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George Orwell wrote in 1945 after a visit of a Soviet soccer team Dynamo to play some “friendlies” against Arsenal in the Soviet-allied UK set off violence on the field (and would have caused violence in the stands if Stalin had let any Soviets out of the Soviet Union):

George Orwell
The Sporting Spirit

Now that the brief visit of the Dynamo football team has come to an end, it is possible to say publicly what many thinking people were saying privately before the Dynamos ever arrived. That is, that sport is an unfailing cause of ill-will, and that if such a visit as this had any effect at all on Anglo-Soviet relations, it could only be to make them slightly worse than before.

… Meanwhile the result of the Dynamos’ tour, in so far as it has had any result, will have been to create fresh animosity on both sides.

And how could it be otherwise? I am always amazed when I hear people saying that sport creates goodwill between the nations, and that if only the common peoples of the world could meet one another at football or cricket, they would have no inclination to meet on the battlefield. Even if one didn’t know from concrete examples (the 1936 Olympic Games, for instance) that international sporting contests lead to orgies of hatred, one could deduce it from general principles.

Nearly all the sports practised nowadays are competitive. You play to win, and the game has little meaning unless you do your utmost to win. On the village green, where you pick up sides and no feeling of local patriotism is involved. it is possible to play simply for the fun and exercise: but as soon as the question of prestige arises, as soon as you feel that you and some larger unit will be disgraced if you lose, the most savage combative instincts are aroused. Anyone who has played even in a school football match knows this. At the international level sport is frankly mimic warfare. But the significant thing is not the behaviour of the players but the attitude of the spectators: and, behind the spectators, of the nations who work themselves into furies over these absurd contests, and seriously believe — at any rate for short periods — that running, jumping and kicking a ball are tests of national virtue.

But perhaps they are?

For example, China has won 608 Olympic medals, often by various dubious contrivances, while India has won only 28 medals.

But is that not indicative of Indian indolence?

Granted, India has lately under the Modi government installed 110 million toilets, which is admirable and a vastly higher priority than Olympic gold.

But still …

Even a leisurely game like cricket, demanding grace rather than strength, can cause much ill-will, as we saw in the controversy over body-line bowling and over the rough tactics of the Australian team that visited England in 1921. Football, a game in which everyone gets hurt and every nation has its own style of play which seems unfair to foreigners, is far worse. Worst of all is boxing. One of the most horrible sights in the world is a fight between white and coloured boxers before a mixed audience.

But a boxing audience is always disgusting, and the behaviour of the women, in particular, is such that the army, I believe, does not allow them to attend its contests. At any rate, two or three years ago, when Home Guards and regular troops were holding a boxing tournament, I was placed on guard at the door of the hall, with orders to keep the women out.

In England, the obsession with sport is bad enough, but even fiercer passions are aroused in young countries where games playing and nationalism are both recent developments. In countries like India or Burma, it is necessary at football matches to have strong cordons of police to keep the crowd from invading the field. In Burma, I have seen the supporters of one side break through the police and disable the goalkeeper of the opposing side at a critical moment.

The first big football match that was played in Spain about fifteen years ago led to an uncontrollable riot. As soon as strong feelings of rivalry are aroused, the notion of playing the game according to the rules always vanishes. People want to see one side on top and the other side humiliated, and they forget that victory gained through cheating or through the intervention of the crowd is meaningless. Even when the spectators don’t intervene physically they try to influence the game by cheering their own side and “rattling” opposing players with boos and insults. Serious sport has nothing to do with fair play. It is bound up with hatred, jealousy, boastfulness, disregard of all rules and sadistic pleasure in witnessing violence: in other words it is war minus the shooting.

Actually, this sounds pretty awesome. For example, Rice University’s greatest football player, whose somewhat junky motel next to Rice’s campus my parents stayed at when I arrived in 1976, is best known for being the victim of a “pitch invasion.” From Dicky Maegle’s obituary in the New York Times:

Dicky Maegle Dies at 86; Football Star Remembered for a Bizarre Tackle

He’s in the College Football Hall of Fame, but he’s probably best known for the Cotton Bowl game in which an opposing player left the bench to take him down.

By Richard Goldstein
July 8, 2021

Dicky Maegle was an all-American running back at Rice University. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. And he was a Pro Bowl defensive back in his first N.F.L. season.

But when Rice announced that Maegle had died on Sunday at 86, he was remembered mostly for a single moment: one of the most bizarre episodes in the history of college football, witnessed by some 75,000 fans at the 1954 Cotton Bowl in Dallas and a national television audience.

Taking a handoff at Rice’s 5-yard line in the second quarter of its matchup with Alabama, Maegle cut to the right and raced down the sideline. When he passed the Alabama bench while crossing midfield, on his way to a virtually certain touchdown, the Crimson Tide fullback Tommy Lewis interrupted his rest period and, sans helmet, sprang onto the field and leveled Maegle with a blindside block at Alabama’s 42-yard line.

The referee ruled that Maegle was entitled to a 95-yard touchdown run. Rice, ranked No. 6 in the nation by The Associated Press, went on to a 28-6 victory over 13th-ranked Alabama.

Back to Orwell in 1945:

Instead of blah-blahing about the clean, healthy rivalry of the football field and the great part played by the Olympic Games in bringing the nations together, it is more useful to inquire how and why this modern cult of sport arose. Most of the games we now play are of ancient origin, but sport does not seem to have been taken very seriously between Roman times and the nineteenth century. Even in the English public schools the games cult did not start till the later part of the last century. Dr Arnold, generally regarded as the founder of the modern public school, looked on games as simply a waste of time.

The sport of rugby, which only recently became an Olympic sport, emerged at Dr. Thomas Arnold’s Rugby School. His son William, brother of the poet Matthew Arnold, helped draw up the first written rules for rugby in 1842. Rugby finally diverged forever from the non-hands Association Football favored by Eton in the 1870s.

Then, chiefly in England and the United States, games were built up into a heavily-financed activity, capable of attracting vast crowds and rousing savage passions, and the infection spread from country to country. It is the most violently combative sports, football and boxing, that have spread the widest. There cannot be much doubt that the whole thing is bound up with the rise of nationalism — that is, with the lunatic modern habit of identifying oneself with large power units and seeing everything in terms of competitive prestige. Also, organised games are more likely to flourish in urban communities where the average human being lives a sedentary or at least a confined life, and does not get much opportunity for creative labour. In a rustic community a boy or young man works off a good deal of his surplus energy by walking, swimming, snowballing, climbing trees, riding horses, and by various sports involving cruelty to animals, such as fishing, cock-fighting and ferreting for rats. In a big town one must indulge in group activities if one wants an outlet for one’s physical strength or for one’s sadistic impulses. Games are taken seriously in London and New York, and they were taken seriously in Rome and Byzantium: in the Middle Ages they were played, and probably played with much physical brutality, but they were not mixed up with politics nor a cause of group hatreds.

The English led the world in the development of sports precisely because they were so domestically well-ordered. While the medieval English aristocracy fought and died in the large numbers recounted in Shakespeare’s history plays, the lives and property of the middle ranks were surprisingly secure, as Gregory Clark documents in A Farewell to Alms. (Compare how few fortified hilltop villages there are in England versus in Italy.)

The English diverted the normal masculine urge toward fighting into sport. American football is a 19th-century formalization, along with such cousins as soccer, rugby, and Australian Rules football, of old English mass melees. Each Whitsunday (or whenever) the hearty lads of South Cruckleford would confront the young bucks of North Cruckleford in a quasi-brawl and whichever side could push and shove a stuffed pigskin to the other’s church steeple would win the local honors.

Americans continue that tradition with football substituting for tribal warfare.

Orwell always reminds me of Waugh and vice-versa, so this article about how international sport is bad because it increases nationalism reminds me of Lord Copper of the Daily Beast’s editorial stance in Waugh’s Scoop:

The Beast stands for strong mutually antagonistic governments everywhere,” he said. “Self-sufficiency at home, self-assertion abroad.“

 
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  1. Walter Russell Meade’s “God and Gold” has an entire chapter on how sports were created by the Anglo-Saxon nations. Basically, we were richer than the wogs.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    The English speaking countries got more trains early on. Trains allowed teams to travel, so the whole country needed the same rules.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Redneck farmer

    Red, and yet in North America,Central and South America the Amerindians played competitive sports. Lacrosse is a great example, played intra tribe, against tribal neighbors and unfriendlies. Lacrosse was given it's present name by the French. The Indians called it "little wars." Rules make games uniform and in some cases unwatchable.

  2. Speaking of competitive sports, Rice ranks #20 among university endowments. Do they sit on oil, too?

    https://thebestschools.org/features/richest-universities-endowments-generosity-research/

    In a rustic community a boy or young man works off a good deal of his surplus energy… by various sports involving cruelty to animals, such as fishing, cock-fighting and ferreting for rats.

    Most of the world hasn’t gone snowflake:

    Each Whitsunday (or whenever) the hearty lads of South Cruckleford would confront the young bucks of North Cruckleford in a quasi-brawl and whichever side could push and shove a stuffed pigskin to the other’s church steeple would win the local honors.

    This still goes on in Florence. Here, Green St John takes on White Holy Spirit, with a surprising number of blacks involved:

    • Thanks: SIMP simp
    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Reg Cæsar

    That looks fun, but I hope paramedics and dental care are nearby.

  3. ‘…running, jumping and kicking a ball are tests of national virtue…’

    Maybe they’re not — but are all the attributes involved in winning a modern war all that laudable?

    Certainly some attributes are — far be it from me to question the value of the courage displayed by such men as the pilots of Torpedo Eight at Midway, etc — but other attributes aren’t.

    What was praiseworthy about the willingness of Stalin and his generals to frog-march sixteen million or so young Russians to their deaths, often quite unnecessarily? I’ve heard that in Yugoslavia’s bitter war with the Germans, Mihalovich’s (sp?) Chetniks were ultimately unmanned because Mihalovich just couldn’t face seeing yet another village massacred by the Germans in retaliation for one of his attacks.

    Tito had no such scruples — and it was his movement that went on to fight and win the war with the Germans. Did that make Tito a better man?

    In war it helps to be cruel, ruthless, and without compassion. My understanding is that the Viet Kong became very passive in the districts occupied by South Korean divisions — American troops might massacre some villagers if Americans were ambushed, but the South Koreans would do it for sure. Did that make South Koreans morally superior to Americans?

    We just lost a war in Afghanistan. Would it have meant we were better as a nation if we had done what would have been necessary to win? After all, we could have made a desert and called it victory…probably even saved money into the bargain.

  4. anonymous[437] • Disclaimer says:

    I never got how a team in, say, London could be 90% composed of athletes from everywhere on Earth except London and still be considered the “London” team.

    These teams don’t represent “their” cities. If they represent anything it’s the billionaires who own them. The billionaire with the deepest pockets buys up the best athletes from every corner of the globe and then, unsurprisingly, win — not because Londoners are the best at sports — but because the ex-Soviet Jewish oligarch billionaire who owns their local team has the deepest pockets. It’s just a competition to see whose local cosmopolitan elite has the most stolen money to splurge.

    The teams have absolutely nothing to do with their local cities so why do the locals give a damn if the “local” team wins? I never understood this.

    I suspect this explains why low IQ people tend to get exercised about sports — the kind of people who never ask “Who does this team actually represent? The billionaire who owns it or my local town?” Nor do they ask “Whose interests does this newspaper or television network represent? My town/country or the billionaire who owns it and his little parasitic clique?”

    If I were in charge of sports I’d make it law that the athletes not only be born and raised in the region they represent but that their parents were too. I’d make similar laws about media ownership.

  5. All of which explains why Western governments have tried to introduce BLM, gay, feminist and trans agenda into sport, and the demonising of nations based on racism and transphobia. There was plenty of this in the recent Euros. The English team took the knee for St George, and the Mayor of Munich wanted to bathe their stadium in gay colours for the match against Homophobic Hungary. The future of Nationalism is rainbow tanks rolling through Budapest.

    • Thanks: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @al gore rhythms
    @al gore rhythms

    WRT to English blood sports, I found out recently that there used to be English bull-running events similar to those found in Spain up until the 19th century:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stamford_bull_run

  6. @al gore rhythms
    All of which explains why Western governments have tried to introduce BLM, gay, feminist and trans agenda into sport, and the demonising of nations based on racism and transphobia. There was plenty of this in the recent Euros. The English team took the knee for St George, and the Mayor of Munich wanted to bathe their stadium in gay colours for the match against Homophobic Hungary. The future of Nationalism is rainbow tanks rolling through Budapest.

    Replies: @al gore rhythms

    WRT to English blood sports, I found out recently that there used to be English bull-running events similar to those found in Spain up until the 19th century:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stamford_bull_run

  7. Orwell’s distaste for sports has its origins in his childhood. He was lousy at sports and got roughed up when he played. He really hated football (soccer).

    Frankly, I can tell from photos that he would have been an easy (and amusing) tackle.

    • LOL: JimDandy
    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Bill P

    I can relate.

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Bill P

    Orwell was actually a useful soccer player in his youth, but he wrote about being fouled with impunity and jeered by the crowd when he was playing center forward for a police team in Burma against a local team.

    , @Anonymous
    @Bill P

    He was very tall. Are big guys at a disadvantage in this game?

    Replies: @Mr Mox

    , @Djkjcgjj
    @Bill P

    I agree, although I wonder if the football Orwell was as forced play was rugby, not soccer. Possibly it was both.

    Orwell also had a strong distaste for the public school tradition of homosexuality and sexual harassment. At least he enjoyed cricket.

    , @TheJester
    @Bill P

    Although I can be competitive and intimidating when it MATTERS, I have a different reason for disliking competitive games and sports ... precisely because THEY DON'T MATTER. Lacking a reason, I feel uncomfortable with the feelings aroused in undoing my competitors ... or occasionally finding myself similarly undone FOR NO REASON. Hence, no chess, card games, or competitive sports in my life. Racing against the clock as a measure of performance when riding my bicycle or swimming is a completely different matter.

    Carrying this further, I find it puzzling how the French, let's say, can identify with a soccer team that consists wholly of African players. What connections do the Africans have with the French? (I increasingly find the same void with American NFL teams.) I grasp for connections ... but always find that the connections suggest pathologies of one kind or another.

  8. There is too much emphasis on watching sports in America today. My own interest in watching sports decreased about 90 percent in the last year and a half. I don’t know why, exactly. The woke stuff definitely was a turnoff, but I just don’t really care much anymore. But if and when Fury fights Wilder, I will definitely watch, in part because the white vs. black matchup will make it more interesting for me. As for the Olympics, those ratings are suffering precisely because of the decline of nationalism. Real world animus makes sports more entertaining.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @JimDandy


    There is too much emphasis on watching sports in America today.
     
    Yeah, it's become a place to blow disposable income; and make fake work. Scandalous how much we pay staff involved in college sports.

    I prefer the sports that go up against a third party measure, e.g. high jump, pole vault, long jump, shooting sports, motorcycle hill climb, etc.

    Replies: @InnerCynic, @Abolish_public_education

  9. Well i think Orwell’s basically on target here.

    But the problem is sport misdirects these healthy groupish interests. Yeah, English soccer fans are big a*holes. But what the heck have they done to protect England? Where’s England now?

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @AnotherDad

    The "big asshole" footy fans are pretty much all from the lower orders with low IQ and little education. They need leadership and, more importantly, support from the higher orders, like the late Sir Oswald Mosley (pbuh) gave them. Sadly, England lost many of its best and smartest men in the wars of the last century, and virtually all of the ruling class now consists of cowards and traitors. As ancient as this site's readership is, I'm sure there even here there would be unanimous agreement that it's been a very long time since the last time a member of England's upper class took a public stand against globohomo, for which he was demoted, roundly condemned and even threatened with prosecution by his peers, despite the overwhelming support he had from regular English people.

    In 1977, Enoch Powell was asked to reflect on his famous speech of nine years prior, and he very presciently predicted


    My prospect is that, politicians of all parties will say "Well Enoch Powell is right, we don't say that in public but we know it in private, Enoch Powell is right and it will no doubt develop as he says. But it's better for us to do nothing now, and let it happen perhaps after our time, than to seize the many poisonous nettles which we would have to seize if we were at this stage going to attempt to avert the outcome." So let it go on until a third of Central London, a third of Birmingham, Wolverhampton, are coloured, until the Civil War comes, let it go on. We won't be blamed, we'll either have gone or we'll slip out from under somehow.
     
    , @Almost Missouri
    @AnotherDad


    But what the heck have they done to protect England?
     
    Well, there was that one time when an unarmed Millwall fan single-handedly beat up three Muslim terrorists, but the fact that this obscure incident is the only exception kind of proves the rule that misdirection has rendered healthy group instincts impotent against the rising tide of globohomo.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    , @kaganovitch
    @AnotherDad

    But the problem is sport misdirects these healthy groupish interests. Yeah, English soccer fans are big a*holes. But what the heck have they done to protect England? Where’s England now?

    Well, if Arsenal football louts had their way, Great Britain wouldn't have imported millions of South Asians to despoil their daughters. I'm not normally a big supporter of dolchstosslegenden, but the Blair government's immigration shenanigans surely qualifies. The British working class has been demoralized, dispossesed and traduced. The traditional symbiosis of British proles under the leadership of British elites which in better times led that nation to dominate the world, has been betrayed by the British elites, who have decided to go their own Davoisie way. May they rot.

    , @al gore rhythms
    @AnotherDad

    "But what the heck have they done to protect England?"

    Millwall supporters during the London riots of 2011 defending the streets of Eltham:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ac-CpHMx20

    , @oliver elkington
    @AnotherDad

    What can they do? most football fans are salt of the earth working class types who are very aware of racial differences(indeed even now you will not feel welcome by fans at many clubs except for maybe the biggest 4 if you are not properly White British) they have voted for parties and movements that they have thought represented their interests like Ukip, Brexit etc and quite frankly they have been sold down the river by the elites, maybe there will be a proper uprising one day but the media seems to have such a strong hold on many that even if a lot of football fans tried to organise a political party that represented the interests of the working class they would probably lose their online and general media presence immediately.

  10. This reads a lot like an interesting chapter in your next book.

  11. whichever side could push and shove a stuffed pigskin to the other’s church steeple would win the local honors

    Proud Boys should have gone into Mob Football https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_football#Surviving_medieval_ball_games
    rather than confronting antifa (our pro-government militia).

    Never mess with your local pro-government militia.

  12. I’ve read this essay a long time ago & essentially agree with it. Just, one thing puzzles me in reality: why on earth would someone cheer for a team not representing his tribe?
    Alright, when it comes to “just a game” interpretation when one watches it for fun, for entertainment- I understand.

    But if your tribe or clearly defined tribal member clashes with another tribe, this is quite another matter. And if different kinds of people, in most cases races, are supposed to represent you, or your tribe- why would anyone identify with them, however good they may be?

    I simply couldn’t squeeze any emotional investment out of me if I was French, to cheer for the current French football team. They’re not “me”. The same goes for white Americans & NBA & NFL in general. When I was a kid & still cared about these things, I strongly supported my people’s teams (I also played football and basketball, but after my 17s-19s found them basically a waste of time). But it was the primal “we” element that mattered, not some sophistication, brilliance, strength or endurance.

    Bloodless war, more or less.

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Bardon Kaldian


    why on earth would someone cheer for a team not representing his tribe?
     
    Why indeed.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/31/BLM_protest_in_Amsterdam_on_June_10%2C_2020_-_DSC03156.jpg/800px-BLM_protest_in_Amsterdam_on_June_10%2C_2020_-_DSC03156.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @El Dato, @SunBakedSuburb, @Buffalo Joe, @Not Raul

    , @guest007
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Duke University became white Americans college basketball team because Duke, at one time, had more white players that other schools such as Kentucky or UNC. However, when Duke entered the one and done college basketball market, Duke is as black as any other college basketball team. However, there still seem to be some residual support from whites for Duke. Gonzaga University, being in Spokane, is just not on TV enough at the right times against the right opponents for whites to transfer their support.

    , @James J O'Meara
    @Bardon Kaldian

    "why on earth would someone cheer for a team not representing his tribe?"

