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The Clemente Solution to the "Latinx" Problem
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The Spanish language doesn’t have neuter nouns, which drives Woke Anglos crazy: thus, they concoct ghastly neologisms like “Latinx.”

It’s not our business to solve this problem that Anglos perceive in the Spanish language. Fortunately, in English we have a perfectly good neuter noun/adjective, which was widely used in baseball not long ago.

“Latin” was good enough for outfielder Roberto Clemente, who died a hero on New Year’s Eve 1972 flying emergency supplies to earthquake-wrecked Nicaragua. So it ought to be good enough for the rest of us.

 
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  1. Or how about we just continue using “Latino” and “Latina”? By looking for substitutes for “Latinx”, you are accepting the woke premise that words must be gender-neutral. This is something I reject outright, as should everyone on the side of sanity.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @anon215

    "Or how about we just continue using “Latino” and “Latina”?"

    Or, we could stop lumping the entire Central/South/Caribbean American population into one (false*) generalization, and instead refer to Cubans as Cuban, Colombians and Colombian, and Mexicans as illega.. I mean, Mexican.

    *The term Latino is about as off base as can be. The connection between Latin and the groups of people defined as such is pretty frail. Aren't Italians the real Latinos?

    Replies: @Dumbo, @e

    , @R.G. Camara
    @anon215

    Yeah, Steve is backtracking once again. Don't give them an inch.

    Latino and Latina are fine, and fuck the Commies. Never let anyone who isn't a judge or your parents control your speech.

    , @023423452
    @anon215

    I disagree, and I feel like "Latin" is pretty old. I remember my grandfather talking (positively) about the "Latins" and the "Chinese" (which was his word for "Asian").

    , @Peter Akuleyev
    @anon215


    Or how about we just continue using “Latino” and “Latina”?
     
    Why do we need to import Spanish words into English? The English word is "Latin". Using "Latino" and "Latina" is already a silly progressive affectation. Hence the irony of the "LatinX" movement.

    Replies: @anon215

  2. Two observations:

    1) They missed a good thing by not having Latinx rhyme with Sphinx. That would really be cool.

    2) The ‘X’ is like the ‘X’ in Malcolm X. The whole point is to be in your face oppositional.

    • Agree: JimDandy
    • Replies: @Mr. Peabody
    @Joe Magarac

    That's how I thought it was pronounced.
    Lay-tinks: Those members of the Tinks-American Community who have not taken ordination.

  3. Wonder if Pelosi probably gets Clemente mixed up with “Willie” Stargell? I know she has no clue who the hell Manny Sanguillen or Al Oliver were. I think that Clemente and Steve Blass should have shared the 1971 World Series MVP. Good lawd, how did that team beat the Orioles and their 4-20 game winners. Clemente like others didn’t receive the recognition he deserved because of playing in a small market like Pittsburgh. That is why Reggie Jackson did a one and done with the Orioles and flew the coop to NYC.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    @Trinity

    How did the ‘79 Pirates beat the Orioles down 3-1 and facing three of the best starting pitchers in the world (Flanagan, Palmer, McGregor)? It’s one of my first sports memories and still grates on me.

    Replies: @Marty

    , @Dr. DoomNGloom
    @Trinity


    Good lawd, how did that team beat the Orioles and their 4-20 game winners.
     
    HOF quality Outfield and one of the best batting orders of the decade. They were the proto "lumber company".
  4. Or just use the term “Dusky Lopezs”.

  5. Do these “Latins” speak Latin?

    • Agree: Hermes
    • LOL: Trinity
    • Replies: @epebble
    @Twinkie

    Why are the Spanish (and Portuguese ?) speakers of the Americas called "Latin"? That is like calling Native Americans "Sanskrit" because someone made a mistake of calling them Indians.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dr. X, @Jack D, @Prester John

    , @Clyde
    @Twinkie


    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?
     
    Did Lou Gehrig die of Lou Gehrig's disease?

    >>Keep Latinx. It makes the wokistas look stupid. Latinx rhymes with Michael Spinks.

    , @gent
    @Twinkie


    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?

     

    Originally it meant Catholic, but that division evaporated when the Irish and cohorts started immigrating in mass. We'd be better off using the old Spanish imperial ethnic divisions. Castizo/mestizo/indio/etc.
    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Twinkie


    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?
     
    No, they don't. That is why they do not understand a word of what is said in church, but they go anyway, because that is what you do on Sunday. So Cogito Ergo Sum or Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc does not mean a damn thing to them.

    The term Latino/Latina is a pretty silly one anyway, because it is only used by wokex gringos and gringas (gringx) in the Estados Unidos to refer to people who speak languages other than English which have descended from Latin, but excluding French, Romanian, and Italian.

    (People in Europe do not refer to people like Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo as Latinos.)

    Latinos and Latinas in the wild do not refer to themselves as such either. Even in a relatively small country like Ecuador, there are a number of ethnicities, none of which are "Latino".

    The largest number of Ecuadorians identify themselves as Mestizos, and though Spanish (descended from a western Roman empire dialect of Latin) is the main language, other languages include Achuar-Shiwiar ,Chachi, Colorado, Quechua – which comprises 9 separate dialects are spoken in as many areas in the country with a combined population of 1'460,00--Shuar, and Waorani.

    The way to deal with wokeism is to LAUGH at it!

    https://i2.wp.com/www.chrismadden.co.uk/images/cartoons/a807-court-of-language-crime-cartoon.jpg

    Replies: @J.Ross, @El Dato, @syonredux, @AndrewR, @Peter D. Bredon

    , @imnobody00
    @Twinkie

    A Spanish living in Latin America here.

    Latin America is an invention of the French. Before that, it was "Hispanoamérica" (Hispanic America), which refers to the Spanish legacy and the Spanish language (being "Hispania" the Latin name of Spain, the conqueror of these lands). When it included Brazil, it was "Iberoamérica" (Iberic America), the countries conquered by the Iberian Peninsula (that is, by Spain and Portugal).

    But, back in the days, the French wanted to claim having a special relationship with these countries. There are some countries in the Caribbean that speak French (Haiti, French Guyana and some tiny islands) so they had an idea. Since French and Spanish are Latin languages (they come from Latin), they invented "Latin America" ("the American countries that speak languages derived from Latin"), which is really contrived. This included the French-speaking countries and gave France a way to claim a special relationship with the American countries.

    Then English people and US people copied the expression, which is universal today. Since USA is the first cultural power, it is "Latin America" all around the world, even in Spain.

    The name for people was "Latin American (people)", but this was too long so it became "Latin (people)", like the ancient Romans.

  6. This is something I have believed for a while. Latin really is the English word for Latino/a. Why not use it?

    Hispanic is another good English word.

    A Dominican friend of mine called his ethnic background “Spanish”. Also a good English word.

    Cesar Chavez and his crowd used “Chicano/a” for American born Latins, especially of Mexican descent. That word has fallen out of favor. Imagine an alternate Woke 2021 with the word “Chicanx”.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Paleo Liberal

    You are right. Latins is the plural for Latin people of all genders. Hispanic refers explicitly to people of any race with Spanish surnames. That’s according to republican race traitor Richard Nixon’s 1970 executive order creating the Hispanic affirmative action class and subsequent satanic Supreme Court orders.

    , @Anonymous
    @Paleo Liberal

    "This is something I have believed for a while. Latin really is the English word for Latino/a. Why not use it?"

    Because they tried to go woke. But woke is never enough... there is always woker.

    Also... "Latin" used in that way has connotations that are inexpedient for the woke.
    A "Latin" man is expected to be an actual man... and a "Latin" woman a woman.
    Perhaps even moreso (rightly or wrongly) than the non-Latin varieties.

    Latinos/Latinas/Latinx(es) are sexless compadres.
    MS-13 on one side and Justice Sotomayor on the other.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Swamp Fox
    @Paleo Liberal

    Had a few half black, half Mexican kids at my public high school.
    Called them"Chicanbros."
    Or "Pork and Beaners."

  7. “It’s not our business to solve this problem that Anglos perceive in the Spanish language. Fortunately, in English we have a perfectly good neuter noun/adjective”

    It.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Lol

    Anyway, Sailer seems to think there are no native Hispanophones who think this is a problem to be solved. I don't know the full story of this neologism but I imagine that Latin@s themselves (or at least woke American ones) have been the primary driving force behind this. Cringe Anglo shitlibs have just been "amplifying" like "good allies"

  8. @Twinkie
    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?

    Replies: @epebble, @Clyde, @gent, @Jonathan Mason, @imnobody00

    Why are the Spanish (and Portuguese ?) speakers of the Americas called “Latin”? That is like calling Native Americans “Sanskrit” because someone made a mistake of calling them Indians.

    • Disagree: but an humble craftsman
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @epebble


    That is like calling Native Americans “Sanskrit” because someone made a mistake of calling them Indians.
     
    Why are we calling our purported aboriginals "Native Americans"? Most of us here are native Americans. The President has to be a native American.
    , @Dr. X
    @epebble


    Why are the Spanish (and Portuguese ?) speakers of the Americas called “Latin”?
     
    Because they speak Romance Languages derived from Latin and worship in the Latin Church.
    , @Jack D
    @epebble

    Latin is really short for Latin America, as opposed to Anglo America.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @epebble

    , @Prester John
    @epebble

    Aren't Italians Latin? I mean, the "Mater Lingua" only ORIGINATED in Italy, right?

  9. The Spanish language doesn’t have neuter nouns, which drives Woke Anglos crazy: thus, they concoct ghastly neologisms like “Latinx.”

    The Latinos of the L.A. Dodgers blame another group:

    • LOL: Not Raul
  10. Thanks for mentioning Clemente. I am old enough to have seen him play, and I can remember what fun it was to watch him hit, run, and of course, oh my, ohhh doctor, throw. He had style. Many didn’t like his style, but I think they would admit he was was engaging. Younger readers here who think (correctly) that modern baseball players are boring, and don’t know Clemente, might want to check-out a few Clemente highlight compilations on Youtube.

    • Replies: @Travis
    @SafeNow

    modern baseball is boring because there are now more strikeouts than hits. Back in 1980 a typical MLB game had 9 hits and 4 strikeouts. In 2019 they averaged 8 hits per game and 9 strikeouts per game.

    I suppose if you like seeing players hit home runs, 2019 was a great year for baseball, the juiced ball helped players hit a record 6,776 home runs. Vastly more than players hit during the steroid year peak of 5,528 in 1999. While in 1999 players struck out 31,120 times, in 2019 there were 42,823 strikeouts.

    Supposedly they stopped using the juiced ball this year. So home runs will not be setting another record this year. But we are on pace for another record year for strikeouts.

    , @Wade Hampton
    @SafeNow

    I agree with your comments about Clemente, but not all modern baseball players are boring. You might have a look at this highlight reel of Padres SS Fernando Tatis, Jr.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-CqmaWJTdaA&t=413s

    Replies: @SafeNow

  11. @anon215
    Or how about we just continue using "Latino" and "Latina"? By looking for substitutes for "Latinx", you are accepting the woke premise that words must be gender-neutral. This is something I reject outright, as should everyone on the side of sanity.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @R.G. Camara, @023423452, @Peter Akuleyev

    “Or how about we just continue using “Latino” and “Latina”?”

    Or, we could stop lumping the entire Central/South/Caribbean American population into one (false*) generalization, and instead refer to Cubans as Cuban, Colombians and Colombian, and Mexicans as illega.. I mean, Mexican.

    *The term Latino is about as off base as can be. The connection between Latin and the groups of people defined as such is pretty frail. Aren’t Italians the real Latinos?

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @Mike Tre


    Or, we could stop lumping the entire Central/South/Caribbean American population into one (false*) generalization,
     
    Jorge Luis Borges has a funny bit in his famous interview with William Buckley where he says that "there is no such thing as a Latin American, only Colombian, Peruvian, Argentine (not 'Argentinian'), Brazilian", etc.

    The term Latino is even worse than "Latin American" because it doesn't even mean a geographical origin, is a false ethnic-linguistic categorization lumping together European people from Spain and amerindian people from Nicaragua, but somehow not including the more similar Brazilians or Haitians, because they don't speak Spanish...

    https://youtu.be/bNxzQSheCkc?t=2172
    , @e
    @Mike Tre

    Dems want to call them The Browns, but Cleveland objected.

  12. Let’s mock them by creating more neuter words. For example

    Blackx, Democratz, Peoplex of Colorx , Gayx etc.

    • Agree: Cortes, fish
    • Replies: @Rob
    @Undocumented Shopper

    If you do not give the x a stress, Latinx sound like la Kleenex. Especially so with the stress on the second to last syllable, like they do it in espanol. Just so you know. If they want 2 stresses in the term, well, Ingles no trabaja like that. The term they actually want is Latin x. Except, names of ethnic groups are capitalized, so Latin X, like Malcolm X.

    Which leads me to my next idea. As Undocumented Shopper suggests, perhaps the x ending is how we know a group was oppressed so, men, but womenx; not ‘black,but blackx; not lgbtqi, but lgbtqix. That way, the rule is, ‘if there is a x in your name, you are free of blame.’ The upside is that lgbtqi has gone several years without an addition.

    We simply have to get them to use -z for plurals! You know who uses -s to pluralize? White men. Do you see an x in that term? No you not. That how you know there awful.

    If that is not bad enough enough, you know what world uses -s in its plural? Yes that’s right. Nazis. Are you really going to use the same plural that literal Nazis use?

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Undocumented Shopper

    Shopper, I call our Latino cleaning lady Kleenex.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

  13. Puerto Ricans = “Latino” version of White Yankees
    Mexicans = “Latino” version of White Southerners

  14. Op says:

    Or, they could adopt the rules from the little-known language of Spain, Asturian-Leonese. It is the only Romance language or dialect with a gender neutral noun tense. Of course, its neuters end in -o, as opposed to their masculine -u, so it would end up sounding the same in the end.

  15. Eh, I like Latinx. Using it means that I get to insult someone while simultaneously being Woke. For example, I once had a conversation with an anti-YT Latinx scholar, and I made a point of using Latinx as much as possible: Latinx languages, Latinx literature, Latinx criticism, etc. It was glorious….

    “Latin” was good enough for outfielder Roberto Clemente, who died a hero on New Year’s Eve 1972 flying emergency supplies to earthquake-wrecked Nicaragua. So it ought to be good enough for the rest of us.

    Dunno, Steve. Why would anyone want to sully a noble word like “Latin” by linking it to semi-literate Mestizo rabble?

  16. If you’re into vowels: Latinaeiou.

    If you’re into consonants: Latinlgbtx

    • LOL: Ron Mexico
    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @anon

    Look, let me explain something to you. I'm not Mr. Lebowski. You're Mr. Lebowski. I'm the Dude. So that's what you call me. That, or His Dudeness … Duder … or El Duderino, if, you know, you're not into the whole brevity thing.

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @anon

    FourOneOne, I like vowels. I had a dog named Phydeaux.

    Replies: @Wade Hampton

  17. @Twinkie
    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?

    Replies: @epebble, @Clyde, @gent, @Jonathan Mason, @imnobody00

    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?

    Did Lou Gehrig die of Lou Gehrig’s disease?

    >>Keep Latinx. It makes the wokistas look stupid. Latinx rhymes with Michael Spinks.

  18. When Clemente was home in the off-season, he would sometimes watch winter ball games.

    One time Clemente watched a Catholic school league game. Local priests officiated the game.

    During the game, the priest officiating behind the plate was hit in the head with a pitch. The priest became quite disoriented, and wandered off into nearby woods. Clemente, being a kind fellow, went into the woods to find the priest. Clemente took the priest to a medical clinic, and footed the bill.

    And so Roberto Clemente saved the Holy Roaming Umpire.

    • Thanks: J.Ross, AnotherDad
    • LOL: Lurker, Swamp Fox
    • Replies: @iffen
    @Paleo Liberal

    You should suffer some sort of penalty for posting this. I can't figure out how to make you pay.

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Paleo Liberal

    Well done.

  19. Many of the Spanish-speaking-ancestry people I know say “Spanish” to describe themselves and others of like background. Sometimes they’ll use a specific identifier such as Puerto Rican, Dominican, Salvadoran, etc. None of this comes up often, as in most cases they seem to have a relatively low level of ethnic consciousness.

    • Replies: @Peterike
    @prosa123

    “ Sometimes they’ll use a specific identifier such as Puerto Rican, Dominican, Salvadoran, etc. None of this comes up often, as in most cases they seem to have a relatively low level of ethnic consciousness.”

    Oh yeah? Call a Dominican a Puerto Rican or vice versa. See how well that goes over.

    Replies: @joe_mama

    , @Anon
    @prosa123

    Nonsense. A Latin American-born person NEVER calls himself Spanish. They know only someone born in Spain has the right to call himself Spanish. They might call themselves Hispanic to please their gringo coworkers or whatnot, but among THEMSELVES, they will say Mexican, Guatemalan, etc. They have a HIGH level of ethnic consciousness. You are totally misinformed.

  20. @Paleo Liberal
    When Clemente was home in the off-season, he would sometimes watch winter ball games.

    One time Clemente watched a Catholic school league game. Local priests officiated the game.

    During the game, the priest officiating behind the plate was hit in the head with a pitch. The priest became quite disoriented, and wandered off into nearby woods. Clemente, being a kind fellow, went into the woods to find the priest. Clemente took the priest to a medical clinic, and footed the bill.

    And so Roberto Clemente saved the Holy Roaming Umpire.

    Replies: @iffen, @The Anti-Gnostic

    You should suffer some sort of penalty for posting this. I can’t figure out how to make you pay.

    • Agree: Polistra
  21. To denote both Latinos and Latinas, we would need to create a special character that combines an “o” and an “a”. But soft! Such a character already exists: @. There’s no need to pronounce “Latinks” when we can refer to Latinats: “Latin@s”.
    A hearty “Ave atque vale” to all our native speakers of Latin!

  22. Speaking of Latinxes (Latinxi? Latixen?), PowerLine had a post today about a Mexican middleweight boxer whom they’re comparing to the all-time greats. His name is Canelo Alverez, and he looks very Celtic, right down to the freckles:

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    He's compensating furiously with his tatts. Or is it cultural appreciation? (That's an autocorrect I've decided to let stand.)

    I've known more than one Celtic Latino. Red hair and freckles. Something cute about it really. I'm almost jealous...they get the benefits of both. All you need is the right surname, and you can do that by deed poll. Ah my misspent life.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    , @Trinity
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Saint Patrick's Battalion. Check out a couple of boxers of Irish, Mexican and Indian descent, Danny "Little Red" Lopez and big brother, Ernie.

    Little Red Lopez was an all time great.

    , @Twinkie
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    So that guy gets affirmative action, eh?

    , @syonredux
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I had a Latinx teacher in grade school (7th grade) with an aggressively Irish appearance: red hair, ultra pale skin, freckles, etc. He was a nice guy. I used to discuss James Michener books with him.

    , @G. Poulin
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Years ago I watched a movie starring Tom Berenger about a group of Irish soldiers who deserted the U.S. army and enlisted in the Mexican army. I wonder if Canelo is descended from one of those micks.

    Replies: @Too Long Didn't Read, @Paleo Liberal

    , @Matttt
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Canelo = cinnamon. Redheads with light skin like Mr. Alvarez are called ginger in American English, but they are called cinnamon in Mexican Spanish.

    Also, there's a famous Mexican song about "ojos negros, piel canela," black eyes, cinnamon skin. I always thought that mean brownish skin, but now I wonder.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jonathan Mason

  23. The Spanish language doesn’t have neuter nouns, which drives Woke Anglos crazy: thus, they concoct ghastly neologisms like “Latinx.”

    Well, the Latinxes (Latincters?) themselves came up with the ghastly “Anglo”. They have it coming, good and hard.

  24. We just called everyone south of the Rio Grande “Mexicans”. Which makes sense – the rest of the world calls Americans “Yankees”, even though technically that refers to a small group of Americans from New England. Why shouldn’t I call all the Latins Mexican?
    And what is the “correct” way to say “Peking”? Do Chinese people really pronounce and spell it “Beijing”, or is “Beijing” a word the Woke invented to harass us? And so what if the Chinese do say “Beijing”? There is still nothing wrong with us pronouncing the word as “Peking”. The Japanese call baseball “baseberu”. Is that racist of them? – of course not. “Peking” is not racist either.
    How do you pronounce “Don Juan”? Do you try to pronounce it with a Spanish accent, “Don Hwan?” Does that make you culturally sensitive or are you expropriating and butchering their culture with your clumsy Anglo attempt to effect a Spanish accent? What if I pronounce it Don “Jew- un”? You would think I was a hillbilly who had read the word in a book but never heard it pronounced and was woefully mis-reading it. But my English professor who studied at Oxford told me Don “Jew-un” is the preferred pronunciation for many of the Oxford professors.
    You can pronounce Don Juan four different ways, all of them “correct” and none of them racist. Same goes for what you decide to call Mexicans, even if they are from Peru.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @rebel yell


    Do Chinese people really pronounce and spell it “Beijing”?

     

    In terms of raw phonics, that's more or less the right pronunciation, but non-Chinese will never get it 'right' because they don't know the tones with which the syllables must be pronounced. Also, many 'well-informed' Westerners who seek to use the 'authentic' versions of place names of course adopt 'Beijing' instead of 'Peking', but they make the 'j' a 'zh' sound, sometimes exaggerating it comically, which is completely wrong. It's just an ordinary j.

    But then you should hear what some of the Chinese versions of Western place names sound like. Some vaguely evoke the native names, but others are nowhere near verisimilitude. They are generally comfortable for Chinese speakers to pronounce, though, which is what you'd expect anywhere other than the Woke West.


    But my English professor who studied at Oxford told me Don “Jew-un” is the preferred pronunciation for many of the Oxford professors.

     

    This may have been because that's the way Lord Byron pronounced the name of his famous poem by that name.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @AndrewR, @AndrewR

    , @Mackerel Sky
    @rebel yell

    If you say "Peking", you just sound out of date. It's like calling China "Cathay" and Thailand "Siam". It was generally done once, and now it isn't.

    Replies: @Charon, @Wade Hampton

    , @JR Ewing
    @rebel yell


    We just called everyone south of the Rio Grande “Mexicans”.
     
    I can do better than that.

    My dad is 85 and lived his entire life in West Texas. Aside from visits to border towns in Mexico when he was younger and a trip to Hawaii in the 1960's, he has never left the continental United States. He still lives in the same town he was born in and will die there someday.

    When Jose Maria Olazabel - a spaniard with a quintessential Spanish name, right down to the 'th' sound in the middle - came from behind and won the Masters in 1994, my dad's comment on the telephone later that evening was that the "Mexican" made an eagle and pulled out the tournament.

    When I pointed out to him that the winner was Spanish and not Mexican, his response was, "They're all the same."

    Ironically, or not so ironically, it is a colloquialism in his small town to refer to actual Mexicans as "Spanish". There is a Mexican restaurant called the "Spanish Inn" and the locals refer to a city park in the Mexican neighborhood of town as, "Spanish Park".

    I'll also add that on a visit to Costa Rica once, I got into a conversation in Spanish with our bus driver and his opinion of Mexicans was something skin to ignorant accented hillbillies who can't speak proper Spanish.

    , @Ron Mexico
    @rebel yell

    12th grade English Lit teacher pronounced it "Jew-on"

    , @James J O'Meara
    @rebel yell

    Byron's Don Juan is pronounced Jew-on, as can be seen by the meter and rhymes therein.

    It's part of the English habit of pronouncing dirty furrin words any old way they want to. It's part of the whole anti-intellectual thing; "upper class" people can say whatever they want, and "correcting" them shows not education but pedantry. In turn, being an "Oxford professor" combines both snobbery and pedantry.

