mater, so while I've never given my alma mater a dime (to do so for non-business reasons would be totally alien and inconceivable to me), I have given money, in the single digit thousands, to a prestigious school in my current city, as part of joining a philanthropic club of sorts that's associated with the university. No one actually cares that I didn't go there (it almost never even comes up), and it has opened up a number of networking opportunities that have easily paid that amount back in terms of new business for my company.

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Desiderius

    I was
    Smokin' with the boys upstairs
    When I
    Heard about the whole affair,
    I said,
    Whoa, no!
    William and Mary won't do!
    Well I did not think
    The girl could be so cruel....
    And I'm NEVER going back
    To my old school!

    -- William Blake

    For a short time I had one of those weird telemarketing jobs where I cold-called Harvard grads to try and scrounge up donations, even small amounts from alums who were not rich donors. The conversations I had with these people were rather interesting.

    In general the people who had an undergrad degree from Harvard were very affable and willing to cough up say a few hundred bucks on a handshake over the phone. The MBAs, MDs, JDs and K-School types were a bit more diffident on the phone, but you knew they would write a big check later on. But the GSAS types (Ph.D.s in non-lucrative fields) were a different animal entirely: they would scream at you and curse you (well, me, actually) and shriek and swear that they never ever wanted to hear from Harvard again. They were constantly having nervous breakdowns right there on the phone, it was quite a thing to hear. Got a lot of good material off of those earfuls.

    Totally OT but since these days people around here are talking about kooky things like neurotic Olympic athletes...

    Who is your favorite TV weirdo eccentric-genius crime-solver...

    -- Abby Sciuto,
    -- Dr. Spencer Reed,
    -- Penelope Garcia, or
    -- that creepy bearded geek on NCIS New Orleans?

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Polistra

  13. “Our hearts will give, while we shall live, three cheers for Old Nassau!”

  14. This whole “donate money to your old uni” thing is very strange. It’s not just a matter of bribing them to guarantee your stupider children a place at that uni – some of these donations go above and beyond what’s necessary for that purpose, or even come from people whose kids aren’t applying at all.

    These are for-profit fee-charging institutions, many of which have giant hedge funds attached, or own patents, and so on. They don’t need your money. They’re not charities. It’s like donating a million dollars to McDonald’s because you worked the grill back when you were 18.

    Do Americans realise this is bizarre? It’s weirder than the tipping fetish.

    Do non-Americans also do this? I’ve never heard of it in my ancestral homeland (Indonesia, I mean Kenya), but then, I don’t get out much.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    If one is super rich, one has to do something with the money. Trying to give it all to your children mans giving the tax man a large amount. Some rich guys spend it on politics, some on universities, some of other charities. Instead of thinking about just financing a new building, much of money flows to particular programs and is spent on students.

    Once again, one has to wonder if Trump being a sociopath has made sociopathic behavior more acceptable and now there are more Americans who have zero interest in helping others.

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account


    This whole “donate money to your old uni” thing is very strange.
     
    Absolutely.

    Do Americans realise this is bizarre? It’s weirder than the tipping fetish.
     
    A good question.

    Do non-Americans also do this?
     
    No.
  15. @Altai
    Maybe universities should try to make college a more enjoyable experience filled with more fond memories for the types of non-chads who tend to earn lots of money?

    From my understanding of stereotypes though, that wouldn't really be worth it for the Ivy's since their chads tend to be the ones who go into Wall Street and make god-like amounts of money.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @guest007

    The establishment hates white non-Chads too

  16. My small college went co-ed in the early 70’s. When I was there a decade later, the admin. actually argued against sex-blind admissions (pushed by the usual suspects) that male alumni were more likely to donate then female.

    Later, they added a few hundred more women to be about half and half. Now they’re thoroughly woke with a female president, who said in print that all women must be believed about rape (they were then successfully sued). I sent them an angry email, but I hadn’t donated since my 10 year reunion, and not much then.

    The big (known) donor from my private HS class was the QB.

  17. @Almost Missouri
    @Desiderius


    getting pretty dated.
     

    loyalty to whom.
     
    Obviously, most universities today are doing the exact opposite of what they would do if they were actually interested in getting donations. They are actively discriminating against the people most likely to benefit them reputationally and financially. There are two possible conclusions:

    1) This confirms the thesis that Wokism is a terminal disease with no brakes, no remission, and no endpoint before total annihilation. There is no adult in the room who can turn off the woke sh*tshow before someone (the university) really gets hurt.

    And/or

    2) To the extent they plan their financial future at all, universities plan to rely on Federal largesse, which is now mostly a euphemism for some variation of grifting from the Federal Reserve's Mass Global Looting Regime. Besides sluicing more cash than any combination of donors ever could, the FRMGLR offers the benefit of requiring no gratitude whatsoever to one's benefactors. In fact, contempt toward those they loot from seems to be the rule.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Wency, @Desiderius

    Both/and

  18. On a random comment note…

    It’s just so bloody obvious that American Jews try to implement any policy they see in Israel here in the States

    California Jewish restaurateurs say “I’m going to require a Covid passport!”

    Jewish Corporations—same

    American gentiles of all stripes are being forced into Israeli (Jewish) policies.

    We saw that so well with the Miami Apartment Collapse…Oh no, we can’t have US search and rescue teams…we need OUR teams…Israeli teams (who I’m pretty sure only generated a pansyfansy map of possible survivor pockets…I think the Americans did the actual digging..I may be wrong though)

    We have lost our autonomy and it stinks.

    And it’s a shocking mental difference between Jews and Christians…Christians are ‘I trust in God and my immune system for a disease I have a 99.999% of surviving totally intact’ Jews are ‘Science! Vaccinate the children now!’

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Thoughts


    Christians are ‘I trust in God and my immune system for a disease I have a 99.999% of surviving totally
     
    This is a total misrepresentation, both of the facts and of Christian theology. First of all, your chances of surviving Covid are a LOT less than 99.999%. For the elderly, death rates can be as high as 15%. If survival is 99.999%, why did the US have half a million excess deaths last year?

    2nd, unless you are a Christian scientist, "Trusting in God" does not mean that you cannot be vaccinated against disease. There are millions upon millions of devout Christians who have been vaccinated against Covid and many other diseases. Unless you are a snake handler, trusting in God does not require that you disobey the DON'T WALK sign and step out into traffic in the belief that He will save you. God helps those who help themselves. Vaccines are God's instruments just as much as your immune system.

    If you fail to have yourself vaccinated and you die from Covid, you have in effect committed suicide.

    Replies: @Thoughts, @vinteuil, @JimDandy

    , @AnotherDad
    @Thoughts


    It’s just so bloody obvious that American Jews try to implement any policy they see in Israel here in the States.
     
    Huh? I wish!

    Gee let's have the analog of Israel's immigration policy, where the majority Jews only lets their fellow Jews. Where would the US be if it had only let white gentiles? Uh ... in a pretty damn great spot!

    Or how about black worship? Israel doing that? Or minority oppression narratives? Israel putting the oppression of the Palestinians front and center in the 1948 Project? Israeli school kids spend all their time on the Nakba? Or crashing fertility? Israel pushing that? Don't have children Israeli women ... it's bad, bad, bad for you. Overthrow the patriarchy, lean in, be a slut. That the message? Pushing miscegenation? Lots of Arab men/Jewish women in all their commercials and TV shows?

    No the Jews push minoritarianism here, and nationalism/ethnocentrism there. (Not that there aren't some Jewish nuts there as well. The destructive Jewish nut thing is just a thing.)

    As Steve's pointed out a few times, watching what the Jews do in their own country--as opposed to what they push here--is actually instructive. They aren't trying to kill themselves ... they're trying to kill/minoritize/disempower/strip-your-nation-from you!

    ~~~

    Re vaccines:

    White gentiles pioneered vaccine technology. (People all over have done things since ancient times, but the first really effective modern vaccine is vaccinnia.) And have created far more of them than any ethnic group. Though some Jews have done great work--e.g. Albert Sabin a legit Jewish hero. You can think of vaccines as being "white guy magic".

    A new vaccine is always a risk ... but so is a new disease. Mr. Spikey is a nasty critter, and you get some exposure either way. The question is how much and what form.

    I'd already decided on Pfizer-BioNTech for myself. But seeing Israel choose it--i.e. Jews looking out for themselves; not looking to do to gentiles--was additional confirmation it was a reasonable pick.

    We have lost our autonomy and it stinks.
     
    No doubt there. Minoritarianism is an illogical, cancerous ideology.

    Being bossed around be people who hate you ... sucks!

    There's no end to the ways republican self-government in your own nation is superior to any alternative.
  19. @Almost Missouri
    @Desiderius


    getting pretty dated.
     

    loyalty to whom.
     
    Obviously, most universities today are doing the exact opposite of what they would do if they were actually interested in getting donations. They are actively discriminating against the people most likely to benefit them reputationally and financially. There are two possible conclusions:

    1) This confirms the thesis that Wokism is a terminal disease with no brakes, no remission, and no endpoint before total annihilation. There is no adult in the room who can turn off the woke sh*tshow before someone (the university) really gets hurt.

    And/or

    2) To the extent they plan their financial future at all, universities plan to rely on Federal largesse, which is now mostly a euphemism for some variation of grifting from the Federal Reserve's Mass Global Looting Regime. Besides sluicing more cash than any combination of donors ever could, the FRMGLR offers the benefit of requiring no gratitude whatsoever to one's benefactors. In fact, contempt toward those they loot from seems to be the rule.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Wency, @Desiderius

    The universities with big endowments basically have “F.U. money”. So what you’re describing is their F.U. to the chad-bros. Harvard only pulls like 5% out of its endowment each year, which a decent investment return can make up for. They could go on this way forever, if no one ever donated another dime to them.

    Universities without big endowments — well, they don’t clearly don’t have that great of donors anyway and rely more on tuition, so what’s the loss?

    • Replies: @Giant Duck
    @Wency

    Endowed funds are not typically distributed evenly across schools and programs within a private university (I don't know about public university finances). So even when an overall endowment is significant, there will likely be newer and/or smaller programs that view themselves as underfunded. They still want donors and don't (yet) have "FU money." Harvard College > Harvard Divinity School, for example.

    , @Polistra
    @Wency

    Although I stopped contributing a decade ago, this entire comment thread has me reconsidering. I might just start writing checks for ten dollars, just to piss them off.

  20. @Desiderius
    @slumber_j

    People who do give small amounts do so to feel like they're a part of the prestigious thing moreso than to make an appreciable difference.

    I'm almost convinced that that particular brand of wheedling is some kind of shit test psyop to let you know you're not in the in-crowd* to get people to step up their game in order to stop the abuse. RNC/Trump does the same thing. Probably works about as well as advertising for the expressed purpose but serves some sort of (likely unhealthy) psychological need somewhere in that ecology.

    Giving to Steve feels so much better all around.

    * - I've done major donor fundraising. The treatment they get is (of course) the exact opposite.

    Replies: @Wency, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Giving smaller amounts can also open up doors in some cases. Of course, it doesn’t have to be your alma mater. My business is located in another city from my alma mater, so while I’ve never given my alma mater a dime (to do so for non-business reasons would be totally alien and inconceivable to me), I have given money, in the single digit thousands, to a prestigious school in my current city, as part of joining a philanthropic club of sorts that’s associated with the university. No one actually cares that I didn’t go there (it almost never even comes up), and it has opened up a number of networking opportunities that have easily paid that amount back in terms of new business for my company.

  21. I stopped donating to my alma mater when they became what people call “woke”. If they have enough money for that, then they don’t need any more from me. They’re like the gambling addict in the old joke; “oh, you don’t have to worry, I’ve got gambling money”.

    • Agree: black sea
  22. >neuro bldg
    >”HEDCO”
    kek.
    >Wunnuva
    Wunnuva what?

  23. The sad part is, they really think they can change the profile of the person likely to donate.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Redneck farmer

    They think they can change it all. Pride goeth before a fall.

  24. anonymous[155] • Disclaimer says:

    Went to a southern highly conservative university. The first thing they teach you is hating liberal school graduates and loving your fellow schoolmates. It was a major turn off for my individualistic value. They even teach you in future hiring always favoring your own school mates wearing school rings. Favoring your own schoolmates and taking care of each other are the main value.

    Yes, this school has high donation rate from the graduates. Sticking together like family. In my view, only the weaks need to stick together and help each other. The strong can afford individualist value.

  25. Penn State was built by chad alumni donations. Now it is a woketard, a$$hole school. Pardon the language, but that is what Penn State has become. Good news there will be no future Chads. Maybe some shemans and hegirls to pick up the slack.

  26. My father was the first in his family to attend college and was an athlete, so he’s an athletic booster and gives them money every year. He’s grateful for the way the school altered the trajectory of his life and being a small D3 school, he feels good about helping them out. We’re not talking millions or anything but over the years it’s certainly in the low six figures.

    My own Jesuit university has gone full woke and I refuse to send them a dime, not that they really need my money anyway. I tend to donate to smaller local organizations instead, figuring it’s a more meaningful and direct impact on my community.

    • Thanks: Desiderius, Johann Ricke
  27. @Altai
    Maybe universities should try to make college a more enjoyable experience filled with more fond memories for the types of non-chads who tend to earn lots of money?

    From my understanding of stereotypes though, that wouldn't really be worth it for the Ivy's since their chads tend to be the ones who go into Wall Street and make god-like amounts of money.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @guest007

    How many students have fond memories of being a chemical engineering major versus a business management majors. Considering how many colleges of engineering still use the weed-out method of education, many engineers were not that fond of college.

    • Disagree: James Speaks
    • Replies: @Mike_from_SGV
    @guest007

    I had a technical major in college, and decades later I still get nightmares about being in a test and not knowing the material. So glad thats over.

  28. The worst traits for being a donor are being black, Hispanic, Asian, a theater major, and having the lowest “nonacademic” rating.

    People with the lowest “nonacademic” rating are probably mainly people from families that can not afford as many extracurriculars, enrichment experiences, etc.; so it’s probably just an instrument for relatively low income.

  29. @Torn and Frayed
    If this is true then the Chads are providing to the university industrial complex the rope with which Chad progeny and culture will be hung. It perfectly explains why America is in the sorry state it is today. The future social architects of a breakaway white province within the US should take careful note of this phenomenon.

    Replies: @AnonymousNameChange, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad, @Corvinus

    The “Chad” categorization obscures the often more meaningful ethnic distinctions. If you’re thinking in terms of the traditional WASP Chad stereotype, you’re missing what’s actually happening in many cases.

  30. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    This whole "donate money to your old uni" thing is very strange. It's not just a matter of bribing them to guarantee your stupider children a place at that uni - some of these donations go above and beyond what's necessary for that purpose, or even come from people whose kids aren't applying at all.