    Don't know. But it's definitely a White thing. The proprietor of castefootball.us observed long ago that White people will watch anyone playing a sport, but other races/ethnics will only watch "their tribe".

    Meritocracy? Like, "we welcome any high IQ immigrants!"

    Hence, adding ethnics to your team is a no-brainer. You add their people to your paying fans, and the White fans stay. Integrating baseball was an easy business decision.

    EG: the "Brooklyn" Dodgers had several Jewish stars. When the team moved to LA, suddenly Jews couldn't play baseball, only Hispanics.

    The working out of this today in entertainment, politics, etc. is obvious. Whites hire/vote for blacks etc., blacks etc. hire/vote for their own, soon only blacks etc. have jobs/run the country.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

  13. Next explain the decline of the public’s interest in organized sport. Sure, revulsion toward wokeism can account for much of the recent collapse of football, basketball, baseball, and various other fanbases, but boxing interest faded much earlier and I think football, at least, was in trouble even before idiot players started ‘taking a knee’ to annoy the fans.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @Veracitor

    I think it's just that we all turned off our tv's and started staring at our phones and computers. Sports action doesn't really work on a small screen and when you're on the computer you're either working or playing a game (reading blogs is part of game-playing). Our new teams are our favorite youtubers or podcasters.

    what's funny is that it took so many of us so long to realize how boring the NBA is. I haven't watched a game in almost 5 years and I don't miss it at all.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Veracitor

    Vera, money. When you watch some A-Hole dancing around because he made a tackle and then think he makes $14 million or watch a DH wiff on three fast balls and he make $25 million, you sour quickly.

  14. Asians like Rice University.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @JohnnyWalker123

    What an original joke. Never heard that one before. However, Rice University is 24% Asian as compared to University of Houston four miles away that is 23% Asian. At least Rice is not a school that discriminates against Asians like much of the Ivy League schools.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @epebble

  15. But a boxing audience is always disgusting, and the behaviour of the women, in particular, is such that the army, I believe, does not allow them to attend its contests. At any rate, two or three years ago, when Home Guards and regular troops were holding a boxing tournament, I was placed on guard at the door of the hall, with orders to keep the women out.

    “Sorry love, you’ll have to flick your bean back at home. Away, strumpet!”

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Is that's what Orwell is alluding to here--women's sexual excitement by violence? I guess it must be, although I haven't known any women who respond to combat sports that way, at least not overtly: generally they just wince and leave the room.

    I've always liked boxing, but I remember my maternal grandfather (who was himself very athletic) talking about how much he hated taking business associates to boxing matches in Chicago, starting in the 1930s. He was a lawyer and had ended up becoming house counsel to one of the biggest printing companies in the US, and at some point his portfolio came to include running a big paper mill subsidiary in Appleton, WI. Big printing and paper customers expected my grandfather to take them to the big fight, and the savagery of the fans appalled him: being among them was easily his least favorite aspect of his working life.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @prosa123, @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

  16. Next explain the decline of the public’s interest in organized sport. Sure, revulsion toward wokeism can account for much of the recent collapse of football, basketball, baseball, and various other fanbases, but boxing interest faded much earlier and I think football, at least, was in trouble even before idiot players started ‘taking a knee’ to annoy the fans.

    Perhaps because there is now so much available online, including computer games ?

    Also, are children playing as much sport as they used to ? If you have played a sport it is easier for you to identify with players.

  17. Too bad George Orwell only made it to age 47. If had another 40 years he would have had more to say about everything. Or even better if George Orwell could time travel to year 2000, then write and philosophize up until now, including the current pandemic/plandemic/shameless Federal Gov’t/globohomo takeover.

    Globohomo-short for global homogenization? So sayeth the internet.

    • Replies: @al gore rhythms
    @Clyde

    If Orwell had lived to the age of 76 or so we could have seen an Orwell essay on Punk rock.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  18. • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Though Naomi’s hairstyle is attractive,
    perhaps it slows down her reactive
    time. Is it “hate”
    to suggest that the weight
    and the mass of her hair is distractive?

  19. Anonymous[771] • Disclaimer says:

    The old rules football/brawl is still played in parts of England.

    Pretty brutal.

    Marginally less so.

  20. Naomi Osaka was humiliated 6-1, 6-4 by Marketa Vondrousova
    of the Czech Republic, solidifying the Slavic women’s growing
    dominance of women’s tennis. Of course, the globalists were betting
    on Osaka as the symbol of the new diverse Japan but Osaka is having
    severe problems handling her newfound celebrity and wealth.
    Perhaps she’s having difficulty reconciling the two halves of her
    personality: her gigantic ego as a black woman and her humble
    self as a Japanese woman.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Anon 2

    I think Naomi may have exaggerated the extent of her mental illness and depression, particularly since her own sister did not seem to know about it when she was commenting on Reddit.

    However it is probably true that she is having difficulty handling the fame and wealth that has come with her outstanding success on the tennis court.

    One never really knows why a sports person performs poorly on a certain occasion, but obviously personal factors do come into play.

    Maybe she had a row with her boyfriend the night before. Human beings are not machines.

    I always remember how Rory McIlroy dumped his fiance by text message, then went on a tear and won three successive tournaments, or how Greg Norman got a new wife and came second in a major after a break of many years.

    Replies: @Barnard

  21. The game of soccer is no laughing matter!

    “The thin, high bugle call took everyone completely by surprise—
    everyone, that is, except the fifty thousand well-trained men who had
    been waiting for it with mounting impatience. The whole arena became
    instantly silent, so silent that I could hear the noise of the traffic outside
    the stadium. A second time that bugle sounded—and all the vast
    acreage of faces opposite me vanished in a blinding sea of fire.”

    Arthur C. Clarke. “A Slight Case of Sunstroke”

  22. Orwell’s antipathy towards sports, particularly Association Football, was part of his Nationalism/Patriotism dichotomy. A nationalist was someone who hated other peoples’ countries. A patriot was someone who loved his own country. He, of course, was a patriot. International sport only stirred up nationalism and was therefore despicable.

    He did not practice what he preached. This was particularly true concerning Scotland. Orwell ( ne Eric Arthur Blair ) was of fairly remote Scots ancestry – Blar = Gaelic for “meadow”. His hostility towards Scots and Scotland was well known in English literary circles. The famous story is told of Orwell seeing the prominent Scots poet Edwin Maxwell ( he and his wife produced the first translations of Kafka into English) approaching. Orwell then walked over to the other side of the road and quickly went round the corner so as not to meet a Scotsman on his travels.

    There was a sinister aspect to this. During WWII, he tried to smear the Scottish National Party as Nazi sympathisers. Whatever their faults, the SNP have always been a strictly constitutional party. Orwell was in a position of some influence – he was editor of the Tribune newspaper. People could have been imprisoned as a result of Orwell’s insinuations. Fortunately, not.

    Orwell was essentially a propagandist. You can’t take what he writes at face value.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Verymuchalive

    Orwell also didn't like the Irish due to his English patriotism. If the English had been oppressing the Irish, surely the Irish must have had it coming.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

    , @El Dato
    @Verymuchalive


    Whatever their faults, the SNP have always been a strictly constitutional party.
     
    I guess he saw what was coming:

    SNP adherents telling people what they can't say in public ("unintendedly stirring up hate") and at home ("the exception to the Public Order Act 1986 which allows people to use otherwise illegal language in their own homes should be abolished")

    Humza Yousaf

    ... and Euro-Love to a degree that they want to go their own way and de-Brexit.

    Orwell was essentially a propagandist. You can’t take what he writes at face value.
     
    In retrospect, he had excellent judgement and a deep insight in political and psychological motiviations.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @Verymuchalive

    , @Djkjcgjj
    @Verymuchalive

    I’m pretty sure Orwell didn’t hate Scots or Scotland. He moved to Scotland in his later days, spending some of his final years there, where he wrote “1984”. He hated the snobbery of some rich English people who summered in Scotland, looking down on common English and Scots who couldn’t afford to travel, or vacation in either country.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

  23. Worst of all is boxing. One of the most horrible sights in the world is a fight between white and coloured boxers before a mixed audience.

    “If he dies… he dies!”

    But a boxing audience is always disgusting, and the behaviour of the women, in particular, is such that the army, I believe, does not allow them to attend its contests.

    Women different than their public façade? Say no more! The tingles will always be the tingles.

    • Replies: @Trinity
    @El Dato

    As much as I think Jack Johnson is one of the most overrated boxers of all time, I have to own up and say he has to be one of the most courageous. Not so much in his selection of opponents, Johnson largely built his reputation on feasting on old and washed up Jim Jeffries who had to lose 100lbs and hadn't fought in 5 years, and beating up overstuffed middleweights like 5'7.5" 180lbs Tommy Burns and even smaller 5'7" Sam Langford. Another fight that Johnson made his reputation on was his fight with the middleweight champion at the time, Stanley Ketchel who stood all of 5'9" and barely scaled above the middleweight limit. The "fight" was agreed to be a rehearsed sparring bout until Ketchel decided to try and land a lucky punch. Johnson would knock out several of Ketchel's teeth after being floored by Ketchel.

    Lack of quality opponents aside, Johnson standing in there and fighting with tens of thousands of angry White spectators cursing him, taunting him, and begging for his blood would unnerve a mere mortal. I cannot think of any boxer past or present who could have dealt with that hostility and prevailed most of the time. Greg Haugen, another ballsy fighter, would brave over well over 100,000 hostile Mexicans when he went down to Mexico to take on legendary Julio Cesar Chavez. Haugen had angered the rabid Mexican fans and Chavez by suggesting Julio's record consisted of beating Mexican cab drivers. I am not sure that even Johnson faced that hostile of a crowd and to my knowledge even his fight with Willard and Jeffries did not approach well over 100,000 spectators.

    Replies: @Ed Case

  24. @Bill P
    Orwell's distaste for sports has its origins in his childhood. He was lousy at sports and got roughed up when he played. He really hated football (soccer).

    Frankly, I can tell from photos that he would have been an easy (and amusing) tackle.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jonathan Mason, @Anonymous, @Djkjcgjj, @TheJester

    I can relate.

  25. @Reg Cæsar
    Speaking of competitive sports, Rice ranks #20 among university endowments. Do they sit on oil, too?

    https://thebestschools.org/features/richest-universities-endowments-generosity-research/


    In a rustic community a boy or young man works off a good deal of his surplus energy... by various sports involving cruelty to animals, such as fishing, cock-fighting and ferreting for rats.
     
    Most of the world hasn't gone snowflake:


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ARKIrmZnBBs

    Each Whitsunday (or whenever) the hearty lads of South Cruckleford would confront the young bucks of North Cruckleford in a quasi-brawl and whichever side could push and shove a stuffed pigskin to the other’s church steeple would win the local honors.
     
    This still goes on in Florence. Here, Green St John takes on White Holy Spirit, with a surprising number of blacks involved:


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=zm7XTqXqbpY

    Replies: @El Dato

    That looks fun, but I hope paramedics and dental care are nearby.

  26. Anon[395] • Disclaimer says:

    Soccer is its own special kind of insanity.

    But in general I’ve always thought that it’s a mistake to have out and out national team sports in the Olympics. Track and field is the core of the Olympics, and anything else should be examined to see to what extent it resembles track and field in the nature of its competitiveness. If you have team sports, the more obscure and amateur it is, the better. Curling is great.

    But money and viewership rule.

  27. You have to remember that for Orwell and much of the English upper classes, football hooliganism was seen through the additional lens of class hatred. So their response to it was never proportional. I have no doubt that upon seeing some up close he’d have declared it essential that all sport be banned, or more likely, write that all sport should be banned on account of those beastly working class men.

    In England it is now a thing of the past but it does persist in forms in some parts of Europe to varying degrees of intensity. As well as the Middle East and South America.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Altai

    You must not have read any of Orwell's writings. His sympathy for the working class, ordinary blokes is palpable. For example Keep the Aspidistra Flying. Or Down and Out in Paris and London.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Reg Cæsar

    , @El Dato
    @Altai

    Orwell was upper class?

    He held down a colonial job in Burma, s'true...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  28. It’s interesting to me to hear that “ferreting for rats” was a pastime for rural boys. I remember my Grandfather (born 1888) explaining that his family in Donegal kept ferrets to put down rabbit holes. The fleeing rabbits were shot and ended up as dinner meat that evening. I suppose most families kept ferrets in those days. That activity is also the origin of the idiom “ferret out” meaning to find the truth.

    • Thanks: vhrm, Buffalo Joe
    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Rohirrimborn

    Ratting (UK)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZYLDqQPOAw

    Ratting (US)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SM4C3_nMN_g

  29. What would Orwell think of competitive female beauty pageants?

  30. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    OT:
    https://americanmind.org/salvo/thats-not-happening-and-its-good-that-it-is/
    Interesting essay exploiting “the megaphone” and “the war on noticing”….

  31. @Verymuchalive
    Orwell's antipathy towards sports, particularly Association Football, was part of his Nationalism/Patriotism dichotomy. A nationalist was someone who hated other peoples' countries. A patriot was someone who loved his own country. He, of course, was a patriot. International sport only stirred up nationalism and was therefore despicable.

    He did not practice what he preached. This was particularly true concerning Scotland. Orwell ( ne Eric Arthur Blair ) was of fairly remote Scots ancestry - Blar = Gaelic for "meadow". His hostility towards Scots and Scotland was well known in English literary circles. The famous story is told of Orwell seeing the prominent Scots poet Edwin Maxwell ( he and his wife produced the first translations of Kafka into English) approaching. Orwell then walked over to the other side of the road and quickly went round the corner so as not to meet a Scotsman on his travels.

    There was a sinister aspect to this. During WWII, he tried to smear the Scottish National Party as Nazi sympathisers. Whatever their faults, the SNP have always been a strictly constitutional party. Orwell was in a position of some influence - he was editor of the Tribune newspaper. People could have been imprisoned as a result of Orwell's insinuations. Fortunately, not.

    Orwell was essentially a propagandist. You can't take what he writes at face value.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @El Dato, @Djkjcgjj

    Orwell also didn’t like the Irish due to his English patriotism. If the English had been oppressing the Irish, surely the Irish must have had it coming.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    @Steve Sailer

    I studied Orwell in school in Scotland, way back in nineteen canteen. Even then, my teachers suggested that Orwell was over-compensating for his remote Scottish ancestry. His choice of nom de plume seems to indicate that. Orwell is the name of a river in East Anglia and George is, of course, the name of England's patron saint.

  32. @Redneck farmer
    Walter Russell Meade's "God and Gold" has an entire chapter on how sports were created by the Anglo-Saxon nations. Basically, we were richer than the wogs.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Buffalo Joe

    The English speaking countries got more trains early on. Trains allowed teams to travel, so the whole country needed the same rules.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer, Not Raul
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Steve Sailer


    Trains allowed teams to travel
     
    What's the explanation for the West creating mountaineering, skiing, and so on as sports?

    And how the hell can surfing and rock climbing be literal, scored sports?! The west demands measurement and rank ordering? Capitalism demands advertising and sponsorship, and there has to be something nailed down that can be sponsored?

    Replies: @njguy73

  33. Whatever one might think of the sports themselves, what are we to think about the competition to host the Olympic Games? Do the people in the potential Olympics sites really want the games or is it another example of leaders whose interests are not those of the people they supposedly represent?

    • Replies: @anon
    @Tono Bungay

    Whatever one might think of the sports themselves, what are we to think about the competition to host the Olympic Games?

    Pretty obvious, isn't it?

    https://media.tenor.com/images/0872dddbf89c3ebd53f1f6cf05d7470a/tenor.gif

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Abolish_public_education
    @Tono Bungay

    As I recall, a private group of fanatics from Denver once submitted a successful bid for the Winter games, but the idea was subsequently rejected by voters. The games were then diverted to another city.

    Then there was that scandal involving (I think) SLC where local organizers were caught offering the selection committee, visiting members all sorts of personal inducements.

    I oppose tax dollars going to attract Olympics, Stupor Bowls, employers, etc, to build stadiums, schools, etc, or any other special interest program.

    , @ntn
    @Tono Bungay

    Good point. Who wants it after Brisbane in 2032?

  34. @Steve Sailer
    @Verymuchalive

    Orwell also didn't like the Irish due to his English patriotism. If the English had been oppressing the Irish, surely the Irish must have had it coming.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

    I studied Orwell in school in Scotland, way back in nineteen canteen. Even then, my teachers suggested that Orwell was over-compensating for his remote Scottish ancestry. His choice of nom de plume seems to indicate that. Orwell is the name of a river in East Anglia and George is, of course, the name of England’s patron saint.

  35. Anon[223] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    The English speaking countries got more trains early on. Trains allowed teams to travel, so the whole country needed the same rules.

    Replies: @Anon

    Trains allowed teams to travel

    What’s the explanation for the West creating mountaineering, skiing, and so on as sports?

    And how the hell can surfing and rock climbing be literal, scored sports?! The west demands measurement and rank ordering? Capitalism demands advertising and sponsorship, and there has to be something nailed down that can be sponsored?

    • Replies: @njguy73
    @Anon

    The Olympic stopped being an international sporting movement sometime around 1983. It is now an global athletic brand.

    Replies: @Anon

  36. This is why we need to bring back gladiatorial games.

    • Replies: @donut
    @The Alarmist

    It's a thought .

  37. Being a fan is an interesting psychological arrangement. You need only assert that you are a ‘fan’ of a sports franchise and you are ‘in’. The team won’t reject you and you are instantly admitted to the club of like minded people. The only drawback is you become the ‘enemy’ of those who are ‘fans’ of a rival team. Don’t want to wear a Dodger’s hat at a Giant’s game e.g. I got around that growing up by being an Oakland A’s fan. No one ever jeered at my A’s cap and my team could and did win many pennants and World Series without drawing scorn from the teams with national fan bases. In fact many of those teams fans admired plucky little Oakland and its ability to field high quality low budget teams by scouting and developing their own players because their team could just buy Oaklands players and not have to think about the millions they blew on some big name free agent who didn’t work out.

  38. Surprised to find myself disagreeing so much with Orwell here, but has the rise of mass interstate sports not corresponded with the decline in mass interstate violence?

    Or maybe the latter is an illusion caused by the advent of nuclear weapons? So Orwell’s pre-1945 observation of mass interstate sport going hand-in-hand with mass interstate violence would have carried on being correct absent this particular technological innovation?

    In any case, as AnotherDad observes, the passions that underpin football hooliganism have done next to nothing to protect their mother country in the Age of Woke Coercion.

    Worst of all is boxing.

    Whatever Orwell’s aversion to boxing, sportwriters always seem to wax their most poetical when covering boxing, as compared to the grindingly statistical coverage of, say, baseball.

    sport does not seem to have been taken very seriously between Roman times and the nineteenth century.

    I guess Orwell is omitting the notoriously fanatical sporting culture of Byzantium, which any well-read Englishman should have been familiar with. Or maybe he not unreasonably counts that part of “Roman times”.

    What is the root of my unexpected disagreement with Orwell? Perhaps this:

    There cannot be much doubt that the whole thing is bound up with the rise of nationalism — that is, with the lunatic modern habit of identifying oneself with large power units

    Contra Orwell, there does not seem to me to be anything “lunatic” about “identifying oneself with large power units” at all, in fact it seems quite natural and rational. From WWII to the modern culture wars, doing so has worked out quite well for those whose large power units are subsequently victorious. I personally would love to identify myself with some large power units, but the only ones on offer all seem to be in the business of exterminating me and my kind.

    Though I suppose I can agree with Orwell that those who today identify with the large power units of Wokism, Leftism and their many permutations really are lunatics, as their victories have brung and will bring only bitter fruit for most of them.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Almost Missouri


    Surprised to find myself disagreeing so much with Orwell here, but has the rise of mass interstate sports not corresponded with the decline in mass interstate violence?
     
    What's most interesting about the article is how much less violent sports have gotten. Most people really are just a lot less violent in all aspects of life than they used to be.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  39. “Games are taken seriously in London and New York, and they were taken seriously in Rome and Byzantium: in the Middle Ages they were played, and probably played with much physical brutality, but they were not mixed up with politics nor a cause of group hatreds.”

    Au contraire. The infamous Nika Riots of 532AD were caused in large part due to a chariot race. [Nika means “Win!” “Victory!” “Conquer!”]. Normally don’t think of Orwell as low energy, a la Jeb!