    Same with Don Quixote: pronounced "Quick-sit"

    I've had two real Oxford professors. One (whom Joyce Carol Oates wrote about in the story "Gay" as published in the Christmas 1972 issue of Playboy) taught The English Novel and mentioned Smollett's translation of Don Quick-sit. He also alluded to how he "learned Italian from the servants".

    The other was the son of the Anglican Bishop of Ontario, and author of a well-received book on French Existentialism (published by Oxford, of course). He pronounced French exactly as if it were English. Yes, really.

    So yeah, "Oxford professors".

    Those British chefs do the same thing: Paaastah (Gordon Ramsey), Orry-gone -o, jallopenno, etc.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  25. @epebble
    @Twinkie

    Why are the Spanish (and Portuguese ?) speakers of the Americas called "Latin"? That is like calling Native Americans "Sanskrit" because someone made a mistake of calling them Indians.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dr. X, @Jack D, @Prester John

    That is like calling Native Americans “Sanskrit” because someone made a mistake of calling them Indians.

    Why are we calling our purported aboriginals “Native Americans”? Most of us here are native Americans. The President has to be a native American.

  26. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Speaking of Latinxes (Latinxi? Latixen?), PowerLine had a post today about a Mexican middleweight boxer whom they're comparing to the all-time greats. His name is Canelo Alverez, and he looks very Celtic, right down to the freckles:

    https://www.football24.news/img/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Canelo-Alvarez-David-Benavidezs-dad-hints-at-doping.jpg

    Replies: @Polistra, @Trinity, @Twinkie, @syonredux, @G. Poulin, @Matttt

    He’s compensating furiously with his tatts. Or is it cultural appreciation? (That’s an autocorrect I’ve decided to let stand.)

    I’ve known more than one Celtic Latino. Red hair and freckles. Something cute about it really. I’m almost jealous…they get the benefits of both. All you need is the right surname, and you can do that by deed poll. Ah my misspent life.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Polistra

    People tend to imagine gingers when they imagine Irish people but the "black Irish" supposedly came from Iberia in ancient times. Someone like Colin Farrell could pass for Arab but he's all Irish.

  27. I remember in college in the early 1990s some group was trying to popularize “Latinø” as a gender-neutral alternative to Latino/Latina. I believe that it may have been the Latinøs themselves, surprisingly. I guess it did not catch on, probably because no one really knows how to pronounce ø, plus it’s a northern European character anyway.

  28. @prosa123
    Many of the Spanish-speaking-ancestry people I know say "Spanish" to describe themselves and others of like background. Sometimes they'll use a specific identifier such as Puerto Rican, Dominican, Salvadoran, etc. None of this comes up often, as in most cases they seem to have a relatively low level of ethnic consciousness.

    Replies: @Peterike, @Anon

    “ Sometimes they’ll use a specific identifier such as Puerto Rican, Dominican, Salvadoran, etc. None of this comes up often, as in most cases they seem to have a relatively low level of ethnic consciousness.”

    Oh yeah? Call a Dominican a Puerto Rican or vice versa. See how well that goes over.

    • Agree: Gary in Gramercy
    • Replies: @joe_mama
    @Peterike

    Been my experience as well.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEG66-Lro7U

  29. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Speaking of Latinxes (Latinxi? Latixen?), PowerLine had a post today about a Mexican middleweight boxer whom they're comparing to the all-time greats. His name is Canelo Alverez, and he looks very Celtic, right down to the freckles:

    https://www.football24.news/img/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Canelo-Alvarez-David-Benavidezs-dad-hints-at-doping.jpg

    Replies: @Polistra, @Trinity, @Twinkie, @syonredux, @G. Poulin, @Matttt

    Saint Patrick’s Battalion. Check out a couple of boxers of Irish, Mexican and Indian descent, Danny “Little Red” Lopez and big brother, Ernie.

    Little Red Lopez was an all time great.

  30. I haven’t followed the NYY in many decades.

    Have they erected a centerfield monument to Clemente, yet? How about one for a gay/trans player on Murderers Row? (Why not one for a psycho now sitting on Sing-Sing’s Murderers Row?)

  31. Latinx sonax on my street today. Construction, with power tools, on mothers day. House had been sold, new owner (or Latinx dorm renters) has not moved in yet, so I do not blame the new owner. Any nearby house having a mothers day gathering in the yard, screw them. Screw societal norms — learning the language, yielding for the ambulance, etc.

  32. Sorry but as a dedicated Latin student, when I hear “Latin” I’m thinking of George Sanders or some other actor with a pretentious British accent playing a Roman commander astride a silver horse in some biblical epic

    And as a Pirate fan it’s sad to deal with how the Lumber Company has degenerated into the current plucky but hapless toothpick wielders. God, how even one Mike Easler could help us out now

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Known Fact


    I’m thinking of George Sanders or some other actor with a pretentious British accent playing a Roman commander astride a silver horse in some biblical epic
     
    These are imperial times.

    https://i.postimg.cc/JztfPY2S/Fat-Counsellors.png

    Replies: @photondancer

    , @James J O'Meara
    @Known Fact

    I have a wewy gweat fwiend in Wome named Biggus Dickus.

  33. Anonymous[141] • Disclaimer says:

    Looking for your review of State of Play. Any link? Not showing in TAC.

  34. @Twinkie
    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?

    Replies: @epebble, @Clyde, @gent, @Jonathan Mason, @imnobody00

    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?

    Originally it meant Catholic, but that division evaporated when the Irish and cohorts started immigrating in mass. We’d be better off using the old Spanish imperial ethnic divisions. Castizo/mestizo/indio/etc.

  35. @Twinkie
    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?

    Replies: @epebble, @Clyde, @gent, @Jonathan Mason, @imnobody00

    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?

    No, they don’t. That is why they do not understand a word of what is said in church, but they go anyway, because that is what you do on Sunday. So Cogito Ergo Sum or Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc does not mean a damn thing to them.

    The term Latino/Latina is a pretty silly one anyway, because it is only used by wokex gringos and gringas (gringx) in the Estados Unidos to refer to people who speak languages other than English which have descended from Latin, but excluding French, Romanian, and Italian.

    (People in Europe do not refer to people like Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo as Latinos.)

    Latinos and Latinas in the wild do not refer to themselves as such either. Even in a relatively small country like Ecuador, there are a number of ethnicities, none of which are “Latino”.

    The largest number of Ecuadorians identify themselves as Mestizos, and though Spanish (descended from a western Roman empire dialect of Latin) is the main language, other languages include Achuar-Shiwiar ,Chachi, Colorado, Quechua – which comprises 9 separate dialects are spoken in as many areas in the country with a combined population of 1’460,00–Shuar, and Waorani.

    The way to deal with wokeism is to LAUGH at it!

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Jonathan Mason

    I'm like totally for sure really certain that the people who have lost their jobs, businesses, and/or lives to woke will appreciate the advice to just like don't have a cow man.

    , @El Dato
    @Jonathan Mason

    Laugh like Kyle!

    , @syonredux
    @Jonathan Mason


    The way to deal with wokeism is to LAUGH at it!
     
    Ah, you sweet Summer child.....


    https://allthatsinteresting.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/struggle-session-dunce-cap-featured-image.png


    https://multimedia.scmp.com/cultural-revolution/images/article/225hei-bang-fen-zi-wang-yilun.jpg

    http://www.nybooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/li-zhensheng-featured.jpg
    , @AndrewR
    @Jonathan Mason

    Did everyone hear about the Cornell law student in hot water because he dared to read a court transcript the way it was written instead of censoring himself when the VERY BAD WORD THAT WHITE PEOPLE CAN NEVER SAY came up?

    , @Peter D. Bredon
    @Jonathan Mason

    https://youtu.be/Iv4PFgOmAsI

  36. Wokeness will likely hit a brick wall when it hits the non-Anglo world. Greek nouns are preceded by male, female and neutral definitive and indefinite articles, adjectives and noun endings. There is no chance of the language changing to suit the Woke religion given it is so tied up with Hellenic identity.

    It is always amusing to see the Anglos tear each other apart.

    • Agree: fish
  37. @Paleo Liberal
    This is something I have believed for a while. Latin really is the English word for Latino/a. Why not use it?

    Hispanic is another good English word.

    A Dominican friend of mine called his ethnic background “Spanish”. Also a good English word.

    Cesar Chavez and his crowd used “Chicano/a” for American born Latins, especially of Mexican descent. That word has fallen out of favor. Imagine an alternate Woke 2021 with the word “Chicanx”.

    Replies: @Alden, @Anonymous, @Swamp Fox

    You are right. Latins is the plural for Latin people of all genders. Hispanic refers explicitly to people of any race with Spanish surnames. That’s according to republican race traitor Richard Nixon’s 1970 executive order creating the Hispanic affirmative action class and subsequent satanic Supreme Court orders.

  38. @epebble
    @Twinkie

    Why are the Spanish (and Portuguese ?) speakers of the Americas called "Latin"? That is like calling Native Americans "Sanskrit" because someone made a mistake of calling them Indians.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dr. X, @Jack D, @Prester John

    Why are the Spanish (and Portuguese ?) speakers of the Americas called “Latin”?

    Because they speak Romance Languages derived from Latin and worship in the Latin Church.

  39. Latinx is complete nonsense. I am an active member of a Hispanic business advocacy group and the only people woke & stupid (redundant) enough to use the term are some advertising agencies that we use. They have been told very forcefully that the term is the creation of non-Hispanics and non-Catholics and we do not appreciate it. It is the erasure of all Latinas, the height of linguistic ignorance and culturally imbecilic.

    • Replies: @Swamp Fox
    @Mule named Sal

    Sixteen miles on the Erie Canal🎵🎵
    Great fourth grade Catholic school memories.

  40. But these Woke Anglos are exactly the type of person HBD’ers think should be running society. Ivy League types who done real good on the SAT and think of themselves as part of a Smart Set, determined to guide society.

    Like say, the old communist intelligentsia.

    You might wanna revisit your worldview. I know you’ve concocted a self-serving vision in which a Smart Set (which, of course, includes you) are the source of all Goodness. But I suspect even a Yale Man can see how stupid it is.

    Fantasy

    Reality

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @RichardTaylor

    You're right, I don't want to be ruled by the Harvard faculty either. But the goal of trying to limit nonwhite immigration is to deny the Harvard faculty the imported allies it needs to overwhelm us at the polls.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    , @Alden
    @RichardTaylor

    Yale man’s mommy’s laundry maid ironed his shirt and that exact faggy 3 point handkerchief. Family driver delivered clean laundry and several pairs freshly polished shoes once a week. At least he didn’t live with mommy while in college as FDR did. Who is it?

  41. @epebble
    @Twinkie

    Why are the Spanish (and Portuguese ?) speakers of the Americas called "Latin"? That is like calling Native Americans "Sanskrit" because someone made a mistake of calling them Indians.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dr. X, @Jack D, @Prester John

    Latin is really short for Latin America, as opposed to Anglo America.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Jack D


    Latin is really short for Latin America
     
    Do "Latin Americans" speak Latin?

    We ought to call it Spanish-speaking (or -colonized) America. Or just use geographical terms such as Central America and South America. Even Hispanic is better than Latin.

    Latin is for the people of Latium. Celts and Celtic-conquered American aborigines go home!

    Replies: @International Jew, @RSDB, @nebulafox

    , @epebble
    @Jack D

    Calling Spanish (and Portuguese ?) speaking America, Latin America doesn't make it any more sensible. If we want to keep using fancy ancient words, we can end the Negro -> Black -> "African American" transition by ending it with Hieroglyphics. Similarly Hebrew -> Jew can be made fancier by renaming as Cuneiform. East Asians become Mandarin. South Asians become Hindi (Sanskrit having become used for the "Indians" already).

    Replies: @S Johnson

  42. @Jonathan Mason
    @Twinkie


    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?
     
    No, they don't. That is why they do not understand a word of what is said in church, but they go anyway, because that is what you do on Sunday. So Cogito Ergo Sum or Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc does not mean a damn thing to them.

    The term Latino/Latina is a pretty silly one anyway, because it is only used by wokex gringos and gringas (gringx) in the Estados Unidos to refer to people who speak languages other than English which have descended from Latin, but excluding French, Romanian, and Italian.

    (People in Europe do not refer to people like Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo as Latinos.)

    Latinos and Latinas in the wild do not refer to themselves as such either. Even in a relatively small country like Ecuador, there are a number of ethnicities, none of which are "Latino".

    The largest number of Ecuadorians identify themselves as Mestizos, and though Spanish (descended from a western Roman empire dialect of Latin) is the main language, other languages include Achuar-Shiwiar ,Chachi, Colorado, Quechua – which comprises 9 separate dialects are spoken in as many areas in the country with a combined population of 1'460,00--Shuar, and Waorani.

    The way to deal with wokeism is to LAUGH at it!

    https://i2.wp.com/www.chrismadden.co.uk/images/cartoons/a807-court-of-language-crime-cartoon.jpg

    Replies: @J.Ross, @El Dato, @syonredux, @AndrewR, @Peter D. Bredon

    I’m like totally for sure really certain that the people who have lost their jobs, businesses, and/or lives to woke will appreciate the advice to just like don’t have a cow man.

  43. @Jack D
    @epebble

    Latin is really short for Latin America, as opposed to Anglo America.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @epebble

    Latin is really short for Latin America

    Do “Latin Americans” speak Latin?

    We ought to call it Spanish-speaking (or -colonized) America. Or just use geographical terms such as Central America and South America. Even Hispanic is better than Latin.

    Latin is for the people of Latium. Celts and Celtic-conquered American aborigines go home!

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Twinkie

    Quebec is legitimately "Latin America" too.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew

    , @RSDB
    @Twinkie


    Do “Latin Americans” speak Latin? ... Latin is for the people of Latium.

     

    Parlano latino i laziali di oggi?
    , @nebulafox
    @Twinkie

    Let's go all the way and ban Anatolian interlopers, too. ;)

  44. The term Latino/Latina is a pretty silly one anyway, because it is only used by wokex gringos and gringas (gringx) in the Estados Unidos to refer to people who speak languages other than English which have descended from Latin, but excluding French, Romanian, and Italian.

    Latino has more of a political organizing ring to it. But the word i’ve never heard for self-reference is “Hispanic.” Usually people just give their national origin–Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, etc.

    I drove commercial delivery (building products–Austin was booming) for a bit, after dropping out of grad school. Drove with a Mexican-American guy for a while–weirdly a JW, good guy. His term was “Spanish”. Everyone around was either “white”, “black” or “Spanish”.

    (Note: may have changed. No idea what terms people are using now.)

    ~

    Lower priority than all the other stuff he didn’t do, but Trump should have fixed this mess for the 2020 census.

    Census race category–add Mestizo and Mulatto, break up the API to Polynesians, East Asians, South Asians.

    If you’re going to do the ethnic thing … add them all, not just this bogus pan-Latin-American, but also including Spain thing. Our lone ethnic category … which has nothing to do with the historic American nation! (Basically an anti-white-American organizing category.)

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @AnotherDad


    Census race category–add Mestizo and Mulatto, break up the API to Polynesians, East Asians, South Asians.
     
    I am down with breaking up the API category as you suggested, but Mestizo and Mulatto are not races. They should simply mark themselves as multiracial, which they are (the components being European/white, American aboriginal, African/black, and East or South Asian).

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew

  45. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Speaking of Latinxes (Latinxi? Latixen?), PowerLine had a post today about a Mexican middleweight boxer whom they're comparing to the all-time greats. His name is Canelo Alverez, and he looks very Celtic, right down to the freckles:

    https://www.football24.news/img/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Canelo-Alvarez-David-Benavidezs-dad-hints-at-doping.jpg

    Replies: @Polistra, @Trinity, @Twinkie, @syonredux, @G. Poulin, @Matttt

    So that guy gets affirmative action, eh?

  46. @AnotherDad

    The term Latino/Latina is a pretty silly one anyway, because it is only used by wokex gringos and gringas (gringx) in the Estados Unidos to refer to people who speak languages other than English which have descended from Latin, but excluding French, Romanian, and Italian.
     
    Latino has more of a political organizing ring to it. But the word i've never heard for self-reference is "Hispanic." Usually people just give their national origin--Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, etc.

    I drove commercial delivery (building products--Austin was booming) for a bit, after dropping out of grad school. Drove with a Mexican-American guy for a while--weirdly a JW, good guy. His term was "Spanish". Everyone around was either "white", "black" or "Spanish".

    (Note: may have changed. No idea what terms people are using now.)

    ~

    Lower priority than all the other stuff he didn't do, but Trump should have fixed this mess for the 2020 census.

    Census race category--add Mestizo and Mulatto, break up the API to Polynesians, East Asians, South Asians.

    If you're going to do the ethnic thing ... add them all, not just this bogus pan-Latin-American, but also including Spain thing. Our lone ethnic category ... which has nothing to do with the historic American nation! (Basically an anti-white-American organizing category.)

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Census race category–add Mestizo and Mulatto, break up the API to Polynesians, East Asians, South Asians.

    I am down with breaking up the API category as you suggested, but Mestizo and Mulatto are not races. They should simply mark themselves as multiracial, which they are (the components being European/white, American aboriginal, African/black, and East or South Asian).

    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
    @Twinkie

    Make the woke left own their madness and highlight their consensus with people on the right. Have multiple racial and ethnic categories. For example you could be, say, a Mulatto Hispanic or a Castizo Anglo. And institute race tribunals...but only for the sake of protecting victimized minorities against privileged Whites abusing the system. And start calling for Affirmative Action in the NBA, but only on behalf of Cambodians, Mestizos etc.

    Mainstream conservatives lack not only a backbone but also the creativity and dark sense of humor appropriate for The Current Year.

    Also, breaking up the API category would really highlight just how far ahead Fancy Asians and the children of Hindu programmers really are. I’m always surprised by how well APIs do despite Jingle Asians and Islanders holding them back (though recent waves of Filipinos have been much more positively selected, not sure about the Cambodians, Thais et al)

  47. The Spanish language doesn’t have neuter nouns, which drives Woke Anglos crazy: thus, they concoct ghastly neologisms like “Latinx.”

    Gender for inanimate nouns annoyed me back in high school French. La table, le lit, la viande, le vin …

    But the last couple decades, i’ve wondered whether the gendered language doesn’t help them stave off some of the feminist nuttery and now woke insanity. Keep them a bit more grounded about sexual dimorphism and ergo reality. Don’t think it’s a vaccine, but might be helping a bit.

    • Replies: @JohnPlywood
    @AnotherDad

    Obviously not, as the Latin European world is more deeply entrenched in low fertility and feminism than the Germanic world. Latin America has had transsexuals long before the North did.

  48. @anon215
    Or how about we just continue using "Latino" and "Latina"? By looking for substitutes for "Latinx", you are accepting the woke premise that words must be gender-neutral. This is something I reject outright, as should everyone on the side of sanity.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @R.G. Camara, @023423452, @Peter Akuleyev

    Yeah, Steve is backtracking once again. Don’t give them an inch.

    Latino and Latina are fine, and fuck the Commies. Never let anyone who isn’t a judge or your parents control your speech.

  49. @Jack D
    @epebble

    Latin is really short for Latin America, as opposed to Anglo America.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @epebble

    Calling Spanish (and Portuguese ?) speaking America, Latin America doesn’t make it any more sensible. If we want to keep using fancy ancient words, we can end the Negro -> Black -> “African American” transition by ending it with Hieroglyphics. Similarly Hebrew -> Jew can be made fancier by renaming as Cuneiform. East Asians become Mandarin. South Asians become Hindi (Sanskrit having become used for the “Indians” already).

    • Replies: @S Johnson
    @epebble

    The term ‘Latin America’ was apparently popularised in the 1860s by France as part of Napoleon III’s plan to project French power into America, beginning with Mexico. So the idea was to emphasise some degree of affinity between races with Latinate languages (particularly French, Spanish and Portuguese), in contrast especially to Britain and Germany. The Second Mexican Empire didn’t last, but the name stuck because it is useful to have a term that includes Brazil with Spanish America.

    Replies: @epebble

  50. “latinx” is a good name for a strip bar featuring chicas guapas y ¡calientes!

    •••••••••

    every time i read “woke”, i always imagine it being said by elmer fudd.

    • LOL: AndrewR
  51. Six dead, no wounded in Colorado Springs: Sailer’s Law of Mass Shootings (which, of course, is a tendency, not a law) says the murderer is not black.

    Steve on Twitter

    Methinks this one, at Canterbury Manufactured Home Community, is brown:

    Seven dead including suspect in shooting at mobile home community

    According to CSPD, it appears that a birthday party was being held at the trailer in the 2800 block of Preakness Way for one of the victims.

    Preakness Way! Just off Triple Crown! Not far from Derby! How well-timed can a mass shooting be? The Preakness is Saturday.

    Sadly, Belmont St is miles distant, in something called “Security-Widefield”. Sounds pretty white.

  52. Twitter becomes Tumblr; Real Life becomes Tumblr.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Altai


    Twitter becomes Tumblr; Real Life becomes Tumblr.

     

    What does Tumblr become? Grindr?

    What happens if Grindr buys Fiverr? Wait... never mind. We don't want to know.

    Replies: @El Dato

  53. @Altai
    Twitter becomes Tumblr; Real Life becomes Tumblr.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Twitter becomes Tumblr; Real Life becomes Tumblr.

    What does Tumblr become? Grindr?

    What happens if Grindr buys Fiverr? Wait… never mind. We don’t want to know.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Reg Cæsar

    Everybody who uses "Latinx", in writing or speech (in case it can be understood by the other side of the conversation, or, in case there is a "conversation", through the bullhorn) is a fucking asshole who needs to be whipped à la Saudi Arabia.

    That's my opinion and I stick to it.

  54. @epebble
    @Jack D

    Calling Spanish (and Portuguese ?) speaking America, Latin America doesn't make it any more sensible. If we want to keep using fancy ancient words, we can end the Negro -> Black -> "African American" transition by ending it with Hieroglyphics. Similarly Hebrew -> Jew can be made fancier by renaming as Cuneiform. East Asians become Mandarin. South Asians become Hindi (Sanskrit having become used for the "Indians" already).

    Replies: @S Johnson

    The term ‘Latin America’ was apparently popularised in the 1860s by France as part of Napoleon III’s plan to project French power into America, beginning with Mexico. So the idea was to emphasise some degree of affinity between races with Latinate languages (particularly French, Spanish and Portuguese), in contrast especially to Britain and Germany. The Second Mexican Empire didn’t last, but the name stuck because it is useful to have a term that includes Brazil with Spanish America.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @S Johnson

    If language group is the preferred appellation, then the correct word is "Romance". Everybody loves Romance. Latin is so out of favor that even Roman Catholic Church decided to dump it. Only Lawyers use it now and everybody hates lawyers.

    Replies: @S Johnson

  55. @Twinkie
    @Jack D


    Latin is really short for Latin America
     
    Do "Latin Americans" speak Latin?

    We ought to call it Spanish-speaking (or -colonized) America. Or just use geographical terms such as Central America and South America. Even Hispanic is better than Latin.

    Latin is for the people of Latium. Celts and Celtic-conquered American aborigines go home!

    Replies: @International Jew, @RSDB, @nebulafox

    Quebec is legitimately “Latin America” too.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
    @International Jew

    Good point. It’s like calling the US part of “Germanic America”.

    Also, if we have White and Black Hispanics why not have Brown and Black Anglos? If pressed, I would claim ‘Anglo’ as my ethnicity. (Obviously not my race, which is a different can of worms).

  56. @Peterike
    @prosa123

    “ Sometimes they’ll use a specific identifier such as Puerto Rican, Dominican, Salvadoran, etc. None of this comes up often, as in most cases they seem to have a relatively low level of ethnic consciousness.”

    Oh yeah? Call a Dominican a Puerto Rican or vice versa. See how well that goes over.

    Replies: @joe_mama

    Been my experience as well.