    These are for-profit fee-charging institutions, many of which have giant hedge funds attached, or own patents, and so on. They don't need your money. They're not charities. It's like donating a million dollars to McDonald's because you worked the grill back when you were 18.

    Do Americans realise this is bizarre? It's weirder than the tipping fetish.

    Do non-Americans also do this? I've never heard of it in my ancestral homeland (Indonesia, I mean Kenya), but then, I don't get out much.

    Replies: @guest007, @Bardon Kaldian

    If one is super rich, one has to do something with the money. Trying to give it all to your children mans giving the tax man a large amount. Some rich guys spend it on politics, some on universities, some of other charities. Instead of thinking about just financing a new building, much of money flows to particular programs and is spent on students.

    Once again, one has to wonder if Trump being a sociopath has made sociopathic behavior more acceptable and now there are more Americans who have zero interest in helping others.

    • Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @guest007

    Americans: universities are the same as charities. They aren't businesses that charge fees to their customers. If you don't want to give them vast sums of money, you're a sociopath.

  31. I really don’t care who is likely to donate. It’s the donors’ choice how they want to foolishly spend their own money.

    I’m more concerned about why and how much taxpayer money the Federal Government gives to Ivy League schools. Just more welfare for the wealthy at our expense.

  32. hi,
    University of Wisconsin-Madison grad here.
    Not one thin dime!
    thanks for listening.

  33. Alumni like to see their name attached to their generous donations, therefore dorms and buidings with their name on them. The Jesuit prep in Cleveland has a great athletic facility and chapel all made possible by a donation of the Murphy Oil Soap family. The cornerstone of the chapel reads “Look what soap has brought us”….translated from the Latin.

  34. I don’t care that rich guys might be able to make strategic donations, out of their own pockets, so as to help their kids get into Ivy U’s. I get a little annoyed by how the politicians funnel other people’s money into those schools, so as to open doors for their own kids.

    Those same politicians are the ones who demagogue that we need to do more to help the historical victims of discrimination, complain about privileges, etc.

    [MORE]

    Someone around here recently posted links that revealed the large endowments at a bunch of public U’s. There’s no good reason why a public U needs to control a king’s ransom, and worse, still charge high tuition.

    Those U’s were endowed, at creation, with funds sufficient to perform their mission: To produce applied science majors (the only kind of students that were supposed to be admitted). At zero out-of-pocket cost to them. Forevermore.

    Those U’s need to start applying those endowments towards the purpose that they were intended, and then refund the excess to taxpayers.

    Once again we see governments hoarding enormous assets, in plain sight (“in a lockbox”), as a slush fund for its future, pet projects.

    Taxpayers don’t want State U squirreling away its (i.e. the People’s) assets for some institutional, vanity project like a center for nanotechnology research (and them naming it after the egotist who put up the first $50M).

  35. I attended a big state university. I learned a lot and was well-prepared for the workforce. The school tried to ram leftism and affirmative action down our throats. When the first “dear alumnus, please donate” letter arrived, I told them never to contact me again because I’ll never give them a dime.

    • Replies: @BLESTO-V
    @Goddard

    I got out of big prestige U before the diversity/multiculti thing hit, so I stopped donating when they started charging to go to baseball games, 1986.

  36. @peterike
    Typical. Stupid rich white people giving vast amounts of money to institutions that hate them and are actively trying to dispossess whites of everything they've built. But muh college! White people are their own worst enemy. This is yet another in an endless list of examples.

    "My anecdotal impression is that South Asians are pretty generous toward educational institutions, while East Asians are not. But I could be wrong."

    That's because South Asians are much more like Jews, and really, really like having their name on the building. They're show offs. Chinese not so much.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @JohnnyWalker123, @Shel100

    “South Asians are much more like Jews, and really, really like having their name on the building.”

    I don’t know about dot Indians, but you’re definitely right about my people. HaShem undoubtedly has a wry sense of humor, since we can resist neither a sale nor a “naming opportunity.”

    • Replies: @BenjaminL
    @Gary in Gramercy

    This came up when commenters discussed Steve's review of Colin Quinn's book:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/sailer-in-takis-magazine-colin-quinns-the-coloring-book-a-comedian-solves-race-relations-in-america/#comment-1042941



    Go to a cultural center anywhere in the country, no matter where, and even if there are no Jews it’s the Maurice and Florence Rosenthal Center for Art of Wyoming, the Herman and Lillian Tannenbaum Historical Museum of NASCAR of Rural Arkansas.
     

     

    Actual example:

    The Benjamin and Marian Schuster Performing Arts Center is located in Dayton, Ohio and was built in 2003 to serve as Dayton’s key performance arts center. Architect Cesar Pelli created a world-class 2,300-seat theatre that has fiber optic lights in the dome ceiling that depict the Dayton sky as it appeared on the eve before the Wright brothers’ first flight, December 16, 1903. The Winter Garden houses exotic palm trees and a cafe with a large glass-enclosed wall that overlooks downtown Dayton.

    Since its opening, the Schuster Center has hosted a number of top plays, including Wicked, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat and Beauty and the Beast.

    http://www.schustercenter.org/
     
  37. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    This whole "donate money to your old uni" thing is very strange. It's not just a matter of bribing them to guarantee your stupider children a place at that uni - some of these donations go above and beyond what's necessary for that purpose, or even come from people whose kids aren't applying at all.

    These are for-profit fee-charging institutions, many of which have giant hedge funds attached, or own patents, and so on. They don't need your money. They're not charities. It's like donating a million dollars to McDonald's because you worked the grill back when you were 18.

    Do Americans realise this is bizarre? It's weirder than the tipping fetish.

    Do non-Americans also do this? I've never heard of it in my ancestral homeland (Indonesia, I mean Kenya), but then, I don't get out much.

    Replies: @guest007, @Bardon Kaldian

    This whole “donate money to your old uni” thing is very strange.

    Absolutely.

    Do Americans realise this is bizarre? It’s weirder than the tipping fetish.

    A good question.

    Do non-Americans also do this?

    No.

  38. OT White supremacist violence rears its ugly head in Minnesota:

  39. @Thoughts
    On a random comment note...

    It's just so bloody obvious that American Jews try to implement any policy they see in Israel here in the States

    California Jewish restaurateurs say "I'm going to require a Covid passport!"

    Jewish Corporations---same

    American gentiles of all stripes are being forced into Israeli (Jewish) policies.

    We saw that so well with the Miami Apartment Collapse...Oh no, we can't have US search and rescue teams...we need OUR teams...Israeli teams (who I'm pretty sure only generated a pansyfansy map of possible survivor pockets...I think the Americans did the actual digging..I may be wrong though)

    We have lost our autonomy and it stinks.

    And it's a shocking mental difference between Jews and Christians...Christians are 'I trust in God and my immune system for a disease I have a 99.999% of surviving totally intact' Jews are 'Science! Vaccinate the children now!'

    Replies: @Jack D, @AnotherDad

    Christians are ‘I trust in God and my immune system for a disease I have a 99.999% of surviving totally

    This is a total misrepresentation, both of the facts and of Christian theology. First of all, your chances of surviving Covid are a LOT less than 99.999%. For the elderly, death rates can be as high as 15%. If survival is 99.999%, why did the US have half a million excess deaths last year?

    2nd, unless you are a Christian scientist, “Trusting in God” does not mean that you cannot be vaccinated against disease. There are millions upon millions of devout Christians who have been vaccinated against Covid and many other diseases. Unless you are a snake handler, trusting in God does not require that you disobey the DON’T WALK sign and step out into traffic in the belief that He will save you. God helps those who help themselves. Vaccines are God’s instruments just as much as your immune system.

    If you fail to have yourself vaccinated and you die from Covid, you have in effect committed suicide.

    • Replies: @Thoughts
    @Jack D

    I'm actually a huge fan of snake handlers.

    I went through a whole snake handler phase in my 20s.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @vinteuil
    @Jack D


    ...your chances of surviving Covid are a LOT less than 99.999%.
     
    Well, it all depends on who "you" are, right? Suppose "you" are 30, in good shape, taking Zinc & Vitamin D3 supplements, with a renegade physician at your disposal who's willing to provide HCQ & Ivermectin should the need arise...even if you get infected, is your chance of dying meaningfully greater than .001%?

    Maybe this is a case where one size does not fit all.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @JohnnyWalker123, @Jack D

    , @JimDandy
    @Jack D

    Yes, a minority of very old people in hospice with a life-expectancy of three weeks do die with Covid in their systems. The same can be said for some other groups. Thank you for raising awareness. You are officially a Good Person as well as a Smart Person.

    Replies: @Jack D

  40. @Redneck farmer
    The sad part is, they really think they can change the profile of the person likely to donate.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    They think they can change it all. Pride goeth before a fall.

  41. @Jack D
    @Thoughts


    Christians are ‘I trust in God and my immune system for a disease I have a 99.999% of surviving totally
     
    This is a total misrepresentation, both of the facts and of Christian theology. First of all, your chances of surviving Covid are a LOT less than 99.999%. For the elderly, death rates can be as high as 15%. If survival is 99.999%, why did the US have half a million excess deaths last year?

    2nd, unless you are a Christian scientist, "Trusting in God" does not mean that you cannot be vaccinated against disease. There are millions upon millions of devout Christians who have been vaccinated against Covid and many other diseases. Unless you are a snake handler, trusting in God does not require that you disobey the DON'T WALK sign and step out into traffic in the belief that He will save you. God helps those who help themselves. Vaccines are God's instruments just as much as your immune system.

    If you fail to have yourself vaccinated and you die from Covid, you have in effect committed suicide.

    Replies: @Thoughts, @vinteuil, @JimDandy

    I’m actually a huge fan of snake handlers.

    I went through a whole snake handler phase in my 20s.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Thoughts

    I am shocked, shocked to hear this! Shocked AND surprised.

  42. The “Chad” stereotype (frat boy, athletic, etc.) is usually not Jewish but one look around any Ivy League campus and you will see TONS of newer buildings, endowed professorships, institutes, etc. with Jewish names on them – Jews are very generous donors (even if they insist on getting their names put up in exchange). It doesn’t seem like Jews fit into Steve’s model of donor prediction.

    • Replies: @res
    @Jack D


    Jews are very generous donors (even if they insist on getting their names put up in exchange). It doesn’t seem like Jews fit into Steve’s model of donor prediction.
     
    That's a good point. One issue is that Jews are a smallish proportion of the population (larger in order elite colleges > colleges > general population) so may not account for as much of the variance and given that they don't have (I assume?) a Jewish variable it is harder to account for.

    The question is can one build a model which would predict the Jews who are most likely to donate? If so, how dis/similar would it be to the paper model Steve presents?

    I would be willing to bet large quantities of money college admissions offices have a good understanding of Jewish donation though. I wonder how much that contributes to Jewish overrepresentation at elite colleges.

    Also, any thoughts on how size and frequency of donation vary with respect to Jews? The paper looked at frequency. $100 donations don't get names on buildings (if you are lucky, maybe a brick). Though they may get a callout in an alumni magazine.

    Replies: @LP5, @Alfa158, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @SFG, @gregor

    , @guest007
    @Jack D

    Steve when to undergraduate at Rice in Texas where virtually every college in Texas has a Moody building and a Sid Richardson Building. Buildings named after Jews is an Ivy League thing.

    I was once at a conference where the lunch speaker was T. Boone Pickens who, as part of his introduction, was said to have donated $250 million to Oklahoma State University but only half of it being for the Athletic Department. The wonky DC types at the meeting wanted to know why anyone would donate $125 million to an athletic department. I told them that the donation was to increase the chance that OK State beat the University of Oklahoma. I remarked to the non-college sports fans that they is how they keep score in Oklahoma.

  43. res says:
    @Jack D
    The "Chad" stereotype (frat boy, athletic, etc.) is usually not Jewish but one look around any Ivy League campus and you will see TONS of newer buildings, endowed professorships, institutes, etc. with Jewish names on them - Jews are very generous donors (even if they insist on getting their names put up in exchange). It doesn't seem like Jews fit into Steve's model of donor prediction.

    Replies: @res, @guest007

    Jews are very generous donors (even if they insist on getting their names put up in exchange). It doesn’t seem like Jews fit into Steve’s model of donor prediction.

    That’s a good point. One issue is that Jews are a smallish proportion of the population (larger in order elite colleges > colleges > general population) so may not account for as much of the variance and given that they don’t have (I assume?) a Jewish variable it is harder to account for.

    The question is can one build a model which would predict the Jews who are most likely to donate? If so, how dis/similar would it be to the paper model Steve presents?

    I would be willing to bet large quantities of money college admissions offices have a good understanding of Jewish donation though. I wonder how much that contributes to Jewish overrepresentation at elite colleges.

    Also, any thoughts on how size and frequency of donation vary with respect to Jews? The paper looked at frequency. $100 donations don’t get names on buildings (if you are lucky, maybe a brick). Though they may get a callout in an alumni magazine.

    • Replies: @LP5
    @res

    Alumni magazines have been increasingly infested with woke themes. Did their editors miss those development office meetings about not alienating prospective big donors with the latest wokishness? Something's gotta give, particularly at those non-FU Money schools.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @Alfa158
    @res

    Andrew Viterbi had the entire USC engineering department renamed after him with a $52M donation. That sounds like a real bargain to me because, given how much he must have made out of Qualcomm, that probably seemed like tipping-his-auto-detailer-money to him.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Reg Cæsar

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @res

    "college admissions offices have a good understanding of Jewish donation though. I wonder how much that contributes to Jewish overrepresentation at elite colleges."

    Heh heh. Apparently somebody here is not a Jew.

    , @SFG
    @res

    I kind of wonder how much Jewish donors are contributing to all the silly wokeness at some of these schools. You'd only have to turn Harvard and Yale and Princeton (or maybe just Harvard) and the others would follow suit--academia is one of the most prestige-obsessed industries around (probably because it's their main selling point, after all).

    This is pure conjecture, of course.

    , @gregor
    @res

    I believe there's more data on political donations. The top donor lists for both parties are quite Jewish. I've seen estimates that Jews give perhaps over 50% of the money for Democrats and something like 25% for Republicans. For Harvard donations I would not be surprised if it was even more Jewish.

    The top universities have a lot of Jewish students, a lot of Jewish faculty, and a lot of Jewish administrators. Of the top 25 American universities, there are 14 Jewish presidents (56%) and I think it's even more Jewish at the very top. Has all the money helped them take over the universities? Seems obvious to me that it has.

  44. “In other words, (David Dornsife) the kind of guy who….is most hated by the academic establishment.”