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    These riots were mostly politically, genealogically, economically, culturally & theologically motivated. They were, in modernese, "political riots".

    Since theology frequently served as the catalyst for ethnic, financial or political rivalry, Greens were, I think Monophysites, while Justinian supported Blues, who were basically orthodox Chalcedonians, but he had later been vacillating in doctrinal issues, becoming closer to Aphthartodocetism- which could be interpreted as a Monophysite heresy. Happily for history of the Christian doctrine, Justinian died later, but still in time, because he might have fallen into heresy, which is something we all would find deeply disturbing & would strongly condemn.

    , @David
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Isn't a riot with thousands of dead serious?

    And it wasn't a chariot race, but centuries of enmity between two horse racing franchises. In the first few pages of his meditations, Marcus Aurelius mentions learning from a grandfather (by adoption) not to take sides between the Greens and the Blues.

    The year before the Nika Riots, the Blues (principal victims, at the hands of the Greens), had conspired to sneak weapons into the circus and had killed 3000 Greens.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  40. @AnotherDad
    Well i think Orwell's basically on target here.

    But the problem is sport misdirects these healthy groupish interests. Yeah, English soccer fans are big a*holes. But what the heck have they done to protect England? Where's England now?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Almost Missouri, @kaganovitch, @al gore rhythms, @oliver elkington

    The “big asshole” footy fans are pretty much all from the lower orders with low IQ and little education. They need leadership and, more importantly, support from the higher orders, like the late Sir Oswald Mosley (pbuh) gave them. Sadly, England lost many of its best and smartest men in the wars of the last century, and virtually all of the ruling class now consists of cowards and traitors. As ancient as this site’s readership is, I’m sure there even here there would be unanimous agreement that it’s been a very long time since the last time a member of England’s upper class took a public stand against globohomo, for which he was demoted, roundly condemned and even threatened with prosecution by his peers, despite the overwhelming support he had from regular English people.

    In 1977, Enoch Powell was asked to reflect on his famous speech of nine years prior, and he very presciently predicted

    My prospect is that, politicians of all parties will say “Well Enoch Powell is right, we don’t say that in public but we know it in private, Enoch Powell is right and it will no doubt develop as he says. But it’s better for us to do nothing now, and let it happen perhaps after our time, than to seize the many poisonous nettles which we would have to seize if we were at this stage going to attempt to avert the outcome.” So let it go on until a third of Central London, a third of Birmingham, Wolverhampton, are coloured, until the Civil War comes, let it go on. We won’t be blamed, we’ll either have gone or we’ll slip out from under somehow.

  41. I was delighted to learn that the Great Woke Hope/Loudmouth Osaka was routed in straight sets. It increased my appreciation for the Czechs, so who says sports doesn’t help international good will?

  42. @El Dato

    Worst of all is boxing. One of the most horrible sights in the world is a fight between white and coloured boxers before a mixed audience.
     
    "If he dies... he dies!"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHY9Hz5rD0s

    But a boxing audience is always disgusting, and the behaviour of the women, in particular, is such that the army, I believe, does not allow them to attend its contests.
     
    Women different than their public façade? Say no more! The tingles will always be the tingles.

    Replies: @Trinity

    As much as I think Jack Johnson is one of the most overrated boxers of all time, I have to own up and say he has to be one of the most courageous. Not so much in his selection of opponents, Johnson largely built his reputation on feasting on old and washed up Jim Jeffries who had to lose 100lbs and hadn’t fought in 5 years, and beating up overstuffed middleweights like 5’7.5″ 180lbs Tommy Burns and even smaller 5’7″ Sam Langford. Another fight that Johnson made his reputation on was his fight with the middleweight champion at the time, Stanley Ketchel who stood all of 5’9″ and barely scaled above the middleweight limit. The “fight” was agreed to be a rehearsed sparring bout until Ketchel decided to try and land a lucky punch. Johnson would knock out several of Ketchel’s teeth after being floored by Ketchel.

    Lack of quality opponents aside, Johnson standing in there and fighting with tens of thousands of angry White spectators cursing him, taunting him, and begging for his blood would unnerve a mere mortal. I cannot think of any boxer past or present who could have dealt with that hostility and prevailed most of the time. Greg Haugen, another ballsy fighter, would brave over well over 100,000 hostile Mexicans when he went down to Mexico to take on legendary Julio Cesar Chavez. Haugen had angered the rabid Mexican fans and Chavez by suggesting Julio’s record consisted of beating Mexican cab drivers. I am not sure that even Johnson faced that hostile of a crowd and to my knowledge even his fight with Willard and Jeffries did not approach well over 100,000 spectators.

    • Thanks: InnerCynic
    • Replies: @Ed Case
    @Trinity


    Johnson would knock out several of Ketchel’s teeth after being floored by Ketchel.
     
    Gunboat Smith said that 'fight' was a stew and that Ketchel won a couple of thousand off Johnson playing cards later that night [from In This Corner: 40 Champions Tell Their Story].
    Johnson beat all the best black heavyweightys before he beat Burns.
    Sure, he wouldn't meet them after that, but as he said, there was no gate for 2 blacks fighting.
  43. Thank goodness Stalin was such an evil dictator and prevented Soviet hooligans from traveling to London! I mean, these were the famous Soviet hooligans, who killed and maimed at Heysel!

    Also, if memory serves me right about 1945, the democratically elected leader of the British Empire, the Right Honorable Winston Churchil, was not a dictator, having collected one gazillion votes across India and most of Africa, whose men then he led into war.

  44. @AnotherDad
    Well i think Orwell's basically on target here.

    But the problem is sport misdirects these healthy groupish interests. Yeah, English soccer fans are big a*holes. But what the heck have they done to protect England? Where's England now?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Almost Missouri, @kaganovitch, @al gore rhythms, @oliver elkington

    But what the heck have they done to protect England?

    Well, there was that one time when an unarmed Millwall fan single-handedly beat up three Muslim terrorists, but the fact that this obscure incident is the only exception kind of proves the rule that misdirection has rendered healthy group instincts impotent against the rising tide of globohomo.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Almost Missouri

    This account of Millwall fan Roy Larner's public treatment subsequent to his astonishing act of bravery indicates one of many ways the people in charge have gone about emasculating a nation:


    He was pointedly not invited to the anniversary of the attack, his name not mentioned, and was knowingly left off the honour call, whilst the deputy commissioner, Sir Craig Mackey, was polishing his boots to collect a gallantry medal for locking his car doors and radioing for help during the Westminster Bridge attack, Roy Larner was busily being forgotten.
     
    https://nicethreadsmate.com/what-about-roy-larner/

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  45. @Bardon Kaldian
    I've read this essay a long time ago & essentially agree with it. Just, one thing puzzles me in reality: why on earth would someone cheer for a team not representing his tribe?
    Alright, when it comes to "just a game" interpretation when one watches it for fun, for entertainment- I understand.

    But if your tribe or clearly defined tribal member clashes with another tribe, this is quite another matter. And if different kinds of people, in most cases races, are supposed to represent you, or your tribe- why would anyone identify with them, however good they may be?

    I simply couldn't squeeze any emotional investment out of me if I was French, to cheer for the current French football team. They're not "me". The same goes for white Americans & NBA & NFL in general. When I was a kid & still cared about these things, I strongly supported my people's teams (I also played football and basketball, but after my 17s-19s found them basically a waste of time). But it was the primal "we" element that mattered, not some sophistication, brilliance, strength or endurance.

    Bloodless war, more or less.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @guest007, @James J O'Meara

    why on earth would someone cheer for a team not representing his tribe?

    Why indeed.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Almost Missouri



    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/31/BLM_protest_in_Amsterdam_on_June_10%2C_2020_-_DSC03156.jpg/800px-BLM_protest_in_Amsterdam_on_June_10%2C_2020_-_DSC03156.jpg

     

    To paraphrase Susan Sontag, “Western white women are the cancer of human civilization."
    , @El Dato
    @Almost Missouri

    "It all started when some sadass genius invented the washing machine..."

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Almost Missouri

    Women should not deny their intimate link to biological reality: when they step away from the moon and tides mental illness begins its creep. We see this in young upper-middle class white women holding BLM signs: pathological altruism blinding them to the fact that their black allies in the cult of anti-racism want to rape and kill them.

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Almost Missouri

    Almost Missouri, every Saturday, like clock work, a group of middle aged plus white women stand at the entrance to our town park with their signs. Should head to the inner city and find a group that needs their assistance. Hollow, useless posturing.

    , @Not Raul
    @Almost Missouri

    What’s with the feather? Are these Canadians?

  46. @Almost Missouri
    Surprised to find myself disagreeing so much with Orwell here, but has the rise of mass interstate sports not corresponded with the decline in mass interstate violence?

    Or maybe the latter is an illusion caused by the advent of nuclear weapons? So Orwell's pre-1945 observation of mass interstate sport going hand-in-hand with mass interstate violence would have carried on being correct absent this particular technological innovation?

    In any case, as AnotherDad observes, the passions that underpin football hooliganism have done next to nothing to protect their mother country in the Age of Woke Coercion.

    Worst of all is boxing.
     
    Whatever Orwell's aversion to boxing, sportwriters always seem to wax their most poetical when covering boxing, as compared to the grindingly statistical coverage of, say, baseball.

    sport does not seem to have been taken very seriously between Roman times and the nineteenth century.
     
    I guess Orwell is omitting the notoriously fanatical sporting culture of Byzantium, which any well-read Englishman should have been familiar with. Or maybe he not unreasonably counts that part of "Roman times".

    What is the root of my unexpected disagreement with Orwell? Perhaps this:

    There cannot be much doubt that the whole thing is bound up with the rise of nationalism — that is, with the lunatic modern habit of identifying oneself with large power units
     
    Contra Orwell, there does not seem to me to be anything "lunatic" about "identifying oneself with large power units" at all, in fact it seems quite natural and rational. From WWII to the modern culture wars, doing so has worked out quite well for those whose large power units are subsequently victorious. I personally would love to identify myself with some large power units, but the only ones on offer all seem to be in the business of exterminating me and my kind.

    Though I suppose I can agree with Orwell that those who today identify with the large power units of Wokism, Leftism and their many permutations really are lunatics, as their victories have brung and will bring only bitter fruit for most of them.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    Surprised to find myself disagreeing so much with Orwell here, but has the rise of mass interstate sports not corresponded with the decline in mass interstate violence?

    What’s most interesting about the article is how much less violent sports have gotten. Most people really are just a lot less violent in all aspects of life than they used to be.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Triteleia Laxa

    https://youtu.be/spHVLpEL2JE?t=37

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @prosa123

  47. Speaking of Orwell reminding you or Waugh, you missed the Society for Cruelty to Animals in ‘Black Mischief’.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @I am Robert

    Yup.

  48. Modi’s government is the sort of based ethnonationalist LARP we need in the west, but sadly he cucks to Israel like the rest of the boomercons, even Bolsonaro. It kinda makes sense though, as they have their blood hatred of the musselmen.

  49. Anonymous[373] • Disclaimer says:
    @Almost Missouri
    @Bardon Kaldian


    why on earth would someone cheer for a team not representing his tribe?
     
    Why indeed.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/31/BLM_protest_in_Amsterdam_on_June_10%2C_2020_-_DSC03156.jpg/800px-BLM_protest_in_Amsterdam_on_June_10%2C_2020_-_DSC03156.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @El Dato, @SunBakedSuburb, @Buffalo Joe, @Not Raul

    To paraphrase Susan Sontag, “Western white women are the cancer of human civilization.”

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  50. @Bardon Kaldian
    https://edition.cnn.com/2021/07/27/tennis/naomi-osaka-loses-olympics-3rd-round-spt-intl/index.html

    Osaka is not Kyoto. Or Tokyo. Or whatever ....

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex

    Though Naomi’s hairstyle is attractive,
    perhaps it slows down her reactive
    time. Is it “hate”
    to suggest that the weight
    and the mass of her hair is distractive?

  51. @Bill P
    Orwell's distaste for sports has its origins in his childhood. He was lousy at sports and got roughed up when he played. He really hated football (soccer).

    Frankly, I can tell from photos that he would have been an easy (and amusing) tackle.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jonathan Mason, @Anonymous, @Djkjcgjj, @TheJester

    Orwell was actually a useful soccer player in his youth, but he wrote about being fouled with impunity and jeered by the crowd when he was playing center forward for a police team in Burma against a local team.

  52. Anonymous[133] • Disclaimer says:
    @Altai
    You have to remember that for Orwell and much of the English upper classes, football hooliganism was seen through the additional lens of class hatred. So their response to it was never proportional. I have no doubt that upon seeing some up close he'd have declared it essential that all sport be banned, or more likely, write that all sport should be banned on account of those beastly working class men.

    In England it is now a thing of the past but it does persist in forms in some parts of Europe to varying degrees of intensity. As well as the Middle East and South America.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @El Dato

    You must not have read any of Orwell’s writings. His sympathy for the working class, ordinary blokes is palpable. For example Keep the Aspidistra Flying. Or Down and Out in Paris and London.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Anonymous

    Not to mention The Road to Wigan Pier.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    For example Keep the Aspidistra Flying.
     
    I read that as a teen and can remember none of it, nor even the title of the other early Orwell novel I read. The aspidistra was a fad houseplant of the day, which he suggested could be the national flower or tree of the middle classes. It's telling that his mockery of the bourgeois is forgotten, but his equally scathing satires of the Soviets live on forever. Something about a boot...

    His sympathy for the working class, ordinary blokes is palpable.
     
    That quote about the military rifle on the wall does stick in one's mind.

    Orwell is similar to Teddy Roosevelt in some ways, if opposite in others. TR liked football, even played it, but was all ready to have it banned when the yearly fatalities reached double digits.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  53. @I am Robert
    Speaking of Orwell reminding you or Waugh, you missed the Society for Cruelty to Animals in 'Black Mischief'.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Yup.

  54. Dinamo Moscow FC was affiliated with the KGB, and there is little doubt that their tour in 1945 was for propaganda purposes.

    They beat Cardiff City 10-1 and prevailed 4-3 in a game against an Arsenal team fortified with three ringers played in thick fog at Tottenham’s stadium.

    The English and Welsh players were no doubt weakened by years of food rationing.

    Moscow Dinamo is now owned by a bank.

    Most of what Orwell said is true and is common sense. The interesting question is whether sports can be used to replace warfare, all whether they’re a different factors at play.

    It seems to me that warfare has more to do with the ego of politicians then of the sentiments towards foreigners held by ordinary citizens.

    One remembers the famous episode during World War I trench warfare when there was a truce at Christmas or New Year and a friendly soccer game broke out between English and German players in no man’s land.

    As a spectator of sports one’s attitude depends on one’s age and stage of life. When I first went to professional soccer matches I was a boy watching adult heroes.

    When I see the European and South American soccer championships now, I am an old man watching young boys playing a game I once played, so it’s not the same, but still good for the occasional bout of nostalgia in which I imagine my younger self taking a penalty kick to decide the championship of Europe.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan, interesting that in 1945, with most of Europe still smoldering and corpses rotting under rubble in bombed out English cities, somehow a soccer match was deem relavent.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  55. @Almost Missouri
    @AnotherDad


    But what the heck have they done to protect England?
     
    Well, there was that one time when an unarmed Millwall fan single-handedly beat up three Muslim terrorists, but the fact that this obscure incident is the only exception kind of proves the rule that misdirection has rendered healthy group instincts impotent against the rising tide of globohomo.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    This account of Millwall fan Roy Larner’s public treatment subsequent to his astonishing act of bravery indicates one of many ways the people in charge have gone about emasculating a nation:

    He was pointedly not invited to the anniversary of the attack, his name not mentioned, and was knowingly left off the honour call, whilst the deputy commissioner, Sir Craig Mackey, was polishing his boots to collect a gallantry medal for locking his car doors and radioing for help during the Westminster Bridge attack, Roy Larner was busily being forgotten.

    https://nicethreadsmate.com/what-about-roy-larner/

    • Thanks: bomag, InnerCynic
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @slumber_j

    Agree. In a just state, Roy Larner would be lionized and living in a mansion on a state pension granted by executive dispensation. Or better yet, he'd be the new Permanent Secretary of Immigration.

    Instead, in clown world, this formerly homeless unemployed man is still homeless and jobless, but now he's homeless and jobless with a little medallion denoting he once did something or other. In fact, I think the medallion came from private donors, so it was not even officially sanctioned.

    This is why England loses.

  56. Because I had only read his 1984 way back and no other writing by George Orwell until recently, I had assumed he was some kind of wise man. Upon reading Animal Farm and (especially) Homage to Catalonia, I realized that he was not as bright a guy as I’d thought. (Peak Stupidity opines on Orwellian Stupidity out of the man himself.)

    Perhaps Mr. Orwell was right about the Olympics and team sports BETWEEN nations. However, the original Olympiads consisted of individual sports, didn’t they? I suppose a relay race is a team sport, though …

    Anyway, maybe the Olympics could get back to a way to bring at least people from foreign nations, if not the nations themselves, together, if it went back to being comprised of individual sports. As it exists now, I can’t watch or pay attention because of the woke politics… oh, and not having a TV.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Gee I don't know Alfred. You are attacking the man for idealistically taking up arms against fascism? By that reasoning anyone on the Allied side who didn't drop weapons Iraq style at the first sight of a Panzer III is probably in a state of sin, too.

    1) Narrowly escapes a Stalinist purge in a meatgrinder where he idealistically assumed the Reds were the good guys (having signed up with the non-Stalinist part of the Reds purely by accident)
    2) Reconsiders his goals in life
    3) 1945: "Animal Farm": Stalinism in the Soviet Union today.
    4) 1948: "1984": A biting satire about Fabianism in the UK tomorrow (1984 = 100 years after foundation of the Fabian Society)
    5) "My work here is done"

    Of course there are other works warning about the problems of collectivism and manipulative uniparties, but for the english-speaking works, 1984 is the reference.

    - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugen_Richter
    - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/We_(novel)

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

  57. @Verymuchalive
    Orwell's antipathy towards sports, particularly Association Football, was part of his Nationalism/Patriotism dichotomy. A nationalist was someone who hated other peoples' countries. A patriot was someone who loved his own country. He, of course, was a patriot. International sport only stirred up nationalism and was therefore despicable.

    He did not practice what he preached. This was particularly true concerning Scotland. Orwell ( ne Eric Arthur Blair ) was of fairly remote Scots ancestry - Blar = Gaelic for "meadow". His hostility towards Scots and Scotland was well known in English literary circles. The famous story is told of Orwell seeing the prominent Scots poet Edwin Maxwell ( he and his wife produced the first translations of Kafka into English) approaching. Orwell then walked over to the other side of the road and quickly went round the corner so as not to meet a Scotsman on his travels.

    There was a sinister aspect to this. During WWII, he tried to smear the Scottish National Party as Nazi sympathisers. Whatever their faults, the SNP have always been a strictly constitutional party. Orwell was in a position of some influence - he was editor of the Tribune newspaper. People could have been imprisoned as a result of Orwell's insinuations. Fortunately, not.

    Orwell was essentially a propagandist. You can't take what he writes at face value.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @El Dato, @Djkjcgjj

    Whatever their faults, the SNP have always been a strictly constitutional party.

    I guess he saw what was coming:

    SNP adherents telling people what they can’t say in public (“unintendedly stirring up hate”) and at home (“the exception to the Public Order Act 1986 which allows people to use otherwise illegal language in their own homes should be abolished”)

    Humza Yousaf

    … and Euro-Love to a degree that they want to go their own way and de-Brexit.

    Orwell was essentially a propagandist. You can’t take what he writes at face value.

    In retrospect, he had excellent judgement and a deep insight in political and psychological motiviations.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    @El Dato

    All mainstream parties in the West are now parties in name only - whether Conservative in name only, Socialist in name only, Liberal in name only, Nationalist in name only. They adhere to a narrow range of Neolib-Neocon-Welfarist-HomoGlobalist policies.

    You can't compare those parties to parties of the same or similar names 60 0r 70 years ago, often less than that. Jimmy Carter or Ronald Reagan would never have become US Presidents now, because their parties would have not have permitted their nomination.