  57. @RichardTaylor
    But these Woke Anglos are exactly the type of person HBD'ers think should be running society. Ivy League types who done real good on the SAT and think of themselves as part of a Smart Set, determined to guide society.

    Like say, the old communist intelligentsia.

    You might wanna revisit your worldview. I know you've concocted a self-serving vision in which a Smart Set (which, of course, includes you) are the source of all Goodness. But I suspect even a Yale Man can see how stupid it is.

    https://www.gentlemansgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/A-classic-Ivy-League-student.jpg

    Fantasy

    http://www.prairiedogmag.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Dumb_and_Dumber_To_review.jpg

    Reality

    Replies: @International Jew, @Alden

    You’re right, I don’t want to be ruled by the Harvard faculty either. But the goal of trying to limit nonwhite immigration is to deny the Harvard faculty the imported allies it needs to overwhelm us at the polls.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @International Jew


    You’re right, I don’t want to be ruled by the Harvard faculty either. But the goal of trying to limit nonwhite immigration is to deny the Harvard faculty the imported allies it needs to overwhelm us at the polls.
     
    Exactly IJ.

    Americans actually here make decisions how to govern ourselves. (Ideally only responsible, productive men with families and ergo a stake in the future. That's another battle.)

    Republican self-government ... what a concept!
  58. @Reg Cæsar
    @Altai


    Twitter becomes Tumblr; Real Life becomes Tumblr.

     

    What does Tumblr become? Grindr?

    What happens if Grindr buys Fiverr? Wait... never mind. We don't want to know.

    Replies: @El Dato

    Everybody who uses “Latinx”, in writing or speech (in case it can be understood by the other side of the conversation, or, in case there is a “conversation”, through the bullhorn) is a fucking asshole who needs to be whipped à la Saudi Arabia.

    That’s my opinion and I stick to it.

  59. @Jonathan Mason
    @Twinkie


    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?
     
    No, they don't. That is why they do not understand a word of what is said in church, but they go anyway, because that is what you do on Sunday. So Cogito Ergo Sum or Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc does not mean a damn thing to them.

    The term Latino/Latina is a pretty silly one anyway, because it is only used by wokex gringos and gringas (gringx) in the Estados Unidos to refer to people who speak languages other than English which have descended from Latin, but excluding French, Romanian, and Italian.

    (People in Europe do not refer to people like Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo as Latinos.)

    Latinos and Latinas in the wild do not refer to themselves as such either. Even in a relatively small country like Ecuador, there are a number of ethnicities, none of which are "Latino".

    The largest number of Ecuadorians identify themselves as Mestizos, and though Spanish (descended from a western Roman empire dialect of Latin) is the main language, other languages include Achuar-Shiwiar ,Chachi, Colorado, Quechua – which comprises 9 separate dialects are spoken in as many areas in the country with a combined population of 1'460,00--Shuar, and Waorani.

    The way to deal with wokeism is to LAUGH at it!

    https://i2.wp.com/www.chrismadden.co.uk/images/cartoons/a807-court-of-language-crime-cartoon.jpg

    Replies: @J.Ross, @El Dato, @syonredux, @AndrewR, @Peter D. Bredon

    Laugh like Kyle!

  60. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Speaking of Latinxes (Latinxi? Latixen?), PowerLine had a post today about a Mexican middleweight boxer whom they're comparing to the all-time greats. His name is Canelo Alverez, and he looks very Celtic, right down to the freckles:

    https://www.football24.news/img/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Canelo-Alvarez-David-Benavidezs-dad-hints-at-doping.jpg

    Replies: @Polistra, @Trinity, @Twinkie, @syonredux, @G. Poulin, @Matttt

    I had a Latinx teacher in grade school (7th grade) with an aggressively Irish appearance: red hair, ultra pale skin, freckles, etc. He was a nice guy. I used to discuss James Michener books with him.

  61. @anon215
    Or how about we just continue using "Latino" and "Latina"? By looking for substitutes for "Latinx", you are accepting the woke premise that words must be gender-neutral. This is something I reject outright, as should everyone on the side of sanity.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @R.G. Camara, @023423452, @Peter Akuleyev

    I disagree, and I feel like “Latin” is pretty old. I remember my grandfather talking (positively) about the “Latins” and the “Chinese” (which was his word for “Asian”).

  62. @Jonathan Mason
    @Twinkie


    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?
     
    No, they don't. That is why they do not understand a word of what is said in church, but they go anyway, because that is what you do on Sunday. So Cogito Ergo Sum or Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc does not mean a damn thing to them.

    The term Latino/Latina is a pretty silly one anyway, because it is only used by wokex gringos and gringas (gringx) in the Estados Unidos to refer to people who speak languages other than English which have descended from Latin, but excluding French, Romanian, and Italian.

    (People in Europe do not refer to people like Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo as Latinos.)

    Latinos and Latinas in the wild do not refer to themselves as such either. Even in a relatively small country like Ecuador, there are a number of ethnicities, none of which are "Latino".

    The largest number of Ecuadorians identify themselves as Mestizos, and though Spanish (descended from a western Roman empire dialect of Latin) is the main language, other languages include Achuar-Shiwiar ,Chachi, Colorado, Quechua – which comprises 9 separate dialects are spoken in as many areas in the country with a combined population of 1'460,00--Shuar, and Waorani.

    The way to deal with wokeism is to LAUGH at it!

    https://i2.wp.com/www.chrismadden.co.uk/images/cartoons/a807-court-of-language-crime-cartoon.jpg

    Replies: @J.Ross, @El Dato, @syonredux, @AndrewR, @Peter D. Bredon

    The way to deal with wokeism is to LAUGH at it!

    Ah, you sweet Summer child…..

  63. @rebel yell
    We just called everyone south of the Rio Grande "Mexicans". Which makes sense - the rest of the world calls Americans "Yankees", even though technically that refers to a small group of Americans from New England. Why shouldn't I call all the Latins Mexican?
    And what is the "correct" way to say "Peking"? Do Chinese people really pronounce and spell it "Beijing", or is "Beijing" a word the Woke invented to harass us? And so what if the Chinese do say "Beijing"? There is still nothing wrong with us pronouncing the word as "Peking". The Japanese call baseball "baseberu". Is that racist of them? - of course not. "Peking" is not racist either.
    How do you pronounce "Don Juan"? Do you try to pronounce it with a Spanish accent, "Don Hwan?" Does that make you culturally sensitive or are you expropriating and butchering their culture with your clumsy Anglo attempt to effect a Spanish accent? What if I pronounce it Don "Jew- un"? You would think I was a hillbilly who had read the word in a book but never heard it pronounced and was woefully mis-reading it. But my English professor who studied at Oxford told me Don "Jew-un" is the preferred pronunciation for many of the Oxford professors.
    You can pronounce Don Juan four different ways, all of them "correct" and none of them racist. Same goes for what you decide to call Mexicans, even if they are from Peru.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Mackerel Sky, @JR Ewing, @Ron Mexico, @James J O'Meara

    Do Chinese people really pronounce and spell it “Beijing”?

    In terms of raw phonics, that’s more or less the right pronunciation, but non-Chinese will never get it ‘right’ because they don’t know the tones with which the syllables must be pronounced. Also, many ‘well-informed’ Westerners who seek to use the ‘authentic’ versions of place names of course adopt ‘Beijing’ instead of ‘Peking’, but they make the ‘j’ a ‘zh’ sound, sometimes exaggerating it comically, which is completely wrong. It’s just an ordinary j.

    But then you should hear what some of the Chinese versions of Western place names sound like. Some vaguely evoke the native names, but others are nowhere near verisimilitude. They are generally comfortable for Chinese speakers to pronounce, though, which is what you’d expect anywhere other than the Woke West.

    But my English professor who studied at Oxford told me Don “Jew-un” is the preferred pronunciation for many of the Oxford professors.

    This may have been because that’s the way Lord Byron pronounced the name of his famous poem by that name.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Speaking of Beijing, Spanish (and French) speakers still use Pekin as their preferred name for that Chinese city. This butchering of English to meet the demands of Woke intellectuals from American universities is something that hasn't caught on in most other languages.

    As an aside I remember Coca Cola issuing a series of bilingual English/Spanish Christmas-themed packages a number of years back, (no doubt to brandish their multi-culti bona fides) and in English you were wished a PC "Happy Holidays" but in Spanish it was "Feliz Navidad" (Happy Christmas).
    A negligible percentage of English speakers might take offence at the word "Christmas" but apparently 99.99999% of Spanish speakers celebrate this particular holiday, hence it was a "Happy Christmas" for them.

    Replies: @Mackerel Sky

    , @AndrewR
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    *sigh*

    I am so sick of people using "the West" and it's derivative forms as interchangable with "Anglophones" or sometimes just "Americans." Yes, English speakers often say "Beizhing." Frankly I think that sounds a lot more pleasant than "Beidjing," which is already quite different from how it's pronounced in Mandarin.

    Contrary to your pretentious pronouncement, most "Western" languages still use some form of the word Peking. danish, Norwegian and Icelandic seem to be the only notable exception besides English and the Celtic languages

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beijing#/languages

    , @AndrewR
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Also you hilariously seem to be implying that the "woke western" Anglophones pronounce "Paris," for example, anything like the the French do. Butchering foreign words is universal. And making sincere attempts to pronounce a foreign word accurately is not "woke," nor is it very common even in the "woke west"

  64. Anonymous[283] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: A story from 2020, but I hadn’t realised that Nigeria is projected to have a higher population than China by 2100.

    (Nigerian growth meets Chinese decline.)

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-53409521

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Anonymous


    OT: A story from 2020, but I hadn’t realised that Nigeria is projected to have a higher population than China by 2100.

    (Nigerian growth meets Chinese decline.)
     
    The PLA bio-labs may have something to say about that.

    Replies: @El Dato, @nebulafox

    , @nebulafox
    @Anonymous

    Under-commented on story of the century, Africa's fertility. I'm not sure it'll be as immediate as some people say-one shouldn't underestimate the size of the African continent-but it's one of those things that despite everything you know about the media, you'd expect to be... well, commented upon more.

    Of the other non-American countries that have more people than Nigeria, India and Indonesia still are above-replacement rate fertility, but only just, around 2.2-2.3 compared to Pakistan's 3.something and Nigeria's 5.something. (Both of the former countries had governments in the past that resorted to... rather forceful measures to get rates down, but the real reasons are the same as everywhere else: urbanization, development, etc.) This still represents a dramatic reduction in fertility over the past 50 years. There's no reason to assume it'll remain steady, let alone grow higher. Only Pakistan is notably above average, but it's still nowhere near Nigeria's levels of fertility, and it's #5 to Nigeria's #6. It's possible that Nigeria might end up more populous than anywhere in the world by 2100, should current trends continue indefinitely. We have no reason to assume that they will, of course-plenty of countries out there with sub-par or par fertility rates now that had 6 kids per woman 50, 60 years ago-but that's still remarkable.

    , @fish
    @Anonymous

    Great.....more phone scams.

  65. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paleo Liberal
    This is something I have believed for a while. Latin really is the English word for Latino/a. Why not use it?

    Hispanic is another good English word.

    A Dominican friend of mine called his ethnic background “Spanish”. Also a good English word.

    Cesar Chavez and his crowd used “Chicano/a” for American born Latins, especially of Mexican descent. That word has fallen out of favor. Imagine an alternate Woke 2021 with the word “Chicanx”.

    Replies: @Alden, @Anonymous, @Swamp Fox

    “This is something I have believed for a while. Latin really is the English word for Latino/a. Why not use it?”

    Because they tried to go woke. But woke is never enough… there is always woker.

    Also… “Latin” used in that way has connotations that are inexpedient for the woke.
    A “Latin” man is expected to be an actual man… and a “Latin” woman a woman.
    Perhaps even moreso (rightly or wrongly) than the non-Latin varieties.

    Latinos/Latinas/Latinx(es) are sexless compadres.
    MS-13 on one side and Justice Sotomayor on the other.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    MS-13 on one side and Justice Sotomayor on the other.

     

    I thought they were on the same side.
  66. And then they came for… ex-major leaguer Frank-Paul Santangelo.

    In an ANONYMOUS INSTAGRAM POST someone claims that Santangelo made an “unwanted advance” (not assault) many years ago, and boom! the man loses his job. That’s due process, right?

    We don’t even know if it’s a man, or woman, or whatever making the claim.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Polistra


    In an ANONYMOUS INSTAGRAM POST someone claims that Santangelo made an “unwanted advance”...
     
    Trayvon Martin made an unwanted advance. Volkert van der Graaf and Mohammed Bouyeri did as well, the latter toward a moving bicycle.
  67. https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.usatoday.com/amp/5016257001

    Mass shooting at trailer park in Colorado….

    @ the above: I’ll never forget 11th grade Spanish class…..the teacher posted the neutral word in the middle bar and then left and right did the various other variations including male/female/plural and lastly the “with respect”(nosotros) variation….

    I always thought it interesting they put the adjective behind the noun….not in front….different grammar concept…..

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Neoconned

    Not sure what you mean. "Nosotros/nosotras" is the only way to say we/us. "Vosotros" is the Spanish informal plural second person pronoun. The formal 2nd person plural pronoun in Spain and the only one in LatAm is "Ustedes(/Uds.)"

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @Neoconned

    If anything, this mass shooting shows that Hispanics are closer to whites than to blacks.

    , @Alden
    @Neoconned

    It’s because the noun is the most important thing. Shoes... color and type. Hair...... length color style.

  68. And what’s this now with the Cohen twins? Meghan and I haven’t even recovered from Althea Bernstein and now this? And can y’all HBD Nazis explain one is an NFL star and the other is Dindu Flambé?

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Polistra

    That's called making a squirrel out of it.

    I could understand students in drunken stupor breaking into a substation and trying to have hangtime on a 200KV line, but this?

    Unless he was under the influence of serious uppers?

    , @Gary in Gramercy
    @Polistra

    No True Cohen...

    Replies: @Cortes

    , @International Jew
    @Polistra


    And what’s this now with the Cohen twins? Meghan and I haven’t even recovered from Althea Bernstein and now this? And can y’all HBD Nazis explain one is an NFL star and the other is Dindu Flambé?
     
    Because evading tacklers and evading police draw on similar skills.


    A lesson from this incident: the much-maligned stun gun isn't inherently ineffective, it's just underpowered.

    Replies: @Perry Mason

  69. @rebel yell
    We just called everyone south of the Rio Grande "Mexicans". Which makes sense - the rest of the world calls Americans "Yankees", even though technically that refers to a small group of Americans from New England. Why shouldn't I call all the Latins Mexican?
    And what is the "correct" way to say "Peking"? Do Chinese people really pronounce and spell it "Beijing", or is "Beijing" a word the Woke invented to harass us? And so what if the Chinese do say "Beijing"? There is still nothing wrong with us pronouncing the word as "Peking". The Japanese call baseball "baseberu". Is that racist of them? - of course not. "Peking" is not racist either.
    How do you pronounce "Don Juan"? Do you try to pronounce it with a Spanish accent, "Don Hwan?" Does that make you culturally sensitive or are you expropriating and butchering their culture with your clumsy Anglo attempt to effect a Spanish accent? What if I pronounce it Don "Jew- un"? You would think I was a hillbilly who had read the word in a book but never heard it pronounced and was woefully mis-reading it. But my English professor who studied at Oxford told me Don "Jew-un" is the preferred pronunciation for many of the Oxford professors.
    You can pronounce Don Juan four different ways, all of them "correct" and none of them racist. Same goes for what you decide to call Mexicans, even if they are from Peru.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Mackerel Sky, @JR Ewing, @Ron Mexico, @James J O'Meara

    If you say “Peking”, you just sound out of date. It’s like calling China “Cathay” and Thailand “Siam”. It was generally done once, and now it isn’t.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Mackerel Sky

    But there's a thing called irony, and beyond that there's perversity. For some of us these are among our final redoubts. Allow us our trivial pleasures and compensations, I pray thee.

    Besides: Cathay, Burma, and Siam are splendid-sounding words.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Brutusale

    , @Wade Hampton
    @Mackerel Sky

    I panicked...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5p2XAGE8R8

  70. @Mike Tre
    @anon215

    "Or how about we just continue using “Latino” and “Latina”?"

    Or, we could stop lumping the entire Central/South/Caribbean American population into one (false*) generalization, and instead refer to Cubans as Cuban, Colombians and Colombian, and Mexicans as illega.. I mean, Mexican.

    *The term Latino is about as off base as can be. The connection between Latin and the groups of people defined as such is pretty frail. Aren't Italians the real Latinos?

    Replies: @Dumbo, @e

    Or, we could stop lumping the entire Central/South/Caribbean American population into one (false*) generalization,

    Jorge Luis Borges has a funny bit in his famous interview with William Buckley where he says that “there is no such thing as a Latin American, only Colombian, Peruvian, Argentine (not ‘Argentinian’), Brazilian”, etc.

    The term Latino is even worse than “Latin American” because it doesn’t even mean a geographical origin, is a false ethnic-linguistic categorization lumping together European people from Spain and amerindian people from Nicaragua, but somehow not including the more similar Brazilians or Haitians, because they don’t speak Spanish…

    • Thanks: Bardon Kaldian, Ian Smith
  71. What about suspecto and suspecta?

    “Suspex” is even better.

    • Replies: @fish
    @Sick of Orcs

    Just stop it! I’m at the neurologist and my hysterical cackling under a hospital approved face covering is drawing stares....

  72. @Mackerel Sky
    @rebel yell

    If you say "Peking", you just sound out of date. It's like calling China "Cathay" and Thailand "Siam". It was generally done once, and now it isn't.

    Replies: @Charon, @Wade Hampton

    But there’s a thing called irony, and beyond that there’s perversity. For some of us these are among our final redoubts. Allow us our trivial pleasures and compensations, I pray thee.

    Besides: Cathay, Burma, and Siam are splendid-sounding words.

    • Agree: El Dato, Lurker
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Charon

    Most of the Thai restaurants I've gone to over the last 38 years have had "Siam" in their name.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @AceDeuce, @anon, @Foreign Expert, @photondancer, @Jonathan Mason

    , @Brutusale
    @Charon

    When I order a Bombay Sapphire martini before dining on Peking Duck, people seem to be able to figure out what I want.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  73. • Replies: @El Dato
    @JohnnyWalker123

    D'oh!

    Space Race Victory Day is near, grasshopper.

  74. @Trinity
    Wonder if Pelosi probably gets Clemente mixed up with "Willie" Stargell? I know she has no clue who the hell Manny Sanguillen or Al Oliver were. I think that Clemente and Steve Blass should have shared the 1971 World Series MVP. Good lawd, how did that team beat the Orioles and their 4-20 game winners. Clemente like others didn't receive the recognition he deserved because of playing in a small market like Pittsburgh. That is why Reggie Jackson did a one and done with the Orioles and flew the coop to NYC.

    Replies: @Danindc, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    How did the ‘79 Pirates beat the Orioles down 3-1 and facing three of the best starting pitchers in the world (Flanagan, Palmer, McGregor)? It’s one of my first sports memories and still grates on me.

    • Agree: Trinity
    • Replies: @Marty
    @Danindc

    Just weeks before the trade in which the Pirates got their key piece, I was privy to a pre-game exchange at Candlestick Park that went like this:

    Stargell (coming down first base line) - “smell that fart? smell that fart? Eat that fart. What kinda car you got?

    Madlock (in Giants dugout) - “got me a big Lincoln.”

    Stargell - “shit that ain’t no kinda car.”

    Madlock - “kinda car you got, Will?”

    Stargell - “Got me a Benz.”

  75. @anon215
    Or how about we just continue using "Latino" and "Latina"? By looking for substitutes for "Latinx", you are accepting the woke premise that words must be gender-neutral. This is something I reject outright, as should everyone on the side of sanity.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @R.G. Camara, @023423452, @Peter Akuleyev

    Or how about we just continue using “Latino” and “Latina”?

    Why do we need to import Spanish words into English? The English word is “Latin”. Using “Latino” and “Latina” is already a silly progressive affectation. Hence the irony of the “LatinX” movement.

    • Replies: @anon215
    @Peter Akuleyev

    A very good point, but it kinda misses my point. Spanish language is by definition GENDERED. Even more, it ASSUMES GENDER (the worst MEGAHITLER thing anyone can do!) and assigns those assumptions to objects!

    But yes, I agree. We shouldn't have to speak like Antonio Mendoza ("Neeeeekadauguaaaaah) in our own country.

  76. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Speaking of Latinxes (Latinxi? Latixen?), PowerLine had a post today about a Mexican middleweight boxer whom they're comparing to the all-time greats. His name is Canelo Alverez, and he looks very Celtic, right down to the freckles:

    https://www.football24.news/img/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Canelo-Alvarez-David-Benavidezs-dad-hints-at-doping.jpg

    Replies: @Polistra, @Trinity, @Twinkie, @syonredux, @G. Poulin, @Matttt

    Years ago I watched a movie starring Tom Berenger about a group of Irish soldiers who deserted the U.S. army and enlisted in the Mexican army. I wonder if Canelo is descended from one of those micks.

    • Replies: @Too Long Didn't Read
    @G. Poulin

    I wonder if Canelo is descended from one of those micks.

    Doubtful, since the US Army tracked down every San Patricio they could find and executed them, plus 1848 was a long time ago. More likely descended from some Mick who had to leave the Isles in order to avoid arrest, and settled on Mexico as a tolerable hideout.

    , @Paleo Liberal
    @G. Poulin

    My favorite all-time insult, as best as I can remember from seeing a play at Lincoln Center almost 50 years ago. It was that good an insult.

    The Irish joining the Mexican Army finally explains the insult. I hadn't known about that. Thank you, since it explains my all-time favorite insult.

    This is from an Irish Renaissance play, The Plough and the Stars, if I remember correctly, by Sean O'Casey.

    Please forgive me if I misquote. This is what I remember from a 1972 production:



    "You are an illegitimate son of an illegitimate son of a Corporal in the Mexican Army"

  77. People speaking Italian, Romanian and French can also describe themselves as “Latin” (Portuguese speakers as well but they already seem to be assimilated to Latinos). Since (1) these categories are largely created to establish racial bean-counting and affirmative action, and (2) including in French and Italians would undermine AA, this usage of the word will not get promoted by institutions.

  78. @Joe Magarac
    Two observations:

    1) They missed a good thing by not having Latinx rhyme with Sphinx. That would really be cool.

    2) The 'X' is like the 'X' in Malcolm X. The whole point is to be in your face oppositional.

    Replies: @Mr. Peabody

    That’s how I thought it was pronounced.
    Lay-tinks: Those members of the Tinks-American Community who have not taken ordination.

  79. OT: Idle research

    Looks like the Scottish Independence Party (i.e. the “rejoin the the EU” party, led by the sturgeon who implemented a nice plan to attempt to get her predecessor into prison with charges of sexual harrassment) won.

    [MORE]

    Puffery from the BBC: Nicola Sturgeon tells PM referendum is case of ‘when – not if’

    Nicola Sturgeon spoke directly with Mr Johnson for the first time since the SNP won an emphatic victory in Thursday’s Holyrood election.

    Earlier, Ms Sturgeon said she did not expect the debate to end up in court.

    A senior UK government minister appeared to suggest it would not mount a legal challenge to her plans.

    George Galloway at RT.com

    Despite the best efforts of the BBC, which has forgotten what the first B in its name stands for, the separatist Scottish Nationalist Party has failed for the second election in a row to win a majority in the Scottish Parliament.

    The BBC, which over Brexit and the Union has proved it hates the Crown while living on the half-Crown, described this as a “triumph” but it’s far from that.

    The now anathematised Alex Salmond left his successor Nicola Sturgeon a parliamentary majority but she has, twice, thrown it away. Along the way, he has been airbrushed out of her history and, but for the good sense of a jury, could’ve now been just a year into an eight-year stretch in prison (at the age of 66).