    His attempt to loved, or perhaps he just wants to invest in what currently seems to be the inevitable future. A future made more secure thru his, and like minded types (Gates), efforts:

    “Dornsife has made charitable contributions to World Vision, whereby they support bringing water, sanitation and hygiene to 25 countries in Africa. In 2016 they received a World Vision Water Warrior Award for helping to bring water, sanitation and hygiene to 10,066,000 people since 1990.”

    David and wife standing in the center of the future:

    dornsifes-marqez-africa

    In the meantime, for himself, Dornsife chooses to live in Northern California’s “Whiteopia”. ~25 miles NE of Silicon Valley, not too far from where Scott Adams makes his home:

    whiteopia

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @danand

    dan, Water is in short suppy in much of California. Mendocino is experiencing a severe water shortage and are trucking water in. It is the Twenty First Century and whole African countries can't figure out how to dig wells or source water, or mantain sanitary condition around their water sources, as in, don't let your live stock into the water to spoil it with feces. Good for Mr. and Mrs Dornsife but I doubt that they solved any problems in Africa.

    , @AnotherDad
    @danand

    Down the road, China will likely fix the problems good-whites create. (Unfortunately, that probably means we'll either a dying civilization ... or be getting "fixed" as well.)

    , @stillCARealist
    @danand

    that's my hometown. It was 100% white when I was growing up, with plenty of them working class. Now the wealthy Asians are moving in, and the Hispanics are there to do all the actual work.

  45. @Wency
    @Almost Missouri

    The universities with big endowments basically have "F.U. money". So what you're describing is their F.U. to the chad-bros. Harvard only pulls like 5% out of its endowment each year, which a decent investment return can make up for. They could go on this way forever, if no one ever donated another dime to them.

    Universities without big endowments -- well, they don't clearly don't have that great of donors anyway and rely more on tuition, so what's the loss?

    Replies: @Giant Duck, @Polistra

    Endowed funds are not typically distributed evenly across schools and programs within a private university (I don’t know about public university finances). So even when an overall endowment is significant, there will likely be newer and/or smaller programs that view themselves as underfunded. They still want donors and don’t (yet) have “FU money.” Harvard College > Harvard Divinity School, for example.

  46. this consideration was important in the past, but not anymore for the big universities with billion dollar endowments that go up 5% every year thanks to the stock market. not only are donations irrelevant, but tuition is irrelevant at this point. these universities make more in the market every year than all their tuition and donations combined. they’ll still accept that big check from donors, but it’s no longer important until it crosses the 50 million dollar mark or so. then they’ll put your name on the new building or scholarship.

    donations still matter for the 200 smaller universities and colleges though.

  47. @Jack D
    @Thoughts


    Christians are ‘I trust in God and my immune system for a disease I have a 99.999% of surviving totally
     
    This is a total misrepresentation, both of the facts and of Christian theology. First of all, your chances of surviving Covid are a LOT less than 99.999%. For the elderly, death rates can be as high as 15%. If survival is 99.999%, why did the US have half a million excess deaths last year?

    2nd, unless you are a Christian scientist, "Trusting in God" does not mean that you cannot be vaccinated against disease. There are millions upon millions of devout Christians who have been vaccinated against Covid and many other diseases. Unless you are a snake handler, trusting in God does not require that you disobey the DON'T WALK sign and step out into traffic in the belief that He will save you. God helps those who help themselves. Vaccines are God's instruments just as much as your immune system.

    If you fail to have yourself vaccinated and you die from Covid, you have in effect committed suicide.

    Replies: @Thoughts, @vinteuil, @JimDandy

    …your chances of surviving Covid are a LOT less than 99.999%.

    Well, it all depends on who “you” are, right? Suppose “you” are 30, in good shape, taking Zinc & Vitamin D3 supplements, with a renegade physician at your disposal who’s willing to provide HCQ & Ivermectin should the need arise…even if you get infected, is your chance of dying meaningfully greater than .001%?

    Maybe this is a case where one size does not fit all.

    • Troll: guest007
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @vinteuil

    Kinda strange that you have to keep explaining that to people with above-average IQs, eh? Ah well, Covid definitely does discriminate, but mass-psychosis clearly does not.

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @vinteuil

    Take no more than 10-15 mg in Zinc supplement per day (or ~100 mg per week). Too much can cause copper deficiency. See below.

    https://www.gastrojournal.org/article/0016-5085(88)90445-3/pdf

    Also, take a form of Zinc (Citrate, Gluconate) other than Zinc Oxide. Oxide is less well absorbed. See below.

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24259556/

    , @Jack D
    @vinteuil

    Even if that describes you, it doesn't describe your granny. If you bring home Covid to her and she dies, wouldn't you feel bad about that?

    Maybe you are a magnificent physical specimen but I see a lot of 30 year olds that are obese and asthmatic and with pasty complexions and indifferent diets and who don't have a doctor at all, let alone a renegade one. Covid hits them like a ton of bricks even if it doesn't kill them. My favorite are the ones who ask for the Covid vaccine after they have already contracted Covid - sorry, too late now. There's no "morning after" pill for Covid.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Colin Wright, @vinteuil

  48. @The Alarmist
    And to think, ex-con Lori Laughlin and her ex-con hubby had the nerve to think they could bypass the official university money-laundering alumni office.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Bill Jones

    Lori Laughlin did nothing wrong.

    • Replies: @0
    @JimDandy

    What was amazing was how much hatred she received, and especially her daughter. People take this college admissions stuff VERY seriously. It consumes the entire life of many ambitious high school students. It's actually all really quite sad.

    Replies: @guest007, @JimDandy

    , @guest007
    @JimDandy

    She and her husband committed fraud. There was a criminal conviction. Just like the parents who paid someone to correct their children's SAT tests were convicted like Felicity Huffman.

    What is interesting is someone finally figuring out that for non-revenue, partial scholarship athletes, the real gift to the student is the admission to a school that the student could not get into otherwise and then selling that gift.

    I spoke to the president of a highly selective university that has Divison III sports about athletes admission. He used the term "tip" to say that good athletes were given a "tip" on the admission scales and that several of the Division III conferences have started reviews to make sure that everyone who was given a tip actually is an athlete and participated.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimDandy

  49. @vinteuil
    @Jack D


    ...your chances of surviving Covid are a LOT less than 99.999%.
     
    Well, it all depends on who "you" are, right? Suppose "you" are 30, in good shape, taking Zinc & Vitamin D3 supplements, with a renegade physician at your disposal who's willing to provide HCQ & Ivermectin should the need arise...even if you get infected, is your chance of dying meaningfully greater than .001%?

    Maybe this is a case where one size does not fit all.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @JohnnyWalker123, @Jack D

    Kinda strange that you have to keep explaining that to people with above-average IQs, eh? Ah well, Covid definitely does discriminate, but mass-psychosis clearly does not.

  50. @Desiderius
    @slumber_j

    People who do give small amounts do so to feel like they're a part of the prestigious thing moreso than to make an appreciable difference.

    I'm almost convinced that that particular brand of wheedling is some kind of shit test psyop to let you know you're not in the in-crowd* to get people to step up their game in order to stop the abuse. RNC/Trump does the same thing. Probably works about as well as advertising for the expressed purpose but serves some sort of (likely unhealthy) psychological need somewhere in that ecology.

    Giving to Steve feels so much better all around.

    * - I've done major donor fundraising. The treatment they get is (of course) the exact opposite.

    Replies: @Wency, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    I was
    Smokin’ with the boys upstairs
    When I
    Heard about the whole affair,
    I said,
    Whoa, no!
    William and Mary won’t do!
    Well I did not think
    The girl could be so cruel….
    And I’m NEVER going back
    To my old school!

    — William Blake

    For a short time I had one of those weird telemarketing jobs where I cold-called Harvard grads to try and scrounge up donations, even small amounts from alums who were not rich donors. The conversations I had with these people were rather interesting.

    In general the people who had an undergrad degree from Harvard were very affable and willing to cough up say a few hundred bucks on a handshake over the phone. The MBAs, MDs, JDs and K-School types were a bit more diffident on the phone, but you knew they would write a big check later on. But the GSAS types (Ph.D.s in non-lucrative fields) were a different animal entirely: they would scream at you and curse you (well, me, actually) and shriek and swear that they never ever wanted to hear from Harvard again. They were constantly having nervous breakdowns right there on the phone, it was quite a thing to hear. Got a lot of good material off of those earfuls.

    Totally OT but since these days people around here are talking about kooky things like neurotic Olympic athletes…

    Who is your favorite TV weirdo eccentric-genius crime-solver…

    — Abby Sciuto,
    — Dr. Spencer Reed,
    — Penelope Garcia, or
    — that creepy bearded geek on NCIS New Orleans?

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Who is your favorite TV weirdo eccentric-genius crime-solver…

    Why no love for that Monk fellow?

    , @Polistra
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Bet you didn't even waste your time on the GSD.

  51. @Jack D
    @Thoughts


    Christians are ‘I trust in God and my immune system for a disease I have a 99.999% of surviving totally
     
    This is a total misrepresentation, both of the facts and of Christian theology. First of all, your chances of surviving Covid are a LOT less than 99.999%. For the elderly, death rates can be as high as 15%. If survival is 99.999%, why did the US have half a million excess deaths last year?

    2nd, unless you are a Christian scientist, "Trusting in God" does not mean that you cannot be vaccinated against disease. There are millions upon millions of devout Christians who have been vaccinated against Covid and many other diseases. Unless you are a snake handler, trusting in God does not require that you disobey the DON'T WALK sign and step out into traffic in the belief that He will save you. God helps those who help themselves. Vaccines are God's instruments just as much as your immune system.

    If you fail to have yourself vaccinated and you die from Covid, you have in effect committed suicide.

    Replies: @Thoughts, @vinteuil, @JimDandy

    Yes, a minority of very old people in hospice with a life-expectancy of three weeks do die with Covid in their systems. The same can be said for some other groups. Thank you for raising awareness. You are officially a Good Person as well as a Smart Person.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @JimDandy

    I don't think the number of very old people in hospice with a life-expectancy of three weeks can account for all of the excess deaths last year. The median age for Covid deaths in the US was somewhere around 80, which meant that half of the deaths were people who were younger than 80. In some cases MUCH younger than 80.

    Replies: @JimDandy

  52. The old model said that if the institution enrolls Chads Junior who are like Chads Senior (stipulating that Chads are big donors), then the institutions will continue to receive big bucks.

    The new model says that if the institution enrolls Jamals and Shaneequas then, when the new, woke mindset blackmails Big Corp, big bucks roll in and the Chads are unnecessary. Off to the ovens Communmity Colleges for you, Chad.

    To think ahead and realize that without Chads and their demonstrably greater ability to use logic, write coherently and even do math, the institutions will falter is too much work because we tired.

  53. Anonymous[290] • Disclaimer says:

    In the old Dartmouth Review once I read a short piece about some MGM chick-flick screenwritten by F. Scott Fitzgerald during his Hollywood lush phase, “Winter Carnival” or something-something (sorry, never got around to watching it). Pre-Internet the impression one could get was that these alumni reunion events were exceptional occasions, something to look forward to all year; ditto w/ the monthly newsletter, which was probably pretty boring most issues but had a pleasing nostalgic effect esp. for the sports meatheads. I still get my alumni magazine, which I never once requested/paid for, and they always seem to find me right away after I’ve moved, months ahead of the marketers and collectors. The magazine is just feelgood woke trash and makes me hate the university more. It’s not Princeton but it’s a pretty old one, same region/era. Such a fossilized useless appurtenance of pre-WWII society

  54. @res
    @Jack D


    Jews are very generous donors (even if they insist on getting their names put up in exchange). It doesn’t seem like Jews fit into Steve’s model of donor prediction.
     
    That's a good point. One issue is that Jews are a smallish proportion of the population (larger in order elite colleges > colleges > general population) so may not account for as much of the variance and given that they don't have (I assume?) a Jewish variable it is harder to account for.

    The question is can one build a model which would predict the Jews who are most likely to donate? If so, how dis/similar would it be to the paper model Steve presents?

    I would be willing to bet large quantities of money college admissions offices have a good understanding of Jewish donation though. I wonder how much that contributes to Jewish overrepresentation at elite colleges.

    Also, any thoughts on how size and frequency of donation vary with respect to Jews? The paper looked at frequency. $100 donations don't get names on buildings (if you are lucky, maybe a brick). Though they may get a callout in an alumni magazine.

    Replies: @LP5, @Alfa158, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @SFG, @gregor

    Alumni magazines have been increasingly infested with woke themes. Did their editors miss those development office meetings about not alienating prospective big donors with the latest wokishness? Something’s gotta give, particularly at those non-FU Money schools.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @LP5

    The big donors get a different magazine, if you take my meaning. That may be the point.

  55. @peterike
    Typical. Stupid rich white people giving vast amounts of money to institutions that hate them and are actively trying to dispossess whites of everything they've built. But muh college! White people are their own worst enemy. This is yet another in an endless list of examples.

    "My anecdotal impression is that South Asians are pretty generous toward educational institutions, while East Asians are not. But I could be wrong."

    That's because South Asians are much more like Jews, and really, really like having their name on the building. They're show offs. Chinese not so much.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @JohnnyWalker123, @Shel100

    They’re show offs. Chinese not so much.

    In Massachusetts:

    [MORE]

    • Thanks: epebble
  56. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:

    At USC, he was a member of the Kappa Alpha Order fraternity.

    … picture a room of 35 beer soaked freshman frat pledge future fatcat donors learning the frat culture … in unison hollering with great gusto …

    WHEAT – BARLEY – ALFALFA
    GIVE ‘EM HELL
    KAPPA ALPHA

    WHEAT – BARLEY – HAY
    GIVE ‘EM HELL
    K. A.

    … ya had ta be there …

  57. Very unusual surname. In a variety of spellings, very few on the planet.
    For the record, they’re not, as this article shows. They all go back to some goy called Gottschalk Dornseiff (1463-1533) from Hessen, Germany.
    http://dornseif.org/

  58. Anonymous[161] • Disclaimer says:

    So, all those chad bros generously fund the virgin bitch a-holes who steer the universities into queer-BLM anti-white lunacy. Good going, chad morons.

  59. @peterike
    Typical. Stupid rich white people giving vast amounts of money to institutions that hate them and are actively trying to dispossess whites of everything they've built. But muh college! White people are their own worst enemy. This is yet another in an endless list of examples.

    "My anecdotal impression is that South Asians are pretty generous toward educational institutions, while East Asians are not. But I could be wrong."

    That's because South Asians are much more like Jews, and really, really like having their name on the building. They're show offs. Chinese not so much.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @JohnnyWalker123, @Shel100

    The Chinese (and other Asians) are huge show-offs. They love to buy name-brand everything (bags, clothing, cars, etc).