    Sometimes the changes can come back and bite the perps. 30 years ago, the SNP was still a fairly traditional nationalist party in a number of regards. Then Alex Salmond took over and started to introduce the changes that have led to the present situation. An older relative was a prominent SNP politician who had known Salmond since the latter had joined the SNP. I was also a member at the time. As traditional nationalists, we very quickly resigned from the party. Neither of us have rejoined or joined other political parties. Indeed, such have been the changes, we would not be permitted to rejoin as we would have to agree to conform to these policies first. For example, members who are opposed to the EU have been purged or forced to resign.

    Ironically, one of the members who has been forced to resign is Alex Salmond himself. The sex allegations were a useful pretext, to which you can his work for Sputnik and RT ( "tool of the Kremlin" ). Truly, the Revolution does devour its children.

    , @Verymuchalive
    @El Dato

    Today, all mainstream parties in the West are parties in name only. Conservative parties are Conservative In Name Only. Likewise, Liberal parties are LINOs, Socialist SINOs and Nationalist NINOs. All these parties now support a narrow range of Neolib-Neocon-Homoglobalist- Welfarist policies, differing only in degree.

    Parties of the same or similar names 60. 70, 80 years ago were completely different. To lump in decent, traditional nationalists of that period with the present globalist clique known as the SNP is a gross insult to the former.

  58. @Altai
    You have to remember that for Orwell and much of the English upper classes, football hooliganism was seen through the additional lens of class hatred. So their response to it was never proportional. I have no doubt that upon seeing some up close he'd have declared it essential that all sport be banned, or more likely, write that all sport should be banned on account of those beastly working class men.

    In England it is now a thing of the past but it does persist in forms in some parts of Europe to varying degrees of intensity. As well as the Middle East and South America.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @El Dato

    Orwell was upper class?

    He held down a colonial job in Burma, s’true…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @El Dato

    Orwell went to Eton but not to university.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  59. @Almost Missouri
    @Bardon Kaldian


    why on earth would someone cheer for a team not representing his tribe?
     
    Why indeed.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/31/BLM_protest_in_Amsterdam_on_June_10%2C_2020_-_DSC03156.jpg/800px-BLM_protest_in_Amsterdam_on_June_10%2C_2020_-_DSC03156.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @El Dato, @SunBakedSuburb, @Buffalo Joe, @Not Raul

    “It all started when some sadass genius invented the washing machine…”

    • LOL: bomag
  60. IN Shooting an Elephant Orwell expresses his disgust with the pressure crowds can place upon a person.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Ray P

    People used to praise "Shooting an Elephant" for its leftist sentiments, but I always thought that the obvious message was: Us animal-loving Englishmen are degrading ourselves by having to rule a bunch of backward Burmese who forced me to shoot the elephant.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Stan Adams, @Jonathan Mason

  61. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    But a boxing audience is always disgusting, and the behaviour of the women, in particular, is such that the army, I believe, does not allow them to attend its contests. At any rate, two or three years ago, when Home Guards and regular troops were holding a boxing tournament, I was placed on guard at the door of the hall, with orders to keep the women out.
     
    "Sorry love, you'll have to flick your bean back at home. Away, strumpet!"

    Replies: @slumber_j

    Is that’s what Orwell is alluding to here–women’s sexual excitement by violence? I guess it must be, although I haven’t known any women who respond to combat sports that way, at least not overtly: generally they just wince and leave the room.

    I’ve always liked boxing, but I remember my maternal grandfather (who was himself very athletic) talking about how much he hated taking business associates to boxing matches in Chicago, starting in the 1930s. He was a lawyer and had ended up becoming house counsel to one of the biggest printing companies in the US, and at some point his portfolio came to include running a big paper mill subsidiary in Appleton, WI. Big printing and paper customers expected my grandfather to take them to the big fight, and the savagery of the fans appalled him: being among them was easily his least favorite aspect of his working life.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @slumber_j

    No, I expect that what he is describing is what we see briefly in Casey At the Bat or the music video to Paradise by the Dashboard Light: raging, emasculating screaming from a female audience member, who cannot perform what the make athlete is doing, but nevertheless cannot stand to see him fail.

    , @prosa123
    @slumber_j

    Dunno. I've been to many boxing matches, mostly smaller productions though one was on ESPN's Friday Night Fights, and none of the crowds were unruly by any stretch of the imagination.
    While I have no experience with big-time matches, like those held in Las Vegas, keep in mind that tickets are insanely expensive, and I would imagine that keeps out the riff-raff.

    , @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @slumber_j


    Is that’s what Orwell is alluding to here–women’s sexual excitement by violence?
     
    I don't see what else he could possibly be referring to. Those saucy wenches were disgracing themselves!
  62. @Ray P
    IN Shooting an Elephant Orwell expresses his disgust with the pressure crowds can place upon a person.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    People used to praise “Shooting an Elephant” for its leftist sentiments, but I always thought that the obvious message was: Us animal-loving Englishmen are degrading ourselves by having to rule a bunch of backward Burmese who forced me to shoot the elephant.

    • Replies: @Ray P
    @Steve Sailer

    Orwell's novel Burma Days disagrees. He may well have said that imperialism degrades the imperialist race but he never put across the sentiment that the phrase 'bunch of backward Burmese' conveys. That's the contemptuous attitude the bigoted English characters in the novel display which Orwell clearly meant to criticize.

    , @Stan Adams
    @Steve Sailer

    It's a good read.

    https://www.orwellfoundation.com/the-orwell-foundation/orwell/essays-and-other-works/shooting-an-elephant/


    In Moulmein, in lower Burma, I was hated by large numbers of people – the only time in my life that I have been important enough for this to happen to me. I was sub-divisional police officer of the town, and in an aimless, petty kind of way anti-European feeling was very bitter. No one had the guts to raise a riot, but if a European woman went through the bazaars alone somebody would probably spit betel juice over her dress. As a police officer I was an obvious target and was baited whenever it seemed safe to do so. When a nimble Burman tripped me up on the football field and the referee (another Burman) looked the other way, the crowd yelled with hideous laughter. This happened more than once. In the end the sneering yellow faces of young men that met me everywhere, the insults hooted after me when I was at a safe distance, got badly on my nerves. The young Buddhist priests were the worst of all. There were several thousands of them in the town and none of them seemed to have anything to do except stand on street corners and jeer at Europeans.

    All this was perplexing and upsetting. For at that time I had already made up my mind that imperialism was an evil thing and the sooner I chucked up my job and got out of it the better. Theoretically – and secretly, of course – I was all for the Burmese and all against their oppressors, the British. As for the job I was doing, I hated it more bitterly than I can perhaps make clear. In a job like that you see the dirty work of Empire at close quarters. The wretched prisoners huddling in the stinking cages of the lock-ups, the grey, cowed faces of the long-term convicts, the scarred buttocks of the men who had been Bogged with bamboos – all these oppressed me with an intolerable sense of guilt. But I could get nothing into perspective. I was young and ill-educated and I had had to think out my problems in the utter silence that is imposed on every Englishman in the East. I did not even know that the British Empire is dying, still less did I know that it is a great deal better than the younger empires that are going to supplant it. All I knew was that I was stuck between my hatred of the empire I served and my rage against the evil-spirited little beasts who tried to make my job impossible. With one part of my mind I thought of the British Raj as an unbreakable tyranny, as something clamped down, in saecula saeculorum, upon the will of prostrate peoples; with another part I thought that the greatest joy in the world would be to drive a bayonet into a Buddhist priest’s guts. Feelings like these are the normal by-products of imperialism; ask any Anglo-Indian official, if you can catch him off duty.
     
    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer


    People used to praise “Shooting an Elephant” for its leftist sentiments, but I always thought that the obvious message was: Us animal-loving Englishmen are degrading ourselves by having to rule a bunch of backward Burmese who forced me to shoot the elephant.
     
    I think Orwell, who was a police officer at the time, spoke about the universal dilemma faced by law enforcement in having to do things that make no sense so as to please the public (and politicians).

    In the story in question, the elephant, which had run amok in the market place, had blown itself out and was now peacefully grazing, having forgotten about whatever had caused it to go nuts. Orwell was expected, by the custom of the place to now execute the elephant, and in the process destroy a valuable piece of commercial property equivalent to a truck today.
  63. @Anon 2
    Naomi Osaka was humiliated 6-1, 6-4 by Marketa Vondrousova
    of the Czech Republic, solidifying the Slavic women’s growing
    dominance of women’s tennis. Of course, the globalists were betting
    on Osaka as the symbol of the new diverse Japan but Osaka is having
    severe problems handling her newfound celebrity and wealth.
    Perhaps she’s having difficulty reconciling the two halves of her
    personality: her gigantic ego as a black woman and her humble
    self as a Japanese woman.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I think Naomi may have exaggerated the extent of her mental illness and depression, particularly since her own sister did not seem to know about it when she was commenting on Reddit.

    However it is probably true that she is having difficulty handling the fame and wealth that has come with her outstanding success on the tennis court.

    One never really knows why a sports person performs poorly on a certain occasion, but obviously personal factors do come into play.

    Maybe she had a row with her boyfriend the night before. Human beings are not machines.

    I always remember how Rory McIlroy dumped his fiance by text message, then went on a tear and won three successive tournaments, or how Greg Norman got a new wife and came second in a major after a break of many years.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    @Jonathan Mason

    Both women involved were star tennis players. McIlroy dumped Caroline Wozniacki, whose career initially held up but slumped for a couple of years afterwards. After that run, McIlroy started dating his now wife and hasn't won a major since. Norman's new wife was tennis legend Chris Evert. It was surprising they got together as they both crave being the center of attention. They got divorced 15 months later and Norman remarried again fairly quickly.

  64. @El Dato
    @Altai

    Orwell was upper class?

    He held down a colonial job in Burma, s'true...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Orwell went to Eton but not to university.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    Orwell won a scholarship to Eton as his family would not have been able to afford the full fees, so he always had a sense of slight inferiority when mixing with wealthy boys who included future prime Ministers.

    By all accounts at Eton hedid no work at all and had no chance of getting admission to Oxford or Cambridge, so he joined the colonial police in Burma, where he had relatives on his mother's side of the family. (Orwell was born in Burma.)

    He described his own background as lower upper middle class.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  65. Wow, first Osaka crashes and burns, and then Biles does the same — the two Princesses of Diversity quickly out of action. Dozens of hagiographic articles by woke sportswriters now must be scrapped; will they have anything else they can capably write about?

    • Replies: @Gordo
    @Mike_from_SGV


    Wow, first Osaka crashes and burns, and then Biles does the same — the two Princesses of Diversity quickly out of action. Dozens of hagiographic articles by woke sportswriters now must be scrapped; will they have anything else they can capably write about?
     
    No doubt they have backup pieces ready about 'racial abuse' and other chimera.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Mike_from_SGV


    Dozens of hagiographic articles by woke sportswriters now must be scrapped...
     
    Nope. Today's ESPN talking points are about how "brave" they are and what an inspiration to the rest of the team they are. I turned it off.
  66. @Jonathan Mason
    @Anon 2

    I think Naomi may have exaggerated the extent of her mental illness and depression, particularly since her own sister did not seem to know about it when she was commenting on Reddit.

    However it is probably true that she is having difficulty handling the fame and wealth that has come with her outstanding success on the tennis court.

    One never really knows why a sports person performs poorly on a certain occasion, but obviously personal factors do come into play.

    Maybe she had a row with her boyfriend the night before. Human beings are not machines.

    I always remember how Rory McIlroy dumped his fiance by text message, then went on a tear and won three successive tournaments, or how Greg Norman got a new wife and came second in a major after a break of many years.

    Replies: @Barnard

    Both women involved were star tennis players. McIlroy dumped Caroline Wozniacki, whose career initially held up but slumped for a couple of years afterwards. After that run, McIlroy started dating his now wife and hasn’t won a major since. Norman’s new wife was tennis legend Chris Evert. It was surprising they got together as they both crave being the center of attention. They got divorced 15 months later and Norman remarried again fairly quickly.

  67. Orwell was right all along.

    And while I’m no Libertarian, I think they are right about public spending on sports venues being a form of public corruption.

    Separation of Sports and State, forever!

  68. @Achmed E. Newman
    Because I had only read his 1984 way back and no other writing by George Orwell until recently, I had assumed he was some kind of wise man. Upon reading Animal Farm and (especially) Homage to Catalonia, I realized that he was not as bright a guy as I'd thought. (Peak Stupidity opines on Orwellian Stupidity out of the man himself.)

    Perhaps Mr. Orwell was right about the Olympics and team sports BETWEEN nations. However, the original Olympiads consisted of individual sports, didn't they? I suppose a relay race is a team sport, though ...

    Anyway, maybe the Olympics could get back to a way to bring at least people from foreign nations, if not the nations themselves, together, if it went back to being comprised of individual sports. As it exists now, I can't watch or pay attention because of the woke politics... oh, and not having a TV.

    Replies: @El Dato

    Gee I don’t know Alfred. You are attacking the man for idealistically taking up arms against fascism? By that reasoning anyone on the Allied side who didn’t drop weapons Iraq style at the first sight of a Panzer III is probably in a state of sin, too.

    1) Narrowly escapes a Stalinist purge in a meatgrinder where he idealistically assumed the Reds were the good guys (having signed up with the non-Stalinist part of the Reds purely by accident)
    2) Reconsiders his goals in life
    3) 1945: “Animal Farm”: Stalinism in the Soviet Union today.
    4) 1948: “1984”: A biting satire about Fabianism in the UK tomorrow (1984 = 100 years after foundation of the Fabian Society)
    5) “My work here is done”

    Of course there are other works warning about the problems of collectivism and manipulative uniparties, but for the english-speaking works, 1984 is the reference.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugen_Richter
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/We_(novel)

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
    @El Dato


    Gee I don’t know Alfred. You are attacking the man for idealistically taking up arms against fascism? By that reasoning anyone on the Allied side who didn’t drop weapons Iraq style at the first sight of a Panzer III is probably in a state of sin, too.

    1) Narrowly escapes a Stalinist purge in a meatgrinder where he idealistically assumed the Reds were the good guys (having signed up with the non-Stalinist part of the Reds purely by accident)
     

    Of course there are other works warning about the problems of collectivism and manipulative uniparties, but for the english-speaking works, 1984 is the reference.

    Hi Dato,

    To add to your post, one reason that 1984 is so good is that parts of it are autobiographical. Orwell had briefly been a political prisoner in Barcelona (uncertain of his fate) and a policeman in Burma. His work during the war was with the BBC, where there were constant struggles about what he could and could not say and what would be good propaganda. In London, during the war there were the constant discomforts of rationing as well as V2 rockets ("steamers").

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @El Dato

    It sounds like you read my blog post, El Data. You can see that my point (same here above) was that I had a habit of figuring every "classic" author was wise in all his writings. 1984 is an excellent book - unfortunately seeming to be taken as an instruction manual nowadays.

    (1) Yeah, I almost agree. Orwell (Eric Blair) saw only the small picture. I don't fault him for his youthful idealism. The book was more of a diary of his time being caught in the midst of bigger events, which he only figured out later. It's just that I expected a bigger political point to it.

    (2) Probably. Not many of us were wise at 30-something years old in big political matters.

    (3) Animal Farm was disappointing to me. It was not really a criticism of the whole idea of hard-core Socialism, bordering on Communism. The allegory would have been different in that case, as I discussed in this review of it. No, in Animal Farm, his allegory showed certain animals, the pigs that is, being greedy, and the impression is that the animal farm would have run splendidly had it not been for those greedy pigs. I understand that was his comparison to Stalinism.

    If that was his point, OK, but I expected an allegory to illustrate the inherent problems with Socialism and Communism. I guess I shouldn't have, as Mr. Orwell remained a Socialist to the end.

    (4) As I wrote, it was a great book. It applied very well to the USSR and East Bloc of my time, right on through and past the actual year 1984.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @El Dato

    An excerpt from the PS review of Animal Farm:


    This was not the allegory I had expected, however. It seems everything on Animal Farm would have worked out OK, per Mr. Orwell, had the bad animals not ruined things. (This is very much as he thought the military could run just fine with no chain of command, but equal footing for everyone, in Homage to Catalonia.)

    Nah, I'd have rather read a story in which the hardworking horse Boxer finally got fed up with putting in more effort for no reward, as other animals, especially the damn cat, were wanking off. There should have been a page or two about the weekly animal meetings in which the many chickens and their numerous chicks, born to the least-productive egg-laying hens and given the vote at 18 weeks, outvote the dogs, pigs, horses, and sheep, giving themselves large rations. Then, at a subsequent weekly meeting, Muriel the goat, pissed off about the unfairness of it all, goes ahead and eats all copies of the ballots, causing a riot that results in the construction of an animal penitentiary, something they all thought was in their past.

    Perhaps, I'm a little harsh on the author. He did, after all, have the pigs decide that their leadership work was worth more pay and better accommodations. That was a big part of the story, of course, but I'm not sure George Orwell actually got it. That's bound to happen because some animals and some people simply ARE better than others, and we can't all be equal. Did he get that?
     

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @El Dato

  69. @Steve Sailer
    @Ray P

    People used to praise "Shooting an Elephant" for its leftist sentiments, but I always thought that the obvious message was: Us animal-loving Englishmen are degrading ourselves by having to rule a bunch of backward Burmese who forced me to shoot the elephant.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Stan Adams, @Jonathan Mason

    Orwell’s novel Burma Days disagrees. He may well have said that imperialism degrades the imperialist race but he never put across the sentiment that the phrase ‘bunch of backward Burmese’ conveys. That’s the contemptuous attitude the bigoted English characters in the novel display which Orwell clearly meant to criticize.

  70. @Bardon Kaldian
    I've read this essay a long time ago & essentially agree with it. Just, one thing puzzles me in reality: why on earth would someone cheer for a team not representing his tribe?
    Alright, when it comes to "just a game" interpretation when one watches it for fun, for entertainment- I understand.

    But if your tribe or clearly defined tribal member clashes with another tribe, this is quite another matter. And if different kinds of people, in most cases races, are supposed to represent you, or your tribe- why would anyone identify with them, however good they may be?

    I simply couldn't squeeze any emotional investment out of me if I was French, to cheer for the current French football team. They're not "me". The same goes for white Americans & NBA & NFL in general. When I was a kid & still cared about these things, I strongly supported my people's teams (I also played football and basketball, but after my 17s-19s found them basically a waste of time). But it was the primal "we" element that mattered, not some sophistication, brilliance, strength or endurance.

    Bloodless war, more or less.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @guest007, @James J O'Meara

    Duke University became white Americans college basketball team because Duke, at one time, had more white players that other schools such as Kentucky or UNC. However, when Duke entered the one and done college basketball market, Duke is as black as any other college basketball team. However, there still seem to be some residual support from whites for Duke. Gonzaga University, being in Spokane, is just not on TV enough at the right times against the right opponents for whites to transfer their support.

  71. @JohnnyWalker123
    Asians like Rice University.

    Replies: @guest007

    What an original joke. Never heard that one before. However, Rice University is 24% Asian as compared to University of Houston four miles away that is 23% Asian. At least Rice is not a school that discriminates against Asians like much of the Ivy League schools.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @guest007

    They discriminate against them in their brochures and promo lit. When I was looking at their transfer application 3 years ago the materials showed a lot of whites and white-pluses (mestizos) in addition to the expected NAMBIPOC allotment. I can't remember seeing any visual depiction of the racial dog that didn't bark, excluding faculty headshots probably taken from the security ID card database.

    West Coast uni's I checked admitted by their own marketing photography that the schools were chock full of E. & S. Asians.

    , @epebble
    @guest007

    Rice is primarily a STEM school, hence there is no Zero-sum mindset prevalent in Ivies. Similar to Caltech.

    Replies: @guest007

  72. @JimDandy
    There is too much emphasis on watching sports in America today. My own interest in watching sports decreased about 90 percent in the last year and a half. I don't know why, exactly. The woke stuff definitely was a turnoff, but I just don't really care much anymore. But if and when Fury fights Wilder, I will definitely watch, in part because the white vs. black matchup will make it more interesting for me. As for the Olympics, those ratings are suffering precisely because of the decline of nationalism. Real world animus makes sports more entertaining.