    In fact, Scotland now has a government more than two thirds of us didn’t vote for. Only 31% of Scots voted for the SNP last Thursday. More voters backed the unionist parties than backed the separatist ones.

    So, there will NOT be a second Independence Referendum in the lifetime of this parliament. There is no “mandate” for one (and neither could there have been one, such matters being reserved to Westminster). No Supreme Court will overturn the constitution of the UK at the behest of a minority government with a minority of votes cast and less than a third of the people behind them. And any expenditure on such a court case would have to be borne by the SNP not the Scottish Government, such spending being ipso-facto ultra-vires.

    Scotland is in a bad way and very woke:

    The worst drug deaths in Europe. Collapsing educational attainment. Chronic unemployment and underemployment (fewer than half of all Scots qualify to pay income tax and half of that half are paid by the taxes of the other 25%). Misgovernance of the legal system shown not only in the Salmond case but in multiple cases of “Malicious Prosecution” (their stated admission not my words). A Hate Crime Bill aimed at punishing the “unwoke” for things they say EVEN IN THEIR OWN HOME.

    Plus, apparently dot-indian wheeler-dealer “industrialists” of the kind seen in Yeltsin’s Russia

    And, remember you read it here first, pending corruption allegations which will reverberate through this land and make the news in Timbuktu.

    Remember this name. Sanjeev Gupta. Gupta-gate, opening soon…

    From Wikipedia:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanjeev_Gupta

    Is the whole of the UK under Brahmin management?

    In October 2019, Gupta consolidated all his global steel businesses to form Liberty Steel Group, which he announced would aim to be the world’s first carbon neutral company by 2030. He extended that target to his aluminium businesses, which he grouped together to form ALVANCE Aluminium Group, which he announced in January 2020.

    A man who likes to ride the winds of change.

    He has been dubbed the man who can save the British steel industry through an approach called Greensteel, and has since been working to apply this model of operation to other countries including Australia and the USA.

    And also:

    In May 2017, Gupta was awarded CEO of the year at the Platts Global Metals Awards in London.

    In October 2017, he was awarded “Business Leader of the Year” at the British Asian Achievers Awards 2017.

    The HRH Prince of Wales appointed Gupta as an official HRH Ambassador for Industrial Cadets in March 2018. Gupta is also a member of the Wall Street Journal CEO council.

    • Thanks: photondancer
  80. @Polistra
    And what's this now with the Cohen twins? Meghan and I haven't even recovered from Althea Bernstein and now this? And can y'all HBD Nazis explain one is an NFL star and the other is Dindu Flambé?


    https://i.ibb.co/4WppzLD/Screenshot-20210510-044730-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @El Dato, @Gary in Gramercy, @International Jew

    That’s called making a squirrel out of it.

    I could understand students in drunken stupor breaking into a substation and trying to have hangtime on a 200KV line, but this?

    Unless he was under the influence of serious uppers?

  81. @Polistra
    And what's this now with the Cohen twins? Meghan and I haven't even recovered from Althea Bernstein and now this? And can y'all HBD Nazis explain one is an NFL star and the other is Dindu Flambé?


    https://i.ibb.co/4WppzLD/Screenshot-20210510-044730-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @El Dato, @Gary in Gramercy, @International Jew

    No True Cohen…

    • LOL: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Shocking!

    Still, at least it’s not Christmas...

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1pN9o68y4o

  82. @Known Fact
    Sorry but as a dedicated Latin student, when I hear "Latin" I'm thinking of George Sanders or some other actor with a pretentious British accent playing a Roman commander astride a silver horse in some biblical epic

    And as a Pirate fan it's sad to deal with how the Lumber Company has degenerated into the current plucky but hapless toothpick wielders. God, how even one Mike Easler could help us out now

    Replies: @El Dato, @James J O'Meara

    I’m thinking of George Sanders or some other actor with a pretentious British accent playing a Roman commander astride a silver horse in some biblical epic

    These are imperial times.

    • Replies: @photondancer
    @El Dato

    Hooray! Finally a pop culture reference I understand. :-) Although it's a bit dismaying that that book was written 45 years ago and we're still trying to solve problems by pouring money on them.

  83. Good enough for Clemente, and good enough for the Latin Kings, too.

  84. Anonymous[422] • Disclaimer says:

    Latino/a are gendered nouns that were imported directly from Spanish by Anglo-white libs and their Professional Hispanic lackeys back when PC started to gain traction to take the place of the completely bona fide English word “Latin.”
    Hence back in the day Ramon Navarro was a “Latin lover,” Desi Arnaz was a “Latin” bandleader and Roberto Clemente was a “Latin” ballplayer.
    Even the unreconstructed-boogyman-conservative Jesse Helms used the term quite memorably back in 1985 about his Mexico City visit: “All Latins are volatile people. Hence, I was not surprised at the volatile reaction.”
    Now that PC has been taking to an even higher level by libs they feel gendered Latino/a could offend the 0.000001 of people who don’t identify as male/female; and we can’t have that, now can we?!!

  85. @International Jew
    @RichardTaylor

    You're right, I don't want to be ruled by the Harvard faculty either. But the goal of trying to limit nonwhite immigration is to deny the Harvard faculty the imported allies it needs to overwhelm us at the polls.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    You’re right, I don’t want to be ruled by the Harvard faculty either. But the goal of trying to limit nonwhite immigration is to deny the Harvard faculty the imported allies it needs to overwhelm us at the polls.

    Exactly IJ.

    Americans actually here make decisions how to govern ourselves. (Ideally only responsible, productive men with families and ergo a stake in the future. That’s another battle.)

    Republican self-government … what a concept!

  86. @Anonymous
    OT: A story from 2020, but I hadn't realised that Nigeria is projected to have a higher population than China by 2100.

    (Nigerian growth meets Chinese decline.)

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-53409521

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @nebulafox, @fish

    OT: A story from 2020, but I hadn’t realised that Nigeria is projected to have a higher population than China by 2100.

    (Nigerian growth meets Chinese decline.)

    The PLA bio-labs may have something to say about that.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @AnotherDad


    The PLA bio-labs
     
    Motto: "It's all so tiresome"

    may have something to say about that.
     
    That, and also the carrying capacity of Nigeria.

    Definitely related:

    From "Sexplosion", a chapter in Stanislaw Lem's A Perfect Vacuum: Perfect Reviews of Nonexistent Books, 1971, Michael Kandel Translation 1979


    If one is to believe the author — and more and more they tell us to believe the authors of science fiction! — the current surge of sex will become a deluge in the 1980’s. But the action of the novel Sexplosion begins twenty years later, in a New York buried in snowdrifts during a severe winter. An old man of un­known name, wading through the drifts, bumping into the hulks of snow-covered cars, reaches a lifeless office building; he pulls a key from his breast pocket, warm with the last of his body heat, opens the iron gate, and goes down to the basement. His roaming there and the snatches of memory that intrude upon it — this is the whole novel.

    ...

    That was the era of democracy come true at last: one could do anything — with anyone. Heeding the advice of their own futurologists, the corporations [General Sexotics, Cybordelics, and Intercourse International], having quietly divided up among themselves the global market in contravention of the antitrust act, went into specialization. General Sexotics worked on equal rights for deviants, and the remaining two companies invested in automation. Flagellashes, batterabusers, black-n-blue’s appeared as prototypes, to assure the public that there could be no talk of a glut on the market, for a great industry — if it be truly a great industry — does not simply meet needs: it creates them! The old methods of home fornication — the time had come for them to be laid to rest alongside the flints and clubs of the Neanderthals. Scholarly bodies offered six- and eight-year courses of study, then graduate work and advanced degrees in the higher and lower eroticisms; the neurosexator was developed, then throttles, mufflers, insulating materials, and special sound absorbers, in order that one tenant not dis­turb another’s peace or pleasure with uncontrolled outcries.

    A chemical substance — code name Nosex — had been synthe­sized some time before, possibly as early as the 1970’s. Only a small group of experts, security-cleared, knew of its existence. The drug was immediately recognized to be a type of secret weapon, and was manufactured by the laboratories of a small firm connected with the Pentagon. The use of Nosex in aerosol form could in fact decimate the population of any country, be­cause the drug, taken in quantities of fractions of a milligram, eliminated all sensation accompanying the sex act. The act, true, continued to be possible, but only as a variety of physical labor, fairly fatiguing, like wringing out clothes, scouring pots, scrubbing floors. Later on, consideration was given to the idea of using Nosex to check the population explosion in the Third World, but the plan was thought to be dangerous.

    No one knows how the world-wide catastrophe came about. Was it true, as some said, that a stockpile of Nosex blew up as the result of a short circuit, a fire, and a tank of ether? Or did there come into play here a move on the part of the industrial enemies of the three corporations that controlled the market? Or, then again, did some subversive organization—reactionary or religious—possibly have a hand in it? We are not told.

    Wearied by his trek through the miles of vaults, the old man takes a seat on the smooth knees of a plastic Cleopatra, but not before pulling her brake, and his thoughts travel back, as to the edge of a precipice, to the Crash of 1998. Overnight, in an in­stinctive feeling of revulsion, the public turned its back on all the products then flooding the market. That which yesterday enticed, today was what an ax is to a tired logger, a washboard to a laundress. The eternal (it had seemed) enchantment, the spell cast by biology on the human race, was broken. There­after, breasts brought to mind only the fact that people are mammalian; legs, that they have with what to walk; buttocks, that there is something also with which to sit. Nothing more, but nothing more! How lucky McLuhan, that he did not live to witness this catastrophe, he who in his later works had in­terpreted the cathedral and the spaceship, the jet engine, the tur­bine, the windmill, the saltcellar, the hat, the theory of relativity, the brackets in mathematical equations, zeros, and exclamation points as surrogates and substitutes for that single function which alone is the experiencing of existence in the pure state.

     

    , @nebulafox
    @AnotherDad

    I wouldn't put much past the CCP, but that's the kind of propaganda leak they really don't want to risk getting out in Africa ("See, we respect you-notice how we don't nag you about stupid LGBT stuff unlike Some People"), and I could see African population growth potentially serving their long-term interests provided that it is kept within check. Beijing's not stupid, they know they aren't going to have the biggest population in the world forever. They don't have to. In terms of power, much more optimal to have 800 million people at Chinese levels of development and functionality than 1.2 billion at India's.

    China's real issue is having a Japan/ROK/Taiwan/Singapore style population crash before they have the wealth and infrastructure to handle it. The former seems to be working out OK, but the latter is still a real issue. There's a reason robotics research is so in demand in that part of the world these days, and people from less developed countries interested in the subject (Indonesia, Bangladesh) go to East Asia for grad school these days.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal

  87. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "It’s not our business to solve this problem that Anglos perceive in the Spanish language. Fortunately, in English we have a perfectly good neuter noun/adjective"

    It.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Lol

    Anyway, Sailer seems to think there are no native Hispanophones who think this is a problem to be solved. I don’t know the full story of this neologism but I imagine that Latin@s themselves (or at least woke American ones) have been the primary driving force behind this. Cringe Anglo shitlibs have just been “amplifying” like “good allies”

  88. Im not a gringo, I’m a gringx

    • LOL: Cortes
  89. @Polistra
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    He's compensating furiously with his tatts. Or is it cultural appreciation? (That's an autocorrect I've decided to let stand.)

    I've known more than one Celtic Latino. Red hair and freckles. Something cute about it really. I'm almost jealous...they get the benefits of both. All you need is the right surname, and you can do that by deed poll. Ah my misspent life.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    People tend to imagine gingers when they imagine Irish people but the “black Irish” supposedly came from Iberia in ancient times. Someone like Colin Farrell could pass for Arab but he’s all Irish.

  90. @epebble
    @Twinkie

    Why are the Spanish (and Portuguese ?) speakers of the Americas called "Latin"? That is like calling Native Americans "Sanskrit" because someone made a mistake of calling them Indians.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dr. X, @Jack D, @Prester John

    Aren’t Italians Latin? I mean, the “Mater Lingua” only ORIGINATED in Italy, right?

  91. @Jonathan Mason
    @Twinkie


    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?
     
    No, they don't. That is why they do not understand a word of what is said in church, but they go anyway, because that is what you do on Sunday. So Cogito Ergo Sum or Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc does not mean a damn thing to them.

    The term Latino/Latina is a pretty silly one anyway, because it is only used by wokex gringos and gringas (gringx) in the Estados Unidos to refer to people who speak languages other than English which have descended from Latin, but excluding French, Romanian, and Italian.

    (People in Europe do not refer to people like Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo as Latinos.)

    Latinos and Latinas in the wild do not refer to themselves as such either. Even in a relatively small country like Ecuador, there are a number of ethnicities, none of which are "Latino".

    The largest number of Ecuadorians identify themselves as Mestizos, and though Spanish (descended from a western Roman empire dialect of Latin) is the main language, other languages include Achuar-Shiwiar ,Chachi, Colorado, Quechua – which comprises 9 separate dialects are spoken in as many areas in the country with a combined population of 1'460,00--Shuar, and Waorani.

    The way to deal with wokeism is to LAUGH at it!

    https://i2.wp.com/www.chrismadden.co.uk/images/cartoons/a807-court-of-language-crime-cartoon.jpg

    Replies: @J.Ross, @El Dato, @syonredux, @AndrewR, @Peter D. Bredon

    Did everyone hear about the Cornell law student in hot water because he dared to read a court transcript the way it was written instead of censoring himself when the VERY BAD WORD THAT WHITE PEOPLE CAN NEVER SAY came up?

  92. @Anonymous
    @Paleo Liberal

    "This is something I have believed for a while. Latin really is the English word for Latino/a. Why not use it?"

    Because they tried to go woke. But woke is never enough... there is always woker.

    Also... "Latin" used in that way has connotations that are inexpedient for the woke.
    A "Latin" man is expected to be an actual man... and a "Latin" woman a woman.
    Perhaps even moreso (rightly or wrongly) than the non-Latin varieties.

    Latinos/Latinas/Latinx(es) are sexless compadres.
    MS-13 on one side and Justice Sotomayor on the other.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    MS-13 on one side and Justice Sotomayor on the other.

    I thought they were on the same side.

  93. Anonymous[422] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    @rebel yell


    Do Chinese people really pronounce and spell it “Beijing”?

     

    In terms of raw phonics, that's more or less the right pronunciation, but non-Chinese will never get it 'right' because they don't know the tones with which the syllables must be pronounced. Also, many 'well-informed' Westerners who seek to use the 'authentic' versions of place names of course adopt 'Beijing' instead of 'Peking', but they make the 'j' a 'zh' sound, sometimes exaggerating it comically, which is completely wrong. It's just an ordinary j.

    But then you should hear what some of the Chinese versions of Western place names sound like. Some vaguely evoke the native names, but others are nowhere near verisimilitude. They are generally comfortable for Chinese speakers to pronounce, though, which is what you'd expect anywhere other than the Woke West.


    But my English professor who studied at Oxford told me Don “Jew-un” is the preferred pronunciation for many of the Oxford professors.

     

    This may have been because that's the way Lord Byron pronounced the name of his famous poem by that name.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @AndrewR, @AndrewR

    Speaking of Beijing, Spanish (and French) speakers still use Pekin as their preferred name for that Chinese city. This butchering of English to meet the demands of Woke intellectuals from American universities is something that hasn’t caught on in most other languages.

    As an aside I remember Coca Cola issuing a series of bilingual English/Spanish Christmas-themed packages a number of years back, (no doubt to brandish their multi-culti bona fides) and in English you were wished a PC “Happy Holidays” but in Spanish it was “Feliz Navidad” (Happy Christmas).
    A negligible percentage of English speakers might take offence at the word “Christmas” but apparently 99.99999% of Spanish speakers celebrate this particular holiday, hence it was a “Happy Christmas” for them.

    • Replies: @Mackerel Sky
    @Anonymous


    Speaking of Beijing, Spanish (and French) speakers still use Pekin as their preferred name for that Chinese city. 
     
    Its ironic to refer to "Beijing" as "butchering of English" because as your own post hints, English obtained "Peking" via other European languages, which themselves obtained it from non-Mandarin-speaking Chinese. It's a foreign place name that we got from Continentals before we knew any better. I don't see why some of you view this as a linguistic or cultural hill worth fighting on. Place names change sometimes. Yes, sometimes they are changed for retarded reasons, but not in the case of changing "Peking" to "Beijing".

    And the battle is lost anyway. "Peking" peaked in the mid 1960s. By the mid 1980s, it had been overtaken by "Beijing". "Beijing" has been the usual accepted term for a generation now. It's not a PC or woke thing. We barely had that in the 1980s.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Anonymous

  94. @Polistra
    And then they came for... ex-major leaguer Frank-Paul Santangelo.

    In an ANONYMOUS INSTAGRAM POST someone claims that Santangelo made an "unwanted advance" (not assault) many years ago, and boom! the man loses his job. That's due process, right?

    https://i.ibb.co/h8JhwZ3/Screenshot-20210510-042200-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    We don't even know if it's a man, or woman, or whatever making the claim.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    In an ANONYMOUS INSTAGRAM POST someone claims that Santangelo made an “unwanted advance”…

    Trayvon Martin made an unwanted advance. Volkert van der Graaf and Mohammed Bouyeri did as well, the latter toward a moving bicycle.

  95. Steve, Latin is a good thought but it won’t fly. The point of saying Latino was to convey respect for those people. Like San Jose, California, renaming itself San José. Or NPR reporters saying Nee-cah-rahg-oo-a. So basically we’re in a bind now; if we say Latino, we disrespect the tranny community, but if we say Latin then we disrespect Mexicans/Guatemalans/Ricans etc.

  96. O/T … Go on … you know you want to read it….

    Stop this fascist gaslighting

    Without white progressives like me to supervise them, ethnic minorities are helpless and easily exploited

    By Titania McGrath

    I feel physically sick. The government’s new “Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities” has issued a report intended to gaslight us into believing that we are not living in a fascist state. My lived experience tells me otherwise, and that is surely far more reliable than “facts” or “evidence”.

    As critics have noted, the report makes the astonishing claim that racism no longer exists in the UK. I mean, it doesn’t technically say that (it actually says that “racism still exists in the UK” and “has no place in any civilised society”) but we all know what the report’s writers were secretly thinking.

    Anyway, the substance of the report is beside the point. Unless it confirms everything that I have already decided is true, it has absolutely no value whatsoever and all copies should be destroyed.

    ….

    source: https://thecritic.co.uk/issues/may-2021/stop-this-fascist-gaslighting/

  97. do squirrels go through this?

    they don’t seem to really care: black on brown on red on tan on grey on albino…

    just one big squirrel party.

    stupid humans.

  98. @Polistra
    And what's this now with the Cohen twins? Meghan and I haven't even recovered from Althea Bernstein and now this? And can y'all HBD Nazis explain one is an NFL star and the other is Dindu Flambé?


    https://i.ibb.co/4WppzLD/Screenshot-20210510-044730-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @El Dato, @Gary in Gramercy, @International Jew

    And what’s this now with the Cohen twins? Meghan and I haven’t even recovered from Althea Bernstein and now this? And can y’all HBD Nazis explain one is an NFL star and the other is Dindu Flambé?

    Because evading tacklers and evading police draw on similar skills.

    A lesson from this incident: the much-maligned stun gun isn’t inherently ineffective, it’s just underpowered.

    • Replies: @Perry Mason
    @International Jew

    I'm a Mexican national by birth and of mixed descent, due to my father's side. Mexicans, both there and here in Texas, generally refer to themselves as Mexicans. Surprise surprise.

    When making finer distinctions, non-Americanized Mexicans still use the term "Indio" to refer to whole or partial descent from the various tribes that preceded European arrivals. Or 'Indios Mexicanos'. And then further, sometimes you will hear specific tribes, but that is because of ethnic pride deep in the interior.

    I find that in a mixed setting with non-Hispanics, Central, Spanish Caribbean and Latin Americans will refer to themselves as "Spanish", whether mestizo by race or not, or their nationality (Brazilians, Peruvians and Argentines in particular).

    Latin is fine...but always sounded ignorant to me, despite that yes Spanish is at Latin derivate. It seems like an ad hoc appellation chosen by Anglos for want of any more appropriate term, because of their lack of knowledge or imagination. Despite its annoying governmental origin, Hispanic is a good term and avoids confusion with "Spanish" as a reference solely to Spain. It instead refers to the historic colony and encapsulates the historical Greater Spain and its colonies, including intermarriage with the natives of the day.

  99. @AnotherDad
    @Anonymous


    OT: A story from 2020, but I hadn’t realised that Nigeria is projected to have a higher population than China by 2100.

    (Nigerian growth meets Chinese decline.)
     
    The PLA bio-labs may have something to say about that.

    Replies: @El Dato, @nebulafox

    The PLA bio-labs

    Motto: “It’s all so tiresome”

    may have something to say about that.

    That, and also the carrying capacity of Nigeria.

    Definitely related:

    From “Sexplosion”, a chapter in Stanislaw Lem’s A Perfect Vacuum: Perfect Reviews of Nonexistent Books, 1971, Michael Kandel Translation 1979

    [MORE]

    If one is to believe the author — and more and more they tell us to believe the authors of science fiction! — the current surge of sex will become a deluge in the 1980’s. But the action of the novel Sexplosion begins twenty years later, in a New York buried in snowdrifts during a severe winter. An old man of un­known name, wading through the drifts, bumping into the hulks of snow-covered cars, reaches a lifeless office building; he pulls a key from his breast pocket, warm with the last of his body heat, opens the iron gate, and goes down to the basement. His roaming there and the snatches of memory that intrude upon it — this is the whole novel.

    That was the era of democracy come true at last: one could do anything — with anyone. Heeding the advice of their own futurologists, the corporations [General Sexotics, Cybordelics, and Intercourse International], having quietly divided up among themselves the global market in contravention of the antitrust act, went into specialization. General Sexotics worked on equal rights for deviants, and the remaining two companies invested in automation. Flagellashes, batterabusers, black-n-blue’s appeared as prototypes, to assure the public that there could be no talk of a glut on the market, for a great industry — if it be truly a great industry — does not simply meet needs: it creates them! The old methods of home fornication — the time had come for them to be laid to rest alongside the flints and clubs of the Neanderthals. Scholarly bodies offered six- and eight-year courses of study, then graduate work and advanced degrees in the higher and lower eroticisms; the neurosexator was developed, then throttles, mufflers, insulating materials, and special sound absorbers, in order that one tenant not dis­turb another’s peace or pleasure with uncontrolled outcries.

    A chemical substance — code name Nosex — had been synthe­sized some time before, possibly as early as the 1970’s. Only a small group of experts, security-cleared, knew of its existence. The drug was immediately recognized to be a type of secret weapon, and was manufactured by the laboratories of a small firm connected with the Pentagon. The use of Nosex in aerosol form could in fact decimate the population of any country, be­cause the drug, taken in quantities of fractions of a milligram, eliminated all sensation accompanying the sex act. The act, true, continued to be possible, but only as a variety of physical labor, fairly fatiguing, like wringing out clothes, scouring pots, scrubbing floors. Later on, consideration was given to the idea of using Nosex to check the population explosion in the Third World, but the plan was thought to be dangerous.

    No one knows how the world-wide catastrophe came about. Was it true, as some said, that a stockpile of Nosex blew up as the result of a short circuit, a fire, and a tank of ether? Or did there come into play here a move on the part of the industrial enemies of the three corporations that controlled the market? Or, then again, did some subversive organization—reactionary or religious—possibly have a hand in it? We are not told.