    However, a lot of them are miserly, distrusting, and misanthropic. Many of them would probably rather buy a Gucci bag than donate to their university. They may perceive donating as a scam.

    By the 2nd&3rd generation, they usually assimilate to American norms and become much “nicer.” It’s mainly the first generation who are tight-fisted.

  60. @guest007
    In the book "Paying for the Party" by Elizabeth A. Armstrong and Laura T. Hamilton and the follow up book "Parenting to a Degree" there was a long discussion that the sorority, business lite white girl were the type of students who paid full retail for college, did not make huge demands on the university, and would help the cash flow of the university. The downside was that the sorority member, business-lite degree (think hospitality, sports management) are a horrible influence of many of the other female students on campus.

    One can assume that the frat pros on most campuses are also paying full retail and also not worried about their grades that much.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Elaborate on why they are a bad influence.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @JohnnyWalker123

    the authors of "Paying for the Party" have been following a set of female students who all started at the same freshman dorm. A group of female students were described as being on the pink helicopter path. The were middle to upper middle class with college educated parents who generally did not work in the knowledge economy. The daughters had easy majors, did not worry about GPA, join sororities, and saw college as a social networking experience. For those students, their job and economic prospects had nothing to do with academic success in college. However, for middle class and blue collar girls who tried to befriend those students, the pink helicopter students were a horrible influence. The blue collar girls did not have the family wealth to be able to work unpaid internships, start in low paid jobs in Manhattan or Chicago, and did not have the knowledge about class to operate in those circle. Many of the blue collar and middle class girls who tried to emulate the pink helicopter students either flunked out, had to transferred and had to chance of competing for careers in the same areas.

    A good take away from the book is the counsel families that do not have wealth about avoiding college majors that require unpaid internship, semesters abroad, have entry level in expensive urban areas, or require parental support for clothes, transportation, or a social life.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Jack D

  61. @Torn and Frayed
    If this is true then the Chads are providing to the university industrial complex the rope with which Chad progeny and culture will be hung. It perfectly explains why America is in the sorry state it is today. The future social architects of a breakaway white province within the US should take careful note of this phenomenon.

    Replies: @AnonymousNameChange, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad, @Corvinus

    If this is true then the Chads are providing to the university industrial complex the rope with which Chad progeny and culture will be hung. It perfectly explains why America is in the sorry state it is today. The future social architects of a breakaway white province within the US should take careful note of this phenomenon.

    Spot on T&F.

    These folks are funding people, who–beyond just being a bunch of bloated bureaucratic trough feeders–teach/harangue everyone’s kids to hate you.

    Amazing how oblivious normies–granted busy with jobs/careers/family/life–are to how nasty and toxic our “academic” institutions are now with thoroughly entrench minoritartianism.

  62. Burma/Myanmar is to watch:

    https://thediplomat.com/2021/07/myanmar-plunges-into-deadly-third-covid-19-wave/

    Myanmar Plunges Into Deadly Third COVID-19 Wave

    Basically, if 50-60% of them get Covid & a small number dies, that would be interesting …

    Now, it seems that across the Western world- people are just getting tired of Covid soap…

    https://www.itv.com/news/london/2021-07-19/bottles-thrown-at-police-in-anti-lockdown-and-anti-vaccination-protest

    Bottles thrown at police in anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination protest

    But the funniest comments are here:

    https://www.jpost.com/israel-news/israeli-health-experts-agree-to-give-third-covid-jab-to-the-elderly-675228

    First in world, Israel agrees to give seniors 60+ third COVID jab
    Comments:

    The Dog

    Whats wrong? Didn’t they die fast enough? Mengele.

    T

    Give them a couple more might aswel then one more for luck

  63. @vinteuil
    @Jack D


    ...your chances of surviving Covid are a LOT less than 99.999%.
     
    Well, it all depends on who "you" are, right? Suppose "you" are 30, in good shape, taking Zinc & Vitamin D3 supplements, with a renegade physician at your disposal who's willing to provide HCQ & Ivermectin should the need arise...even if you get infected, is your chance of dying meaningfully greater than .001%?

    Maybe this is a case where one size does not fit all.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @JohnnyWalker123, @Jack D

    Take no more than 10-15 mg in Zinc supplement per day (or ~100 mg per week). Too much can cause copper deficiency. See below.

    https://www.gastrojournal.org/article/0016-5085(88)90445-3/pdf

    Also, take a form of Zinc (Citrate, Gluconate) other than Zinc Oxide. Oxide is less well absorbed. See below.

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24259556/

  64. @Jack D
    The "Chad" stereotype (frat boy, athletic, etc.) is usually not Jewish but one look around any Ivy League campus and you will see TONS of newer buildings, endowed professorships, institutes, etc. with Jewish names on them - Jews are very generous donors (even if they insist on getting their names put up in exchange). It doesn't seem like Jews fit into Steve's model of donor prediction.

    Replies: @res, @guest007

    Steve when to undergraduate at Rice in Texas where virtually every college in Texas has a Moody building and a Sid Richardson Building. Buildings named after Jews is an Ivy League thing.

    I was once at a conference where the lunch speaker was T. Boone Pickens who, as part of his introduction, was said to have donated $250 million to Oklahoma State University but only half of it being for the Athletic Department. The wonky DC types at the meeting wanted to know why anyone would donate $125 million to an athletic department. I told them that the donation was to increase the chance that OK State beat the University of Oklahoma. I remarked to the non-college sports fans that they is how they keep score in Oklahoma.

  65. I get the feeling that some degree of the racial gap in giving (at least in frequency or likelihood) relates to the perceived chances of the alumnus’ children getting into the school as well. If the father (or mother) is rich, white, smart, and has a strong feeling their children will be similar to them (or at least one or two of the kids), they will feel it worthy to start contributing early and often. Likely one will have a strong shot if all goes well.

    This is in contrast to someone who feels that their admission to the school was a bit of a fluke/luck or that their children will mean revert pretty hard and not have much of a chance of getting in. If I got lucky in the affirmative action lottery I certainly wouldn’t feel obligated to give to the school, as my children won’t likely get the same dice roll. This is similar to east Asians, as there are many at nearly the same level, and it takes some luck to be gifted one of the allotted spots (not that the colleges admit the allocation). Knowing the racial breakdown of admitted legacies would make this much more clear, I would think.

    Also, most blacks and Hispanics know full well that they got into these schools for very specific reasons. Such feelings don’t generate as intensely loyalty as the feelings of earned status. Scrap AA and their charitable rates would go up, for those that get in, that is..

  66. My alma mater gave me a very nice scholarship without which I would have been unable t0 attend, and I made regular 4 figure donations until they invited the murderous commie bitch Angela Davis to “teach” one year.

  67. jb says:

    OT but interesting — it appears that we are going to start language policing other languages now:

    State TV Host Mocks Black Jan. 6 Cop in ‘N-Word’ Fueled Rant

    My first thought was “no way!” No TV host would ever be so suicidal! But it turns out here that “State” refers to the Russian state, and “N-Word” refers to the Russian word for “Negro” (which for some inexplicable reason also counts as a slur — go figure). So is every European language now going to have its own forbidden syllables?

  68. Anonymous[141] • Disclaimer says:

    Imperiled Troy Apke (the he can run, run white safety) trying to make it as a CB.

    Personally I would just keep him purely for special teams, even if he has brain farts at safety. Has saved several touchdowns by running down returners in pursuit. George Allen would have understood the logic.

  69. @Gary in Gramercy
    @peterike

    "South Asians are much more like Jews, and really, really like having their name on the building."

    I don't know about dot Indians, but you're definitely right about my people. HaShem undoubtedly has a wry sense of humor, since we can resist neither a sale nor a "naming opportunity."

    Replies: @BenjaminL

    This came up when commenters discussed Steve’s review of Colin Quinn’s book:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/sailer-in-takis-magazine-colin-quinns-the-coloring-book-a-comedian-solves-race-relations-in-america/#comment-1042941

    Go to a cultural center anywhere in the country, no matter where, and even if there are no Jews it’s the Maurice and Florence Rosenthal Center for Art of Wyoming, the Herman and Lillian Tannenbaum Historical Museum of NASCAR of Rural Arkansas.

    Actual example:

    The Benjamin and Marian Schuster Performing Arts Center is located in Dayton, Ohio and was built in 2003 to serve as Dayton’s key performance arts center. Architect Cesar Pelli created a world-class 2,300-seat theatre that has fiber optic lights in the dome ceiling that depict the Dayton sky as it appeared on the eve before the Wright brothers’ first flight, December 16, 1903. The Winter Garden houses exotic palm trees and a cafe with a large glass-enclosed wall that overlooks downtown Dayton.

    Since its opening, the Schuster Center has hosted a number of top plays, including Wicked, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat and Beauty and the Beast.

    http://www.schustercenter.org/

  70. By the way- why not take, even for the sake of an argument, anti-wax people more seriously?

    https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/health-coronavirus-vaccines-skeptic/

    The ex-Pfizer scientist who became an anti-vax hero

    Michael Yeadon was a scientific researcher and vice president at drugs giant Pfizer Inc. He co-founded a successful biotech. Then his career took an unexpected turn.

    https://banned.video/watch?id=609238dcf609210fc6b0c516

  71. Great article.

    A few quick observations:

    1) Based on the MAE major (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering), this is almost certainly Princeton rather than Yale, which I believe does not have a major with that acronym.

    2) Unless I’m reading the chart incorrectly, ceteris paribus, females alums are more likely to give than males, which surprises me and certainly cuts against the chad bro profile.

    3) I think this model looks pretty close to a prediction of future income, which strikes me as sensible.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Recently Based


    2) Unless I’m reading the chart incorrectly, ceteris paribus, females alums are more likely to give than males, which surprises me and certainly cuts against the chad bro profile.
     
    At first glance. Men are more loyal and like to be the "big man".

    But women are more nurturing and conforming. The "good girls" will be doing their bit from the PTA to college donation.

    And ... all the stuff we talk about here. Heck just look at the comments. Lots of men--correctly--believe colleges are no longer "on their side", but feminized PC/woke cesspits. I'll bet if this study was done today, and looked at only donations over the last 10 years it would be even more dramatic. An every larger proportion of men--especially white men--have woken up and think "Everything i read/hear indicates you are my enemy. Screw you. Not a dime."

  72. @Hodag
    I have never donated to any of my schools. I have donated a lot of money (it is my only charity) to the people who gave me a scholarship to college. Then again they put on really awesome golf outings so it is a two way street.

    Replies: @ex-banker

    Evans or Ouimet? Both great organizations that reward hard-working kids as caddies or in other golf-related jobs.

  73. @peterike
    Typical. Stupid rich white people giving vast amounts of money to institutions that hate them and are actively trying to dispossess whites of everything they've built. But muh college! White people are their own worst enemy. This is yet another in an endless list of examples.

    "My anecdotal impression is that South Asians are pretty generous toward educational institutions, while East Asians are not. But I could be wrong."

    That's because South Asians are much more like Jews, and really, really like having their name on the building. They're show offs. Chinese not so much.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @JohnnyWalker123, @Shel100

    Same with whites who vote democrat.

  74. Yes, Universities no longer want or need Rich Chad types. No bros need apply. They have both FU money from endowments and a limitless supply of cash coming their way from the Regency and beyond.

    However, what happens when Mr. Big Shot no longer can get his kid into Harvard or Yale or NYU or USC or even Notre Dame?

    As per the Dallas Justice Network, those spots are reserved for black people only?*

    His response, will be to do whatever he can to destroy those institutions, and create a leg up for his kid. This the White pill — lots and lots and lots of Masters of the Universe types with money and ambition are going to find out their kids will have none. Now, the plan by the black Ascendancy is they will scream at those guys a lot and that will work like it always has. And it will — until suddenly it does not.

    Its not like, say a hedge fund manager could actively conspire to wreck the Harvard Endowment fund, now. Nope, could never ever happen. And its not like they could not fund “grassroots” groups demanding the HYPS be taxed and forced to admit hundreds of thousands of low iq blacks for “equity” thus effectively drowning those groups.

    *Dallas Justice Network sent targeted letters to rich White people in Highland Park Dallas demanding their kids (often, named in the letters) do not go to either HYPS or US News Top 50 Colleges, so that black kids can take their place. And refusal to both sign and abide by the pledge would place them on the racist list published. Its headed by a black woman. More of this please!

  75. Note that the biggest increase in likelihood to donate is becoming an MBA, followed by earning a law degree, spouse is an alumni too, belonging to a fraternity/sorority, and doctors, then small engineering majors, finance minors, American studies majors (Tom Wolfe earned his Ph.D. in American studies at Yale), and econ majors.

    The worst traits for being a donor are being black, Hispanic, Asian, a theater major, and having the lowest “nonacademic” rating.

    Good summary. I perused the table, cooked up a picture of what’s going on … then you had it down below.

    Confess i’m a bit surprised “spouse is an alumni” isn’t #1.

    I had a pretty serious high-quality undergrad girlfriend. We almost–but didn’t quite–ship it. (Mostly my maturity issues … and the Irish hot-headed thing.) If we had, i think we would think of ourselves is a family of X-ians and be donors.

    But instead, i’m much, much more mentally/emotionally attached to Texas where i met and married AnotherMom (as well as made lifelong friends). I left there to lead adult life, build a career, have kids. So it’s a much bigger deal.

    “Spouse is an alumni” would seem to correlate highest with the quality of experience/emotional attactment and hence good feelings about the U and donations. Though i guess i would depend heavily on how much you like your spouse.

  76. @res
    @Jack D


    Jews are very generous donors (even if they insist on getting their names put up in exchange). It doesn’t seem like Jews fit into Steve’s model of donor prediction.
     
    That's a good point. One issue is that Jews are a smallish proportion of the population (larger in order elite colleges > colleges > general population) so may not account for as much of the variance and given that they don't have (I assume?) a Jewish variable it is harder to account for.

    The question is can one build a model which would predict the Jews who are most likely to donate? If so, how dis/similar would it be to the paper model Steve presents?

    I would be willing to bet large quantities of money college admissions offices have a good understanding of Jewish donation though. I wonder how much that contributes to Jewish overrepresentation at elite colleges.

    Also, any thoughts on how size and frequency of donation vary with respect to Jews? The paper looked at frequency. $100 donations don't get names on buildings (if you are lucky, maybe a brick). Though they may get a callout in an alumni magazine.