    Replies: @bomag

    There is too much emphasis on watching sports in America today.

    Yeah, it’s become a place to blow disposable income; and make fake work. Scandalous how much we pay staff involved in college sports.

    I prefer the sports that go up against a third party measure, e.g. high jump, pole vault, long jump, shooting sports, motorcycle hill climb, etc.

    • Replies: @InnerCynic
    @bomag

    Rally racing. Against the clock and spread over multiple days.

    , @Abolish_public_education
    @bomag

    State U’s profster of football is often the highest paid, public worker in the state; his numerous assistants also do pretty well. In fairness to the coach, at least he teaches and is willing to live-or-die by his results.

    The top-ten is usually dominated by clinical profsters of medicine. The schools split fees, so to speak.

  73. Anonymous[170] • Disclaimer says:

    Not so much a comment as a message to Steve:

    A golf movie rated 8 on IMDB (which is a high rating)

    Open (2021)

    Open

    IMDB: 8
    A former professional golfer attempts to qualify for The Open Championship having taken a break from the game due to experiencing a trauma. On his comeback he meets a woman who is recovering from a trauma of her own. The peace and beauty of the golf course provides them with the platform they need to form an unbreakable bond.

    A link to the actual movie. There’s pop ups but just delete them. Keep clicking on the play button and the movie will play. I watched a couple of minutes. The wrinkle is she’s an English black and he’s an English White.

    https://ev01.to/watch-movie/watch-open-online-70930.4556883

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Anonymous

    '...The wrinkle is she’s an English black and he’s an English White.'

    That takes care of that. Not after the Summer of George...

  74. @slumber_j
    @Almost Missouri

    This account of Millwall fan Roy Larner's public treatment subsequent to his astonishing act of bravery indicates one of many ways the people in charge have gone about emasculating a nation:


    He was pointedly not invited to the anniversary of the attack, his name not mentioned, and was knowingly left off the honour call, whilst the deputy commissioner, Sir Craig Mackey, was polishing his boots to collect a gallantry medal for locking his car doors and radioing for help during the Westminster Bridge attack, Roy Larner was busily being forgotten.
     
    https://nicethreadsmate.com/what-about-roy-larner/

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Agree. In a just state, Roy Larner would be lionized and living in a mansion on a state pension granted by executive dispensation. Or better yet, he’d be the new Permanent Secretary of Immigration.

    Instead, in clown world, this formerly homeless unemployed man is still homeless and jobless, but now he’s homeless and jobless with a little medallion denoting he once did something or other. In fact, I think the medallion came from private donors, so it was not even officially sanctioned.

    This is why England loses.

    • Agree: InnerCynic
  75. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Games are taken seriously in London and New York, and they were taken seriously in Rome and Byzantium: in the Middle Ages they were played, and probably played with much physical brutality, but they were not mixed up with politics nor a cause of group hatreds."

    Au contraire. The infamous Nika Riots of 532AD were caused in large part due to a chariot race. [Nika means "Win!" "Victory!" "Conquer!"]. Normally don't think of Orwell as low energy, a la Jeb!

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @David

    These riots were mostly politically, genealogically, economically, culturally & theologically motivated. They were, in modernese, “political riots”.

    Since theology frequently served as the catalyst for ethnic, financial or political rivalry, Greens were, I think Monophysites, while Justinian supported Blues, who were basically orthodox Chalcedonians, but he had later been vacillating in doctrinal issues, becoming closer to Aphthartodocetism- which could be interpreted as a Monophysite heresy. Happily for history of the Christian doctrine, Justinian died later, but still in time, because he might have fallen into heresy, which is something we all would find deeply disturbing & would strongly condemn.

  76. @Tono Bungay
    Whatever one might think of the sports themselves, what are we to think about the competition to host the Olympic Games? Do the people in the potential Olympics sites really want the games or is it another example of leaders whose interests are not those of the people they supposedly represent?

    Replies: @anon, @Abolish_public_education, @ntn

    Whatever one might think of the sports themselves, what are we to think about the competition to host the Olympic Games?

    Pretty obvious, isn’t it?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    The Olympics are becoming less popular to host, so the IOC rather than try to extract bribes and fancy new stadiums from competing countries, gave the next two Olympics to two old reliable giant cities with tons of existing stadia: Paris in 2024 and Los Angeles in 2028. About 30 years ago Paris built a 90,000 seat super stadium where the stands are on rails so it can host both World Cup finals and Olympic track. So it's about time the Olympics went there after decades of the IOC extracting more bribes and concessions by saying to rivals, "Well, the obvious choice is Paris, but perhaps ..."

    So it's about time.

    And L.A. has the Coliseum and Rose Bowl, which are primitive 1920s stadiums but historic, plus Dodger and Angel Stadiums, which are by now historic too.

    It's actually not that hard to host the Olympics or World Cup if you don't feel obligated to build a whole bunch of new stadiums. L.A. did it on the cheap in 1984 and made a big profit.

    Replies: @WIzard of Oz, @anon

  77. @slumber_j
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Is that's what Orwell is alluding to here--women's sexual excitement by violence? I guess it must be, although I haven't known any women who respond to combat sports that way, at least not overtly: generally they just wince and leave the room.

    I've always liked boxing, but I remember my maternal grandfather (who was himself very athletic) talking about how much he hated taking business associates to boxing matches in Chicago, starting in the 1930s. He was a lawyer and had ended up becoming house counsel to one of the biggest printing companies in the US, and at some point his portfolio came to include running a big paper mill subsidiary in Appleton, WI. Big printing and paper customers expected my grandfather to take them to the big fight, and the savagery of the fans appalled him: being among them was easily his least favorite aspect of his working life.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @prosa123, @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    No, I expect that what he is describing is what we see briefly in Casey At the Bat or the music video to Paradise by the Dashboard Light: raging, emasculating screaming from a female audience member, who cannot perform what the make athlete is doing, but nevertheless cannot stand to see him fail.

  78. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Almost Missouri


    Surprised to find myself disagreeing so much with Orwell here, but has the rise of mass interstate sports not corresponded with the decline in mass interstate violence?
     
    What's most interesting about the article is how much less violent sports have gotten. Most people really are just a lot less violent in all aspects of life than they used to be.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Almost Missouri

    That's legal and part of the sport's performance. It is a very different kind of violence from that which victimises people.

    , @prosa123
    @Almost Missouri

    Christ Jesus, the narrator of that video actually first-names the women!!!!

  79. A memorably disturbing (but no doubt truthful) passage about English boys and animals in Orwell’s semi-autobiographical novel Coming Up for Air:

    Then Joe found a late thrush’s nest with half-fledged chicks in it in a blackberry bush. After a lot of argument about what to do with them we took the chicks out, had shots at them with stones, and finally stamped on them. There were four of them, and we each had one to stamp on. It was getting on towards tea-time now. We knew that old Brewer would be as good as his word and there was a hiding ahead of us, but we were getting too hungry to stay out much longer. Finally we trailed home, with one more row on the way, because when we were passing the allotments we saw a rat and chased it with sticks, and old Bennet the station-master, who worked at his allotment every night and was very proud of it, came after us in a tearing rage because we’d trampled on his onion-bed.

  80. @Almost Missouri
    @Bardon Kaldian


    why on earth would someone cheer for a team not representing his tribe?
     
    Why indeed.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/31/BLM_protest_in_Amsterdam_on_June_10%2C_2020_-_DSC03156.jpg/800px-BLM_protest_in_Amsterdam_on_June_10%2C_2020_-_DSC03156.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @El Dato, @SunBakedSuburb, @Buffalo Joe, @Not Raul

    Women should not deny their intimate link to biological reality: when they step away from the moon and tides mental illness begins its creep. We see this in young upper-middle class white women holding BLM signs: pathological altruism blinding them to the fact that their black allies in the cult of anti-racism want to rape and kill them.

  81. @Veracitor
    Next explain the decline of the public’s interest in organized sport. Sure, revulsion toward wokeism can account for much of the recent collapse of football, basketball, baseball, and various other fanbases, but boxing interest faded much earlier and I think football, at least, was in trouble even before idiot players started ‘taking a knee’ to annoy the fans.

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Buffalo Joe

    I think it’s just that we all turned off our tv’s and started staring at our phones and computers. Sports action doesn’t really work on a small screen and when you’re on the computer you’re either working or playing a game (reading blogs is part of game-playing). Our new teams are our favorite youtubers or podcasters.

    what’s funny is that it took so many of us so long to realize how boring the NBA is. I haven’t watched a game in almost 5 years and I don’t miss it at all.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @stillCARealist

    Has hockey gotten more watchable on big screen TVs. I couldn't follow the puck on 19" cathode ray tube TVs.

    Replies: @Captain Tripps, @JimDandy

  82. The English are more responsible than anyone for poisoning international sports, Heysel Stadium in 1985 being exhibit A.

    They’ve even infected the Ryder Cup with their wankerish behavior, although in that case they suddenly put on their “European” hats and for 3 days pretend that they don’t despise Spain and Germany. Then when it’s over these ridiculous Brexiteers return to their regularly scheduled programming.

    • LOL: LondonBob
    • Replies: @WIzard of Oz
    @Bragadocious

    I've tried hard to learn something from this but the only plain unassailable inference is that you don't like the English, or at least your conception of the English. I wonder if you know any or could even tell the difference between different
    Scottish, Welsh, Irish and English accents, regional and class differences etc.

    , @Anonymous
    @Bragadocious

    Bollocks!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DUexzDFhWtM

  83. @AnotherDad
    Well i think Orwell's basically on target here.

    But the problem is sport misdirects these healthy groupish interests. Yeah, English soccer fans are big a*holes. But what the heck have they done to protect England? Where's England now?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Almost Missouri, @kaganovitch, @al gore rhythms, @oliver elkington

    But the problem is sport misdirects these healthy groupish interests. Yeah, English soccer fans are big a*holes. But what the heck have they done to protect England? Where’s England now?

    Well, if Arsenal football louts had their way, Great Britain wouldn’t have imported millions of South Asians to despoil their daughters. I’m not normally a big supporter of dolchstosslegenden, but the Blair government’s immigration shenanigans surely qualifies. The British working class has been demoralized, dispossesed and traduced. The traditional symbiosis of British proles under the leadership of British elites which in better times led that nation to dominate the world, has been betrayed by the British elites, who have decided to go their own Davoisie way. May they rot.

  84. @Mike_from_SGV
    Wow, first Osaka crashes and burns, and then Biles does the same -- the two Princesses of Diversity quickly out of action. Dozens of hagiographic articles by woke sportswriters now must be scrapped; will they have anything else they can capably write about?

    Replies: @Gordo, @Jim Don Bob

    Wow, first Osaka crashes and burns, and then Biles does the same — the two Princesses of Diversity quickly out of action. Dozens of hagiographic articles by woke sportswriters now must be scrapped; will they have anything else they can capably write about?

    No doubt they have backup pieces ready about ‘racial abuse’ and other chimera.

  85. @El Dato
    @Verymuchalive


    Whatever their faults, the SNP have always been a strictly constitutional party.
     
    I guess he saw what was coming:

    SNP adherents telling people what they can't say in public ("unintendedly stirring up hate") and at home ("the exception to the Public Order Act 1986 which allows people to use otherwise illegal language in their own homes should be abolished")

    Humza Yousaf

    ... and Euro-Love to a degree that they want to go their own way and de-Brexit.

    Orwell was essentially a propagandist. You can’t take what he writes at face value.
     
    In retrospect, he had excellent judgement and a deep insight in political and psychological motiviations.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @Verymuchalive

    All mainstream parties in the West are now parties in name only – whether Conservative in name only, Socialist in name only, Liberal in name only, Nationalist in name only. They adhere to a narrow range of Neolib-Neocon-Welfarist-HomoGlobalist policies.

    You can’t compare those parties to parties of the same or similar names 60 0r 70 years ago, often less than that. Jimmy Carter or Ronald Reagan would never have become US Presidents now, because their parties would have not have permitted their nomination.

    Sometimes the changes can come back and bite the perps. 30 years ago, the SNP was still a fairly traditional nationalist party in a number of regards. Then Alex Salmond took over and started to introduce the changes that have led to the present situation. An older relative was a prominent SNP politician who had known Salmond since the latter had joined the SNP. I was also a member at the time. As traditional nationalists, we very quickly resigned from the party. Neither of us have rejoined or joined other political parties. Indeed, such have been the changes, we would not be permitted to rejoin as we would have to agree to conform to these policies first. For example, members who are opposed to the EU have been purged or forced to resign.

    Ironically, one of the members who has been forced to resign is Alex Salmond himself. The sex allegations were a useful pretext, to which you can his work for Sputnik and RT ( “tool of the Kremlin” ). Truly, the Revolution does devour its children.

  86. @El Dato
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Gee I don't know Alfred. You are attacking the man for idealistically taking up arms against fascism? By that reasoning anyone on the Allied side who didn't drop weapons Iraq style at the first sight of a Panzer III is probably in a state of sin, too.

    1) Narrowly escapes a Stalinist purge in a meatgrinder where he idealistically assumed the Reds were the good guys (having signed up with the non-Stalinist part of the Reds purely by accident)
    2) Reconsiders his goals in life
    3) 1945: "Animal Farm": Stalinism in the Soviet Union today.
    4) 1948: "1984": A biting satire about Fabianism in the UK tomorrow (1984 = 100 years after foundation of the Fabian Society)
    5) "My work here is done"

    Of course there are other works warning about the problems of collectivism and manipulative uniparties, but for the english-speaking works, 1984 is the reference.

    - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugen_Richter
    - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/We_(novel)

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

    Gee I don’t know Alfred. You are attacking the man for idealistically taking up arms against fascism? By that reasoning anyone on the Allied side who didn’t drop weapons Iraq style at the first sight of a Panzer III is probably in a state of sin, too.

    1) Narrowly escapes a Stalinist purge in a meatgrinder where he idealistically assumed the Reds were the good guys (having signed up with the non-Stalinist part of the Reds purely by accident)

    Of course there are other works warning about the problems of collectivism and manipulative uniparties, but for the english-speaking works, 1984 is the reference.

    Hi Dato,

    To add to your post, one reason that 1984 is so good is that parts of it are autobiographical. Orwell had briefly been a political prisoner in Barcelona (uncertain of his fate) and a policeman in Burma. His work during the war was with the BBC, where there were constant struggles about what he could and could not say and what would be good propaganda. In London, during the war there were the constant discomforts of rationing as well as V2 rockets (“steamers”).

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @AKAHorace


    Orwell had briefly been a political prisoner in Barcelona (uncertain of his fate)...
     
    He wrote about all this in Homage to Catalonia. There's no allegory there though, as this book was a diary, not a novel. Because he was caught in the mass confusion in the local struggles between one Communist sect and another, Orwell had not realized that this struggle in Barcelona was part of a bigger picture, a big Commie on Commie struggle in the USSR, who supported the "Republicans". That is, even by the end of the book, which is only a year later or so, as he wrote it up in France, I think, on the way home, he didn't know the big picture.

    One thing Orwell wrote was that he had a lot of fondness for the Spanish people in general. When the police from one party went to search his apartment for weapons, no matter what else they tore up, they would not ask his wife to move off the bed and left it undisturbed. (Yeah, he brought his wife with him to a civil war. Who TF does that?)

    Replies: @WIzard of Oz, @AKAHorace

  87. @Anonymous
    @Altai

    You must not have read any of Orwell's writings. His sympathy for the working class, ordinary blokes is palpable. For example Keep the Aspidistra Flying. Or Down and Out in Paris and London.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Reg Cæsar

    Not to mention The Road to Wigan Pier.

  88. @Rohirrimborn
    It's interesting to me to hear that "ferreting for rats" was a pastime for rural boys. I remember my Grandfather (born 1888) explaining that his family in Donegal kept ferrets to put down rabbit holes. The fleeing rabbits were shot and ended up as dinner meat that evening. I suppose most families kept ferrets in those days. That activity is also the origin of the idiom "ferret out" meaning to find the truth.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    Ratting (UK)

    Ratting (US)

  89. Anonymous[674] • Disclaimer says:
    @guest007
    @JohnnyWalker123

    What an original joke. Never heard that one before. However, Rice University is 24% Asian as compared to University of Houston four miles away that is 23% Asian. At least Rice is not a school that discriminates against Asians like much of the Ivy League schools.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @epebble

    They discriminate against them in their brochures and promo lit. When I was looking at their transfer application 3 years ago the materials showed a lot of whites and white-pluses (mestizos) in addition to the expected NAMBIPOC allotment. I can’t remember seeing any visual depiction of the racial dog that didn’t bark, excluding faculty headshots probably taken from the security ID card database.

    West Coast uni’s I checked admitted by their own marketing photography that the schools were chock full of E. & S. Asians.

  90. Sports is the Domestication of Man. Instead of sending the men to actual war we put them on sports teams in a simulation of war.

    Course, since the advent of sports we have had two pedal-to-the-metal world wars, but hey, nobody’s perfect.

    What’s not to like, you silly Orwell?

  91. @bomag
    @JimDandy


    There is too much emphasis on watching sports in America today.
     
    Yeah, it's become a place to blow disposable income; and make fake work. Scandalous how much we pay staff involved in college sports.

    I prefer the sports that go up against a third party measure, e.g. high jump, pole vault, long jump, shooting sports, motorcycle hill climb, etc.

    Replies: @InnerCynic, @Abolish_public_education

    Rally racing. Against the clock and spread over multiple days.

  92. @El Dato
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Gee I don't know Alfred. You are attacking the man for idealistically taking up arms against fascism? By that reasoning anyone on the Allied side who didn't drop weapons Iraq style at the first sight of a Panzer III is probably in a state of sin, too.

    1) Narrowly escapes a Stalinist purge in a meatgrinder where he idealistically assumed the Reds were the good guys (having signed up with the non-Stalinist part of the Reds purely by accident)
    2) Reconsiders his goals in life
    3) 1945: "Animal Farm": Stalinism in the Soviet Union today.
    4) 1948: "1984": A biting satire about Fabianism in the UK tomorrow (1984 = 100 years after foundation of the Fabian Society)
    5) "My work here is done"

    Of course there are other works warning about the problems of collectivism and manipulative uniparties, but for the english-speaking works, 1984 is the reference.

    - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugen_Richter
    - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/We_(novel)

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

    It sounds like you read my blog post, El Data. You can see that my point (same here above) was that I had a habit of figuring every “classic” author was wise in all his writings. 1984 is an excellent book – unfortunately seeming to be taken as an instruction manual nowadays.

    (1) Yeah, I almost agree. Orwell (Eric Blair) saw only the small picture. I don’t fault him for his youthful idealism. The book was more of a diary of his time being caught in the midst of bigger events, which he only figured out later. It’s just that I expected a bigger political point to it.

    (2) Probably. Not many of us were wise at 30-something years old in big political matters.

    (3) Animal Farm was disappointing to me. It was not really a criticism of the whole idea of hard-core Socialism, bordering on Communism. The allegory would have been different in that case, as I discussed in this review of it. No, in Animal Farm, his allegory showed certain animals, the pigs that is, being greedy, and the impression is that the animal farm would have run splendidly had it not been for those greedy pigs. I understand that was his comparison to Stalinism.

    If that was his point, OK, but I expected an allegory to illustrate the inherent problems with Socialism and Communism. I guess I shouldn’t have, as Mr. Orwell remained a Socialist to the end.

    (4) As I wrote, it was a great book. It applied very well to the USSR and East Bloc of my time, right on through and past the actual year 1984.

    • Agree: El Dato
  93. @El Dato
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Gee I don't know Alfred. You are attacking the man for idealistically taking up arms against fascism? By that reasoning anyone on the Allied side who didn't drop weapons Iraq style at the first sight of a Panzer III is probably in a state of sin, too.

    1) Narrowly escapes a Stalinist purge in a meatgrinder where he idealistically assumed the Reds were the good guys (having signed up with the non-Stalinist part of the Reds purely by accident)
    2) Reconsiders his goals in life
    3) 1945: "Animal Farm": Stalinism in the Soviet Union today.
    4) 1948: "1984": A biting satire about Fabianism in the UK tomorrow (1984 = 100 years after foundation of the Fabian Society)
    5) "My work here is done"

    Of course there are other works warning about the problems of collectivism and manipulative uniparties, but for the english-speaking works, 1984 is the reference.

    - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugen_Richter
    - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/We_(novel)

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

    An excerpt from the PS review of Animal Farm:

    This was not the allegory I had expected, however. It seems everything on Animal Farm would have worked out OK, per Mr. Orwell, had the bad animals not ruined things. (This is very much as he thought the military could run just fine with no chain of command, but equal footing for everyone, in Homage to Catalonia.)

    Nah, I’d have rather read a story in which the hardworking horse Boxer finally got fed up with putting in more effort for no reward, as other animals, especially the damn cat, were wanking off. There should have been a page or two about the weekly animal meetings in which the many chickens and their numerous chicks, born to the least-productive egg-laying hens and given the vote at 18 weeks, outvote the dogs, pigs, horses, and sheep, giving themselves large rations. Then, at a subsequent weekly meeting, Muriel the goat, pissed off about the unfairness of it all, goes ahead and eats all copies of the ballots, causing a riot that results in the construction of an animal penitentiary, something they all thought was in their past.

    Perhaps, I’m a little harsh on the author. He did, after all, have the pigs decide that their leadership work was worth more pay and better accommodations. That was a big part of the story, of course, but I’m not sure George Orwell actually got it. That’s bound to happen because some animals and some people simply ARE better than others, and we can’t all be equal. Did he get that?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I think you have to look at Animal Farm and 1984 in the context of the culture that Orwell grew up in.

    The people who ran the British Empire sincerely believed that they were bringing enlightenment to the heathen in the context of Christianity which was the universal religion of Europe.

    The British Empire did provide a class of administrators who were astonishingly professional and believed that they were serving God, Queen (or King) and Empire and did so with a very low rate of corruption--even if with hindsight their decisions may be criticized.

    What went wrong in socialist revolutions was that there was now no natural ruling class with a sense of noblesse oblige, so it was replaced with a new ruling class of power-hungry bureaucrats and secret policemen.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @El Dato
    @Achmed E. Newman

    https://mises.org/library/brilliant-confused-radicalism-george-orwell

    Jeff Riggenbach on Orwell's "1984" as an allegory to his experience in edukaschion:

    The will of the headmaster of St. Cyprian's — and the will of his wife, who ran the school with him — was imposed on the students in the form of a series of beatings — beatings administered, sometimes by the headmaster himself, sometimes by certain favored older boys who were, in effect, licensed to beat younger boys. "I … remember, more than once," Orwell writes, "being led out of the room in the middle of a Latin sentence, receiving a beating and then going straight ahead with the same sentence, just like that." All in all, Orwell wrote, attending St. Cyprian's was about "as bad as [being] in an army," but perhaps not quite as bad as being "in prison."

    "There are no laws or clear-cut rules of conduct for Winston Smith to obey; he, like a child, may transgress without meaning to. He must not only do what is right, he must be good."
     

    That's how it works.

    The vehicles for his breakthrough were a short, satirical novel called Animal Farm, which tells of the efforts of the animals at Manor Farm to overthrow their human rulers and establish a communist utopia under the leadership of the pigs — this was published in 1945 — and a much longer, brutally naturalistic novel of a totalitarian future called Nineteen Eighty-four, published in 1949. These two books made Orwell rich, but he was dead from tuberculosis before the winter of 1949–1950 had ended, aged 46, so he had precious little time to spend any of his new riches on anything but medical bills.

    A few years after Orwell's death, as I have noted, his unflattering memoir of his years at St. Cyprian's finally saw print in the United States. And when it did, it became the subject of an essay in the New Yorker by the British journalist Anthony West.

    West noted that "most of [the terrifying things in Nineteen Eighty-four] "clearly derive from the experience described in 'Such, Such Were the Joys.'" At St. Cyprians, West reminds his readers, "the headmaster's wife … seemed to be spying on Orwell all the time" and "seem[ed], by some kind of magical omniscience, to know what every boy does and even what he thinks."
     

    "Stand still, laddy! AOC is watching you!"

    Replies: @Stan Adams

  94. @AnotherDad
    Well i think Orwell's basically on target here.

    But the problem is sport misdirects these healthy groupish interests. Yeah, English soccer fans are big a*holes. But what the heck have they done to protect England? Where's England now?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Almost Missouri, @kaganovitch, @al gore rhythms, @oliver elkington

    “But what the heck have they done to protect England?”

    Millwall supporters during the London riots of 2011 defending the streets of Eltham:

  95. @Clyde
    Too bad George Orwell only made it to age 47. If had another 40 years he would have had more to say about everything. Or even better if George Orwell could time travel to year 2000, then write and philosophize up until now, including the current pandemic/plandemic/shameless Federal Gov't/globohomo takeover.

    Globohomo-short for global homogenization? So sayeth the internet.

    Replies: @al gore rhythms

    If Orwell had lived to the age of 76 or so we could have seen an Orwell essay on Punk rock.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @al gore rhythms

    Speculating about Orwell's political evolution if he'd lived to, say, 1990 is fun.

  96. @Almost Missouri
    @Triteleia Laxa

    https://youtu.be/spHVLpEL2JE?t=37

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @prosa123

    That’s legal and part of the sport’s performance. It is a very different kind of violence from that which victimises people.

  97. Anonymous[235] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill P
    Orwell's distaste for sports has its origins in his childhood. He was lousy at sports and got roughed up when he played. He really hated football (soccer).

    Frankly, I can tell from photos that he would have been an easy (and amusing) tackle.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jonathan Mason, @Anonymous, @Djkjcgjj, @TheJester

    He was very tall. Are big guys at a disadvantage in this game?

    • Replies: @Mr Mox
    @Anonymous

    He was very tall. Are big guys at a disadvantage in this game?

    Sometimes, yes.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2IDUXLvgcU&ab_channel=GeoBeatsAnimals

    Replies: @Bubba

  98. @The Alarmist
    This is why we need to bring back gladiatorial games.

    Replies: @donut

    It’s a thought .

  99. anon[134] • Disclaimer says:

    Olympic field events mostly OK.
    Still pick up something steel and throw it.
    Pole vaulting needs to return to bamboo poles. Sling shot poles just not right.

    Track events need surfaces of clay, short grass or dirt not launching sponge or whatever.
    No rocket shoes. Bare feet or thin deer skin covering.

    Human achievement not equipment achievement
    Equipment worse than drugs.

    5ds

  100. @Achmed E. Newman
    @El Dato

    An excerpt from the PS review of Animal Farm:


    This was not the allegory I had expected, however. It seems everything on Animal Farm would have worked out OK, per Mr. Orwell, had the bad animals not ruined things. (This is very much as he thought the military could run just fine with no chain of command, but equal footing for everyone, in Homage to Catalonia.)

    Nah, I'd have rather read a story in which the hardworking horse Boxer finally got fed up with putting in more effort for no reward, as other animals, especially the damn cat, were wanking off. There should have been a page or two about the weekly animal meetings in which the many chickens and their numerous chicks, born to the least-productive egg-laying hens and given the vote at 18 weeks, outvote the dogs, pigs, horses, and sheep, giving themselves large rations. Then, at a subsequent weekly meeting, Muriel the goat, pissed off about the unfairness of it all, goes ahead and eats all copies of the ballots, causing a riot that results in the construction of an animal penitentiary, something they all thought was in their past.

    Perhaps, I'm a little harsh on the author. He did, after all, have the pigs decide that their leadership work was worth more pay and better accommodations. That was a big part of the story, of course, but I'm not sure George Orwell actually got it. That's bound to happen because some animals and some people simply ARE better than others, and we can't all be equal. Did he get that?
     

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @El Dato

    I think you have to look at Animal Farm and 1984 in the context of the culture that Orwell grew up in.

    The people who ran the British Empire sincerely believed that they were bringing enlightenment to the heathen in the context of Christianity which was the universal religion of Europe.

    The British Empire did provide a class of administrators who were astonishingly professional and believed that they were serving God, Queen (or King) and Empire and did so with a very low rate of corruption–even if with hindsight their decisions may be criticized.

    What went wrong in socialist revolutions was that there was now no natural ruling class with a sense of noblesse oblige, so it was replaced with a new ruling class of power-hungry bureaucrats and secret policemen.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan, while I agree with you and the long-gone British too, who WERE a good influence on the world in the way your wrote, here's what the problem is: Socialism is the problem itself.

    BTW, I saw another comment of yours that I agree with, wonder of wonders, on the Flu Manchu, but I didn't have a response left. - I'll get that now. OK, done.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  101. @Steve Sailer
    @El Dato

    Orwell went to Eton but not to university.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Orwell won a scholarship to Eton as his family would not have been able to afford the full fees, so he always had a sense of slight inferiority when mixing with wealthy boys who included future prime Ministers.

    By all accounts at Eton hedid no work at all and had no chance of getting admission to Oxford or Cambridge, so he joined the colonial police in Burma, where he had relatives on his mother’s side of the family. (Orwell was born in Burma.)

    He described his own background as lower upper middle class.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    Orwell was born in Burma.
     
    Technically-- literally "literally"-- Blair was born in Burma. Where was he when "Orwell" was born?


    What would he have thought of "Myanmar"? Or "Yangon"?


    "Crab Yangon" sounds inedible.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  102. The sport of rugby, which only recently became an Olympic sport, emerged at Dr. Thomas Arnold’s Rugby School. His son William, brother of the poet Matthew Arnold, helped draw up the first written rules for rugby in 1842. Rugby finally diverged forever from the non-hands Association Football favored by Eton in the 1870s.

    Perhaps apocryphal, but the lore goes that some towns played football as a kicking sport, and others in a proto-rugby form with tackling, the former more prevalent in the South of England and the latter in the North. When two sides with different rules played, it didn’t turn out to be much of an exhibition of sport.

    In any event, one of the paradoxes of world sport is that the supporters of the more brutal and violent on-field sport of Rugby Union behave well, while the supporters of Association Football (Soccer) behave abominably in public. As it has been attributed to Churchill, “Soccer is a gentleman’s game played by hooligans, and rugby is a hooligans’ game played by gentlemen.” Perhaps the actual on-field violence and physical struggle of rugby is cathartic – (our lads either did or didn’t beat those other lads physically) whereas the more restricted rules of soccer which restrain open violence build up frustration in the supporters rather than release it?

  103. i wonder if dorky, unathletic guys were writing the same exact thing all the way back in Rome and Greece. seems like a rite of passage for the intellectual or social loser types who realize they hate how popular and respected and rich the athletes are.

    this is in contrast to the dorky, unathletic guys who LOVE sports, and make it one of their central focuses in life. the world is filled with guys smarter and richer than anybody on Unz who could never play a sport, but have poured millions of dollars into sports.

    sorry Orwells of the world, the sports people are mostly correct, and the Orwells are just bitter losers. pretty much every team owner is a dorky, unathletic guy who is a billionaire self made winner who loves sports. is this where the Orwell crowd talks about how Larry Ellison is just a mouth breathing sports fan moron? that 1600 SAT Paul Allen was a run of the mill punter down at the pub shouting at the television? President Donald Trump was just some McDonald’s worker with basketball posters on his wall?

    non-athletes reaction to sports seems to mostly be divided into these two groups and based on how successful they are in their own life. there are literally thousands of guys more successful in life than Orwell and the anti-sports crowd who feel exactly the opposite way – including the leadership of the ‘smart’ countries China, Japan, and Korea, who are crazy for sports.

    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @prime noticer

    Says every ex-jock running a car dealership in Omaha.

    BTW, Trump? Are you retarded?

  104. @Anonymous
    @Altai

    You must not have read any of Orwell's writings. His sympathy for the working class, ordinary blokes is palpable. For example Keep the Aspidistra Flying. Or Down and Out in Paris and London.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Reg Cæsar

    For example Keep the Aspidistra Flying.

    I read that as a teen and can remember none of it, nor even the title of the other early Orwell novel I read. The aspidistra was a fad houseplant of the day, which he suggested could be the national flower or tree of the middle classes. It’s telling that his mockery of the bourgeois is forgotten, but his equally scathing satires of the Soviets live on forever. Something about a boot…

    His sympathy for the working class, ordinary blokes is palpable.

    That quote about the military rifle on the wall does stick in one’s mind.

    Orwell is similar to Teddy Roosevelt in some ways, if opposite in others. TR liked football, even played it, but was all ready to have it banned when the yearly fatalities reached double digits.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Reg Cæsar

    Isn't Keeep the Aspidistra Flying about selling out and making a living out of advertising?

  105. @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    Orwell won a scholarship to Eton as his family would not have been able to afford the full fees, so he always had a sense of slight inferiority when mixing with wealthy boys who included future prime Ministers.

    By all accounts at Eton hedid no work at all and had no chance of getting admission to Oxford or Cambridge, so he joined the colonial police in Burma, where he had relatives on his mother's side of the family. (Orwell was born in Burma.)

    He described his own background as lower upper middle class.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Orwell was born in Burma.

    Technically– literally “literally”– Blair was born in Burma. Where was he when “Orwell” was born?

    What would he have thought of “Myanmar”? Or “Yangon”?

    “Crab Yangon” sounds inedible.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Reg Cæsar

    I think he was living with his family in Southwold in southeastern England, where his father retired after a career in India. The River Orwell is in that part of the world.

  106. @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I think you have to look at Animal Farm and 1984 in the context of the culture that Orwell grew up in.

    The people who ran the British Empire sincerely believed that they were bringing enlightenment to the heathen in the context of Christianity which was the universal religion of Europe.

    The British Empire did provide a class of administrators who were astonishingly professional and believed that they were serving God, Queen (or King) and Empire and did so with a very low rate of corruption--even if with hindsight their decisions may be criticized.

    What went wrong in socialist revolutions was that there was now no natural ruling class with a sense of noblesse oblige, so it was replaced with a new ruling class of power-hungry bureaucrats and secret policemen.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Jonathan, while I agree with you and the long-gone British too, who WERE a good influence on the world in the way your wrote, here’s what the problem is: Socialism is the problem itself.

    BTW, I saw another comment of yours that I agree with, wonder of wonders, on the Flu Manchu, but I didn’t have a response left. – I’ll get that now. OK, done.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman


    BTW, I saw another comment of yours that I agree with, wonder of wonders, on the Flu Manchu
     
    Very good. Now all you have to do is to publicly declare that you accept me as your personal savior, and you should be on the pathway to righteousness. I always had faith in you.
  107. anonymous[380] • Disclaimer says:

    orwell: always right, always timely!

  108. Christopher Lasch in _The Culture of Narcissism_ argued that fans refusing to accept the fiction of play on the field was a sign of narcissistic decline. In other words, those who intruded from the stands or cheated were breaking the necessary social bounds that were signs of healthy play. Respecting the rules of mock battle required individuals to go beyond their individual selves, a tendency that is being lost.

  109. anon[203] • Disclaimer says:

    “A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise and independence to the mind. Games played with the ball and others of that nature are too violent for the body and stamp no character on the mind. Let your gun therefore be your constant companion of your walks.”
    Thomas Jefferson

  110. Speaking of Orwell:

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Desiderius

    "The last remnants of the old Republic have been swept away. Fear will hold the system together. Fear of the unleashed midwit bureaucrat who doesn't even know what he's been hired for."

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Desiderius

    Holy Totalitarianism! Not only how does he have the power, but how is this even related to his job? Speaking of the USDA and guns, you'd be surprised how many different US Feral Gov't agencies send people to train on shooting down in Brunswick, Georgia, right across from the airport. USDA, check!

    Is there any doubt who is the enemy of Americans, now?

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @anon

  111. @Bill P
    Orwell's distaste for sports has its origins in his childhood. He was lousy at sports and got roughed up when he played. He really hated football (soccer).

    Frankly, I can tell from photos that he would have been an easy (and amusing) tackle.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jonathan Mason, @Anonymous, @Djkjcgjj, @TheJester

    I agree, although I wonder if the football Orwell was as forced play was rugby, not soccer. Possibly it was both.

    Orwell also had a strong distaste for the public school tradition of homosexuality and sexual harassment. At least he enjoyed cricket.

  112. @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    For example Keep the Aspidistra Flying.
     
    I read that as a teen and can remember none of it, nor even the title of the other early Orwell novel I read. The aspidistra was a fad houseplant of the day, which he suggested could be the national flower or tree of the middle classes. It's telling that his mockery of the bourgeois is forgotten, but his equally scathing satires of the Soviets live on forever. Something about a boot...

    His sympathy for the working class, ordinary blokes is palpable.
     
    That quote about the military rifle on the wall does stick in one's mind.

    Orwell is similar to Teddy Roosevelt in some ways, if opposite in others. TR liked football, even played it, but was all ready to have it banned when the yearly fatalities reached double digits.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Isn’t Keeep the Aspidistra Flying about selling out and making a living out of advertising?

  113. @Achmed E. Newman
    @El Dato

    An excerpt from the PS review of Animal Farm:


    This was not the allegory I had expected, however. It seems everything on Animal Farm would have worked out OK, per Mr. Orwell, had the bad animals not ruined things. (This is very much as he thought the military could run just fine with no chain of command, but equal footing for everyone, in Homage to Catalonia.)

    Nah, I'd have rather read a story in which the hardworking horse Boxer finally got fed up with putting in more effort for no reward, as other animals, especially the damn cat, were wanking off. There should have been a page or two about the weekly animal meetings in which the many chickens and their numerous chicks, born to the least-productive egg-laying hens and given the vote at 18 weeks, outvote the dogs, pigs, horses, and sheep, giving themselves large rations. Then, at a subsequent weekly meeting, Muriel the goat, pissed off about the unfairness of it all, goes ahead and eats all copies of the ballots, causing a riot that results in the construction of an animal penitentiary, something they all thought was in their past.

    Perhaps, I'm a little harsh on the author. He did, after all, have the pigs decide that their leadership work was worth more pay and better accommodations. That was a big part of the story, of course, but I'm not sure George Orwell actually got it. That's bound to happen because some animals and some people simply ARE better than others, and we can't all be equal. Did he get that?
     

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @El Dato

    https://mises.org/library/brilliant-confused-radicalism-george-orwell

    Jeff Riggenbach on Orwell’s “1984” as an allegory to his experience in edukaschion:

    The will of the headmaster of St. Cyprian’s — and the will of his wife, who ran the school with him — was imposed on the students in the form of a series of beatings — beatings administered, sometimes by the headmaster himself, sometimes by certain favored older boys who were, in effect, licensed to beat younger boys. “I … remember, more than once,” Orwell writes, “being led out of the room in the middle of a Latin sentence, receiving a beating and then going straight ahead with the same sentence, just like that.” All in all, Orwell wrote, attending St. Cyprian’s was about “as bad as [being] in an army,” but perhaps not quite as bad as being “in prison.”

    “There are no laws or clear-cut rules of conduct for Winston Smith to obey; he, like a child, may transgress without meaning to. He must not only do what is right, he must be good.”

    That’s how it works.

    The vehicles for his breakthrough were a short, satirical novel called Animal Farm, which tells of the efforts of the animals at Manor Farm to overthrow their human rulers and establish a communist utopia under the leadership of the pigs — this was published in 1945 — and a much longer, brutally naturalistic novel of a totalitarian future called Nineteen Eighty-four, published in 1949. These two books made Orwell rich, but he was dead from tuberculosis before the winter of 1949–1950 had ended, aged 46, so he had precious little time to spend any of his new riches on anything but medical bills.

    A few years after Orwell’s death, as I have noted, his unflattering memoir of his years at St. Cyprian’s finally saw print in the United States. And when it did, it became the subject of an essay in the New Yorker by the British journalist Anthony West.

    West noted that “most of [the terrifying things in Nineteen Eighty-four] “clearly derive from the experience described in ‘Such, Such Were the Joys.’” At St. Cyprians, West reminds his readers, “the headmaster’s wife … seemed to be spying on Orwell all the time” and “seem[ed], by some kind of magical omniscience, to know what every boy does and even what he thinks.”

    “Stand still, laddy! AOC is watching you!”

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @El Dato

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWhO6il_7OE

  114. Yeah, right, football prevents, what? riots? war? gang fights? Prevents losing weight is all. Too much barca-lounger, not enough jogging.