    Wearied by his trek through the miles of vaults, the old man takes a seat on the smooth knees of a plastic Cleopatra, but not before pulling her brake, and his thoughts travel back, as to the edge of a precipice, to the Crash of 1998. Overnight, in an in­stinctive feeling of revulsion, the public turned its back on all the products then flooding the market. That which yesterday enticed, today was what an ax is to a tired logger, a washboard to a laundress. The eternal (it had seemed) enchantment, the spell cast by biology on the human race, was broken. There­after, breasts brought to mind only the fact that people are mammalian; legs, that they have with what to walk; buttocks, that there is something also with which to sit. Nothing more, but nothing more! How lucky McLuhan, that he did not live to witness this catastrophe, he who in his later works had in­terpreted the cathedral and the spaceship, the jet engine, the tur­bine, the windmill, the saltcellar, the hat, the theory of relativity, the brackets in mathematical equations, zeros, and exclamation points as surrogates and substitutes for that single function which alone is the experiencing of existence in the pure state.

    • Thanks: Cortes
  100. @SafeNow
    Thanks for mentioning Clemente. I am old enough to have seen him play, and I can remember what fun it was to watch him hit, run, and of course, oh my, ohhh doctor, throw. He had style. Many didn’t like his style, but I think they would admit he was was engaging. Younger readers here who think (correctly) that modern baseball players are boring, and don’t know Clemente, might want to check-out a few Clemente highlight compilations on Youtube.

    Replies: @Travis, @Wade Hampton

    modern baseball is boring because there are now more strikeouts than hits. Back in 1980 a typical MLB game had 9 hits and 4 strikeouts. In 2019 they averaged 8 hits per game and 9 strikeouts per game.

    I suppose if you like seeing players hit home runs, 2019 was a great year for baseball, the juiced ball helped players hit a record 6,776 home runs. Vastly more than players hit during the steroid year peak of 5,528 in 1999. While in 1999 players struck out 31,120 times, in 2019 there were 42,823 strikeouts.

    Supposedly they stopped using the juiced ball this year. So home runs will not be setting another record this year. But we are on pace for another record year for strikeouts.

  101. @Twinkie
    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?

    Replies: @epebble, @Clyde, @gent, @Jonathan Mason, @imnobody00

    A Spanish living in Latin America here.

    Latin America is an invention of the French. Before that, it was “Hispanoamérica” (Hispanic America), which refers to the Spanish legacy and the Spanish language (being “Hispania” the Latin name of Spain, the conqueror of these lands). When it included Brazil, it was “Iberoamérica” (Iberic America), the countries conquered by the Iberian Peninsula (that is, by Spain and Portugal).

    But, back in the days, the French wanted to claim having a special relationship with these countries. There are some countries in the Caribbean that speak French (Haiti, French Guyana and some tiny islands) so they had an idea. Since French and Spanish are Latin languages (they come from Latin), they invented “Latin America” (“the American countries that speak languages derived from Latin”), which is really contrived. This included the French-speaking countries and gave France a way to claim a special relationship with the American countries.

    Then English people and US people copied the expression, which is universal today. Since USA is the first cultural power, it is “Latin America” all around the world, even in Spain.

    The name for people was “Latin American (people)”, but this was too long so it became “Latin (people)”, like the ancient Romans.

    • Thanks: Anonymous Jew
  102. Visual Testing For The Average Woke White Traitor Trash or Woke BLM Racist

    Place a Japanese, Korean, Chinaman, Vietnamese, Thai, in a room and have them correctly identify each one by ethnicity.

    Second test.

    Place a Mexican, Puerto Rican, Colombian, El Salvadoran, Nicaraguan, Panamanian in a room and have them correctly identify each one by ethnicity. * Note these will all be Brown “Latinos,” no Sammy Sosa or Black “Latinos.”

  103. @Twinkie
    @Jack D


    Latin is really short for Latin America
     
    Do "Latin Americans" speak Latin?

    We ought to call it Spanish-speaking (or -colonized) America. Or just use geographical terms such as Central America and South America. Even Hispanic is better than Latin.

    Latin is for the people of Latium. Celts and Celtic-conquered American aborigines go home!

    Replies: @International Jew, @RSDB, @nebulafox

    Do “Latin Americans” speak Latin? … Latin is for the people of Latium.

    Parlano latino i laziali di oggi?

  104. @Mike Tre
    @anon215

    "Or how about we just continue using “Latino” and “Latina”?"

    Or, we could stop lumping the entire Central/South/Caribbean American population into one (false*) generalization, and instead refer to Cubans as Cuban, Colombians and Colombian, and Mexicans as illega.. I mean, Mexican.

    *The term Latino is about as off base as can be. The connection between Latin and the groups of people defined as such is pretty frail. Aren't Italians the real Latinos?

    Replies: @Dumbo, @e

    Dems want to call them The Browns, but Cleveland objected.

  105. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @rebel yell


    Do Chinese people really pronounce and spell it “Beijing”?

     

    In terms of raw phonics, that's more or less the right pronunciation, but non-Chinese will never get it 'right' because they don't know the tones with which the syllables must be pronounced. Also, many 'well-informed' Westerners who seek to use the 'authentic' versions of place names of course adopt 'Beijing' instead of 'Peking', but they make the 'j' a 'zh' sound, sometimes exaggerating it comically, which is completely wrong. It's just an ordinary j.

    But then you should hear what some of the Chinese versions of Western place names sound like. Some vaguely evoke the native names, but others are nowhere near verisimilitude. They are generally comfortable for Chinese speakers to pronounce, though, which is what you'd expect anywhere other than the Woke West.


    But my English professor who studied at Oxford told me Don “Jew-un” is the preferred pronunciation for many of the Oxford professors.

     

    This may have been because that's the way Lord Byron pronounced the name of his famous poem by that name.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @AndrewR, @AndrewR

    *sigh*

    I am so sick of people using “the West” and it’s derivative forms as interchangable with “Anglophones” or sometimes just “Americans.” Yes, English speakers often say “Beizhing.” Frankly I think that sounds a lot more pleasant than “Beidjing,” which is already quite different from how it’s pronounced in Mandarin.

    Contrary to your pretentious pronouncement, most “Western” languages still use some form of the word Peking. danish, Norwegian and Icelandic seem to be the only notable exception besides English and the Celtic languages

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beijing#/languages

  106. @S Johnson
    @epebble

    The term ‘Latin America’ was apparently popularised in the 1860s by France as part of Napoleon III’s plan to project French power into America, beginning with Mexico. So the idea was to emphasise some degree of affinity between races with Latinate languages (particularly French, Spanish and Portuguese), in contrast especially to Britain and Germany. The Second Mexican Empire didn’t last, but the name stuck because it is useful to have a term that includes Brazil with Spanish America.

    Replies: @epebble

    If language group is the preferred appellation, then the correct word is “Romance”. Everybody loves Romance. Latin is so out of favor that even Roman Catholic Church decided to dump it. Only Lawyers use it now and everybody hates lawyers.

    • Replies: @S Johnson
    @epebble

    Plus as white and black Americans consume themselves with racial loathing and wokery, Latins will presumably become the dominant market for old-fashioned heterosexual love. I can see ‘Romantic-Americans’ catching on.

  107. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @rebel yell


    Do Chinese people really pronounce and spell it “Beijing”?

     

    In terms of raw phonics, that's more or less the right pronunciation, but non-Chinese will never get it 'right' because they don't know the tones with which the syllables must be pronounced. Also, many 'well-informed' Westerners who seek to use the 'authentic' versions of place names of course adopt 'Beijing' instead of 'Peking', but they make the 'j' a 'zh' sound, sometimes exaggerating it comically, which is completely wrong. It's just an ordinary j.

    But then you should hear what some of the Chinese versions of Western place names sound like. Some vaguely evoke the native names, but others are nowhere near verisimilitude. They are generally comfortable for Chinese speakers to pronounce, though, which is what you'd expect anywhere other than the Woke West.


    But my English professor who studied at Oxford told me Don “Jew-un” is the preferred pronunciation for many of the Oxford professors.

     

    This may have been because that's the way Lord Byron pronounced the name of his famous poem by that name.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @AndrewR, @AndrewR

    Also you hilariously seem to be implying that the “woke western” Anglophones pronounce “Paris,” for example, anything like the the French do. Butchering foreign words is universal. And making sincere attempts to pronounce a foreign word accurately is not “woke,” nor is it very common even in the “woke west”

  108. @Neoconned
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.usatoday.com/amp/5016257001

    Mass shooting at trailer park in Colorado....

    @ the above: I'll never forget 11th grade Spanish class.....the teacher posted the neutral word in the middle bar and then left and right did the various other variations including male/female/plural and lastly the "with respect"(nosotros) variation....

    I always thought it interesting they put the adjective behind the noun....not in front....different grammar concept.....

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Bardon Kaldian, @Alden

    Not sure what you mean. “Nosotros/nosotras” is the only way to say we/us. “Vosotros” is the Spanish informal plural second person pronoun. The formal 2nd person plural pronoun in Spain and the only one in LatAm is “Ustedes(/Uds.)”

  109. @rebel yell
    We just called everyone south of the Rio Grande "Mexicans". Which makes sense - the rest of the world calls Americans "Yankees", even though technically that refers to a small group of Americans from New England. Why shouldn't I call all the Latins Mexican?
    And what is the "correct" way to say "Peking"? Do Chinese people really pronounce and spell it "Beijing", or is "Beijing" a word the Woke invented to harass us? And so what if the Chinese do say "Beijing"? There is still nothing wrong with us pronouncing the word as "Peking". The Japanese call baseball "baseberu". Is that racist of them? - of course not. "Peking" is not racist either.
    How do you pronounce "Don Juan"? Do you try to pronounce it with a Spanish accent, "Don Hwan?" Does that make you culturally sensitive or are you expropriating and butchering their culture with your clumsy Anglo attempt to effect a Spanish accent? What if I pronounce it Don "Jew- un"? You would think I was a hillbilly who had read the word in a book but never heard it pronounced and was woefully mis-reading it. But my English professor who studied at Oxford told me Don "Jew-un" is the preferred pronunciation for many of the Oxford professors.
    You can pronounce Don Juan four different ways, all of them "correct" and none of them racist. Same goes for what you decide to call Mexicans, even if they are from Peru.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Mackerel Sky, @JR Ewing, @Ron Mexico, @James J O'Meara

    We just called everyone south of the Rio Grande “Mexicans”.

    I can do better than that.

    My dad is 85 and lived his entire life in West Texas. Aside from visits to border towns in Mexico when he was younger and a trip to Hawaii in the 1960’s, he has never left the continental United States. He still lives in the same town he was born in and will die there someday.

    When Jose Maria Olazabel – a spaniard with a quintessential Spanish name, right down to the ‘th’ sound in the middle – came from behind and won the Masters in 1994, my dad’s comment on the telephone later that evening was that the “Mexican” made an eagle and pulled out the tournament.

    When I pointed out to him that the winner was Spanish and not Mexican, his response was, “They’re all the same.”

    Ironically, or not so ironically, it is a colloquialism in his small town to refer to actual Mexicans as “Spanish”. There is a Mexican restaurant called the “Spanish Inn” and the locals refer to a city park in the Mexican neighborhood of town as, “Spanish Park”.

    I’ll also add that on a visit to Costa Rica once, I got into a conversation in Spanish with our bus driver and his opinion of Mexicans was something skin to ignorant accented hillbillies who can’t speak proper Spanish.

  110. @International Jew
    @Twinkie

    Quebec is legitimately "Latin America" too.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew

    Good point. It’s like calling the US part of “Germanic America”.

    Also, if we have White and Black Hispanics why not have Brown and Black Anglos? If pressed, I would claim ‘Anglo’ as my ethnicity. (Obviously not my race, which is a different can of worms).

  111. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Polistra

    No True Cohen...

    Replies: @Cortes

    Shocking!

    Still, at least it’s not Christmas…

  112. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Speaking of Latinxes (Latinxi? Latixen?), PowerLine had a post today about a Mexican middleweight boxer whom they're comparing to the all-time greats. His name is Canelo Alverez, and he looks very Celtic, right down to the freckles:

    https://www.football24.news/img/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Canelo-Alvarez-David-Benavidezs-dad-hints-at-doping.jpg

    Replies: @Polistra, @Trinity, @Twinkie, @syonredux, @G. Poulin, @Matttt

    Canelo = cinnamon. Redheads with light skin like Mr. Alvarez are called ginger in American English, but they are called cinnamon in Mexican Spanish.

    Also, there’s a famous Mexican song about “ojos negros, piel canela,” black eyes, cinnamon skin. I always thought that mean brownish skin, but now I wonder.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Matttt


    Redheads with light skin like Mr. Alvarez are called ginger in American English...
     
    In British English. If it's done in America, it's a new phenomenon, a fad.


    The most famous Ginger since Miss Rogers was a Brit, and by all accounts a capital fellow:


    https://usercontent.one/wp/www.newsgroove.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/1570401221_Inside-Ginger-Baker%E2%80%99s-wild-life-of-sleeping-with-his-daughter%E2%80%99s-pals-threatening-bandmates-with-knives-and-having-orgies-with-Hendrix.jpg


    Ginger Baker’s Son: ‘My Dad Has Been Dead to Me for a Long Time’

    I was daddy's pimp: The shocking admission of Nettie the wild child daughter of Cream drummer Ginger Baker... as her memoirs strip bare the decadence of Seventies rock

    Inside Ginger Baker’s wild life of sleeping with his daughter’s pals, threatening bandmates with knives and having orgies with Hendrix

    “People say Cream gave birth to heavy metal. If that’s so, we should have had an abortion.”

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Peter D. Bredon, @AceDeuce, @reactionry

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Matttt

    Canelo as applied to skin color means light brown or golden brown (cinnamon).

    Spanish is full of terms for skin color and it is difficult to know exactly what they mean.

    In the Dominican Republic people are often referred to as Indio claro, which means light Indian, as opposed to Indio oscuro, which means dark Indian. Most of the people who are described in this way in the Dominican Republic are not (Taino) Indian anyway, but they like to think that they might be.

    Another term used in Spanish is trigueño, which means wheat colored, but it can be pretty difficult to determine whether somebody is a wheatie,or cinnamon colored. It might depend how much they have been out in the sun recently.

    In the Dominican Republic negro (=black) is definitely considered down market, and is closely associated with Haitians, who are considered to be beyond the pale and generally undesirable.

    I once heard a Dominican woman in the United States refer to a dark-skinned African-American street person as a Haitian. He was not actually Haitian, just a bum, but she felt she had adjectively hit the nail on the head.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  113. @Twinkie
    @AnotherDad


    Census race category–add Mestizo and Mulatto, break up the API to Polynesians, East Asians, South Asians.
     
    I am down with breaking up the API category as you suggested, but Mestizo and Mulatto are not races. They should simply mark themselves as multiracial, which they are (the components being European/white, American aboriginal, African/black, and East or South Asian).

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew

    Make the woke left own their madness and highlight their consensus with people on the right. Have multiple racial and ethnic categories. For example you could be, say, a Mulatto Hispanic or a Castizo Anglo. And institute race tribunals…but only for the sake of protecting victimized minorities against privileged Whites abusing the system. And start calling for Affirmative Action in the NBA, but only on behalf of Cambodians, Mestizos etc.

    Mainstream conservatives lack not only a backbone but also the creativity and dark sense of humor appropriate for The Current Year.

    Also, breaking up the API category would really highlight just how far ahead Fancy Asians and the children of Hindu programmers really are. I’m always surprised by how well APIs do despite Jingle Asians and Islanders holding them back (though recent waves of Filipinos have been much more positively selected, not sure about the Cambodians, Thais et al)

  114. OT:

    Barely conscious politicians mumbling that they are guarding the country (as opposed keeping the pillow firmly applied until the struggling stops or the election is won, whatever comes first) and that uppity military behave insultingly is not going over so well

    ‘Civil war is brewing in France and you know it’: French military launches another salvo at Macron with new open letter

    “Best of breed” statements:

    “To encourage the army’s senior officers to take a stand and expose themselves, before angrily sanctioning them as soon as they write anything other than battle reports, one must be quite perverse,” the letter reads.

    Clear talking:

    Pour ergoter sur la forme de la tribune de nos aînés au lieu de reconnaître l’évidence de leurs constats, il faut être bien lâche. Pour invoquer un devoir de réserve mal interprété dans le but de faire taire des citoyens français, il faut être bien fourbe. Pour encourager les cadres dirigeants de l’armée à prendre position et à s’exposer, avant de les sanctionner rageusement dès qu’ils écrivent autre chose que des récits de batailles, il faut être bien pervers.

    Lâcheté, fourberie, perversion : telle n’est pas notre vision de la hiérarchie.
    L’armée est au contraire, par excellence, le lieu où l’on se parle vrai parce que l’on engage sa vie. C’est cette confiance en l’institution militaire que nous appelons de nos vœux.

    I onther words: We have skin in the game and you, apparently, do not.

    Agissez, Mesdames et Messieurs. Il ne s’agit pas, cette fois, d’émotion sur commande, de formules toutes faites ou de médiatisation. Il ne s’agit pas de prolonger vos mandats ou d’en conquérir d’autres. Il s’agit de la survie de notre pays, de votre pays.

    Frenchies can sign here:

    [Exclusif] Signez la nouvelle tribune des militaires

  115. Anon[872] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Lately I’ve been watching amateur YouTube videos of the off-trail high-altitude backcountry Sierra High Route, where you scramble from talus-covered pass to pass at 10- or 12,000 feet altitude, more or less parallel to the John Muir Trail.

    The locations are amazingly pristine. The only trash that anyone on YouTube has found in my viewing so far has been a dropped carabiner. People pack out their trash. In some areas people pack out their feces (not as gross as it sounds, Google “wag bags”). Another rule that is fastidiously followed is carrying food in bear resistant containers that add two and a half pounds to your load.

    I couldn’t help but notice that everyone is white. Except for those who are Asian.

    I’m sure there are well-behaved blacks who would enjoy the Sierra High Route, such as the Central Park Vibrant Gay Birdwatcher.

    But honestly I don’t think that we need to encourage blacks and Latinxes to use wilderness areas if they don’t want to. But it seems that wokesters want more blacks in the backcountry, and fast.

    This woman is almost a parody of the type, Alexandra Lev from Portland:

    Race and Privilege in the Outdoors
    https://andrewskurka.com/race-and-privilege-in-the-outdoors/

    BIPOC have avoided National and State Parks, explained by racial and ethnic discrepancies in income, education, and employment that persist in the US. Entry fees and outdoor equipment are expensive, and have increased significantly over the years, making it difficult for lower income families to visit and play.

    Most of us that grew up in the outdoors learned skills from our parents — the appreciation for the outdoors was passed down to us. Without formative experiences, people lack the skills, knowledge, and the appreciation of the great outdoors in general. The absence of these learned skills often means that many people of color see the outdoors as white spaces that are off limits to them.

    In addition, about 83% of park service employees are white, which can give off the impression that nonwhite populations are not as welcome in parks.

    Here’s another from Nikki Brueggeman, a black-Jewish hybrid:

    Why Black People Don’t Go Camping
    https://aninjusticemag.com/why-black-people-dont-go-camping-a564dd47e5a8

    I’m beginning to worry about what wilderness equity will look like. I don’t think waiver of fees, quotas or preferences for wilderness passes, and public service commercials will help. I think they’re going to need to offer free BIPOC helicopter service into the wilderness so groups of blacks, along with their boomboxes, can party like it’s Miami Beach. And concerns about littering are white supremacist, so that sort of thing should not be enforced. Think of the snowmobile wars in Yellowstone during the Clinton administration, times a hundred.

  116. The obsession conservatives have over niche nonesense from academia continues to astound me. As a leftist from Southern California, I know a lot of Mexicans, leftists, and liberals. Nobody I have ever talked to has ever said ‘Latinx’ except conservatives (same thing with ‘woke’). First gen immigrants call themselves Mexican, their kids call themselves American, and libs and leftists usually go with latino/latina.

    It’s a dumb word, pioneered by second-rate academics looking for tenure. Just don’t use it and it will go away.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
    @anonn

    I think we already tried that strategy with so many wokeisms and look where it’s gotten us. What was crazy only a handful of years ago - child mutilation, men competing as women in the Olympics, mainstream book banning and deplatforming, abolish the police and prisons, blatant propaganda, blatant selective prosecution and disregard for rule of law, blatant anti-White racism, etc - is now the norm. I don’t know...maybe it’s time to draw a line in the sand?

    The Left doesn’t have an end. Get to the left or get to the Gulags.

    , @Anon
    @anonn

    The obsession is by leftists. Read any left-wing rag and there you'll find it. Even NPR has fallen for it.

  117. @Twinkie
    @Jack D


    Latin is really short for Latin America
     
    Do "Latin Americans" speak Latin?

    We ought to call it Spanish-speaking (or -colonized) America. Or just use geographical terms such as Central America and South America. Even Hispanic is better than Latin.

    Latin is for the people of Latium. Celts and Celtic-conquered American aborigines go home!

    Replies: @International Jew, @RSDB, @nebulafox

    Let’s go all the way and ban Anatolian interlopers, too. 😉

  118. @Anonymous
    OT: A story from 2020, but I hadn't realised that Nigeria is projected to have a higher population than China by 2100.

    (Nigerian growth meets Chinese decline.)

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-53409521

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @nebulafox, @fish

    Under-commented on story of the century, Africa’s fertility. I’m not sure it’ll be as immediate as some people say-one shouldn’t underestimate the size of the African continent-but it’s one of those things that despite everything you know about the media, you’d expect to be… well, commented upon more.

    Of the other non-American countries that have more people than Nigeria, India and Indonesia still are above-replacement rate fertility, but only just, around 2.2-2.3 compared to Pakistan’s 3.something and Nigeria’s 5.something. (Both of the former countries had governments in the past that resorted to… rather forceful measures to get rates down, but the real reasons are the same as everywhere else: urbanization, development, etc.) This still represents a dramatic reduction in fertility over the past 50 years. There’s no reason to assume it’ll remain steady, let alone grow higher. Only Pakistan is notably above average, but it’s still nowhere near Nigeria’s levels of fertility, and it’s #5 to Nigeria’s #6. It’s possible that Nigeria might end up more populous than anywhere in the world by 2100, should current trends continue indefinitely. We have no reason to assume that they will, of course-plenty of countries out there with sub-par or par fertility rates now that had 6 kids per woman 50, 60 years ago-but that’s still remarkable.

  119. @AnotherDad
    @Anonymous


    OT: A story from 2020, but I hadn’t realised that Nigeria is projected to have a higher population than China by 2100.

    (Nigerian growth meets Chinese decline.)
     
    The PLA bio-labs may have something to say about that.

    Replies: @El Dato, @nebulafox

    I wouldn’t put much past the CCP, but that’s the kind of propaganda leak they really don’t want to risk getting out in Africa (“See, we respect you-notice how we don’t nag you about stupid LGBT stuff unlike Some People”), and I could see African population growth potentially serving their long-term interests provided that it is kept within check. Beijing’s not stupid, they know they aren’t going to have the biggest population in the world forever. They don’t have to. In terms of power, much more optimal to have 800 million people at Chinese levels of development and functionality than 1.2 billion at India’s.

    China’s real issue is having a Japan/ROK/Taiwan/Singapore style population crash before they have the wealth and infrastructure to handle it. The former seems to be working out OK, but the latter is still a real issue. There’s a reason robotics research is so in demand in that part of the world these days, and people from less developed countries interested in the subject (Indonesia, Bangladesh) go to East Asia for grad school these days.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    @nebulafox

    I worked in robotics for a while. All the robots were made in Japan. One might think that technologically advanced nations like the US or Germany would invest in robotics, but no.

    The way I saw it:

    Germany has Turks
    US has Mexicans
    Japan has robots.

    Replies: @anon

  120. @AnotherDad

    The Spanish language doesn’t have neuter nouns, which drives Woke Anglos crazy: thus, they concoct ghastly neologisms like “Latinx.”
     
    Gender for inanimate nouns annoyed me back in high school French. La table, le lit, la viande, le vin ...

    But the last couple decades, i've wondered whether the gendered language doesn't help them stave off some of the feminist nuttery and now woke insanity. Keep them a bit more grounded about sexual dimorphism and ergo reality. Don't think it's a vaccine, but might be helping a bit.