    Replies: @LP5, @Alfa158, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @SFG, @gregor

    Andrew Viterbi had the entire USC engineering department renamed after him with a $52M donation. That sounds like a real bargain to me because, given how much he must have made out of Qualcomm, that probably seemed like tipping-his-auto-detailer-money to him.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Alfa158

    That sounds like a real bargain to me because, given how much he must have made out of Qualcomm, that probably seemed like tipping-his-auto-detailer-money to him.

    Not quite, it's around %5 of his fortune. But he's a piker next to his partner Irwin Jacobs who has given away close to half a billion.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Alfa158


    Andrew Viterbi had the entire USC engineering department renamed after him with a $52M donation. That sounds like a real bargain to me...
     
    He could have gotten far more bang for his buck at a smaller school. Such as


    https://images.wisconsinhistory.org/700014090002/1409000031-l.jpg

    All he had to do was to buy a vowel from the alliterative Vanna.

  77. OT: Looks like we’ve got a probably hate hoax in St. Louis: https://www.ksdk.com/article/news/local/st-louis-county-health-director-racist-slurs-assault-flipping-off-person-council-meeting/63-7ec1c175-5db9-45f1-ba72-9e6f39a98173 In a heated public meeting about a mask mandate, health director Faisal Khan flipped somebody the bird. He says is because evil Trump supporters called him racial slurs.

  78. @The Alarmist
    And to think, ex-con Lori Laughlin and her ex-con hubby had the nerve to think they could bypass the official university money-laundering alumni office.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Bill Jones

    ex-con Lori Laughlin

    Why the “ex-con” ? Was she pardoned? If not, the conviction still stands and she’s still a con, just not still a prisoner.

  79. @Recently Based
    Great article.

    A few quick observations:

    1) Based on the MAE major (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering), this is almost certainly Princeton rather than Yale, which I believe does not have a major with that acronym.

    2) Unless I'm reading the chart incorrectly, ceteris paribus, females alums are more likely to give than males, which surprises me and certainly cuts against the chad bro profile.

    3) I think this model looks pretty close to a prediction of future income, which strikes me as sensible.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    2) Unless I’m reading the chart incorrectly, ceteris paribus, females alums are more likely to give than males, which surprises me and certainly cuts against the chad bro profile.

    At first glance. Men are more loyal and like to be the “big man”.

    But women are more nurturing and conforming. The “good girls” will be doing their bit from the PTA to college donation.

    And … all the stuff we talk about here. Heck just look at the comments. Lots of men–correctly–believe colleges are no longer “on their side”, but feminized PC/woke cesspits. I’ll bet if this study was done today, and looked at only donations over the last 10 years it would be even more dramatic. An every larger proportion of men–especially white men–have woken up and think “Everything i read/hear indicates you are my enemy. Screw you. Not a dime.”

  80. @res
    @Jack D


    Jews are very generous donors (even if they insist on getting their names put up in exchange). It doesn’t seem like Jews fit into Steve’s model of donor prediction.
     
    That's a good point. One issue is that Jews are a smallish proportion of the population (larger in order elite colleges > colleges > general population) so may not account for as much of the variance and given that they don't have (I assume?) a Jewish variable it is harder to account for.

    The question is can one build a model which would predict the Jews who are most likely to donate? If so, how dis/similar would it be to the paper model Steve presents?

    I would be willing to bet large quantities of money college admissions offices have a good understanding of Jewish donation though. I wonder how much that contributes to Jewish overrepresentation at elite colleges.

    Also, any thoughts on how size and frequency of donation vary with respect to Jews? The paper looked at frequency. $100 donations don't get names on buildings (if you are lucky, maybe a brick). Though they may get a callout in an alumni magazine.

    Replies: @LP5, @Alfa158, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @SFG, @gregor

    “college admissions offices have a good understanding of Jewish donation though. I wonder how much that contributes to Jewish overrepresentation at elite colleges.”

    Heh heh. Apparently somebody here is not a Jew.

  81. @JimDandy
    @Jack D

    Yes, a minority of very old people in hospice with a life-expectancy of three weeks do die with Covid in their systems. The same can be said for some other groups. Thank you for raising awareness. You are officially a Good Person as well as a Smart Person.

    Replies: @Jack D

    I don’t think the number of very old people in hospice with a life-expectancy of three weeks can account for all of the excess deaths last year. The median age for Covid deaths in the US was somewhere around 80, which meant that half of the deaths were people who were younger than 80. In some cases MUCH younger than 80.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Jack D

    I was responding to your comment. You wrote: "For the elderly, death rates can be as high as 15%. "

    That's a pretty meaningless stat without specific context, as is "half of the deaths were people who were younger than 80. In some cases MUCH younger than 80."

    In some cases the people who died were much younger than 80? How many cases? How much younger than 80? What percentage of them were without any comorbidities?

    For that matter, "half a million excess deaths" is a meaningless stat without context. Were they ALL because of Covid? Obviously not, so... how many were because of Covid? (And by that, I mean Covid infections, not Covid-lockdow-era drug overdoses or high speed traffic fatalities or murders or unattended-to cancers or heart conditions, etc.) And How many of those who died OF Covid early on would live today because of better treatments?

    If your position is that Covid is dangerous for the very old, the very sick, and the very fat, you won't get any argument from me. But if you're under 70 without any serious comorbidities, it IS the flu, bro.

    You say that if a person dies of Covid after refusing to get the vaccine, they committed suicide. I could say the same about a person who dies after getting the jab. And that stat is TBD.

  82. The university from which I was graduated has of course gone woke. When they call, I out-woke them: “I prefer to confer my beneficence at the margin, where it will do the most good. Therefore, I donate only to the United Negro College Fund.” This stops them cold.

    I was surprised to see the donations timeline graph takeoff only at the time of application. Back in the day, way back, this was seen as gauche; a transparent bribe. Donations began around 2 years pre-application. Besides the politeness factor, another benefit: students were motivated to work harder in high school, because they knew their parents were already donating.

    • Replies: @Fun To Do Bad Things
    @Safenow

    Your UNCF comment made me wonder.

    We’ve seen today that [B]lack alumni don’t donate much to their HYPS-type alma maters. But is there any data on how much/how often HBCU alumni donate?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  83. @vinteuil
    @Jack D


    ...your chances of surviving Covid are a LOT less than 99.999%.
     
    Well, it all depends on who "you" are, right? Suppose "you" are 30, in good shape, taking Zinc & Vitamin D3 supplements, with a renegade physician at your disposal who's willing to provide HCQ & Ivermectin should the need arise...even if you get infected, is your chance of dying meaningfully greater than .001%?

    Maybe this is a case where one size does not fit all.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @JohnnyWalker123, @Jack D

    Even if that describes you, it doesn’t describe your granny. If you bring home Covid to her and she dies, wouldn’t you feel bad about that?

    Maybe you are a magnificent physical specimen but I see a lot of 30 year olds that are obese and asthmatic and with pasty complexions and indifferent diets and who don’t have a doctor at all, let alone a renegade one. Covid hits them like a ton of bricks even if it doesn’t kill them. My favorite are the ones who ask for the Covid vaccine after they have already contracted Covid – sorry, too late now. There’s no “morning after” pill for Covid.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Jack D

    Your information hygiene is poor, Jack.

    , @Colin Wright
    @Jack D

    '...My favorite are the ones who ask for the Covid vaccine after they have already contracted Covid – sorry, too late now. There’s no “morning after” pill for Covid.'

    You actually believed that story? A friend of mine dismantled it elsewhere. I don't know why that woman fantasized all those experiences -- but she did.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    , @vinteuil
    @Jack D

    Jack D: OK, so I take it you admit that for healthy young people the risk of death from Covid infection is fairly negligible?

    The reason you want them to get vaccinated is not for their own sake, but for the sake of their elderly relatives?

    Replies: @Jack D

  84. @Safenow
    The university from which I was graduated has of course gone woke. When they call, I out-woke them: “I prefer to confer my beneficence at the margin, where it will do the most good. Therefore, I donate only to the United Negro College Fund.” This stops them cold.

    I was surprised to see the donations timeline graph takeoff only at the time of application. Back in the day, way back, this was seen as gauche; a transparent bribe. Donations began around 2 years pre-application. Besides the politeness factor, another benefit: students were motivated to work harder in high school, because they knew their parents were already donating.

    Replies: @Fun To Do Bad Things

    Your UNCF comment made me wonder.

    We’ve seen today that [B]lack alumni don’t donate much to their HYPS-type alma maters. But is there any data on how much/how often HBCU alumni donate?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Fun To Do Bad Things

    HBCU greeks likely do some fundraising amongst themselves. Kamala Harris, for example, is fanatically loyal toward her sorority at Howard U. A black film called "Stomp the Yard" from 15 years or so ago depicted a fraternity at an HBCU in a very positive light as a social force for good in the black community.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Safenow

  85. What chunk of a colleges total donation haul comes from, say, hundred or less, thousand, ten thousand…vs 1 million or 10 million?

    I don’t think the price for tuition. Would have a lot of affect on huge donations, because if you are contemplating donating tens of millions, you think school was totally worth the price. But for donations in tens of thousands or less, Having paid 150 to 250 grand for your undergrad, I can can see potential donors saying, “you already charged me market price for my education. I pay market price for car repairs, and I don’t donate to my mechanic in the hopes that he’ll fix my kids’ car.”

    Colleges got donations because they charged people less than they could have, and either kept rich people in the upper class, or were poor and working class kids’ entre into a SES above theirs. Graduates were grateful. Now, though, a degree is a requirement of staying middle class, and colleges extract considerable remuneration upfront. Kinda changes the equation on donating.

  86. @Jack D
    @JimDandy

    I don't think the number of very old people in hospice with a life-expectancy of three weeks can account for all of the excess deaths last year. The median age for Covid deaths in the US was somewhere around 80, which meant that half of the deaths were people who were younger than 80. In some cases MUCH younger than 80.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    I was responding to your comment. You wrote: “For the elderly, death rates can be as high as 15%. ”

    That’s a pretty meaningless stat without specific context, as is “half of the deaths were people who were younger than 80. In some cases MUCH younger than 80.”

    In some cases the people who died were much younger than 80? How many cases? How much younger than 80? What percentage of them were without any comorbidities?

    For that matter, “half a million excess deaths” is a meaningless stat without context. Were they ALL because of Covid? Obviously not, so… how many were because of Covid? (And by that, I mean Covid infections, not Covid-lockdow-era drug overdoses or high speed traffic fatalities or murders or unattended-to cancers or heart conditions, etc.) And How many of those who died OF Covid early on would live today because of better treatments?

    If your position is that Covid is dangerous for the very old, the very sick, and the very fat, you won’t get any argument from me. But if you’re under 70 without any serious comorbidities, it IS the flu, bro.

    You say that if a person dies of Covid after refusing to get the vaccine, they committed suicide. I could say the same about a person who dies after getting the jab. And that stat is TBD.

  87. @Almost Missouri
    @Desiderius


    getting pretty dated.
     

    loyalty to whom.
     
    Obviously, most universities today are doing the exact opposite of what they would do if they were actually interested in getting donations. They are actively discriminating against the people most likely to benefit them reputationally and financially. There are two possible conclusions:

    1) This confirms the thesis that Wokism is a terminal disease with no brakes, no remission, and no endpoint before total annihilation. There is no adult in the room who can turn off the woke sh*tshow before someone (the university) really gets hurt.

    And/or

    2) To the extent they plan their financial future at all, universities plan to rely on Federal largesse, which is now mostly a euphemism for some variation of grifting from the Federal Reserve's Mass Global Looting Regime. Besides sluicing more cash than any combination of donors ever could, the FRMGLR offers the benefit of requiring no gratitude whatsoever to one's benefactors. In fact, contempt toward those they loot from seems to be the rule.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Wency, @Desiderius

    Never seen a pimp go hungry. Psychological abuse can be very lucrative. Look at the Epstein case.

  88. @Fun To Do Bad Things
    @Safenow

    Your UNCF comment made me wonder.

    We’ve seen today that [B]lack alumni don’t donate much to their HYPS-type alma maters. But is there any data on how much/how often HBCU alumni donate?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    HBCU greeks likely do some fundraising amongst themselves. Kamala Harris, for example, is fanatically loyal toward her sorority at Howard U. A black film called “Stomp the Yard” from 15 years or so ago depicted a fraternity at an HBCU in a very positive light as a social force for good in the black community.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Steve Sailer

    Hazing works.

    , @Safenow
    @Steve Sailer

    “fundraising amongst themselves”

    I can’t speak to fraternity-amongst- themselves, because I was an “independent,” living in a dorm. But they were uncanny in their ability to find some other independent, someone who knew me, someone who could reminisce about shared activities or classes or friends. This went on for decades. Then they must have given up on me, because they switched to a young, current student.

    Slightly off-topic but interesting. I happened to see a pandemic “virtual reunion” book from a high-prestige university. Photos and info on what you’re doing now, plus plenty of reminiscences about what was happening then. This included various arcane special prices and achievements, but NOT the achievement of who was summa, magna, and Phi Beta Kappa. This would have been very simple to do; simply reproduce the graduation brochure. But it would have been unwoke and meritocratic.

  89. @Jack D
    @vinteuil

    Even if that describes you, it doesn't describe your granny. If you bring home Covid to her and she dies, wouldn't you feel bad about that?

    Maybe you are a magnificent physical specimen but I see a lot of 30 year olds that are obese and asthmatic and with pasty complexions and indifferent diets and who don't have a doctor at all, let alone a renegade one. Covid hits them like a ton of bricks even if it doesn't kill them. My favorite are the ones who ask for the Covid vaccine after they have already contracted Covid - sorry, too late now. There's no "morning after" pill for Covid.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Colin Wright, @vinteuil

    Your information hygiene is poor, Jack.

  90. @Steve Sailer
    @Fun To Do Bad Things

    HBCU greeks likely do some fundraising amongst themselves. Kamala Harris, for example, is fanatically loyal toward her sorority at Howard U. A black film called "Stomp the Yard" from 15 years or so ago depicted a fraternity at an HBCU in a very positive light as a social force for good in the black community.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Safenow

    Hazing works.

  91. @danand
    "In other words, (David Dornsife) the kind of guy who....is most hated by the academic establishment."

    His attempt to loved, or perhaps he just wants to invest in what currently seems to be the inevitable future. A future made more secure thru his, and like minded types (Gates), efforts:

    "Dornsife has made charitable contributions to World Vision, whereby they support bringing water, sanitation and hygiene to 25 countries in Africa. In 2016 they received a World Vision Water Warrior Award for helping to bring water, sanitation and hygiene to 10,066,000 people since 1990."