    On the other hand, the Palio actually prevents violence. Siena is the safest of Italian cities.

  115. @Desiderius
    Speaking of Orwell:

    https://twitter.com/ScottMGreer/status/1420082142600630279?s=20

    Replies: @El Dato, @Achmed E. Newman

    “The last remnants of the old Republic have been swept away. Fear will hold the system together. Fear of the unleashed midwit bureaucrat who doesn’t even know what he’s been hired for.”

  116. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    Orwell was born in Burma.
     
    Technically-- literally "literally"-- Blair was born in Burma. Where was he when "Orwell" was born?


    What would he have thought of "Myanmar"? Or "Yangon"?


    "Crab Yangon" sounds inedible.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I think he was living with his family in Southwold in southeastern England, where his father retired after a career in India. The River Orwell is in that part of the world.

  117. @guest007
    @JohnnyWalker123

    What an original joke. Never heard that one before. However, Rice University is 24% Asian as compared to University of Houston four miles away that is 23% Asian. At least Rice is not a school that discriminates against Asians like much of the Ivy League schools.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @epebble

    Rice is primarily a STEM school, hence there is no Zero-sum mindset prevalent in Ivies. Similar to Caltech.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @epebble

    Rice University has 4,000 undergraduates. Cal tech has 1,000. Not exactly the same type of schools considering that Rice plays Division I football.

    A good comparison is the University of Central Florida has 57,000 undergraduates almost the same number as the entire Ivy Leagues. As an academic pointed out, one does not change society by admitting a few more women or minorities to the Ivy Leagues.

  118. @Verymuchalive
    Orwell's antipathy towards sports, particularly Association Football, was part of his Nationalism/Patriotism dichotomy. A nationalist was someone who hated other peoples' countries. A patriot was someone who loved his own country. He, of course, was a patriot. International sport only stirred up nationalism and was therefore despicable.

    He did not practice what he preached. This was particularly true concerning Scotland. Orwell ( ne Eric Arthur Blair ) was of fairly remote Scots ancestry - Blar = Gaelic for "meadow". His hostility towards Scots and Scotland was well known in English literary circles. The famous story is told of Orwell seeing the prominent Scots poet Edwin Maxwell ( he and his wife produced the first translations of Kafka into English) approaching. Orwell then walked over to the other side of the road and quickly went round the corner so as not to meet a Scotsman on his travels.

    There was a sinister aspect to this. During WWII, he tried to smear the Scottish National Party as Nazi sympathisers. Whatever their faults, the SNP have always been a strictly constitutional party. Orwell was in a position of some influence - he was editor of the Tribune newspaper. People could have been imprisoned as a result of Orwell's insinuations. Fortunately, not.

    Orwell was essentially a propagandist. You can't take what he writes at face value.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @El Dato, @Djkjcgjj

    I’m pretty sure Orwell didn’t hate Scots or Scotland. He moved to Scotland in his later days, spending some of his final years there, where he wrote “1984”. He hated the snobbery of some rich English people who summered in Scotland, looking down on common English and Scots who couldn’t afford to travel, or vacation in either country.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    @Djkjcgjj

    Orwell's Scotophobia is well-documented. It continues to be played down by his admirers, like you.
    Orwell rented a farmhouse on the island of Jura, where he stayed intermittently between 1946 and January 1949. He finished 1984 there..
    According to a BBC report, he was spending months on the island "to escape the daily grind of journalism and to find a clean environment which doctors thought would help him recover from a dangerous bout of tuberculosis".

    He left Jura for an English sanatorium in January 1949 and never returned.

  119. @Tono Bungay
    Whatever one might think of the sports themselves, what are we to think about the competition to host the Olympic Games? Do the people in the potential Olympics sites really want the games or is it another example of leaders whose interests are not those of the people they supposedly represent?

    Replies: @anon, @Abolish_public_education, @ntn

    As I recall, a private group of fanatics from Denver once submitted a successful bid for the Winter games, but the idea was subsequently rejected by voters. The games were then diverted to another city.

    Then there was that scandal involving (I think) SLC where local organizers were caught offering the selection committee, visiting members all sorts of personal inducements.

    I oppose tax dollars going to attract Olympics, Stupor Bowls, employers, etc, to build stadiums, schools, etc, or any other special interest program.

  120. @Mike_from_SGV
    Wow, first Osaka crashes and burns, and then Biles does the same -- the two Princesses of Diversity quickly out of action. Dozens of hagiographic articles by woke sportswriters now must be scrapped; will they have anything else they can capably write about?

    Replies: @Gordo, @Jim Don Bob

    Dozens of hagiographic articles by woke sportswriters now must be scrapped…

    Nope. Today’s ESPN talking points are about how “brave” they are and what an inspiration to the rest of the team they are. I turned it off.

  121. The Italians needed fortifications because of their proximity to the Islamic pirates that infested the Mediterranean until the 19th century. The British had no such problem.

  122. @Redneck farmer
    Walter Russell Meade's "God and Gold" has an entire chapter on how sports were created by the Anglo-Saxon nations. Basically, we were richer than the wogs.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Buffalo Joe

    Red, and yet in North America,Central and South America the Amerindians played competitive sports. Lacrosse is a great example, played intra tribe, against tribal neighbors and unfriendlies. Lacrosse was given it’s present name by the French. The Indians called it “little wars.” Rules make games uniform and in some cases unwatchable.

  123. @Veracitor
    Next explain the decline of the public’s interest in organized sport. Sure, revulsion toward wokeism can account for much of the recent collapse of football, basketball, baseball, and various other fanbases, but boxing interest faded much earlier and I think football, at least, was in trouble even before idiot players started ‘taking a knee’ to annoy the fans.

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Buffalo Joe

    Vera, money. When you watch some A-Hole dancing around because he made a tackle and then think he makes $14 million or watch a DH wiff on three fast balls and he make $25 million, you sour quickly.

  124. @slumber_j
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Is that's what Orwell is alluding to here--women's sexual excitement by violence? I guess it must be, although I haven't known any women who respond to combat sports that way, at least not overtly: generally they just wince and leave the room.

    I've always liked boxing, but I remember my maternal grandfather (who was himself very athletic) talking about how much he hated taking business associates to boxing matches in Chicago, starting in the 1930s. He was a lawyer and had ended up becoming house counsel to one of the biggest printing companies in the US, and at some point his portfolio came to include running a big paper mill subsidiary in Appleton, WI. Big printing and paper customers expected my grandfather to take them to the big fight, and the savagery of the fans appalled him: being among them was easily his least favorite aspect of his working life.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @prosa123, @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Dunno. I’ve been to many boxing matches, mostly smaller productions though one was on ESPN’s Friday Night Fights, and none of the crowds were unruly by any stretch of the imagination.
    While I have no experience with big-time matches, like those held in Las Vegas, keep in mind that tickets are insanely expensive, and I would imagine that keeps out the riff-raff.

  125. @Almost Missouri
    @Bardon Kaldian


    why on earth would someone cheer for a team not representing his tribe?
     
    Why indeed.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/31/BLM_protest_in_Amsterdam_on_June_10%2C_2020_-_DSC03156.jpg/800px-BLM_protest_in_Amsterdam_on_June_10%2C_2020_-_DSC03156.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @El Dato, @SunBakedSuburb, @Buffalo Joe, @Not Raul

    Almost Missouri, every Saturday, like clock work, a group of middle aged plus white women stand at the entrance to our town park with their signs. Should head to the inner city and find a group that needs their assistance. Hollow, useless posturing.

  126. @Almost Missouri
    @Triteleia Laxa

    https://youtu.be/spHVLpEL2JE?t=37

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @prosa123

    Christ Jesus, the narrator of that video actually first-names the women!!!!

  127. @Desiderius
    Speaking of Orwell:

    https://twitter.com/ScottMGreer/status/1420082142600630279?s=20

    Replies: @El Dato, @Achmed E. Newman

    Holy Totalitarianism! Not only how does he have the power, but how is this even related to his job? Speaking of the USDA and guns, you’d be surprised how many different US Feral Gov’t agencies send people to train on shooting down in Brunswick, Georgia, right across from the airport. USDA, check!

    Is there any doubt who is the enemy of Americans, now?

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Not only how does he have the power

    She.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @anon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Perhaps you could spend a few minutes reviewing Florida gun law, specifically focused on the state concealed carry permit regulations?

    Or just do a Duck search on her name?

    smh

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  128. Am I the first one to bring up the Soccer War? (Hard to know because some comments show up long after they were sent.)

    The 1969 ‘Soccer War’ Between Honduras and El Salvador

    Every four years, the world’s attention turns to the spectacle that is the World Cup. Rivalries can be fierce as countries vie for the most coveted prize in international sports. For the most part, the action stays on the pitch. But not always. In 1969, long-simmering tensions between Honduras and El Salvador, which were competing for a slot in the 1970 World Cup to be held in Mexico, erupted in open hostilities called the “La Guerra del Futbol.”

    There was fighting between fans at the first game in the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa on June 8, which Honduras won 1–0. The second game, on June 15 in the Salvadoran capital of San Salvador, was won 3–0 by El Salvador; even more violence followed. A play-off match took place in Mexico City on June 26, which El Salvador won 3–2 after extra time.

    That same day, El Salvador dissolved all diplomatic ties with Honduras, stating that “the government of Honduras has not taken any effective measures to punish these crimes which constitute genocide, nor has it given assurances of indemnification or reparations for the damages caused to Salvadorans.” The Salvadoran Air Force then attacked targets inside Honduras on July 14, which caught the better equipped Honduran air force off guard. The larger Salvadoran army then invaded Honduras.

    The Organization of American States (OAS) called for a ceasefire; on July 18, after four days of fighting, the “100 hours war” had ended. El Salvador withdrew its troops August 2; however, the brief hostilities resulted in over 2,000 casualties on each side, with some 300,000 Salvadorans displaced, many returning to their home country beaten and brutalized.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Harry Baldwin

    Fan fights during soccer games may have been the trigger that set off the Soccer War but the real cause was the longstanding issue of Salvadoran migrants in Honduras.

  129. @Almost Missouri
    @Bardon Kaldian


    why on earth would someone cheer for a team not representing his tribe?
     
    Why indeed.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/31/BLM_protest_in_Amsterdam_on_June_10%2C_2020_-_DSC03156.jpg/800px-BLM_protest_in_Amsterdam_on_June_10%2C_2020_-_DSC03156.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @El Dato, @SunBakedSuburb, @Buffalo Joe, @Not Raul

    What’s with the feather? Are these Canadians?

  130. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Games are taken seriously in London and New York, and they were taken seriously in Rome and Byzantium: in the Middle Ages they were played, and probably played with much physical brutality, but they were not mixed up with politics nor a cause of group hatreds."

    Au contraire. The infamous Nika Riots of 532AD were caused in large part due to a chariot race. [Nika means "Win!" "Victory!" "Conquer!"]. Normally don't think of Orwell as low energy, a la Jeb!

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @David

    Isn’t a riot with thousands of dead serious?

    And it wasn’t a chariot race, but centuries of enmity between two horse racing franchises. In the first few pages of his meditations, Marcus Aurelius mentions learning from a grandfather (by adoption) not to take sides between the Greens and the Blues.

    The year before the Nika Riots, the Blues (principal victims, at the hands of the Greens), had conspired to sneak weapons into the circus and had killed 3000 Greens.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @David

    Has anybody ever figured out if the Blues and the Greens hated each other for some underlying reason such as ethnicity or religion or class of if they just hated each other because it was fun?

    Replies: @David

  131. @Jonathan Mason
    Dinamo Moscow FC was affiliated with the KGB, and there is little doubt that their tour in 1945 was for propaganda purposes.

    They beat Cardiff City 10-1 and prevailed 4-3 in a game against an Arsenal team fortified with three ringers played in thick fog at Tottenham's stadium.

    The English and Welsh players were no doubt weakened by years of food rationing.

    Moscow Dinamo is now owned by a bank.

    Most of what Orwell said is true and is common sense. The interesting question is whether sports can be used to replace warfare, all whether they're a different factors at play.

    It seems to me that warfare has more to do with the ego of politicians then of the sentiments towards foreigners held by ordinary citizens.

    One remembers the famous episode during World War I trench warfare when there was a truce at Christmas or New Year and a friendly soccer game broke out between English and German players in no man's land.

    As a spectator of sports one's attitude depends on one's age and stage of life. When I first went to professional soccer matches I was a boy watching adult heroes.

    When I see the European and South American soccer championships now, I am an old man watching young boys playing a game I once played, so it's not the same, but still good for the occasional bout of nostalgia in which I imagine my younger self taking a penalty kick to decide the championship of Europe.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Jonathan, interesting that in 1945, with most of Europe still smoldering and corpses rotting under rubble in bombed out English cities, somehow a soccer match was deem relavent.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Buffalo Joe

    It would have been towards
    the end of 1945 so I imagine that the corpses would have been retrieved by that time. The Battle of Britain was much earlier in the war.

    Professional soccer and most competitive sport had been suspended during the course of the war, so there was tremendous celebration and the sense of liberation when the war was finished and professional sports could resume.

    Many top professional soccer players effectively had their careers ruined by the six year break.

    Replies: @Lurker, @Not Raul

  132. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer


    Trains allowed teams to travel
     
    What's the explanation for the West creating mountaineering, skiing, and so on as sports?

    And how the hell can surfing and rock climbing be literal, scored sports?! The west demands measurement and rank ordering? Capitalism demands advertising and sponsorship, and there has to be something nailed down that can be sponsored?

    Replies: @njguy73

    The Olympic stopped being an international sporting movement sometime around 1983. It is now an global athletic brand.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @njguy73


    The Olympic stopped being an international sporting movement sometime around 1983. It is now an global athletic brand.
     
    Hasn't the Olympics always been an aggregation of sporting federations who just put on their normal world championships using their normal officials and rules? The Olympics brand is and has always been wrapped around that. I don't know if this was true in the very early days, but it's been true since way before 1983.

    The Olympic Committee does have a certain amount of power. When they wanted to add snowboarding to the sports lineup they had trouble dealing with the potheads at the International Snowboarding Federation. The Committee then went to the International Ski Federation, who organize Olympic skiing events, and suggested that if they were to create a snowboarding division the Nagano Olympics would be waiting. One major dreadlocked snowboarder did end up boycotting Nagano, but hey, it's the Olympics, and by 2002 the International Snowboarding Federation had completely disbanded. The sponsors, the money, the careers, the mainstream media: The Olympics will win in the end, except for the major national sports like soccer and basketball.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anon, @njguy73

  133. @Tono Bungay
    Whatever one might think of the sports themselves, what are we to think about the competition to host the Olympic Games? Do the people in the potential Olympics sites really want the games or is it another example of leaders whose interests are not those of the people they supposedly represent?

    Replies: @anon, @Abolish_public_education, @ntn

    Good point. Who wants it after Brisbane in 2032?

  134. @AnotherDad
    Well i think Orwell's basically on target here.

    But the problem is sport misdirects these healthy groupish interests. Yeah, English soccer fans are big a*holes. But what the heck have they done to protect England? Where's England now?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Almost Missouri, @kaganovitch, @al gore rhythms, @oliver elkington

    What can they do? most football fans are salt of the earth working class types who are very aware of racial differences(indeed even now you will not feel welcome by fans at many clubs except for maybe the biggest 4 if you are not properly White British) they have voted for parties and movements that they have thought represented their interests like Ukip, Brexit etc and quite frankly they have been sold down the river by the elites, maybe there will be a proper uprising one day but the media seems to have such a strong hold on many that even if a lot of football fans tried to organise a political party that represented the interests of the working class they would probably lose their online and general media presence immediately.

  135. @Harry Baldwin
    Am I the first one to bring up the Soccer War? (Hard to know because some comments show up long after they were sent.)

    The 1969 ‘Soccer War’ Between Honduras and El Salvador

    Every four years, the world’s attention turns to the spectacle that is the World Cup. Rivalries can be fierce as countries vie for the most coveted prize in international sports. For the most part, the action stays on the pitch. But not always. In 1969, long-simmering tensions between Honduras and El Salvador, which were competing for a slot in the 1970 World Cup to be held in Mexico, erupted in open hostilities called the “La Guerra del Futbol.”

    There was fighting between fans at the first game in the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa on June 8, which Honduras won 1–0. The second game, on June 15 in the Salvadoran capital of San Salvador, was won 3–0 by El Salvador; even more violence followed. A play-off match took place in Mexico City on June 26, which El Salvador won 3–2 after extra time.

    That same day, El Salvador dissolved all diplomatic ties with Honduras, stating that “the government of Honduras has not taken any effective measures to punish these crimes which constitute genocide, nor has it given assurances of indemnification or reparations for the damages caused to Salvadorans.” The Salvadoran Air Force then attacked targets inside Honduras on July 14, which caught the better equipped Honduran air force off guard. The larger Salvadoran army then invaded Honduras.

    The Organization of American States (OAS) called for a ceasefire; on July 18, after four days of fighting, the “100 hours war” had ended. El Salvador withdrew its troops August 2; however, the brief hostilities resulted in over 2,000 casualties on each side, with some 300,000 Salvadorans displaced, many returning to their home country beaten and brutalized.
     

    Replies: @prosa123

    Fan fights during soccer games may have been the trigger that set off the Soccer War but the real cause was the longstanding issue of Salvadoran migrants in Honduras.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
  136. @Anonymous
    Not so much a comment as a message to Steve:

    A golf movie rated 8 on IMDB (which is a high rating)

    Open (2021)

    Open

    IMDB: 8
    A former professional golfer attempts to qualify for The Open Championship having taken a break from the game due to experiencing a trauma. On his comeback he meets a woman who is recovering from a trauma of her own. The peace and beauty of the golf course provides them with the platform they need to form an unbreakable bond.

    A link to the actual movie. There’s pop ups but just delete them. Keep clicking on the play button and the movie will play. I watched a couple of minutes. The wrinkle is she’s an English black and he’s an English White.

    https://ev01.to/watch-movie/watch-open-online-70930.4556883

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘…The wrinkle is she’s an English black and he’s an English White.’

    That takes care of that. Not after the Summer of George…

  137. Sports in the past were either blowoffs for military guys pre/post a battle or else part of celebrations, sometimes religious but most times military. For example, I believe it was the Mongol warriors who, after a battle, played a game of polo….but instead of a ball, used the heads of one of their defeated opponents.

    The Romans instituted the sports for sports sake, though it was gradual. State-sponsored games were at first given in honor of, you guessed it, military triumphs, but eventually emperors would sponsor games for any old reason and then just let them run pretty continuously for years on end. And those games were confined to either chariot racing or gladiator staged-fights.

    I’m betting the English fascination with sports for sports sake began after Napoleon was defeated. After that, England had no rational fear of invasion from any nation and was the king of the seas. The population at home could indulge itself in sport at that point, much as it began to indulge in some cosplay of the middle ages (in the 19th Century, neo-jousting tournaments came back into vogue in England, as were all things from medieval times, e.g. Ivanhoe became a hit).

  138. @bomag
    @JimDandy


    There is too much emphasis on watching sports in America today.
     
    Yeah, it's become a place to blow disposable income; and make fake work. Scandalous how much we pay staff involved in college sports.

    I prefer the sports that go up against a third party measure, e.g. high jump, pole vault, long jump, shooting sports, motorcycle hill climb, etc.

    Replies: @InnerCynic, @Abolish_public_education

    State U’s profster of football is often the highest paid, public worker in the state; his numerous assistants also do pretty well. In fairness to the coach, at least he teaches and is willing to live-or-die by his results.

    The top-ten is usually dominated by clinical profsters of medicine. The schools split fees, so to speak.

  139. @Buffalo Joe
    @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan, interesting that in 1945, with most of Europe still smoldering and corpses rotting under rubble in bombed out English cities, somehow a soccer match was deem relavent.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    It would have been towards
    the end of 1945 so I imagine that the corpses would have been retrieved by that time. The Battle of Britain was much earlier in the war.

    Professional soccer and most competitive sport had been suspended during the course of the war, so there was tremendous celebration and the sense of liberation when the war was finished and professional sports could resume.