    Replies: @JohnPlywood

    Obviously not, as the Latin European world is more deeply entrenched in low fertility and feminism than the Germanic world. Latin America has had transsexuals long before the North did.

  121. @rebel yell
    We just called everyone south of the Rio Grande "Mexicans". Which makes sense - the rest of the world calls Americans "Yankees", even though technically that refers to a small group of Americans from New England. Why shouldn't I call all the Latins Mexican?
    And what is the "correct" way to say "Peking"? Do Chinese people really pronounce and spell it "Beijing", or is "Beijing" a word the Woke invented to harass us? And so what if the Chinese do say "Beijing"? There is still nothing wrong with us pronouncing the word as "Peking". The Japanese call baseball "baseberu". Is that racist of them? - of course not. "Peking" is not racist either.
    How do you pronounce "Don Juan"? Do you try to pronounce it with a Spanish accent, "Don Hwan?" Does that make you culturally sensitive or are you expropriating and butchering their culture with your clumsy Anglo attempt to effect a Spanish accent? What if I pronounce it Don "Jew- un"? You would think I was a hillbilly who had read the word in a book but never heard it pronounced and was woefully mis-reading it. But my English professor who studied at Oxford told me Don "Jew-un" is the preferred pronunciation for many of the Oxford professors.
    You can pronounce Don Juan four different ways, all of them "correct" and none of them racist. Same goes for what you decide to call Mexicans, even if they are from Peru.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Mackerel Sky, @JR Ewing, @Ron Mexico, @James J O'Meara

    12th grade English Lit teacher pronounced it “Jew-on”

  122. Rob says:
    @Undocumented Shopper
    Let's mock them by creating more neuter words. For example

    Blackx, Democratz, Peoplex of Colorx , Gayx etc.

    Replies: @Rob, @Buffalo Joe

    If you do not give the x a stress, Latinx sound like la Kleenex. Especially so with the stress on the second to last syllable, like they do it in espanol. Just so you know. If they want 2 stresses in the term, well, Ingles no trabaja like that. The term they actually want is Latin x. Except, names of ethnic groups are capitalized, so Latin X, like Malcolm X.

    Which leads me to my next idea. As Undocumented Shopper suggests, perhaps the x ending is how we know a group was oppressed so, men, but womenx; not ‘black,but blackx; not lgbtqi, but lgbtqix. That way, the rule is, ‘if there is a x in your name, you are free of blame.’ The upside is that lgbtqi has gone several years without an addition.

    We simply have to get them to use -z for plurals! You know who uses -s to pluralize? White men. Do you see an x in that term? No you not. That how you know there awful.

    If that is not bad enough enough, you know what world uses -s in its plural? Yes that’s right. Nazis. Are you really going to use the same plural that literal Nazis use?

  123. @Peter Akuleyev
    @anon215


    Or how about we just continue using “Latino” and “Latina”?
     
    Why do we need to import Spanish words into English? The English word is "Latin". Using "Latino" and "Latina" is already a silly progressive affectation. Hence the irony of the "LatinX" movement.

    Replies: @anon215

    A very good point, but it kinda misses my point. Spanish language is by definition GENDERED. Even more, it ASSUMES GENDER (the worst MEGAHITLER thing anyone can do!) and assigns those assumptions to objects!

    But yes, I agree. We shouldn’t have to speak like Antonio Mendoza (“Neeeeekadauguaaaaah) in our own country.

  124. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/MarkSKrikorian/status/1391027360259051524

    Replies: @El Dato

    D’oh!

    Space Race Victory Day is near, grasshopper.

    • LOL: JohnnyWalker123
  125. @G. Poulin
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Years ago I watched a movie starring Tom Berenger about a group of Irish soldiers who deserted the U.S. army and enlisted in the Mexican army. I wonder if Canelo is descended from one of those micks.

    Replies: @Too Long Didn't Read, @Paleo Liberal

    I wonder if Canelo is descended from one of those micks.

    Doubtful, since the US Army tracked down every San Patricio they could find and executed them, plus 1848 was a long time ago. More likely descended from some Mick who had to leave the Isles in order to avoid arrest, and settled on Mexico as a tolerable hideout.

  126. @Matttt
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Canelo = cinnamon. Redheads with light skin like Mr. Alvarez are called ginger in American English, but they are called cinnamon in Mexican Spanish.

    Also, there's a famous Mexican song about "ojos negros, piel canela," black eyes, cinnamon skin. I always thought that mean brownish skin, but now I wonder.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jonathan Mason

    Redheads with light skin like Mr. Alvarez are called ginger in American English…

    In British English. If it’s done in America, it’s a new phenomenon, a fad.

    The most famous Ginger since Miss Rogers was a Brit, and by all accounts a capital fellow:

    Ginger Baker’s Son: ‘My Dad Has Been Dead to Me for a Long Time’

    I was daddy’s pimp: The shocking admission of Nettie the wild child daughter of Cream drummer Ginger Baker… as her memoirs strip bare the decadence of Seventies rock

    Inside Ginger Baker’s wild life of sleeping with his daughter’s pals, threatening bandmates with knives and having orgies with Hendrix

    “People say Cream gave birth to heavy metal. If that’s so, we should have had an abortion.”

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Reg Cæsar

    I don't care if the guy is Caesar or Goethe or Napoleon or JFK: there's something incredibly pathetic about a middle-aged man seducing a teenage girl.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Peter D. Bredon
    @Reg Cæsar

    "If it’s done in America, it’s a new phenomenon, a fad."

    "Ginger Kids" is the eleventh episode in the ninth season of the American animated television series South Park. The 136th episode of the series overall, it first aired on Comedy Central in the United States on November 9, 2005. In the episode, Cartman is led to think he has contracted a mysterious and sudden onset of "gingervitus". -- Wikipedia

    , @AceDeuce
    @Reg Cæsar

    Reminds me of an old joke:

    What's old and wrinkled and smells like ginger?

    Fred Astaire's face.

    , @reactionry
    @Reg Cæsar

    "In British English."

    Given the potential for digital reanimation and virtual sex re-assignment surgery, one could picture a marquee sporting

    GINGER ROGERS FRED ASTAIRE

    Going from bad to worse -

    Lord of the Flies II: Ginger Rogers Golding & Gilligan

    Hat Tip to the urban legend of Seaman Staines and Roger the Cabin Boy

  127. @anonn
    The obsession conservatives have over niche nonesense from academia continues to astound me. As a leftist from Southern California, I know a lot of Mexicans, leftists, and liberals. Nobody I have ever talked to has ever said 'Latinx' except conservatives (same thing with 'woke'). First gen immigrants call themselves Mexican, their kids call themselves American, and libs and leftists usually go with latino/latina.

    It's a dumb word, pioneered by second-rate academics looking for tenure. Just don't use it and it will go away.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew, @Anon

    I think we already tried that strategy with so many wokeisms and look where it’s gotten us. What was crazy only a handful of years ago – child mutilation, men competing as women in the Olympics, mainstream book banning and deplatforming, abolish the police and prisons, blatant propaganda, blatant selective prosecution and disregard for rule of law, blatant anti-White racism, etc – is now the norm. I don’t know…maybe it’s time to draw a line in the sand?

    The Left doesn’t have an end. Get to the left or get to the Gulags.

  128. Hispanics are mixed. Deal with it everybody. This is the reason why it is best to breed with your own. That way you don’t have to make up names to identify your “race.”

  129. @anon
    If you're into vowels: Latinaeiou.

    If you're into consonants: Latinlgbtx

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Buffalo Joe

    Look, let me explain something to you. I’m not Mr. Lebowski. You’re Mr. Lebowski. I’m the Dude. So that’s what you call me. That, or His Dudeness … Duder … or El Duderino, if, you know, you’re not into the whole brevity thing.

  130. @rebel yell
    We just called everyone south of the Rio Grande "Mexicans". Which makes sense - the rest of the world calls Americans "Yankees", even though technically that refers to a small group of Americans from New England. Why shouldn't I call all the Latins Mexican?
    And what is the "correct" way to say "Peking"? Do Chinese people really pronounce and spell it "Beijing", or is "Beijing" a word the Woke invented to harass us? And so what if the Chinese do say "Beijing"? There is still nothing wrong with us pronouncing the word as "Peking". The Japanese call baseball "baseberu". Is that racist of them? - of course not. "Peking" is not racist either.
    How do you pronounce "Don Juan"? Do you try to pronounce it with a Spanish accent, "Don Hwan?" Does that make you culturally sensitive or are you expropriating and butchering their culture with your clumsy Anglo attempt to effect a Spanish accent? What if I pronounce it Don "Jew- un"? You would think I was a hillbilly who had read the word in a book but never heard it pronounced and was woefully mis-reading it. But my English professor who studied at Oxford told me Don "Jew-un" is the preferred pronunciation for many of the Oxford professors.
    You can pronounce Don Juan four different ways, all of them "correct" and none of them racist. Same goes for what you decide to call Mexicans, even if they are from Peru.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Mackerel Sky, @JR Ewing, @Ron Mexico, @James J O'Meara

    Byron’s Don Juan is pronounced Jew-on, as can be seen by the meter and rhymes therein.

    It’s part of the English habit of pronouncing dirty furrin words any old way they want to. It’s part of the whole anti-intellectual thing; “upper class” people can say whatever they want, and “correcting” them shows not education but pedantry. In turn, being an “Oxford professor” combines both snobbery and pedantry.

    Same with Don Quixote: pronounced “Quick-sit”

    I’ve had two real Oxford professors. One (whom Joyce Carol Oates wrote about in the story “Gay” as published in the Christmas 1972 issue of Playboy) taught The English Novel and mentioned Smollett’s translation of Don Quick-sit. He also alluded to how he “learned Italian from the servants”.

    The other was the son of the Anglican Bishop of Ontario, and author of a well-received book on French Existentialism (published by Oxford, of course). He pronounced French exactly as if it were English. Yes, really.

    So yeah, “Oxford professors”.

    Those British chefs do the same thing: Paaastah (Gordon Ramsey), Orry-gone -o, jallopenno, etc.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @James J O'Meara

    Jeeves is a val-et, the winner of the British Open receives the clar-et jug. The last one is curious since the Scots tended to be on good terms with the French.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

  131. @Anonymous
    OT: A story from 2020, but I hadn't realised that Nigeria is projected to have a higher population than China by 2100.

    (Nigerian growth meets Chinese decline.)

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-53409521

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @nebulafox, @fish

    Great…..more phone scams.

  132. @Undocumented Shopper
    Let's mock them by creating more neuter words. For example

    Blackx, Democratz, Peoplex of Colorx , Gayx etc.

    Replies: @Rob, @Buffalo Joe

    Shopper, I call our Latino cleaning lady Kleenex.

    • LOL: Wade Hampton
    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @Buffalo Joe

    Just don't pull a Schwarzenegger with her.

  133. @Known Fact
    Sorry but as a dedicated Latin student, when I hear "Latin" I'm thinking of George Sanders or some other actor with a pretentious British accent playing a Roman commander astride a silver horse in some biblical epic

    And as a Pirate fan it's sad to deal with how the Lumber Company has degenerated into the current plucky but hapless toothpick wielders. God, how even one Mike Easler could help us out now

    Replies: @El Dato, @James J O'Meara

    I have a wewy gweat fwiend in Wome named Biggus Dickus.

  134. @anon
    If you're into vowels: Latinaeiou.

    If you're into consonants: Latinlgbtx

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Buffalo Joe

    FourOneOne, I like vowels. I had a dog named Phydeaux.

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @Wade Hampton
    @Buffalo Joe

    Chapel Hill, the NC equivalent of Madison WI or Berkeley CA, is horribly leftist and smug. Their local pet store is named that.

    http://phydeaux.com

    Replies: @Alden

  135. @Sick of Orcs
    What about suspecto and suspecta?

    "Suspex" is even better.

    Replies: @fish

    Just stop it! I’m at the neurologist and my hysterical cackling under a hospital approved face covering is drawing stares….

    • Thanks: Sick of Orcs
  136. @Jonathan Mason
    @Twinkie


    Do these “Latins” speak Latin?
     
    No, they don't. That is why they do not understand a word of what is said in church, but they go anyway, because that is what you do on Sunday. So Cogito Ergo Sum or Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc does not mean a damn thing to them.

    The term Latino/Latina is a pretty silly one anyway, because it is only used by wokex gringos and gringas (gringx) in the Estados Unidos to refer to people who speak languages other than English which have descended from Latin, but excluding French, Romanian, and Italian.

    (People in Europe do not refer to people like Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo as Latinos.)

    Latinos and Latinas in the wild do not refer to themselves as such either. Even in a relatively small country like Ecuador, there are a number of ethnicities, none of which are "Latino".

    The largest number of Ecuadorians identify themselves as Mestizos, and though Spanish (descended from a western Roman empire dialect of Latin) is the main language, other languages include Achuar-Shiwiar ,Chachi, Colorado, Quechua – which comprises 9 separate dialects are spoken in as many areas in the country with a combined population of 1'460,00--Shuar, and Waorani.

    The way to deal with wokeism is to LAUGH at it!

    https://i2.wp.com/www.chrismadden.co.uk/images/cartoons/a807-court-of-language-crime-cartoon.jpg

    Replies: @J.Ross, @El Dato, @syonredux, @AndrewR, @Peter D. Bredon

  137. @Matttt
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Canelo = cinnamon. Redheads with light skin like Mr. Alvarez are called ginger in American English, but they are called cinnamon in Mexican Spanish.

    Also, there's a famous Mexican song about "ojos negros, piel canela," black eyes, cinnamon skin. I always thought that mean brownish skin, but now I wonder.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jonathan Mason

    Canelo as applied to skin color means light brown or golden brown (cinnamon).

    Spanish is full of terms for skin color and it is difficult to know exactly what they mean.

    In the Dominican Republic people are often referred to as Indio claro, which means light Indian, as opposed to Indio oscuro, which means dark Indian. Most of the people who are described in this way in the Dominican Republic are not (Taino) Indian anyway, but they like to think that they might be.

    Another term used in Spanish is trigueño, which means wheat colored, but it can be pretty difficult to determine whether somebody is a wheatie,or cinnamon colored. It might depend how much they have been out in the sun recently.

    In the Dominican Republic negro (=black) is definitely considered down market, and is closely associated with Haitians, who are considered to be beyond the pale and generally undesirable.

    I once heard a Dominican woman in the United States refer to a dark-skinned African-American street person as a Haitian. He was not actually Haitian, just a bum, but she felt she had adjectively hit the nail on the head.

    • Thanks: Buffalo Joe
    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Jonathan Mason


    In the Dominican Republic negro (=black) is definitely considered down market, and is closely associated with Haitians, who are considered to be beyond the pale and generally undesirable.
     
    Of course. Remember El Jefe ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rafael_Trujillo#Immigration
  138. @International Jew
    @Polistra


    And what’s this now with the Cohen twins? Meghan and I haven’t even recovered from Althea Bernstein and now this? And can y’all HBD Nazis explain one is an NFL star and the other is Dindu Flambé?
     
    Because evading tacklers and evading police draw on similar skills.


    A lesson from this incident: the much-maligned stun gun isn't inherently ineffective, it's just underpowered.

    Replies: @Perry Mason

    I’m a Mexican national by birth and of mixed descent, due to my father’s side. Mexicans, both there and here in Texas, generally refer to themselves as Mexicans. Surprise surprise.

    When making finer distinctions, non-Americanized Mexicans still use the term “Indio” to refer to whole or partial descent from the various tribes that preceded European arrivals. Or ‘Indios Mexicanos’. And then further, sometimes you will hear specific tribes, but that is because of ethnic pride deep in the interior.

    I find that in a mixed setting with non-Hispanics, Central, Spanish Caribbean and Latin Americans will refer to themselves as “Spanish”, whether mestizo by race or not, or their nationality (Brazilians, Peruvians and Argentines in particular).

    Latin is fine…but always sounded ignorant to me, despite that yes Spanish is at Latin derivate. It seems like an ad hoc appellation chosen by Anglos for want of any more appropriate term, because of their lack of knowledge or imagination. Despite its annoying governmental origin, Hispanic is a good term and avoids confusion with “Spanish” as a reference solely to Spain. It instead refers to the historic colony and encapsulates the historical Greater Spain and its colonies, including intermarriage with the natives of the day.

  139. @Neoconned
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.usatoday.com/amp/5016257001

    Mass shooting at trailer park in Colorado....

    @ the above: I'll never forget 11th grade Spanish class.....the teacher posted the neutral word in the middle bar and then left and right did the various other variations including male/female/plural and lastly the "with respect"(nosotros) variation....

    I always thought it interesting they put the adjective behind the noun....not in front....different grammar concept.....

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Bardon Kaldian, @Alden

    If anything, this mass shooting shows that Hispanics are closer to whites than to blacks.

  140. @Jonathan Mason
    @Matttt

    Canelo as applied to skin color means light brown or golden brown (cinnamon).

    Spanish is full of terms for skin color and it is difficult to know exactly what they mean.

    In the Dominican Republic people are often referred to as Indio claro, which means light Indian, as opposed to Indio oscuro, which means dark Indian. Most of the people who are described in this way in the Dominican Republic are not (Taino) Indian anyway, but they like to think that they might be.

    Another term used in Spanish is trigueño, which means wheat colored, but it can be pretty difficult to determine whether somebody is a wheatie,or cinnamon colored. It might depend how much they have been out in the sun recently.

    In the Dominican Republic negro (=black) is definitely considered down market, and is closely associated with Haitians, who are considered to be beyond the pale and generally undesirable.

    I once heard a Dominican woman in the United States refer to a dark-skinned African-American street person as a Haitian. He was not actually Haitian, just a bum, but she felt she had adjectively hit the nail on the head.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    In the Dominican Republic negro (=black) is definitely considered down market, and is closely associated with Haitians, who are considered to be beyond the pale and generally undesirable.

    Of course. Remember El Jefe … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rafael_Trujillo#Immigration

  141. @Buffalo Joe
    @Undocumented Shopper

    Shopper, I call our Latino cleaning lady Kleenex.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    Just don’t pull a Schwarzenegger with her.

  142. @epebble
    @S Johnson

    If language group is the preferred appellation, then the correct word is "Romance". Everybody loves Romance. Latin is so out of favor that even Roman Catholic Church decided to dump it. Only Lawyers use it now and everybody hates lawyers.

    Replies: @S Johnson

    Plus as white and black Americans consume themselves with racial loathing and wokery, Latins will presumably become the dominant market for old-fashioned heterosexual love. I can see ‘Romantic-Americans’ catching on.

  143. @Reg Cæsar
    @Matttt


    Redheads with light skin like Mr. Alvarez are called ginger in American English...
     
    In British English. If it's done in America, it's a new phenomenon, a fad.


    The most famous Ginger since Miss Rogers was a Brit, and by all accounts a capital fellow:


    https://usercontent.one/wp/www.newsgroove.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/1570401221_Inside-Ginger-Baker%E2%80%99s-wild-life-of-sleeping-with-his-daughter%E2%80%99s-pals-threatening-bandmates-with-knives-and-having-orgies-with-Hendrix.jpg


    Ginger Baker’s Son: ‘My Dad Has Been Dead to Me for a Long Time’

    I was daddy's pimp: The shocking admission of Nettie the wild child daughter of Cream drummer Ginger Baker... as her memoirs strip bare the decadence of Seventies rock

    Inside Ginger Baker’s wild life of sleeping with his daughter’s pals, threatening bandmates with knives and having orgies with Hendrix

    “People say Cream gave birth to heavy metal. If that’s so, we should have had an abortion.”

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Peter D. Bredon, @AceDeuce, @reactionry

    I don’t care if the guy is Caesar or Goethe or Napoleon or JFK: there’s something incredibly pathetic about a middle-aged man seducing a teenage girl.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @nebulafox

    ... suddenly I understand this mystery from this past weekend, where redditards were loudly hating the guy who built a rocket that could land on its tail like in a Ray Bradbury story.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @nebulafox


    I don’t care if the guy is Caesar or Goethe or Napoleon or JFK: there’s something incredibly pathetic about a middle-aged man seducing a teenage girl.

     

    He was a rock star. Why do you assume any seduction was necessary? If blokes thought his bandmate was God, why wouldn't birds think Ginger was Adonis?


    https://takahopost.files.wordpress.com/2015/04/clap-2.jpg?w=385
  144. Anon[411] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Census asks people if they voted; historically, the numbers are very close. But in 2020, there was a 4 million vote gap. 4 million more ballots were cast than the census recorded.

    https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2021/05/evidence-2020-election-trickery-people-voted-reported-2020-census-data/?utm_source=Email&utm_medium=the-gateway-pundit&utm_campaign=dailyam&utm_content=daily

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anon

    4 million more ballots were cast than the census recorded.

    People get confused by stuff like "did you vote" all the time, I'm sure.

  145. Sorry, OT, but, SS, this seems like something you need to address:

    Our esteemed host, RKU, is claiming that there is “very real and strong evidence of Covid-19 having been an American biowarfare attack” on China.

    Sooner or later, you need to cut yourself loose from this wealthy lunatic. Preferably sooner.

    I kicked in 1K via VDare a week or so ago, but what we really need is for you to be totally financially independent.

    Go substack, I say.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @vinteuil

    I've never understood people who think that "biowarefare" includes releasing a cootie that is novel and likely to go endemic because your own people have no resistance to it. What's the point of that?

    -----

    I wonder if Steve might not be a bridge too far for SubStack? I'm not sure he'd last long, and then he'd really be without many options. SubStack might decide they need a sacrificial lamb to show that, yeah, they have some limits. Remember, they're taking heat for relatively mainstream writers like Taibbi, Yglesias, and Greenwald. And even if SubStack doesn't mind, they have payment fulfillment partners and internet backbone email partners who might cut them off if they host "nazis" and "hate speech."

    Replies: @vinteuil

    , @El Dato
    @vinteuil

    M. Unz certainly explores widely.

    , @Old Palo Altan
    @vinteuil

    It is certainly true that Steve (and his comment section) were much more varied and free-wheelingly enjoyable than they are now.

    We had fun back then, we were relaxed and adventurous, unafraid and often elegant.

    Best of all, we didn't spend all of our time taking about the least interesting subject on earth: blacks.

  146. OT: How an immigration invasion has turned Vancouver into the “hate crime capital” of North America. As is so typical, the native white Canadians are mostly treated as the villains, but some interesting information anyway.

  147. @G. Poulin
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Years ago I watched a movie starring Tom Berenger about a group of Irish soldiers who deserted the U.S. army and enlisted in the Mexican army. I wonder if Canelo is descended from one of those micks.

    Replies: @Too Long Didn't Read, @Paleo Liberal

    My favorite all-time insult, as best as I can remember from seeing a play at Lincoln Center almost 50 years ago. It was that good an insult.

    The Irish joining the Mexican Army finally explains the insult. I hadn’t known about that. Thank you, since it explains my all-time favorite insult.

    This is from an Irish Renaissance play, The Plough and the Stars, if I remember correctly, by Sean O’Casey.

    Please forgive me if I misquote. This is what I remember from a 1972 production:

    [MORE]

    “You are an illegitimate son of an illegitimate son of a Corporal in the Mexican Army”

  148. @SafeNow
    Thanks for mentioning Clemente. I am old enough to have seen him play, and I can remember what fun it was to watch him hit, run, and of course, oh my, ohhh doctor, throw. He had style. Many didn’t like his style, but I think they would admit he was was engaging. Younger readers here who think (correctly) that modern baseball players are boring, and don’t know Clemente, might want to check-out a few Clemente highlight compilations on Youtube.

    Replies: @Travis, @Wade Hampton

    I agree with your comments about Clemente, but not all modern baseball players are boring. You might have a look at this highlight reel of Padres SS Fernando Tatis, Jr.