    David and wife standing in the center of the future:

    https://flic.kr/p/2me2q81

    In the meantime, for himself, Dornsife chooses to live in Northern California's "Whiteopia". ~25 miles NE of Silicon Valley, not too far from where Scott Adams makes his home:

    https://flic.kr/p/2me7DUZ

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @AnotherDad, @stillCARealist

    dan, Water is in short suppy in much of California. Mendocino is experiencing a severe water shortage and are trucking water in. It is the Twenty First Century and whole African countries can’t figure out how to dig wells or source water, or mantain sanitary condition around their water sources, as in, don’t let your live stock into the water to spoil it with feces. Good for Mr. and Mrs Dornsife but I doubt that they solved any problems in Africa.

  92. It’d be useful to know just what percentage of the big donors are Jews.

    Aside from trends in admissions, it could also explain academia’s lurch towards even more compulsive wokism. Jews are far more Leftist than gentiles.

    If Harvard gets 63% of its donations from Jews, and those Jews think Black Lives Matter, etc, well…

  93. @Jack D
    @vinteuil

    Even if that describes you, it doesn't describe your granny. If you bring home Covid to her and she dies, wouldn't you feel bad about that?

    Maybe you are a magnificent physical specimen but I see a lot of 30 year olds that are obese and asthmatic and with pasty complexions and indifferent diets and who don't have a doctor at all, let alone a renegade one. Covid hits them like a ton of bricks even if it doesn't kill them. My favorite are the ones who ask for the Covid vaccine after they have already contracted Covid - sorry, too late now. There's no "morning after" pill for Covid.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Colin Wright, @vinteuil

    ‘…My favorite are the ones who ask for the Covid vaccine after they have already contracted Covid – sorry, too late now. There’s no “morning after” pill for Covid.’

    You actually believed that story? A friend of mine dismantled it elsewhere. I don’t know why that woman fantasized all those experiences — but she did.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Colin Wright

    It was a Noble Lie.

  94. @res
    @Jack D


    Jews are very generous donors (even if they insist on getting their names put up in exchange). It doesn’t seem like Jews fit into Steve’s model of donor prediction.
     
    That's a good point. One issue is that Jews are a smallish proportion of the population (larger in order elite colleges > colleges > general population) so may not account for as much of the variance and given that they don't have (I assume?) a Jewish variable it is harder to account for.

    The question is can one build a model which would predict the Jews who are most likely to donate? If so, how dis/similar would it be to the paper model Steve presents?

    I would be willing to bet large quantities of money college admissions offices have a good understanding of Jewish donation though. I wonder how much that contributes to Jewish overrepresentation at elite colleges.

    Also, any thoughts on how size and frequency of donation vary with respect to Jews? The paper looked at frequency. $100 donations don't get names on buildings (if you are lucky, maybe a brick). Though they may get a callout in an alumni magazine.

    Replies: @LP5, @Alfa158, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @SFG, @gregor

    I kind of wonder how much Jewish donors are contributing to all the silly wokeness at some of these schools. You’d only have to turn Harvard and Yale and Princeton (or maybe just Harvard) and the others would follow suit–academia is one of the most prestige-obsessed industries around (probably because it’s their main selling point, after all).

    This is pure conjecture, of course.

  95. @Torn and Frayed
    If this is true then the Chads are providing to the university industrial complex the rope with which Chad progeny and culture will be hung. It perfectly explains why America is in the sorry state it is today. The future social architects of a breakaway white province within the US should take careful note of this phenomenon.

    Replies: @AnonymousNameChange, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad, @Corvinus

    If this is true then the Chads are providing to the university industrial complex the rope with which Chad progeny and culture will be hung. It perfectly explains why America is in the sorry state it is today. The future social architects of a breakaway white province within the US should take careful note of this phenomenon.

    This point, and peterike’s similar one below remind me that one of the key things conservatives must push–in the pre-separation world we live in–is some sort of competency testing work around to college.

    Granted it’s down the list

    #1 — immigration moratorium; everything else pales behind that

    #2 — educational choice for regular elementary/secondary school; give deplorables an opportunity to have deplorable education for our kids; (separation piece by piece)

    but probably

    #3 — a regime of competency testing for basic skills and knowledge of specific academic/technical disciplines;

    We don’t need a Fordist–everyone in class, turn the crank–model. Let students self-teach, with on-line, with books, any way they want. Education should actually be one of the things where the Internet dramatically lowers costs. Disruptive. Let’s blow up the credentialism, let the disruption happen and reap the reduced costs and other benefits.

    I’ve written on this in more detail before, but the benefits of popping the “Yale or Jail” paradigm are many:
    — defunding the blob and their toxic indoctrination; and turfing a bunch of those folks out, making them get real jobs
    — giving young people–even in HS–specific useful “academic”/study goals that they control
    — removing parent worry/obsession over college costs–giving modest fertility boost
    — removing student’s debts, letting them get to adult life faster–also creating fertility boost

    (Beyond those there are a bunch of measures to push eugenic fertility both on the welfare side and the tax incentives side.)

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @AnotherDad

    This point, & peterike’s similar one below remind me that one of the key things conservatives must push–in the pre-separation world we live in–is some sort of competency testing work around to college

    I think it was commenter Lot who once said of the contemporary American university “It is the beating heart of Leftism and it needs to be cut out like an Aztec sacrifice”.

    Replies: @res

  96. @Steve Sailer
    @Fun To Do Bad Things

    HBCU greeks likely do some fundraising amongst themselves. Kamala Harris, for example, is fanatically loyal toward her sorority at Howard U. A black film called "Stomp the Yard" from 15 years or so ago depicted a fraternity at an HBCU in a very positive light as a social force for good in the black community.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Safenow

    “fundraising amongst themselves”

    I can’t speak to fraternity-amongst- themselves, because I was an “independent,” living in a dorm. But they were uncanny in their ability to find some other independent, someone who knew me, someone who could reminisce about shared activities or classes or friends. This went on for decades. Then they must have given up on me, because they switched to a young, current student.

    Slightly off-topic but interesting. I happened to see a pandemic “virtual reunion” book from a high-prestige university. Photos and info on what you’re doing now, plus plenty of reminiscences about what was happening then. This included various arcane special prices and achievements, but NOT the achievement of who was summa, magna, and Phi Beta Kappa. This would have been very simple to do; simply reproduce the graduation brochure. But it would have been unwoke and meritocratic.

  97. @danand
    "In other words, (David Dornsife) the kind of guy who....is most hated by the academic establishment."

    His attempt to loved, or perhaps he just wants to invest in what currently seems to be the inevitable future. A future made more secure thru his, and like minded types (Gates), efforts:

    "Dornsife has made charitable contributions to World Vision, whereby they support bringing water, sanitation and hygiene to 25 countries in Africa. In 2016 they received a World Vision Water Warrior Award for helping to bring water, sanitation and hygiene to 10,066,000 people since 1990."

    David and wife standing in the center of the future:

    https://flic.kr/p/2me2q81

    In the meantime, for himself, Dornsife chooses to live in Northern California's "Whiteopia". ~25 miles NE of Silicon Valley, not too far from where Scott Adams makes his home:

    https://flic.kr/p/2me7DUZ

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @AnotherDad, @stillCARealist

    Down the road, China will likely fix the problems good-whites create. (Unfortunately, that probably means we’ll either a dying civilization … or be getting “fixed” as well.)

  98. @Jack D
    @vinteuil

    Even if that describes you, it doesn't describe your granny. If you bring home Covid to her and she dies, wouldn't you feel bad about that?

    Maybe you are a magnificent physical specimen but I see a lot of 30 year olds that are obese and asthmatic and with pasty complexions and indifferent diets and who don't have a doctor at all, let alone a renegade one. Covid hits them like a ton of bricks even if it doesn't kill them. My favorite are the ones who ask for the Covid vaccine after they have already contracted Covid - sorry, too late now. There's no "morning after" pill for Covid.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Colin Wright, @vinteuil

    Jack D: OK, so I take it you admit that for healthy young people the risk of death from Covid infection is fairly negligible?

    The reason you want them to get vaccinated is not for their own sake, but for the sake of their elderly relatives?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @vinteuil

    Yes, that's correct. In the days before America descended into total selfishness, people sometimes did things not for their personal benefit but for the benefit of their family and community (which they thought of as being a sort of extended family). But I guess that's so far in the past that it's now a completely alien and incomprehensible concept, like having duels to defend your honor. Honor being another obsolete concept.

  99. @Thoughts
    On a random comment note...

    It's just so bloody obvious that American Jews try to implement any policy they see in Israel here in the States

    California Jewish restaurateurs say "I'm going to require a Covid passport!"

    Jewish Corporations---same

    American gentiles of all stripes are being forced into Israeli (Jewish) policies.

    We saw that so well with the Miami Apartment Collapse...Oh no, we can't have US search and rescue teams...we need OUR teams...Israeli teams (who I'm pretty sure only generated a pansyfansy map of possible survivor pockets...I think the Americans did the actual digging..I may be wrong though)

    We have lost our autonomy and it stinks.

    And it's a shocking mental difference between Jews and Christians...Christians are 'I trust in God and my immune system for a disease I have a 99.999% of surviving totally intact' Jews are 'Science! Vaccinate the children now!'

    Replies: @Jack D, @AnotherDad

    It’s just so bloody obvious that American Jews try to implement any policy they see in Israel here in the States.

    Huh? I wish!

    Gee let’s have the analog of Israel’s immigration policy, where the majority Jews only lets their fellow Jews. Where would the US be if it had only let white gentiles? Uh … in a pretty damn great spot!

    Or how about black worship? Israel doing that? Or minority oppression narratives? Israel putting the oppression of the Palestinians front and center in the 1948 Project? Israeli school kids spend all their time on the Nakba? Or crashing fertility? Israel pushing that? Don’t have children Israeli women … it’s bad, bad, bad for you. Overthrow the patriarchy, lean in, be a slut. That the message? Pushing miscegenation? Lots of Arab men/Jewish women in all their commercials and TV shows?

    No the Jews push minoritarianism here, and nationalism/ethnocentrism there. (Not that there aren’t some Jewish nuts there as well. The destructive Jewish nut thing is just a thing.)

    As Steve’s pointed out a few times, watching what the Jews do in their own country–as opposed to what they push here–is actually instructive. They aren’t trying to kill themselves … they’re trying to kill/minoritize/disempower/strip-your-nation-from you!

    ~~~

    Re vaccines:

    White gentiles pioneered vaccine technology. (People all over have done things since ancient times, but the first really effective modern vaccine is vaccinnia.) And have created far more of them than any ethnic group. Though some Jews have done great work–e.g. Albert Sabin a legit Jewish hero. You can think of vaccines as being “white guy magic”.

    A new vaccine is always a risk … but so is a new disease. Mr. Spikey is a nasty critter, and you get some exposure either way. The question is how much and what form.

    I’d already decided on Pfizer-BioNTech for myself. But seeing Israel choose it–i.e. Jews looking out for themselves; not looking to do to gentiles–was additional confirmation it was a reasonable pick.

    We have lost our autonomy and it stinks.

    No doubt there. Minoritarianism is an illogical, cancerous ideology.

    Being bossed around be people who hate you … sucks!

    There’s no end to the ways republican self-government in your own nation is superior to any alternative.

  100. @vinteuil
    @Jack D

    Jack D: OK, so I take it you admit that for healthy young people the risk of death from Covid infection is fairly negligible?

    The reason you want them to get vaccinated is not for their own sake, but for the sake of their elderly relatives?

    Replies: @Jack D

    Yes, that’s correct. In the days before America descended into total selfishness, people sometimes did things not for their personal benefit but for the benefit of their family and community (which they thought of as being a sort of extended family). But I guess that’s so far in the past that it’s now a completely alien and incomprehensible concept, like having duels to defend your honor. Honor being another obsolete concept.

  101. @Thoughts
    @Jack D

    I'm actually a huge fan of snake handlers.

    I went through a whole snake handler phase in my 20s.

    Replies: @Jack D

    I am shocked, shocked to hear this! Shocked AND surprised.

  102. @JohnnyWalker123
    @guest007

    Elaborate on why they are a bad influence.

    Replies: @guest007

    the authors of “Paying for the Party” have been following a set of female students who all started at the same freshman dorm. A group of female students were described as being on the pink helicopter path. The were middle to upper middle class with college educated parents who generally did not work in the knowledge economy. The daughters had easy majors, did not worry about GPA, join sororities, and saw college as a social networking experience. For those students, their job and economic prospects had nothing to do with academic success in college. However, for middle class and blue collar girls who tried to befriend those students, the pink helicopter students were a horrible influence. The blue collar girls did not have the family wealth to be able to work unpaid internships, start in low paid jobs in Manhattan or Chicago, and did not have the knowledge about class to operate in those circle. Many of the blue collar and middle class girls who tried to emulate the pink helicopter students either flunked out, had to transferred and had to chance of competing for careers in the same areas.

    A good take away from the book is the counsel families that do not have wealth about avoiding college majors that require unpaid internship, semesters abroad, have entry level in expensive urban areas, or require parental support for clothes, transportation, or a social life.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @guest007

    Cool. Thanks. Good summary.

    , @Jack D
    @guest007

    This lesson goes back at least as far as Fitzgerald and Dickens and actually to the Romans, who used to say:


    Quod licet Iovi, non licet bovi.
     
    "What is permissible for Jupiter may not be permissible for cattle".

    But I guess each generation has to learn its own lessons, the hard way.

    Replies: @guest007

  103. @Colin Wright
    @Jack D

    '...My favorite are the ones who ask for the Covid vaccine after they have already contracted Covid – sorry, too late now. There’s no “morning after” pill for Covid.'

    You actually believed that story? A friend of mine dismantled it elsewhere. I don't know why that woman fantasized all those experiences -- but she did.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    It was a Noble Lie.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
  104. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Desiderius

    I was
    Smokin' with the boys upstairs
    When I
    Heard about the whole affair,
    I said,
    Whoa, no!
    William and Mary won't do!
    Well I did not think
    The girl could be so cruel....
    And I'm NEVER going back
    To my old school!

    -- William Blake

    For a short time I had one of those weird telemarketing jobs where I cold-called Harvard grads to try and scrounge up donations, even small amounts from alums who were not rich donors. The conversations I had with these people were rather interesting.

    In general the people who had an undergrad degree from Harvard were very affable and willing to cough up say a few hundred bucks on a handshake over the phone. The MBAs, MDs, JDs and K-School types were a bit more diffident on the phone, but you knew they would write a big check later on. But the GSAS types (Ph.D.s in non-lucrative fields) were a different animal entirely: they would scream at you and curse you (well, me, actually) and shriek and swear that they never ever wanted to hear from Harvard again. They were constantly having nervous breakdowns right there on the phone, it was quite a thing to hear. Got a lot of good material off of those earfuls.

    Totally OT but since these days people around here are talking about kooky things like neurotic Olympic athletes...

    Who is your favorite TV weirdo eccentric-genius crime-solver...

    -- Abby Sciuto,
    -- Dr. Spencer Reed,
    -- Penelope Garcia, or
    -- that creepy bearded geek on NCIS New Orleans?

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Polistra

    Who is your favorite TV weirdo eccentric-genius crime-solver…

    Why no love for that Monk fellow?

  105. @AnotherDad
    @Torn and Frayed


    If this is true then the Chads are providing to the university industrial complex the rope with which Chad progeny and culture will be hung. It perfectly explains why America is in the sorry state it is today. The future social architects of a breakaway white province within the US should take careful note of this phenomenon.
     
    This point, and peterike's similar one below remind me that one of the key things conservatives must push--in the pre-separation world we live in--is some sort of competency testing work around to college.

    Granted it's down the list

    #1 -- immigration moratorium; everything else pales behind that

    #2 -- educational choice for regular elementary/secondary school; give deplorables an opportunity to have deplorable education for our kids; (separation piece by piece)

    but probably

    #3 -- a regime of competency testing for basic skills and knowledge of specific academic/technical disciplines;

    We don't need a Fordist--everyone in class, turn the crank--model. Let students self-teach, with on-line, with books, any way they want. Education should actually be one of the things where the Internet dramatically lowers costs. Disruptive. Let's blow up the credentialism, let the disruption happen and reap the reduced costs and other benefits.

    I've written on this in more detail before, but the benefits of popping the "Yale or Jail" paradigm are many:
    -- defunding the blob and their toxic indoctrination; and turfing a bunch of those folks out, making them get real jobs
    -- giving young people--even in HS--specific useful "academic"/study goals that they control
    -- removing parent worry/obsession over college costs--giving modest fertility boost
    -- removing student's debts, letting them get to adult life faster--also creating fertility boost


    (Beyond those there are a bunch of measures to push eugenic fertility both on the welfare side and the tax incentives side.)

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    This point, & peterike’s similar one below remind me that one of the key things conservatives must push–in the pre-separation world we live in–is some sort of competency testing work around to college

    I think it was commenter Lot who once said of the contemporary American university “It is the beating heart of Leftism and it needs to be cut out like an Aztec sacrifice”.

    • Replies: @res
    @kaganovitch

    Thanks. That is a terrific quote. I could not resist looking for it.
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/punching-down-at-the-jobless/#comment-3229992


    Big Ed is the beating heart of the left. Cut it out like an Aztec sacrifice.
     
    Speaking of which, what has happened to Lot? His last comment was in May.

    P.S. And you were the first response to that comment.

  106. @Alfa158
    @res

    Andrew Viterbi had the entire USC engineering department renamed after him with a $52M donation. That sounds like a real bargain to me because, given how much he must have made out of Qualcomm, that probably seemed like tipping-his-auto-detailer-money to him.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Reg Cæsar

    That sounds like a real bargain to me because, given how much he must have made out of Qualcomm, that probably seemed like tipping-his-auto-detailer-money to him.

    Not quite, it’s around %5 of his fortune. But he’s a piker next to his partner Irwin Jacobs who has given away close to half a billion.

  107. …their dear old alma maters.

    Almae matres. (And that’s just the nominative! This would be dative.)

    For example, in our basic model, being an economics major

    I.e., a Republican who wants to work on Wall Street

    Which recently spotted a nauseous Bactrian ungulate in the gold markets. What does the Meer-Rosen chart resemble?

    Princetonians tend to love Princeton. E.g., Republican Secretary of State George Shultz had a Princeton Tiger tattoo.

    I wore a Princeton sweatshirt as a teen, only because I got it in a bargain bin. Once an old drunk accosted me, saying he went there.

    I believed him. And lost any awe I may have felt toward the place.

    By the way, is Brooke Shields a major donor?

    Shortly after Shields graduated from college, her four-year transcript was published in the July 1987 edition of Life Magazine. Based on that transcript, The New York Times published a light-hearted op-ed piece intended to tweak the claim that Princeton produced superior, well-rounded graduates. Noting that Shields “got all As and Bs, and obviously paid attention to her school work”, it claimed she “got cheated” because Princeton did not require her to take any classical studies, medieval, modern or American history, nor any course in mathematics, philosophy, economics, political science, world literature, or science with laboratory experience. “[I]f that adds up to a liberal arts education from a place like Princeton, there is no longer any danger that our society will ever suffer from elitism in any form.”

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brooke_Shields#Early_life

    Universities Get More Donations from Chad Bro Alumni

    Chad bro alumni = Build a monarch, cabal ’round him. A morbid launch.

    • Replies: @res
    @Reg Cæsar


    Shortly after Shields graduated from college, her four-year transcript was published in the July 1987 edition of Life Magazine.
     
    Anyone have a copy of that transcript? Now I am curious. This link has text of the NYT article and some discussion.
    https://freerepublic.com/focus/news/3005091/posts

    I recently came upon the July issue of Life magazine, which reproduces, with her permission and comment, the entire four-year academic transcript of Brooke Shields

    The record itself reflects nothing but credit on the young lady. She got all A's and B's. None of the criticism that follows is directed at her

    What caught my attention was the totality of her program - that is, what it takes to get a Princeton degree these days.

    She took four courses in French language and five in French literature. She took eight courses in drama-related subjects: three in acting, three in cinema analysis, one in dance, one in contemporary English drama. These accounted for 59 percent of her classroom hours.

    She took three semesters of ceramics (10 percent).

    She took three courses in psychology - introduction to, abnormal and ''Theories of Psychotherapy'' (10 percent).

    She had two other English courses - ''Women and the Novel'' and ''Victorian Children's Literature'' (7 percent).

    The other courses, one semester each, were ''Philosophy and the Modern Mind,'' ''Comparative Family Systems'' (sociology), ''The Self in World Religions'' and ''History of Earth and Life'' (geology).

    If that adds up to a liberal arts education from a place like Princeton, there is no longer any danger that our society will ever suffer from elitism in any form.

    That education apparently contained no courses in classical studies (history, philosophy, literature of the ancient world), medieval history, modern history or American history; no hard science (physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy) requiring any kind of lab; no math; no anthropology; no economics; no political science or government; no basic sociology; no world literature; no American literature; no geography; not even computer literacy.

    That's no fault of hers; by my lights, she got cheated.
     
    I am guessing these were the requirements

    The other courses, one semester each, were ''Philosophy and the Modern Mind,'' ''Comparative Family Systems'' (sociology), ''The Self in World Religions'' and ''History of Earth and Life'' (geology).
     
    Here are the current general education requirements. I wonder when they went into effect and whether this kerfuffle played a role.
    https://ua.princeton.edu/contents/general-education-requirements

    General Education Requirements for A.B. Students

    Writing Seminar—one course
    Language—one to four terms to complete, depending on the language students study and the level at which they start
    Culture and Difference (CD)—one course
    Epistemology and Cognition (EC)—one course
    Ethical Thought and Moral Values (EM)—one course
    Historical Analysis (HA)—one course
    Literature and the Arts (LA)—two courses
    Quantitative and Computational Reasoning (QR)—one course
    Science and Engineering (SEL/SEN)—two courses. At least one course must be a science and engineering course with laboratory (SEL). Students may elect a second laboratory science course, or a non-laboratory science course (SEN).
    Social Analysis (SA)—two courses
     
    Apparently Princeton actually responded.
    https://www.upi.com/Archives/1987/09/07/Princeton-defends-movie-star-graduate/7779557985600/
  108. @Alfa158
    @res

    Andrew Viterbi had the entire USC engineering department renamed after him with a $52M donation. That sounds like a real bargain to me because, given how much he must have made out of Qualcomm, that probably seemed like tipping-his-auto-detailer-money to him.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Reg Cæsar

    Andrew Viterbi had the entire USC engineering department renamed after him with a $52M donation. That sounds like a real bargain to me…

    He could have gotten far more bang for his buck at a smaller school. Such as

    All he had to do was to buy a vowel from the alliterative Vanna.

  109. @guest007
    @JohnnyWalker123

    the authors of "Paying for the Party" have been following a set of female students who all started at the same freshman dorm. A group of female students were described as being on the pink helicopter path. The were middle to upper middle class with college educated parents who generally did not work in the knowledge economy. The daughters had easy majors, did not worry about GPA, join sororities, and saw college as a social networking experience. For those students, their job and economic prospects had nothing to do with academic success in college. However, for middle class and blue collar girls who tried to befriend those students, the pink helicopter students were a horrible influence. The blue collar girls did not have the family wealth to be able to work unpaid internships, start in low paid jobs in Manhattan or Chicago, and did not have the knowledge about class to operate in those circle. Many of the blue collar and middle class girls who tried to emulate the pink helicopter students either flunked out, had to transferred and had to chance of competing for careers in the same areas.

    A good take away from the book is the counsel families that do not have wealth about avoiding college majors that require unpaid internship, semesters abroad, have entry level in expensive urban areas, or require parental support for clothes, transportation, or a social life.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Jack D

    Cool. Thanks. Good summary.

  110. @Goddard
    I attended a big state university. I learned a lot and was well-prepared for the workforce. The school tried to ram leftism and affirmative action down our throats. When the first “dear alumnus, please donate” letter arrived, I told them never to contact me again because I’ll never give them a dime.

    Replies: @BLESTO-V

    I got out of big prestige U before the diversity/multiculti thing hit, so I stopped donating when they started charging to go to baseball games, 1986.

  111. @guest007
    @Altai

    How many students have fond memories of being a chemical engineering major versus a business management majors. Considering how many colleges of engineering still use the weed-out method of education, many engineers were not that fond of college.

    Replies: @Mike_from_SGV

    I had a technical major in college, and decades later I still get nightmares about being in a test and not knowing the material. So glad thats over.

  112. @guest007
    @JohnnyWalker123

    the authors of "Paying for the Party" have been following a set of female students who all started at the same freshman dorm. A group of female students were described as being on the pink helicopter path. The were middle to upper middle class with college educated parents who generally did not work in the knowledge economy. The daughters had easy majors, did not worry about GPA, join sororities, and saw college as a social networking experience. For those students, their job and economic prospects had nothing to do with academic success in college. However, for middle class and blue collar girls who tried to befriend those students, the pink helicopter students were a horrible influence. The blue collar girls did not have the family wealth to be able to work unpaid internships, start in low paid jobs in Manhattan or Chicago, and did not have the knowledge about class to operate in those circle. Many of the blue collar and middle class girls who tried to emulate the pink helicopter students either flunked out, had to transferred and had to chance of competing for careers in the same areas.

    A good take away from the book is the counsel families that do not have wealth about avoiding college majors that require unpaid internship, semesters abroad, have entry level in expensive urban areas, or require parental support for clothes, transportation, or a social life.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Jack D

    This lesson goes back at least as far as Fitzgerald and Dickens and actually to the Romans, who used to say:

    Quod licet Iovi, non licet bovi.

    “What is permissible for Jupiter may not be permissible for cattle”.

    But I guess each generation has to learn its own lessons, the hard way.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Jack D

    In the follow up book, "Parenting to a Degree" one of the big points is that middle class and blue collar parents should not listen when the university says that students should pursue their passions. Some passions require unpaid internships, international travel, living in expensive urban areas, expensive clothes, make up, and hair, and being able to socialize with c--workers. Other passions require graduate degrees, low paid fellowships and residencies, or moving to a specific location.

    The book makes the point that students from blue collar families to to focus on getting a major that leads to a job with only an undergraduate degree, that entry level is close to family and hometown, and does not need family support (think law enforcement, accounting, education, civil service).

  113. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Desiderius

    I was
    Smokin' with the boys upstairs
    When I
    Heard about the whole affair,
    I said,
    Whoa, no!
    William and Mary won't do!
    Well I did not think
    The girl could be so cruel....
    And I'm NEVER going back
    To my old school!

    -- William Blake

    For a short time I had one of those weird telemarketing jobs where I cold-called Harvard grads to try and scrounge up donations, even small amounts from alums who were not rich donors. The conversations I had with these people were rather interesting.

    In general the people who had an undergrad degree from Harvard were very affable and willing to cough up say a few hundred bucks on a handshake over the phone. The MBAs, MDs, JDs and K-School types were a bit more diffident on the phone, but you knew they would write a big check later on. But the GSAS types (Ph.D.s in non-lucrative fields) were a different animal entirely: they would scream at you and curse you (well, me, actually) and shriek and swear that they never ever wanted to hear from Harvard again. They were constantly having nervous breakdowns right there on the phone, it was quite a thing to hear. Got a lot of good material off of those earfuls.

    Totally OT but since these days people around here are talking about kooky things like neurotic Olympic athletes...

    Who is your favorite TV weirdo eccentric-genius crime-solver...

    -- Abby Sciuto,
    -- Dr. Spencer Reed,
    -- Penelope Garcia, or
    -- that creepy bearded geek on NCIS New Orleans?

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Polistra

    Bet you didn’t even waste your time on the GSD.

  114. @Wency
    @Almost Missouri

    The universities with big endowments basically have "F.U. money". So what you're describing is their F.U. to the chad-bros. Harvard only pulls like 5% out of its endowment each year, which a decent investment return can make up for. They could go on this way forever, if no one ever donated another dime to them.

    Universities without big endowments -- well, they don't clearly don't have that great of donors anyway and rely more on tuition, so what's the loss?

    Replies: @Giant Duck, @Polistra

    Although I stopped contributing a decade ago, this entire comment thread has me reconsidering. I might just start writing checks for ten dollars, just to piss them off.

  115. @guest007
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    If one is super rich, one has to do something with the money. Trying to give it all to your children mans giving the tax man a large amount. Some rich guys spend it on politics, some on universities, some of other charities. Instead of thinking about just financing a new building, much of money flows to particular programs and is spent on students.

    Once again, one has to wonder if Trump being a sociopath has made sociopathic behavior more acceptable and now there are more Americans who have zero interest in helping others.

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Americans: universities are the same as charities. They aren’t businesses that charge fees to their customers. If you don’t want to give them vast sums of money, you’re a sociopath.

  116. @Jack D
    @guest007

    This lesson goes back at least as far as Fitzgerald and Dickens and actually to the Romans, who used to say:


    Quod licet Iovi, non licet bovi.
     
    "What is permissible for Jupiter may not be permissible for cattle".

    But I guess each generation has to learn its own lessons, the hard way.

    Replies: @guest007

    In the follow up book, “Parenting to a Degree” one of the big points is that middle class and blue collar parents should not listen when the university says that students should pursue their passions. Some passions require unpaid internships, international travel, living in expensive urban areas, expensive clothes, make up, and hair, and being able to socialize with c–workers. Other passions require graduate degrees, low paid fellowships and residencies, or moving to a specific location.