    • Replies: @SafeNow
    @Wade Hampton

    Thanks! I don’t watch baseball anymore, so I had never heard of him. I really enjoyed the highlights. He is a fabulous fielder and baserunner, and great fun to watch. Not exactly a likable guy, from what I’ve seen, too bad — neither was Clemente - Maybe he should watch some videos of Mays, Aaron, etc. He is so acrobatic that I worry he might get hurt. Thanks again.

  149. @nebulafox
    @Reg Cæsar

    I don't care if the guy is Caesar or Goethe or Napoleon or JFK: there's something incredibly pathetic about a middle-aged man seducing a teenage girl.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Reg Cæsar

    … suddenly I understand this mystery from this past weekend, where redditards were loudly hating the guy who built a rocket that could land on its tail like in a Ray Bradbury story.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @J.Ross


    … suddenly I understand this mystery from this past weekend, where redditards were loudly hating the guy who built a rocket that could land on its tail like in a Ray Bradbury story.

     

    This classic from 1951 features a similar craft. The science is quite good for the day, but it brings up but never addresses the legal question of whether one has a right to stow away on a vessel which is trespassing on your property. Has that ever come up in common law?


    https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1477720405l/878473.jpg
  150. @Buffalo Joe
    @anon

    FourOneOne, I like vowels. I had a dog named Phydeaux.

    Replies: @Wade Hampton

    Chapel Hill, the NC equivalent of Madison WI or Berkeley CA, is horribly leftist and smug. Their local pet store is named that.

    http://phydeaux.com

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Wade Hampton

    There’s an Australian TV show , Miss Fisher, that’s sometimes on Netflix and cable TV. The heroine’s first name is spelled Phyrenne , pronounced Franny nickname for Frances. Miss Fisher’s a good show if you can ignore the wokeness lessons inserted every few minutes.

  151. @Danindc
    @Trinity

    How did the ‘79 Pirates beat the Orioles down 3-1 and facing three of the best starting pitchers in the world (Flanagan, Palmer, McGregor)? It’s one of my first sports memories and still grates on me.

    Replies: @Marty

    Just weeks before the trade in which the Pirates got their key piece, I was privy to a pre-game exchange at Candlestick Park that went like this:

    Stargell (coming down first base line) – “smell that fart? smell that fart? Eat that fart. What kinda car you got?

    Madlock (in Giants dugout) – “got me a big Lincoln.”

    Stargell – “shit that ain’t no kinda car.”

    Madlock – “kinda car you got, Will?”

    Stargell – “Got me a Benz.”

  152. @Charon
    @Mackerel Sky

    But there's a thing called irony, and beyond that there's perversity. For some of us these are among our final redoubts. Allow us our trivial pleasures and compensations, I pray thee.

    Besides: Cathay, Burma, and Siam are splendid-sounding words.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Brutusale

    Most of the Thai restaurants I’ve gone to over the last 38 years have had “Siam” in their name.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Most of the Thai restaurants I’ve gone to over the last 38 years have had “Siam” in their name.

     

    Nobody wears a "Chennai shirt" or eats "crab Yangon" or "Beijing duck".

    Well, maybe Tiny, but that would make him a cannibal.

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev

    , @AceDeuce
    @Steve Sailer

    Sometimes it's good business--there aren't any "Iranian" restaurants in the U.S.--they're all "Persian" Most Americans are too dumb to know it's the same thing. For good measure, if they set up in small town hicksville as opposed to a city, they call it a "Mediterranean" restaurant.

    , @anon
    @Steve Sailer

    ...Siam in their name

    Ok! Something nostalgic for Boomers that would massively trigger snowflakes, if any were reading.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RG5mOd8Ubsk

    , @Foreign Expert
    @Steve Sailer

    Thais don’t call their country thailand. They also don’t call Bangkok Bangkok.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @photondancer
    @Steve Sailer

    'Siam' used to be popular for Thai restaurant names in Sydney too until the children, who could speak English, realised the punning potential of 'Thai'.

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    https://youtu.be/rlQYqQs0R3w

  153. @El Dato
    @Known Fact


    I’m thinking of George Sanders or some other actor with a pretentious British accent playing a Roman commander astride a silver horse in some biblical epic
     
    These are imperial times.

    https://i.postimg.cc/JztfPY2S/Fat-Counsellors.png

    Replies: @photondancer

    Hooray! Finally a pop culture reference I understand. 🙂 Although it’s a bit dismaying that that book was written 45 years ago and we’re still trying to solve problems by pouring money on them.

  154. @Reg Cæsar
    @Matttt


    Redheads with light skin like Mr. Alvarez are called ginger in American English...
     
    In British English. If it's done in America, it's a new phenomenon, a fad.


    The most famous Ginger since Miss Rogers was a Brit, and by all accounts a capital fellow:


    https://usercontent.one/wp/www.newsgroove.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/1570401221_Inside-Ginger-Baker%E2%80%99s-wild-life-of-sleeping-with-his-daughter%E2%80%99s-pals-threatening-bandmates-with-knives-and-having-orgies-with-Hendrix.jpg


    Ginger Baker’s Son: ‘My Dad Has Been Dead to Me for a Long Time’

    I was daddy's pimp: The shocking admission of Nettie the wild child daughter of Cream drummer Ginger Baker... as her memoirs strip bare the decadence of Seventies rock

    Inside Ginger Baker’s wild life of sleeping with his daughter’s pals, threatening bandmates with knives and having orgies with Hendrix

    “People say Cream gave birth to heavy metal. If that’s so, we should have had an abortion.”

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Peter D. Bredon, @AceDeuce, @reactionry

    “If it’s done in America, it’s a new phenomenon, a fad.”

    “Ginger Kids” is the eleventh episode in the ninth season of the American animated television series South Park. The 136th episode of the series overall, it first aired on Comedy Central in the United States on November 9, 2005. In the episode, Cartman is led to think he has contracted a mysterious and sudden onset of “gingervitus”. — Wikipedia

  155. @Reg Cæsar
    @Matttt


    Redheads with light skin like Mr. Alvarez are called ginger in American English...
     
    In British English. If it's done in America, it's a new phenomenon, a fad.


    The most famous Ginger since Miss Rogers was a Brit, and by all accounts a capital fellow:


    https://usercontent.one/wp/www.newsgroove.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/1570401221_Inside-Ginger-Baker%E2%80%99s-wild-life-of-sleeping-with-his-daughter%E2%80%99s-pals-threatening-bandmates-with-knives-and-having-orgies-with-Hendrix.jpg


    Ginger Baker’s Son: ‘My Dad Has Been Dead to Me for a Long Time’

    I was daddy's pimp: The shocking admission of Nettie the wild child daughter of Cream drummer Ginger Baker... as her memoirs strip bare the decadence of Seventies rock

    Inside Ginger Baker’s wild life of sleeping with his daughter’s pals, threatening bandmates with knives and having orgies with Hendrix

    “People say Cream gave birth to heavy metal. If that’s so, we should have had an abortion.”

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Peter D. Bredon, @AceDeuce, @reactionry

    Reminds me of an old joke:

    What’s old and wrinkled and smells like ginger?

    Fred Astaire’s face.

    • LOL: Cortes, reactionry
  156. @nebulafox
    @AnotherDad

    I wouldn't put much past the CCP, but that's the kind of propaganda leak they really don't want to risk getting out in Africa ("See, we respect you-notice how we don't nag you about stupid LGBT stuff unlike Some People"), and I could see African population growth potentially serving their long-term interests provided that it is kept within check. Beijing's not stupid, they know they aren't going to have the biggest population in the world forever. They don't have to. In terms of power, much more optimal to have 800 million people at Chinese levels of development and functionality than 1.2 billion at India's.

    China's real issue is having a Japan/ROK/Taiwan/Singapore style population crash before they have the wealth and infrastructure to handle it. The former seems to be working out OK, but the latter is still a real issue. There's a reason robotics research is so in demand in that part of the world these days, and people from less developed countries interested in the subject (Indonesia, Bangladesh) go to East Asia for grad school these days.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal

    I worked in robotics for a while. All the robots were made in Japan. One might think that technologically advanced nations like the US or Germany would invest in robotics, but no.

    The way I saw it:

    Germany has Turks
    US has Mexicans
    Japan has robots.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Paleo Liberal

    I worked in robotics for a while.

    Back in the 1980's?

  157. @RichardTaylor
    But these Woke Anglos are exactly the type of person HBD'ers think should be running society. Ivy League types who done real good on the SAT and think of themselves as part of a Smart Set, determined to guide society.

    Like say, the old communist intelligentsia.

    You might wanna revisit your worldview. I know you've concocted a self-serving vision in which a Smart Set (which, of course, includes you) are the source of all Goodness. But I suspect even a Yale Man can see how stupid it is.

    https://www.gentlemansgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/A-classic-Ivy-League-student.jpg

    Fantasy

    http://www.prairiedogmag.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Dumb_and_Dumber_To_review.jpg

    Reality

    Replies: @International Jew, @Alden

    Yale man’s mommy’s laundry maid ironed his shirt and that exact faggy 3 point handkerchief. Family driver delivered clean laundry and several pairs freshly polished shoes once a week. At least he didn’t live with mommy while in college as FDR did. Who is it?

    • LOL: RichardTaylor
  158. @Neoconned
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.usatoday.com/amp/5016257001

    Mass shooting at trailer park in Colorado....

    @ the above: I'll never forget 11th grade Spanish class.....the teacher posted the neutral word in the middle bar and then left and right did the various other variations including male/female/plural and lastly the "with respect"(nosotros) variation....

    I always thought it interesting they put the adjective behind the noun....not in front....different grammar concept.....

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Bardon Kaldian, @Alden

    It’s because the noun is the most important thing. Shoes… color and type. Hair…… length color style.

  159. @Wade Hampton
    @Buffalo Joe

    Chapel Hill, the NC equivalent of Madison WI or Berkeley CA, is horribly leftist and smug. Their local pet store is named that.

    http://phydeaux.com

    Replies: @Alden

    There’s an Australian TV show , Miss Fisher, that’s sometimes on Netflix and cable TV. The heroine’s first name is spelled Phyrenne , pronounced Franny nickname for Frances. Miss Fisher’s a good show if you can ignore the wokeness lessons inserted every few minutes.

  160. @J.Ross
    @nebulafox

    ... suddenly I understand this mystery from this past weekend, where redditards were loudly hating the guy who built a rocket that could land on its tail like in a Ray Bradbury story.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    … suddenly I understand this mystery from this past weekend, where redditards were loudly hating the guy who built a rocket that could land on its tail like in a Ray Bradbury story.

    This classic from 1951 features a similar craft. The science is quite good for the day, but it brings up but never addresses the legal question of whether one has a right to stow away on a vessel which is trespassing on your property. Has that ever come up in common law?

  161. @Mackerel Sky
    @rebel yell

    If you say "Peking", you just sound out of date. It's like calling China "Cathay" and Thailand "Siam". It was generally done once, and now it isn't.

    Replies: @Charon, @Wade Hampton

    I panicked…

  162. @Steve Sailer
    @Charon

    Most of the Thai restaurants I've gone to over the last 38 years have had "Siam" in their name.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @AceDeuce, @anon, @Foreign Expert, @photondancer, @Jonathan Mason

    Most of the Thai restaurants I’ve gone to over the last 38 years have had “Siam” in their name.

    Nobody wears a “Chennai shirt” or eats “crab Yangon” or “Beijing duck”.

    Well, maybe Tiny, but that would make him a cannibal.

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    @Reg Cæsar

    Nobody wears a “Chennai shirt” or eats “crab Yangon” or “Beijing duck”.

    In America anyway. In the PRC it usually is translated as “Beijing Duck” and I suspect that will eventually catch on in the US. Crab Rangoon is safe because the US doesn’t have many Burmese immigrants.

  163. @Anon
    OT: Census asks people if they voted; historically, the numbers are very close. But in 2020, there was a 4 million vote gap. 4 million more ballots were cast than the census recorded.

    https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2021/05/evidence-2020-election-trickery-people-voted-reported-2020-census-data/?utm_source=Email&utm_medium=the-gateway-pundit&utm_campaign=dailyam&utm_content=daily

    Replies: @anon

    4 million more ballots were cast than the census recorded.

    People get confused by stuff like “did you vote” all the time, I’m sure.

  164. @Paleo Liberal
    @nebulafox

    I worked in robotics for a while. All the robots were made in Japan. One might think that technologically advanced nations like the US or Germany would invest in robotics, but no.

    The way I saw it:

    Germany has Turks
    US has Mexicans
    Japan has robots.

    Replies: @anon

    I worked in robotics for a while.

    Back in the 1980’s?

  165. @Steve Sailer
    @Charon

    Most of the Thai restaurants I've gone to over the last 38 years have had "Siam" in their name.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @AceDeuce, @anon, @Foreign Expert, @photondancer, @Jonathan Mason

    Sometimes it’s good business–there aren’t any “Iranian” restaurants in the U.S.–they’re all “Persian” Most Americans are too dumb to know it’s the same thing. For good measure, if they set up in small town hicksville as opposed to a city, they call it a “Mediterranean” restaurant.

  166. @Steve Sailer
    @Charon

    Most of the Thai restaurants I've gone to over the last 38 years have had "Siam" in their name.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @AceDeuce, @anon, @Foreign Expert, @photondancer, @Jonathan Mason

    Siam in their name

    Ok! Something nostalgic for Boomers that would massively trigger snowflakes, if any were reading.

  167. @nebulafox
    @Reg Cæsar

    I don't care if the guy is Caesar or Goethe or Napoleon or JFK: there's something incredibly pathetic about a middle-aged man seducing a teenage girl.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Reg Cæsar

    I don’t care if the guy is Caesar or Goethe or Napoleon or JFK: there’s something incredibly pathetic about a middle-aged man seducing a teenage girl.

    He was a rock star. Why do you assume any seduction was necessary? If blokes thought his bandmate was God, why wouldn’t birds think Ginger was Adonis?

  168. @Steve Sailer
    @Charon

    Most of the Thai restaurants I've gone to over the last 38 years have had "Siam" in their name.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @AceDeuce, @anon, @Foreign Expert, @photondancer, @Jonathan Mason

    Thais don’t call their country thailand. They also don’t call Bangkok Bangkok.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Foreign Expert


    They also don’t call Bangkok Bangkok.
     
    No, they call it

    กรุงเทพมหานคร อมรรัตนโกสินทร์ มหินทรายุธยามหาดิลก ภพนพรัตน์ ราชธานีบุรีรมย์ อุดมราชนิเวศน์ มหาสถาน อมรพิมาน อวตารสถิต สักกะทัตติยะ วิษณุกรรมประสิทธิ์

    or, in Roman script,

    Krung Thep Mahanakhon Amon Rattanakosin Mahinthara Ayuthaya Mahadilok Phop Noppharat Ratchathani Burirom Udomratchaniwet Mahasathan Amon Piman Awatan Sathit Sakkathattiya Witsanukam Prasit.


    In English, this is "the city of angels, the great city, the residence of the Emerald Buddha, the impregnable city (of Ayutthaya) of God Indra, the grand capital of the world endowed with nine precious gems, the happy city, abounding in an enormous Royal Palace that resembles the heavenly abode where reigns the reincarnated god, a city given by Indra and built by Vishnukarn."

    As "Cities of Angels" go, Bangkok beats LA in both population and name length.


    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-hsqg6Bsdk90/XOCkxzErjAI/AAAAAAAALro/CuG9w7IHd3EKXTElRzHytfjb4fH4R6kTgCK4BGAYYCw/s1600/amazing-interesting-random-facts%2B%252894%2529.jpg

    Replies: @International Jew, @Jim Bob Lassiter

  169. @Steve Sailer
    @Charon

    Most of the Thai restaurants I've gone to over the last 38 years have had "Siam" in their name.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @AceDeuce, @anon, @Foreign Expert, @photondancer, @Jonathan Mason

    ‘Siam’ used to be popular for Thai restaurant names in Sydney too until the children, who could speak English, realised the punning potential of ‘Thai’.

  170. @Wade Hampton
    @SafeNow

    I agree with your comments about Clemente, but not all modern baseball players are boring. You might have a look at this highlight reel of Padres SS Fernando Tatis, Jr.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-CqmaWJTdaA&t=413s

    Replies: @SafeNow

    Thanks! I don’t watch baseball anymore, so I had never heard of him. I really enjoyed the highlights. He is a fabulous fielder and baserunner, and great fun to watch. Not exactly a likable guy, from what I’ve seen, too bad — neither was Clemente – Maybe he should watch some videos of Mays, Aaron, etc. He is so acrobatic that I worry he might get hurt. Thanks again.

    • Thanks: Wade Hampton
  171. @Foreign Expert
    @Steve Sailer

    Thais don’t call their country thailand. They also don’t call Bangkok Bangkok.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    They also don’t call Bangkok Bangkok.

    No, they call it

    กรุงเทพมหานคร อมรรัตนโกสินทร์ มหินทรายุธยามหาดิลก ภพนพรัตน์ ราชธานีบุรีรมย์ อุดมราชนิเวศน์ มหาสถาน อมรพิมาน อวตารสถิต สักกะทัตติยะ วิษณุกรรมประสิทธิ์

    or, in Roman script,

    Krung Thep Mahanakhon Amon Rattanakosin Mahinthara Ayuthaya Mahadilok Phop Noppharat Ratchathani Burirom Udomratchaniwet Mahasathan Amon Piman Awatan Sathit Sakkathattiya Witsanukam Prasit.

    In English, this is “the city of angels, the great city, the residence of the Emerald Buddha, the impregnable city (of Ayutthaya) of God Indra, the grand capital of the world endowed with nine precious gems, the happy city, abounding in an enormous Royal Palace that resembles the heavenly abode where reigns the reincarnated god, a city given by Indra and built by Vishnukarn.”

    As “Cities of Angels” go, Bangkok beats LA in both population and name length.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Reg Cæsar


    Krung Thep Mahanakhon Amon Rattanakosin Mahinthara Ayuthaya Mahadilok Phop Noppharat Ratchathani Burirom Udomratchaniwet Mahasathan Amon Piman Awatan Sathit Sakkathattiya Witsanukam Prasit.
     
    Reg, I'm never going to remember that. Couldja maybe give us an easily-remembered anagram?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Reg Cæsar

    Now it's just "El Barrio de la Mala Muerte".

  172. @Anonymous
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Speaking of Beijing, Spanish (and French) speakers still use Pekin as their preferred name for that Chinese city. This butchering of English to meet the demands of Woke intellectuals from American universities is something that hasn't caught on in most other languages.

    As an aside I remember Coca Cola issuing a series of bilingual English/Spanish Christmas-themed packages a number of years back, (no doubt to brandish their multi-culti bona fides) and in English you were wished a PC "Happy Holidays" but in Spanish it was "Feliz Navidad" (Happy Christmas).
    A negligible percentage of English speakers might take offence at the word "Christmas" but apparently 99.99999% of Spanish speakers celebrate this particular holiday, hence it was a "Happy Christmas" for them.

    Replies: @Mackerel Sky

    Speaking of Beijing, Spanish (and French) speakers still use Pekin as their preferred name for that Chinese city. 

    Its ironic to refer to “Beijing” as “butchering of English” because as your own post hints, English obtained “Peking” via other European languages, which themselves obtained it from non-Mandarin-speaking Chinese. It’s a foreign place name that we got from Continentals before we knew any better. I don’t see why some of you view this as a linguistic or cultural hill worth fighting on. Place names change sometimes. Yes, sometimes they are changed for retarded reasons, but not in the case of changing “Peking” to “Beijing”.

    And the battle is lost anyway. “Peking” peaked in the mid 1960s. By the mid 1980s, it had been overtaken by “Beijing”. “Beijing” has been the usual accepted term for a generation now. It’s not a PC or woke thing. We barely had that in the 1980s.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Mackerel Sky


    Place names change sometimes. Yes, sometimes they are changed for retarded reasons, but not in the case of changing “Peking” to “Beijing”.
     
    I've never heard an English-speaker pronounce Bĕijīng correctly. And never heard an English-speaker pronounce Peking incorrectly. That alone is reason enough to keep the English.

    We don't tell Chinamen how to speak their language, and they have no business telling us how to speak our own.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Mackerel Sky

    , @Anonymous
    @Mackerel Sky

    Perhaps "butchering" was the wrong word. Maybe the "altering" of English to be more sensitive to the linguistic norms of foreigners would've been better.
    The point was Spanish (and French) speakers don't give a damn about kowtowing to native Mandarin speakers in China by replacing a perfectly good and well-established word like Pekin with something else. They view their respective languages as being primarily the possession of its native speakers and not some universal language that should cater to the whims of linguistic outsiders.
    (we don't say Roma even though it wouldn't be much of a stretch for native Anglophones to do so).

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  173. Anon[150] • Disclaimer says:
    @vinteuil
    Sorry, OT, but, SS, this seems like something you need to address:

    Our esteemed host, RKU, is claiming that there is "very real and strong evidence of Covid-19 having been an American biowarfare attack" on China.

    Sooner or later, you need to cut yourself loose from this wealthy lunatic. Preferably sooner.

    I kicked in 1K via VDare a week or so ago, but what we really need is for you to be totally financially independent.

    Go substack, I say.

    Replies: @Anon, @El Dato, @Old Palo Altan

    I’ve never understood people who think that “biowarefare” includes releasing a cootie that is novel and likely to go endemic because your own people have no resistance to it. What’s the point of that?

    —–

    I wonder if Steve might not be a bridge too far for SubStack? I’m not sure he’d last long, and then he’d really be without many options. SubStack might decide they need a sacrificial lamb to show that, yeah, they have some limits. Remember, they’re taking heat for relatively mainstream writers like Taibbi, Yglesias, and Greenwald. And even if SubStack doesn’t mind, they have payment fulfillment partners and internet backbone email partners who might cut them off if they host “nazis” and “hate speech.”

    • Replies: @vinteuil
    @Anon


    I wonder if Steve might not be a bridge too far for SubStack?
     
    Well, if so, then to hell with SubStack.

    they’re taking heat for relatively mainstream writers like Taibbi, Yglesias, and Greenwald.

    LOL. Like Taibbi & Greenwald, both of whom have shown a lot of independence of thought, belong in the same class as Yglesias, the shilliest of all shills.

    Taibbi & Greenwald have shown some independence of thought.

    Yglesias has not.
  174. Anon[350] • Disclaimer says:
    @prosa123
    Many of the Spanish-speaking-ancestry people I know say "Spanish" to describe themselves and others of like background. Sometimes they'll use a specific identifier such as Puerto Rican, Dominican, Salvadoran, etc. None of this comes up often, as in most cases they seem to have a relatively low level of ethnic consciousness.

    Replies: @Peterike, @Anon

    Nonsense. A Latin American-born person NEVER calls himself Spanish. They know only someone born in Spain has the right to call himself Spanish. They might call themselves Hispanic to please their gringo coworkers or whatnot, but among THEMSELVES, they will say Mexican, Guatemalan, etc. They have a HIGH level of ethnic consciousness. You are totally misinformed.

  175. @anonn
    The obsession conservatives have over niche nonesense from academia continues to astound me. As a leftist from Southern California, I know a lot of Mexicans, leftists, and liberals. Nobody I have ever talked to has ever said 'Latinx' except conservatives (same thing with 'woke'). First gen immigrants call themselves Mexican, their kids call themselves American, and libs and leftists usually go with latino/latina.

    It's a dumb word, pioneered by second-rate academics looking for tenure. Just don't use it and it will go away.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew, @Anon

    The obsession is by leftists. Read any left-wing rag and there you’ll find it. Even NPR has fallen for it.

  176. @vinteuil
    Sorry, OT, but, SS, this seems like something you need to address:

    Our esteemed host, RKU, is claiming that there is "very real and strong evidence of Covid-19 having been an American biowarfare attack" on China.