    The book makes the point that students from blue collar families to to focus on getting a major that leads to a job with only an undergraduate degree, that entry level is close to family and hometown, and does not need family support (think law enforcement, accounting, education, civil service).

  117. @JimDandy
    @The Alarmist

    Lori Laughlin did nothing wrong.

    Replies: @0, @guest007

    What was amazing was how much hatred she received, and especially her daughter. People take this college admissions stuff VERY seriously. It consumes the entire life of many ambitious high school students. It’s actually all really quite sad.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @0

    Much like having a pregnant teen daughter would destroy the career of many conservative religious leader, or having a child come out as homosexual or trans would destroy the career of most of the pro-Trumpist political class, having a child attend Arizona State would destroy the career, status, and social standing of many on the left. Having a child attend San Diego State or Arizona State would be considered child abuse to most of the liberal elite in the U.S.

    , @JimDandy
    @0

    College admissions culture is more crooked than Chicago politics. People don't take it seriously. This was another case of selective outrage/Two Minutes Of Hate.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  118. @res
    @Jack D


    Jews are very generous donors (even if they insist on getting their names put up in exchange). It doesn’t seem like Jews fit into Steve’s model of donor prediction.
     
    That's a good point. One issue is that Jews are a smallish proportion of the population (larger in order elite colleges > colleges > general population) so may not account for as much of the variance and given that they don't have (I assume?) a Jewish variable it is harder to account for.

    The question is can one build a model which would predict the Jews who are most likely to donate? If so, how dis/similar would it be to the paper model Steve presents?

    I would be willing to bet large quantities of money college admissions offices have a good understanding of Jewish donation though. I wonder how much that contributes to Jewish overrepresentation at elite colleges.

    Also, any thoughts on how size and frequency of donation vary with respect to Jews? The paper looked at frequency. $100 donations don't get names on buildings (if you are lucky, maybe a brick). Though they may get a callout in an alumni magazine.

    Replies: @LP5, @Alfa158, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @SFG, @gregor

    I believe there’s more data on political donations. The top donor lists for both parties are quite Jewish. I’ve seen estimates that Jews give perhaps over 50% of the money for Democrats and something like 25% for Republicans. For Harvard donations I would not be surprised if it was even more Jewish.

    The top universities have a lot of Jewish students, a lot of Jewish faculty, and a lot of Jewish administrators. Of the top 25 American universities, there are 14 Jewish presidents (56%) and I think it’s even more Jewish at the very top. Has all the money helped them take over the universities? Seems obvious to me that it has.

  119. res says:
    @kaganovitch
    @AnotherDad

    This point, & peterike’s similar one below remind me that one of the key things conservatives must push–in the pre-separation world we live in–is some sort of competency testing work around to college

    I think it was commenter Lot who once said of the contemporary American university “It is the beating heart of Leftism and it needs to be cut out like an Aztec sacrifice”.

    Replies: @res

    Thanks. That is a terrific quote. I could not resist looking for it.
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/punching-down-at-the-jobless/#comment-3229992

    Big Ed is the beating heart of the left. Cut it out like an Aztec sacrifice.

    Speaking of which, what has happened to Lot? His last comment was in May.

    P.S. And you were the first response to that comment.

  120. @danand
    "In other words, (David Dornsife) the kind of guy who....is most hated by the academic establishment."

    His attempt to loved, or perhaps he just wants to invest in what currently seems to be the inevitable future. A future made more secure thru his, and like minded types (Gates), efforts:

    "Dornsife has made charitable contributions to World Vision, whereby they support bringing water, sanitation and hygiene to 25 countries in Africa. In 2016 they received a World Vision Water Warrior Award for helping to bring water, sanitation and hygiene to 10,066,000 people since 1990."

    David and wife standing in the center of the future:

    https://flic.kr/p/2me2q81

    In the meantime, for himself, Dornsife chooses to live in Northern California's "Whiteopia". ~25 miles NE of Silicon Valley, not too far from where Scott Adams makes his home:

    https://flic.kr/p/2me7DUZ

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @AnotherDad, @stillCARealist

    that’s my hometown. It was 100% white when I was growing up, with plenty of them working class. Now the wealthy Asians are moving in, and the Hispanics are there to do all the actual work.

  121. res says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    ...their dear old alma maters.
     
    Almae matres. (And that's just the nominative! This would be dative.)


    For example, in our basic model, being an economics major
     
    I.e., a Republican who wants to work on Wall Street
     
    Which recently spotted a nauseous Bactrian ungulate in the gold markets. What does the Meer-Rosen chart resemble?


    https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/102148273-fd67a77bf4dccb059df5997f6b575c2d8bd73b96.jpg?v=1529466991


    Princetonians tend to love Princeton. E.g., Republican Secretary of State George Shultz had a Princeton Tiger tattoo.
     
    I wore a Princeton sweatshirt as a teen, only because I got it in a bargain bin. Once an old drunk accosted me, saying he went there.

    I believed him. And lost any awe I may have felt toward the place.

    By the way, is Brooke Shields a major donor?


    Shortly after Shields graduated from college, her four-year transcript was published in the July 1987 edition of Life Magazine. Based on that transcript, The New York Times published a light-hearted op-ed piece intended to tweak the claim that Princeton produced superior, well-rounded graduates. Noting that Shields "got all As and Bs, and obviously paid attention to her school work", it claimed she "got cheated" because Princeton did not require her to take any classical studies, medieval, modern or American history, nor any course in mathematics, philosophy, economics, political science, world literature, or science with laboratory experience. "[I]f that adds up to a liberal arts education from a place like Princeton, there is no longer any danger that our society will ever suffer from elitism in any form."

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brooke_Shields#Early_life
     


    Universities Get More Donations from Chad Bro Alumni
     
    Chad bro alumni = Build a monarch, cabal 'round him. A morbid launch.

    Replies: @res

    Shortly after Shields graduated from college, her four-year transcript was published in the July 1987 edition of Life Magazine.

    Anyone have a copy of that transcript? Now I am curious. This link has text of the NYT article and some discussion.
    https://freerepublic.com/focus/news/3005091/posts

    I recently came upon the July issue of Life magazine, which reproduces, with her permission and comment, the entire four-year academic transcript of Brooke Shields

    The record itself reflects nothing but credit on the young lady. She got all A’s and B’s. None of the criticism that follows is directed at her

    What caught my attention was the totality of her program – that is, what it takes to get a Princeton degree these days.

    She took four courses in French language and five in French literature. She took eight courses in drama-related subjects: three in acting, three in cinema analysis, one in dance, one in contemporary English drama. These accounted for 59 percent of her classroom hours.

    She took three semesters of ceramics (10 percent).

    She took three courses in psychology – introduction to, abnormal and ”Theories of Psychotherapy” (10 percent).

    She had two other English courses – ”Women and the Novel” and ”Victorian Children’s Literature” (7 percent).

    The other courses, one semester each, were ”Philosophy and the Modern Mind,” ”Comparative Family Systems” (sociology), ”The Self in World Religions” and ”History of Earth and Life” (geology).

    If that adds up to a liberal arts education from a place like Princeton, there is no longer any danger that our society will ever suffer from elitism in any form.

    That education apparently contained no courses in classical studies (history, philosophy, literature of the ancient world), medieval history, modern history or American history; no hard science (physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy) requiring any kind of lab; no math; no anthropology; no economics; no political science or government; no basic sociology; no world literature; no American literature; no geography; not even computer literacy.

    That’s no fault of hers; by my lights, she got cheated.

    I am guessing these were the requirements

    The other courses, one semester each, were ”Philosophy and the Modern Mind,” ”Comparative Family Systems” (sociology), ”The Self in World Religions” and ”History of Earth and Life” (geology).

    Here are the current general education requirements. I wonder when they went into effect and whether this kerfuffle played a role.
    https://ua.princeton.edu/contents/general-education-requirements

    General Education Requirements for A.B. Students

    Writing Seminar—one course
    Language—one to four terms to complete, depending on the language students study and the level at which they start
    Culture and Difference (CD)—one course
    Epistemology and Cognition (EC)—one course
    Ethical Thought and Moral Values (EM)—one course
    Historical Analysis (HA)—one course
    Literature and the Arts (LA)—two courses
    Quantitative and Computational Reasoning (QR)—one course
    Science and Engineering (SEL/SEN)—two courses. At least one course must be a science and engineering course with laboratory (SEL). Students may elect a second laboratory science course, or a non-laboratory science course (SEN).
    Social Analysis (SA)—two courses

    Apparently Princeton actually responded.
    https://www.upi.com/Archives/1987/09/07/Princeton-defends-movie-star-graduate/7779557985600/

  122. @JimDandy
    @The Alarmist

    Lori Laughlin did nothing wrong.

    Replies: @0, @guest007

    She and her husband committed fraud. There was a criminal conviction. Just like the parents who paid someone to correct their children’s SAT tests were convicted like Felicity Huffman.

    What is interesting is someone finally figuring out that for non-revenue, partial scholarship athletes, the real gift to the student is the admission to a school that the student could not get into otherwise and then selling that gift.

    I spoke to the president of a highly selective university that has Divison III sports about athletes admission. He used the term “tip” to say that good athletes were given a “tip” on the admission scales and that several of the Division III conferences have started reviews to make sure that everyone who was given a tip actually is an athlete and participated.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @guest007

    Presumably, a few benchwarmers on Harvard athletic teams are there because they are pretty good but not really adequate athletes but have very generous parents.

    The Varsity Blues scandals was, in part, about coaches rather than the colleges pocketing the generosity.

    I want to see a 1980s-style teen comedy about a bunch of rich kids who got in for sports they don't even play having to win the Big Game to keep their moms out of prison.

    , @JimDandy
    @guest007

    She and her husband committed fraud. There was a criminal conviction. Just like the parents who paid someone to correct their children’s SAT tests were convicted like Felicity Huffman.

    Yeah, there was a criminal conviction in the Derek Chauvin case, too. And there will probably be one in the Rittenhouse case. The "did nothing wrong" meme applies to them, as well. What Loughlin did was not "just like" the parents who correct their children's SAT tests. Rich people bribe their kids' way into elite colleges all the time, Jews use the lobbying network Unz write about in The Myth of Meritocracy, blacks get in for being able to spell their own names, etc. The selective outrage over Loughlin's love for her daughter was pathetic.

  123. @0
    @JimDandy

    What was amazing was how much hatred she received, and especially her daughter. People take this college admissions stuff VERY seriously. It consumes the entire life of many ambitious high school students. It's actually all really quite sad.

    Replies: @guest007, @JimDandy

    Much like having a pregnant teen daughter would destroy the career of many conservative religious leader, or having a child come out as homosexual or trans would destroy the career of most of the pro-Trumpist political class, having a child attend Arizona State would destroy the career, status, and social standing of many on the left. Having a child attend San Diego State or Arizona State would be considered child abuse to most of the liberal elite in the U.S.

  124. @LP5
    @res

    Alumni magazines have been increasingly infested with woke themes. Did their editors miss those development office meetings about not alienating prospective big donors with the latest wokishness? Something's gotta give, particularly at those non-FU Money schools.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    The big donors get a different magazine, if you take my meaning. That may be the point.

  125. @guest007
    @JimDandy

    She and her husband committed fraud. There was a criminal conviction. Just like the parents who paid someone to correct their children's SAT tests were convicted like Felicity Huffman.

    What is interesting is someone finally figuring out that for non-revenue, partial scholarship athletes, the real gift to the student is the admission to a school that the student could not get into otherwise and then selling that gift.

    I spoke to the president of a highly selective university that has Divison III sports about athletes admission. He used the term "tip" to say that good athletes were given a "tip" on the admission scales and that several of the Division III conferences have started reviews to make sure that everyone who was given a tip actually is an athlete and participated.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimDandy

    Presumably, a few benchwarmers on Harvard athletic teams are there because they are pretty good but not really adequate athletes but have very generous parents.

    The Varsity Blues scandals was, in part, about coaches rather than the colleges pocketing the generosity.

    I want to see a 1980s-style teen comedy about a bunch of rich kids who got in for sports they don’t even play having to win the Big Game to keep their moms out of prison.

  126. @guest007
    @JimDandy

    She and her husband committed fraud. There was a criminal conviction. Just like the parents who paid someone to correct their children's SAT tests were convicted like Felicity Huffman.

    What is interesting is someone finally figuring out that for non-revenue, partial scholarship athletes, the real gift to the student is the admission to a school that the student could not get into otherwise and then selling that gift.

    I spoke to the president of a highly selective university that has Divison III sports about athletes admission. He used the term "tip" to say that good athletes were given a "tip" on the admission scales and that several of the Division III conferences have started reviews to make sure that everyone who was given a tip actually is an athlete and participated.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimDandy

    She and her husband committed fraud. There was a criminal conviction. Just like the parents who paid someone to correct their children’s SAT tests were convicted like Felicity Huffman.

    Yeah, there was a criminal conviction in the Derek Chauvin case, too. And there will probably be one in the Rittenhouse case. The “did nothing wrong” meme applies to them, as well. What Loughlin did was not “just like” the parents who correct their children’s SAT tests. Rich people bribe their kids’ way into elite colleges all the time, Jews use the lobbying network Unz write about in The Myth of Meritocracy, blacks get in for being able to spell their own names, etc. The selective outrage over Loughlin’s love for her daughter was pathetic.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  127. @0
    @JimDandy

    What was amazing was how much hatred she received, and especially her daughter. People take this college admissions stuff VERY seriously. It consumes the entire life of many ambitious high school students. It's actually all really quite sad.

    Replies: @guest007, @JimDandy

    College admissions culture is more crooked than Chicago politics. People don’t take it seriously. This was another case of selective outrage/Two Minutes Of Hate.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @JimDandy

    If people didn't take it seriously people wouldn't take it seriously.

  128. @JimDandy
    @0

    College admissions culture is more crooked than Chicago politics. People don't take it seriously. This was another case of selective outrage/Two Minutes Of Hate.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    If people didn’t take it seriously people wouldn’t take it seriously.

  129. @Torn and Frayed
    If this is true then the Chads are providing to the university industrial complex the rope with which Chad progeny and culture will be hung. It perfectly explains why America is in the sorry state it is today. The future social architects of a breakaway white province within the US should take careful note of this phenomenon.

    Replies: @AnonymousNameChange, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad, @Corvinus

    “The future social architects of a breakaway white province within the US should take careful note of this phenomenon.”

    LOL, its always in the future. Listen, why can’t you be this “social architect” NOW? I suggest you seek the advice of James Bowery and his vision of Sortocracy.

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