    Sooner or later, you need to cut yourself loose from this wealthy lunatic. Preferably sooner.

    I kicked in 1K via VDare a week or so ago, but what we really need is for you to be totally financially independent.

    Go substack, I say.

    Replies: @Anon, @El Dato, @Old Palo Altan

    M. Unz certainly explores widely.

  177. @Reg Cæsar
    @Matttt


    Redheads with light skin like Mr. Alvarez are called ginger in American English...
     
    In British English. If it's done in America, it's a new phenomenon, a fad.


    The most famous Ginger since Miss Rogers was a Brit, and by all accounts a capital fellow:


    https://usercontent.one/wp/www.newsgroove.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/1570401221_Inside-Ginger-Baker%E2%80%99s-wild-life-of-sleeping-with-his-daughter%E2%80%99s-pals-threatening-bandmates-with-knives-and-having-orgies-with-Hendrix.jpg


    Ginger Baker’s Son: ‘My Dad Has Been Dead to Me for a Long Time’

    I was daddy's pimp: The shocking admission of Nettie the wild child daughter of Cream drummer Ginger Baker... as her memoirs strip bare the decadence of Seventies rock

    Inside Ginger Baker’s wild life of sleeping with his daughter’s pals, threatening bandmates with knives and having orgies with Hendrix

    “People say Cream gave birth to heavy metal. If that’s so, we should have had an abortion.”

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Peter D. Bredon, @AceDeuce, @reactionry

    “In British English.”

    Given the potential for digital reanimation and virtual sex re-assignment surgery, one could picture a marquee sporting

    GINGER ROGERS FRED ASTAIRE

    Going from bad to worse –

    Lord of the Flies II: Ginger Rogers Golding & Gilligan

    Hat Tip to the urban legend of Seaman Staines and Roger the Cabin Boy

  178. @Reg Cæsar
    @Foreign Expert


    They also don’t call Bangkok Bangkok.
     
    No, they call it

    กรุงเทพมหานคร อมรรัตนโกสินทร์ มหินทรายุธยามหาดิลก ภพนพรัตน์ ราชธานีบุรีรมย์ อุดมราชนิเวศน์ มหาสถาน อมรพิมาน อวตารสถิต สักกะทัตติยะ วิษณุกรรมประสิทธิ์

    or, in Roman script,

    Krung Thep Mahanakhon Amon Rattanakosin Mahinthara Ayuthaya Mahadilok Phop Noppharat Ratchathani Burirom Udomratchaniwet Mahasathan Amon Piman Awatan Sathit Sakkathattiya Witsanukam Prasit.


    In English, this is "the city of angels, the great city, the residence of the Emerald Buddha, the impregnable city (of Ayutthaya) of God Indra, the grand capital of the world endowed with nine precious gems, the happy city, abounding in an enormous Royal Palace that resembles the heavenly abode where reigns the reincarnated god, a city given by Indra and built by Vishnukarn."

    As "Cities of Angels" go, Bangkok beats LA in both population and name length.


    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-hsqg6Bsdk90/XOCkxzErjAI/AAAAAAAALro/CuG9w7IHd3EKXTElRzHytfjb4fH4R6kTgCK4BGAYYCw/s1600/amazing-interesting-random-facts%2B%252894%2529.jpg

    Replies: @International Jew, @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Krung Thep Mahanakhon Amon Rattanakosin Mahinthara Ayuthaya Mahadilok Phop Noppharat Ratchathani Burirom Udomratchaniwet Mahasathan Amon Piman Awatan Sathit Sakkathattiya Witsanukam Prasit.

    Reg, I’m never going to remember that. Couldja maybe give us an easily-remembered anagram?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @International Jew


    Reg, I’m never going to remember that. Couldja maybe give us an easily-remembered anagram?

     

    Not for Thai. But here's one closer to home:


    El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles de Porciúncula = Undress alone, pull out a serene bed, raise a leg alone, coca under lip.
  179. @Steve Sailer
    @Charon

    Most of the Thai restaurants I've gone to over the last 38 years have had "Siam" in their name.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @AceDeuce, @anon, @Foreign Expert, @photondancer, @Jonathan Mason

  180. A real paradox in the gendered nouns of Spanish is that many vulgar names for female genitalia are masculine and many vulgar names for male genitalia are feminine. Go figure.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Casanova (according to Casanova) said it best: the slave takes his name from his master.

  181. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Most of the Thai restaurants I’ve gone to over the last 38 years have had “Siam” in their name.

     

    Nobody wears a "Chennai shirt" or eats "crab Yangon" or "Beijing duck".

    Well, maybe Tiny, but that would make him a cannibal.

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev

    Nobody wears a “Chennai shirt” or eats “crab Yangon” or “Beijing duck”.

    In America anyway. In the PRC it usually is translated as “Beijing Duck” and I suspect that will eventually catch on in the US. Crab Rangoon is safe because the US doesn’t have many Burmese immigrants.

  182. @Paleo Liberal
    This is something I have believed for a while. Latin really is the English word for Latino/a. Why not use it?

    Hispanic is another good English word.

    A Dominican friend of mine called his ethnic background “Spanish”. Also a good English word.

    Cesar Chavez and his crowd used “Chicano/a” for American born Latins, especially of Mexican descent. That word has fallen out of favor. Imagine an alternate Woke 2021 with the word “Chicanx”.

    Replies: @Alden, @Anonymous, @Swamp Fox

    Had a few half black, half Mexican kids at my public high school.
    Called them”Chicanbros.”
    Or “Pork and Beaners.”

  183. …the US doesn’t have many Burmese immigrants.

    Burma has been the top source of refugees for many states at times in the past decade:

    Don’t confuse them with Bhutanese, who also show up often atop cold states’ refugee lists. Though not that far apart, Bhutan is cold and Burma warm. Frigidity bolsters the credit of the refugees’ bona fides. “Would we come here if we didn’t have to?”

    This woman’s children are a Burmese Karen-Cochin Jewish-Mayflower mix. The sun never sets on their ancestry.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisa_Benson_Craig

  184. @vinteuil
    Sorry, OT, but, SS, this seems like something you need to address:

    Our esteemed host, RKU, is claiming that there is "very real and strong evidence of Covid-19 having been an American biowarfare attack" on China.

    Sooner or later, you need to cut yourself loose from this wealthy lunatic. Preferably sooner.

    I kicked in 1K via VDare a week or so ago, but what we really need is for you to be totally financially independent.

    Go substack, I say.

    Replies: @Anon, @El Dato, @Old Palo Altan

    It is certainly true that Steve (and his comment section) were much more varied and free-wheelingly enjoyable than they are now.

    We had fun back then, we were relaxed and adventurous, unafraid and often elegant.

    Best of all, we didn’t spend all of our time taking about the least interesting subject on earth: blacks.

  185. @Charon
    @Mackerel Sky

    But there's a thing called irony, and beyond that there's perversity. For some of us these are among our final redoubts. Allow us our trivial pleasures and compensations, I pray thee.

    Besides: Cathay, Burma, and Siam are splendid-sounding words.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Brutusale

    When I order a Bombay Sapphire martini before dining on Peking Duck, people seem to be able to figure out what I want.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Brutusale

    PATRICIAN
    [to which point, add unzbutton plz]

  186. @Reg Cæsar
    @Foreign Expert


    They also don’t call Bangkok Bangkok.
     
    No, they call it

    กรุงเทพมหานคร อมรรัตนโกสินทร์ มหินทรายุธยามหาดิลก ภพนพรัตน์ ราชธานีบุรีรมย์ อุดมราชนิเวศน์ มหาสถาน อมรพิมาน อวตารสถิต สักกะทัตติยะ วิษณุกรรมประสิทธิ์

    or, in Roman script,

    Krung Thep Mahanakhon Amon Rattanakosin Mahinthara Ayuthaya Mahadilok Phop Noppharat Ratchathani Burirom Udomratchaniwet Mahasathan Amon Piman Awatan Sathit Sakkathattiya Witsanukam Prasit.


    In English, this is "the city of angels, the great city, the residence of the Emerald Buddha, the impregnable city (of Ayutthaya) of God Indra, the grand capital of the world endowed with nine precious gems, the happy city, abounding in an enormous Royal Palace that resembles the heavenly abode where reigns the reincarnated god, a city given by Indra and built by Vishnukarn."

    As "Cities of Angels" go, Bangkok beats LA in both population and name length.


    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-hsqg6Bsdk90/XOCkxzErjAI/AAAAAAAALro/CuG9w7IHd3EKXTElRzHytfjb4fH4R6kTgCK4BGAYYCw/s1600/amazing-interesting-random-facts%2B%252894%2529.jpg

    Replies: @International Jew, @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Now it’s just “El Barrio de la Mala Muerte”.

  187. Anonymous[358] • Disclaimer says:

    A children’s book on Roberto Clemente!

    Here’s a review of it on Amazon:

    My kids and I were huge fans of Dan Gutman books mainly because we learned about a baseball legend in an enjoyable way. I was so disappointed with this book that gave an excerpt on fossil fuels and climate change. It felt political and I don’t feel this is the forum to express opinions given the audience are young boys. The book goes into the “future” and shows Florida as submerged under water. This actually scared my boys as we live in Florida. Very disappointed.

    Gutman 🤦‍♂️ They just can’t help it.

  188. @Mackerel Sky
    @Anonymous


    Speaking of Beijing, Spanish (and French) speakers still use Pekin as their preferred name for that Chinese city. 
     
    Its ironic to refer to "Beijing" as "butchering of English" because as your own post hints, English obtained "Peking" via other European languages, which themselves obtained it from non-Mandarin-speaking Chinese. It's a foreign place name that we got from Continentals before we knew any better. I don't see why some of you view this as a linguistic or cultural hill worth fighting on. Place names change sometimes. Yes, sometimes they are changed for retarded reasons, but not in the case of changing "Peking" to "Beijing".

    And the battle is lost anyway. "Peking" peaked in the mid 1960s. By the mid 1980s, it had been overtaken by "Beijing". "Beijing" has been the usual accepted term for a generation now. It's not a PC or woke thing. We barely had that in the 1980s.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Anonymous

    Place names change sometimes. Yes, sometimes they are changed for retarded reasons, but not in the case of changing “Peking” to “Beijing”.

    I’ve never heard an English-speaker pronounce Bĕijīng correctly. And never heard an English-speaker pronounce Peking incorrectly. That alone is reason enough to keep the English.

    We don’t tell Chinamen how to speak their language, and they have no business telling us how to speak our own.

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Reg Cæsar

    These dogs are called pequinés in Spanish, but not to be confused with pingüinos, which are a kind of Antarctic bird.

    They also find the name hard to get their tongue around.

    https://www.thoughtco.com/thmb/30AVSRQINAdh1NjvRwf2whAzhKI=/768x0/filters:no_upscale():max_bytes(150000):strip_icc():format(webp)/Pekinese-58d55a815f9b584683f01edb.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Mackerel Sky
    @Reg Cæsar

    Because "Peking" is a corruption of another word (presumably the Cantonese "Bak Ging"), pronouncing it "properly" doesn't enter into it, does it.

    And we don't need to pronounce it exactly as they do in Beijing. Nobody says "Paree" in English, either.

    I think you're just pissed because you grew up with the older word. I kinda get it: I was in my teens when it changed, so I was irritated and puzzled at first. Then I realized "Hey, stuff like this changes sometimes. Deal."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  189. Roberto Clemente, who died a hero on New Year’s Eve 1972

    Just before Nixon’s re-election. We were staying over at a friends’ house. Their youngest woke us up with the news, “Sam Clemente died!”

  190. @Reg Cæsar
    @Mackerel Sky


    Place names change sometimes. Yes, sometimes they are changed for retarded reasons, but not in the case of changing “Peking” to “Beijing”.
     
    I've never heard an English-speaker pronounce Bĕijīng correctly. And never heard an English-speaker pronounce Peking incorrectly. That alone is reason enough to keep the English.

    We don't tell Chinamen how to speak their language, and they have no business telling us how to speak our own.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Mackerel Sky

    These dogs are called pequinés in Spanish, but not to be confused with pingüinos, which are a kind of Antarctic bird.

    They also find the name hard to get their tongue around.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    not to be confused with pingüinos
     
    The only penguins to be found in the wild in the Northern Hemisphere are in Ecuador, specifically in the Galápagos Islands. Go see one while you still can.
  191. @Brutusale
    @Charon

    When I order a Bombay Sapphire martini before dining on Peking Duck, people seem to be able to figure out what I want.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    PATRICIAN
    [to which point, add unzbutton plz]

  192. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    A real paradox in the gendered nouns of Spanish is that many vulgar names for female genitalia are masculine and many vulgar names for male genitalia are feminine. Go figure.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Casanova (according to Casanova) said it best: the slave takes his name from his master.

    • LOL: Jim Bob Lassiter
  193. @James J O'Meara
    @rebel yell

    Byron's Don Juan is pronounced Jew-on, as can be seen by the meter and rhymes therein.

    It's part of the English habit of pronouncing dirty furrin words any old way they want to. It's part of the whole anti-intellectual thing; "upper class" people can say whatever they want, and "correcting" them shows not education but pedantry. In turn, being an "Oxford professor" combines both snobbery and pedantry.

    Same with Don Quixote: pronounced "Quick-sit"

    I've had two real Oxford professors. One (whom Joyce Carol Oates wrote about in the story "Gay" as published in the Christmas 1972 issue of Playboy) taught The English Novel and mentioned Smollett's translation of Don Quick-sit. He also alluded to how he "learned Italian from the servants".

    The other was the son of the Anglican Bishop of Ontario, and author of a well-received book on French Existentialism (published by Oxford, of course). He pronounced French exactly as if it were English. Yes, really.

    So yeah, "Oxford professors".

    Those British chefs do the same thing: Paaastah (Gordon Ramsey), Orry-gone -o, jallopenno, etc.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Jeeves is a val-et, the winner of the British Open receives the clar-et jug. The last one is curious since the Scots tended to be on good terms with the French.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Steve Sailer

    Also 'fill-ets' of fish and steak.

  194. @Jonathan Mason
    @Reg Cæsar

    These dogs are called pequinés in Spanish, but not to be confused with pingüinos, which are a kind of Antarctic bird.

    They also find the name hard to get their tongue around.

    https://www.thoughtco.com/thmb/30AVSRQINAdh1NjvRwf2whAzhKI=/768x0/filters:no_upscale():max_bytes(150000):strip_icc():format(webp)/Pekinese-58d55a815f9b584683f01edb.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    not to be confused with pingüinos

    The only penguins to be found in the wild in the Northern Hemisphere are in Ecuador, specifically in the Galápagos Islands. Go see one while you still can.

  195. @Steve Sailer
    @James J O'Meara

    Jeeves is a val-et, the winner of the British Open receives the clar-et jug. The last one is curious since the Scots tended to be on good terms with the French.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Also ‘fill-ets’ of fish and steak.

  196. @International Jew
    @Reg Cæsar


    Krung Thep Mahanakhon Amon Rattanakosin Mahinthara Ayuthaya Mahadilok Phop Noppharat Ratchathani Burirom Udomratchaniwet Mahasathan Amon Piman Awatan Sathit Sakkathattiya Witsanukam Prasit.
     
    Reg, I'm never going to remember that. Couldja maybe give us an easily-remembered anagram?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Reg, I’m never going to remember that. Couldja maybe give us an easily-remembered anagram?

    Not for Thai. But here’s one closer to home:

    El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles de Porciúncula = Undress alone, pull out a serene bed, raise a leg alone, coca under lip.

  197. @Reg Cæsar
    @Mackerel Sky


    Place names change sometimes. Yes, sometimes they are changed for retarded reasons, but not in the case of changing “Peking” to “Beijing”.
     
    I've never heard an English-speaker pronounce Bĕijīng correctly. And never heard an English-speaker pronounce Peking incorrectly. That alone is reason enough to keep the English.

    We don't tell Chinamen how to speak their language, and they have no business telling us how to speak our own.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Mackerel Sky

    Because “Peking” is a corruption of another word (presumably the Cantonese “Bak Ging”), pronouncing it “properly” doesn’t enter into it, does it.

    And we don’t need to pronounce it exactly as they do in Beijing. Nobody says “Paree” in English, either.

    I think you’re just pissed because you grew up with the older word. I kinda get it: I was in my teens when it changed, so I was irritated and puzzled at first. Then I realized “Hey, stuff like this changes sometimes. Deal.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Mackerel Sky


    And we don’t need to pronounce it exactly as they do in Beijing.
     
    Exactly. That was my point.

    Enjoy your Mumbai Sapphire. And Bhārat ink. And Foghorn Livorno cartoons. And flying Zhongguo Pacific.
  198. Anonymous[183] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mackerel Sky
    @Anonymous


    Speaking of Beijing, Spanish (and French) speakers still use Pekin as their preferred name for that Chinese city. 
     
    Its ironic to refer to "Beijing" as "butchering of English" because as your own post hints, English obtained "Peking" via other European languages, which themselves obtained it from non-Mandarin-speaking Chinese. It's a foreign place name that we got from Continentals before we knew any better. I don't see why some of you view this as a linguistic or cultural hill worth fighting on. Place names change sometimes. Yes, sometimes they are changed for retarded reasons, but not in the case of changing "Peking" to "Beijing".

    And the battle is lost anyway. "Peking" peaked in the mid 1960s. By the mid 1980s, it had been overtaken by "Beijing". "Beijing" has been the usual accepted term for a generation now. It's not a PC or woke thing. We barely had that in the 1980s.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Anonymous

    Perhaps “butchering” was the wrong word. Maybe the “altering” of English to be more sensitive to the linguistic norms of foreigners would’ve been better.
    The point was Spanish (and French) speakers don’t give a damn about kowtowing to native Mandarin speakers in China by replacing a perfectly good and well-established word like Pekin with something else. They view their respective languages as being primarily the possession of its native speakers and not some universal language that should cater to the whims of linguistic outsiders.
    (we don’t say Roma even though it wouldn’t be much of a stretch for native Anglophones to do so).

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    The point was Spanish (and French) speakers don’t give a damn about kowtowing to native Mandarin speakers in China by replacing a perfectly good and well-established word like Pekin with something else.
     
    There is a Pekin in Illinois, said to be named for lying on the same latitude as the Chinese capital. It's actually about two-thirds of a degree farther north.


    You may have heard of their high school's champion basketball team:

    https://i.imgur.com/nZ09Jxc.jpg


    https://i.ebayimg.com/thumbs/images/g/BxQAAOSw~qVepuxd/s-l225.jpg

    http://johnbiggsoklahomawriter.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/th-2.jpeg

  199. @Trinity
    Wonder if Pelosi probably gets Clemente mixed up with "Willie" Stargell? I know she has no clue who the hell Manny Sanguillen or Al Oliver were. I think that Clemente and Steve Blass should have shared the 1971 World Series MVP. Good lawd, how did that team beat the Orioles and their 4-20 game winners. Clemente like others didn't receive the recognition he deserved because of playing in a small market like Pittsburgh. That is why Reggie Jackson did a one and done with the Orioles and flew the coop to NYC.

    Replies: @Danindc, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    Good lawd, how did that team beat the Orioles and their 4-20 game winners.

    HOF quality Outfield and one of the best batting orders of the decade. They were the proto “lumber company”.

  200. @Anon
    @vinteuil

    I've never understood people who think that "biowarefare" includes releasing a cootie that is novel and likely to go endemic because your own people have no resistance to it. What's the point of that?

    -----

    I wonder if Steve might not be a bridge too far for SubStack? I'm not sure he'd last long, and then he'd really be without many options. SubStack might decide they need a sacrificial lamb to show that, yeah, they have some limits. Remember, they're taking heat for relatively mainstream writers like Taibbi, Yglesias, and Greenwald. And even if SubStack doesn't mind, they have payment fulfillment partners and internet backbone email partners who might cut them off if they host "nazis" and "hate speech."

    Replies: @vinteuil

    I wonder if Steve might not be a bridge too far for SubStack?

    Well, if so, then to hell with SubStack.

    they’re taking heat for relatively mainstream writers like Taibbi, Yglesias, and Greenwald.

    LOL. Like Taibbi & Greenwald, both of whom have shown a lot of independence of thought, belong in the same class as Yglesias, the shilliest of all shills.

    Taibbi & Greenwald have shown some independence of thought.

    Yglesias has not.

  201. @Mackerel Sky
    @Reg Cæsar

    Because "Peking" is a corruption of another word (presumably the Cantonese "Bak Ging"), pronouncing it "properly" doesn't enter into it, does it.

    And we don't need to pronounce it exactly as they do in Beijing. Nobody says "Paree" in English, either.

    I think you're just pissed because you grew up with the older word. I kinda get it: I was in my teens when it changed, so I was irritated and puzzled at first. Then I realized "Hey, stuff like this changes sometimes. Deal."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    And we don’t need to pronounce it exactly as they do in Beijing.

    Exactly. That was my point.

    Enjoy your Mumbai Sapphire. And Bhārat ink. And Foghorn Livorno cartoons. And flying Zhongguo Pacific.

  202. @Anonymous
    @Mackerel Sky

    Perhaps "butchering" was the wrong word. Maybe the "altering" of English to be more sensitive to the linguistic norms of foreigners would've been better.
    The point was Spanish (and French) speakers don't give a damn about kowtowing to native Mandarin speakers in China by replacing a perfectly good and well-established word like Pekin with something else. They view their respective languages as being primarily the possession of its native speakers and not some universal language that should cater to the whims of linguistic outsiders.
    (we don't say Roma even though it wouldn't be much of a stretch for native Anglophones to do so).

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The point was Spanish (and French) speakers don’t give a damn about kowtowing to native Mandarin speakers in China by replacing a perfectly good and well-established word like Pekin with something else.

    There is a Pekin in Illinois, said to be named for lying on the same latitude as the Chinese capital. It’s actually about two-thirds of a degree farther north.

    You may have heard of their high school’s champion basketball team:


  203. Anon[111] • Disclaimer says:

    Terribly late on the thread. But it has to be pointed out that critical theory has well and truly been exported to Spain and its beautiful language.

    So Irene Montero, present Minister of Equality and champagne socialist, uses inclusive language ending words with the supposedly neuter “e” or “@“: “todos, todas y todes (or tod@)”, “hijos, hijas and hijes” and so on. (Todos = everyone; hijos = sons)

    The Spanish right is doing a good uphill job at discrediting such a mangling of the language, and a recent, huge publicity poster had Spaniards laughing. The company advertising itself specializes in evicting illegal immigrants who took illegal possession of someone’s rightful home. Those occupiers are called “okupas” . The rightful owner gets no help from the government. It’s becoming a widespread phenomenon. So the company Desokupa “ dis-occupies” the home.

    Anyway, the advert showed a bald, burly guy with his arms crossed saying “Wishing to desokupar a todos, todas y tod@s”.

  204. @Paleo Liberal
    When Clemente was home in the off-season, he would sometimes watch winter ball games.

    One time Clemente watched a Catholic school league game. Local priests officiated the game.

    During the game, the priest officiating behind the plate was hit in the head with a pitch. The priest became quite disoriented, and wandered off into nearby woods. Clemente, being a kind fellow, went into the woods to find the priest. Clemente took the priest to a medical clinic, and footed the bill.

    And so Roberto Clemente saved the Holy Roaming Umpire.

    Replies: @iffen, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Well done.

  205. @Mule named Sal
    Latinx is complete nonsense. I am an active member of a Hispanic business advocacy group and the only people woke & stupid (redundant) enough to use the term are some advertising agencies that we use. They have been told very forcefully that the term is the creation of non-Hispanics and non-Catholics and we do not appreciate it. It is the erasure of all Latinas, the height of linguistic ignorance and culturally imbecilic.

    Replies: @Swamp Fox

    Sixteen miles on the Erie Canal🎵🎵
    Great fourth grade Catholic school memories.

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