    Many top professional soccer players effectively had their careers ruined by the six year break.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @Jonathan Mason

    There was some sort of haphazard arrangement that professional players would play at the club nearest to where they were stationed (if not overseas).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Association_football_during_World_War_II#England

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wartime_League

    , @Not Raul
    @Jonathan Mason


    Many top professional soccer players effectively had their careers ruined by the six year break.
     
    Sounds like Ted Williams.

    Maybe, if they ever thaw him out, he’ll make up for lost time.
  140. Anon[335] • Disclaimer says:
    @njguy73
    @Anon

    The Olympic stopped being an international sporting movement sometime around 1983. It is now an global athletic brand.

    Replies: @Anon

    The Olympic stopped being an international sporting movement sometime around 1983. It is now an global athletic brand.

    Hasn’t the Olympics always been an aggregation of sporting federations who just put on their normal world championships using their normal officials and rules? The Olympics brand is and has always been wrapped around that. I don’t know if this was true in the very early days, but it’s been true since way before 1983.

    The Olympic Committee does have a certain amount of power. When they wanted to add snowboarding to the sports lineup they had trouble dealing with the potheads at the International Snowboarding Federation. The Committee then went to the International Ski Federation, who organize Olympic skiing events, and suggested that if they were to create a snowboarding division the Nagano Olympics would be waiting. One major dreadlocked snowboarder did end up boycotting Nagano, but hey, it’s the Olympics, and by 2002 the International Snowboarding Federation had completely disbanded. The sponsors, the money, the careers, the mainstream media: The Olympics will win in the end, except for the major national sports like soccer and basketball.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Thanks.

    , @Anon
    @Anon

    Long interview with the Norwegian boycotter:

    https://snowboardmag.com/stories/the-olympic-issue-terje-haakonsen-interview

    Fashion was a central issue, apparently!?:

    https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2002-feb-02-sp-olysnow03-story.html

    The Economist on lingering resentments in 2011:

    https://www.economist.com/game-theory/2011/11/22/fis-off

    Courses are worse, more dangerous, schedule is too crowded, no time to learn new tricks:

    https://www.kgw.com/article/sports/olympics/snowboarders-still-hold-reservations-about-olympics/53200818

    , @njguy73
    @Anon

    What I mean by "brand" is "marketing tool" or "way of selling stuff."

  141. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan, while I agree with you and the long-gone British too, who WERE a good influence on the world in the way your wrote, here's what the problem is: Socialism is the problem itself.

    BTW, I saw another comment of yours that I agree with, wonder of wonders, on the Flu Manchu, but I didn't have a response left. - I'll get that now. OK, done.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    BTW, I saw another comment of yours that I agree with, wonder of wonders, on the Flu Manchu

    Very good. Now all you have to do is to publicly declare that you accept me as your personal savior, and you should be on the pathway to righteousness. I always had faith in you.

  142. About forty years ago, for a college Cross-Cultural Communication course, I wrote a thesis paper comparing tribal ritual warfare in New Guinea with the modern American sports scene. The point was (and remains) that they are essentially the same. Few people ever die in ritual warfare and quite often the contests are called on account of rain to protect the ornate feather headdresses worn by the participants. They are, therefore, less actual war than an opportunity to relieve intrasocietal tensions by directing aggression outward. Sound a bit familiar? I do, however, wish I would have had access to Orwell’s essay at that time.

    I later had the opportunity to share these views with John Hannah, famous left guard for the New England Patriots and 8-time ProBowler, at a dinner at which I had invited him to speak … he was offended and less than overwhelmed, thinking it sounded like ‘an egghead theory!’ … oddly so for an offensive guard. Oh well, forest… meet the trees.

    Nevertheless, sports still retain those cultural ‘virtues’, though without the call to any kind of ‘unity’ or ‘comity’.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @HansT

    Great story about John Hannah.

  143. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Desiderius

    Holy Totalitarianism! Not only how does he have the power, but how is this even related to his job? Speaking of the USDA and guns, you'd be surprised how many different US Feral Gov't agencies send people to train on shooting down in Brunswick, Georgia, right across from the airport. USDA, check!

    Is there any doubt who is the enemy of Americans, now?

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @anon

    Not only how does he have the power

    She.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @kaganovitch

    Hey, wait a minute. I may have clicked too soon. Mr. Kaganovitch, don't ASSUXIR anything, as you might make an ass out of u and xir.

  144. @Jonathan Mason
    @Buffalo Joe

    It would have been towards
    the end of 1945 so I imagine that the corpses would have been retrieved by that time. The Battle of Britain was much earlier in the war.

    Professional soccer and most competitive sport had been suspended during the course of the war, so there was tremendous celebration and the sense of liberation when the war was finished and professional sports could resume.

    Many top professional soccer players effectively had their careers ruined by the six year break.

    Replies: @Lurker, @Not Raul

    There was some sort of haphazard arrangement that professional players would play at the club nearest to where they were stationed (if not overseas).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Association_football_during_World_War_II#England

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wartime_League

  145. @kaganovitch
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Not only how does he have the power

    She.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Hey, wait a minute. I may have clicked too soon. Mr. Kaganovitch, don’t ASSUXIR anything, as you might make an ass out of u and xir.

    • LOL: kaganovitch
  146. Serious sport has nothing to do with fair play. It is bound up with hatred, jealousy, boastfulness, disregard of all rules and sadistic pleasure in witnessing violence

    Rules? In a knife fight? No rules.

  147. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Desiderius

    Holy Totalitarianism! Not only how does he have the power, but how is this even related to his job? Speaking of the USDA and guns, you'd be surprised how many different US Feral Gov't agencies send people to train on shooting down in Brunswick, Georgia, right across from the airport. USDA, check!

    Is there any doubt who is the enemy of Americans, now?

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @anon

    Perhaps you could spend a few minutes reviewing Florida gun law, specifically focused on the state concealed carry permit regulations?

    Or just do a Duck search on her name?

    smh

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @anon

    Thanks, #364. I had made an assumption he, then she, was a Fed. My apologies. That said, this Fried character is just a pettier tyrant rather than a bigger tyrant. The CCP licensees are some of the least criminal group in the country - way ahead of cops. Note that none of the Jan 6th crowd shot and murdered a woman from a few feet, and got off with not even an arrest, like Michael Leroy Byrd.

    The revoking of these licenses shows why it's important for State to go to Constitutional Carry. As of now 20 already have!

    This is the Florida Commission regarding Jan 6th:


    “The deeply disturbing events that occurred at our nation’s Capitol on January 6th were sedition, treason, and domestic terrorism – and those individuals involved in the insurrection must be held accountable for attempting to subvert our democratic process,” Fried said in a news release.
     
    Pernicious, ridiculous lies as if they were told by the rulers of Oceania itself.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @anon

  148. @Jonathan Mason
    @Buffalo Joe

    It would have been towards
    the end of 1945 so I imagine that the corpses would have been retrieved by that time. The Battle of Britain was much earlier in the war.

    Professional soccer and most competitive sport had been suspended during the course of the war, so there was tremendous celebration and the sense of liberation when the war was finished and professional sports could resume.

    Many top professional soccer players effectively had their careers ruined by the six year break.

    Replies: @Lurker, @Not Raul

    Many top professional soccer players effectively had their careers ruined by the six year break.

    Sounds like Ted Williams.

    Maybe, if they ever thaw him out, he’ll make up for lost time.

  149. @Bardon Kaldian
    I've read this essay a long time ago & essentially agree with it. Just, one thing puzzles me in reality: why on earth would someone cheer for a team not representing his tribe?
    Alright, when it comes to "just a game" interpretation when one watches it for fun, for entertainment- I understand.

    But if your tribe or clearly defined tribal member clashes with another tribe, this is quite another matter. And if different kinds of people, in most cases races, are supposed to represent you, or your tribe- why would anyone identify with them, however good they may be?

    I simply couldn't squeeze any emotional investment out of me if I was French, to cheer for the current French football team. They're not "me". The same goes for white Americans & NBA & NFL in general. When I was a kid & still cared about these things, I strongly supported my people's teams (I also played football and basketball, but after my 17s-19s found them basically a waste of time). But it was the primal "we" element that mattered, not some sophistication, brilliance, strength or endurance.

    Bloodless war, more or less.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @guest007, @James J O'Meara

    “why on earth would someone cheer for a team not representing his tribe?”

    Don’t know. But it’s definitely a White thing. The proprietor of castefootball.us observed long ago that White people will watch anyone playing a sport, but other races/ethnics will only watch “their tribe”.

    Meritocracy? Like, “we welcome any high IQ immigrants!”

    Hence, adding ethnics to your team is a no-brainer. You add their people to your paying fans, and the White fans stay. Integrating baseball was an easy business decision.

    EG: the “Brooklyn” Dodgers had several Jewish stars. When the team moved to LA, suddenly Jews couldn’t play baseball, only Hispanics.

    The working out of this today in entertainment, politics, etc. is obvious. Whites hire/vote for blacks etc., blacks etc. hire/vote for their own, soon only blacks etc. have jobs/run the country.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @James J O'Meara

    EG: the “Brooklyn” Dodgers had several Jewish stars. When the team moved to LA, suddenly Jews couldn’t play baseball, only Hispanics.

    No. I don't recall a Jewish star on the Brooklyn Dodgers. Sandy Koufax started there in 1955 but he wasn't very good until well after the Dodgers moved to L.A. in 1958.

    The LA Dodgers had 3 Jewish players from 1959-1963, with Sandy Koufax being a superstar through 1966. (The Sherry Brothers from Fairfax HS in West Hollywood were the other two.)

    They had one Jewish star since, Shawn Green, and some number of half-Jews like Joc Pedersen.

    The Dodgers haven't had many Mexican stars other than Fernando Valenzuela. Adrian Gonzales and some half Mexicans like Andre Ethier. Their second string catcher Austin Barnes is half Mexican.

    The Dodgers would love to find another Koufax or Valenzuela, whom they made a fortune off of, but they are hard to find.

    , @Anonymous
    @James J O'Meara

    Well it's like horse-racing. Nobody cares about the nationality of a particular horse, only how fast it can run.

  150. @prime noticer
    i wonder if dorky, unathletic guys were writing the same exact thing all the way back in Rome and Greece. seems like a rite of passage for the intellectual or social loser types who realize they hate how popular and respected and rich the athletes are.

    this is in contrast to the dorky, unathletic guys who LOVE sports, and make it one of their central focuses in life. the world is filled with guys smarter and richer than anybody on Unz who could never play a sport, but have poured millions of dollars into sports.

    sorry Orwells of the world, the sports people are mostly correct, and the Orwells are just bitter losers. pretty much every team owner is a dorky, unathletic guy who is a billionaire self made winner who loves sports. is this where the Orwell crowd talks about how Larry Ellison is just a mouth breathing sports fan moron? that 1600 SAT Paul Allen was a run of the mill punter down at the pub shouting at the television? President Donald Trump was just some McDonald's worker with basketball posters on his wall?

    non-athletes reaction to sports seems to mostly be divided into these two groups and based on how successful they are in their own life. there are literally thousands of guys more successful in life than Orwell and the anti-sports crowd who feel exactly the opposite way - including the leadership of the 'smart' countries China, Japan, and Korea, who are crazy for sports.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara

    Says every ex-jock running a car dealership in Omaha.

    BTW, Trump? Are you retarded?

  151. @James J O'Meara
    @Bardon Kaldian

    "why on earth would someone cheer for a team not representing his tribe?"

    Don't know. But it's definitely a White thing. The proprietor of castefootball.us observed long ago that White people will watch anyone playing a sport, but other races/ethnics will only watch "their tribe".

    Meritocracy? Like, "we welcome any high IQ immigrants!"

    Hence, adding ethnics to your team is a no-brainer. You add their people to your paying fans, and the White fans stay. Integrating baseball was an easy business decision.

    EG: the "Brooklyn" Dodgers had several Jewish stars. When the team moved to LA, suddenly Jews couldn't play baseball, only Hispanics.

    The working out of this today in entertainment, politics, etc. is obvious. Whites hire/vote for blacks etc., blacks etc. hire/vote for their own, soon only blacks etc. have jobs/run the country.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    EG: the “Brooklyn” Dodgers had several Jewish stars. When the team moved to LA, suddenly Jews couldn’t play baseball, only Hispanics.

    No. I don’t recall a Jewish star on the Brooklyn Dodgers. Sandy Koufax started there in 1955 but he wasn’t very good until well after the Dodgers moved to L.A. in 1958.

    The LA Dodgers had 3 Jewish players from 1959-1963, with Sandy Koufax being a superstar through 1966. (The Sherry Brothers from Fairfax HS in West Hollywood were the other two.)

    They had one Jewish star since, Shawn Green, and some number of half-Jews like Joc Pedersen.

    The Dodgers haven’t had many Mexican stars other than Fernando Valenzuela. Adrian Gonzales and some half Mexicans like Andre Ethier. Their second string catcher Austin Barnes is half Mexican.

    The Dodgers would love to find another Koufax or Valenzuela, whom they made a fortune off of, but they are hard to find.

  152. @HansT
    About forty years ago, for a college Cross-Cultural Communication course, I wrote a thesis paper comparing tribal ritual warfare in New Guinea with the modern American sports scene. The point was (and remains) that they are essentially the same. Few people ever die in ritual warfare and quite often the contests are called on account of rain to protect the ornate feather headdresses worn by the participants. They are, therefore, less actual war than an opportunity to relieve intrasocietal tensions by directing aggression outward. Sound a bit familiar? I do, however, wish I would have had access to Orwell's essay at that time.

    I later had the opportunity to share these views with John Hannah, famous left guard for the New England Patriots and 8-time ProBowler, at a dinner at which I had invited him to speak ... he was offended and less than overwhelmed, thinking it sounded like 'an egghead theory!' ... oddly so for an offensive guard. Oh well, forest... meet the trees.

    Nevertheless, sports still retain those cultural 'virtues', though without the call to any kind of 'unity' or 'comity'.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Great story about John Hannah.

  153. @Anon
    @njguy73


    The Olympic stopped being an international sporting movement sometime around 1983. It is now an global athletic brand.
     
    Hasn't the Olympics always been an aggregation of sporting federations who just put on their normal world championships using their normal officials and rules? The Olympics brand is and has always been wrapped around that. I don't know if this was true in the very early days, but it's been true since way before 1983.

    The Olympic Committee does have a certain amount of power. When they wanted to add snowboarding to the sports lineup they had trouble dealing with the potheads at the International Snowboarding Federation. The Committee then went to the International Ski Federation, who organize Olympic skiing events, and suggested that if they were to create a snowboarding division the Nagano Olympics would be waiting. One major dreadlocked snowboarder did end up boycotting Nagano, but hey, it's the Olympics, and by 2002 the International Snowboarding Federation had completely disbanded. The sponsors, the money, the careers, the mainstream media: The Olympics will win in the end, except for the major national sports like soccer and basketball.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anon, @njguy73

    Thanks.

  154. @Steve Sailer
    @Ray P

    People used to praise "Shooting an Elephant" for its leftist sentiments, but I always thought that the obvious message was: Us animal-loving Englishmen are degrading ourselves by having to rule a bunch of backward Burmese who forced me to shoot the elephant.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Stan Adams, @Jonathan Mason

    It’s a good read.

    https://www.orwellfoundation.com/the-orwell-foundation/orwell/essays-and-other-works/shooting-an-elephant/

    [MORE]

    In Moulmein, in lower Burma, I was hated by large numbers of people – the only time in my life that I have been important enough for this to happen to me. I was sub-divisional police officer of the town, and in an aimless, petty kind of way anti-European feeling was very bitter. No one had the guts to raise a riot, but if a European woman went through the bazaars alone somebody would probably spit betel juice over her dress. As a police officer I was an obvious target and was baited whenever it seemed safe to do so. When a nimble Burman tripped me up on the football field and the referee (another Burman) looked the other way, the crowd yelled with hideous laughter. This happened more than once. In the end the sneering yellow faces of young men that met me everywhere, the insults hooted after me when I was at a safe distance, got badly on my nerves. The young Buddhist priests were the worst of all. There were several thousands of them in the town and none of them seemed to have anything to do except stand on street corners and jeer at Europeans.

    All this was perplexing and upsetting. For at that time I had already made up my mind that imperialism was an evil thing and the sooner I chucked up my job and got out of it the better. Theoretically – and secretly, of course – I was all for the Burmese and all against their oppressors, the British. As for the job I was doing, I hated it more bitterly than I can perhaps make clear. In a job like that you see the dirty work of Empire at close quarters. The wretched prisoners huddling in the stinking cages of the lock-ups, the grey, cowed faces of the long-term convicts, the scarred buttocks of the men who had been Bogged with bamboos – all these oppressed me with an intolerable sense of guilt. But I could get nothing into perspective. I was young and ill-educated and I had had to think out my problems in the utter silence that is imposed on every Englishman in the East. I did not even know that the British Empire is dying, still less did I know that it is a great deal better than the younger empires that are going to supplant it. All I knew was that I was stuck between my hatred of the empire I served and my rage against the evil-spirited little beasts who tried to make my job impossible. With one part of my mind I thought of the British Raj as an unbreakable tyranny, as something clamped down, in saecula saeculorum, upon the will of prostrate peoples; with another part I thought that the greatest joy in the world would be to drive a bayonet into a Buddhist priest’s guts. Feelings like these are the normal by-products of imperialism; ask any Anglo-Indian official, if you can catch him off duty.

  155. @Djkjcgjj
    @Verymuchalive

    I’m pretty sure Orwell didn’t hate Scots or Scotland. He moved to Scotland in his later days, spending some of his final years there, where he wrote “1984”. He hated the snobbery of some rich English people who summered in Scotland, looking down on common English and Scots who couldn’t afford to travel, or vacation in either country.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

    Orwell’s Scotophobia is well-documented. It continues to be played down by his admirers, like you.
    Orwell rented a farmhouse on the island of Jura, where he stayed intermittently between 1946 and January 1949. He finished 1984 there..
    According to a BBC report, he was spending months on the island “to escape the daily grind of journalism and to find a clean environment which doctors thought would help him recover from a dangerous bout of tuberculosis”.

    He left Jura for an English sanatorium in January 1949 and never returned.

  156. Anon[546] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    @njguy73


    The Olympic stopped being an international sporting movement sometime around 1983. It is now an global athletic brand.
     
    Hasn't the Olympics always been an aggregation of sporting federations who just put on their normal world championships using their normal officials and rules? The Olympics brand is and has always been wrapped around that. I don't know if this was true in the very early days, but it's been true since way before 1983.

    The Olympic Committee does have a certain amount of power. When they wanted to add snowboarding to the sports lineup they had trouble dealing with the potheads at the International Snowboarding Federation. The Committee then went to the International Ski Federation, who organize Olympic skiing events, and suggested that if they were to create a snowboarding division the Nagano Olympics would be waiting. One major dreadlocked snowboarder did end up boycotting Nagano, but hey, it's the Olympics, and by 2002 the International Snowboarding Federation had completely disbanded. The sponsors, the money, the careers, the mainstream media: The Olympics will win in the end, except for the major national sports like soccer and basketball.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anon, @njguy73

    Long interview with the Norwegian boycotter:

    https://snowboardmag.com/stories/the-olympic-issue-terje-haakonsen-interview

    Fashion was a central issue, apparently!?:

    https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2002-feb-02-sp-olysnow03-story.html

    The Economist on lingering resentments in 2011:

    https://www.economist.com/game-theory/2011/11/22/fis-off

    Courses are worse, more dangerous, schedule is too crowded, no time to learn new tricks:

    https://www.kgw.com/article/sports/olympics/snowboarders-still-hold-reservations-about-olympics/53200818

  157. @David
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Isn't a riot with thousands of dead serious?

    And it wasn't a chariot race, but centuries of enmity between two horse racing franchises. In the first few pages of his meditations, Marcus Aurelius mentions learning from a grandfather (by adoption) not to take sides between the Greens and the Blues.

    The year before the Nika Riots, the Blues (principal victims, at the hands of the Greens), had conspired to sneak weapons into the circus and had killed 3000 Greens.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Has anybody ever figured out if the Blues and the Greens hated each other for some underlying reason such as ethnicity or religion or class of if they just hated each other because it was fun?

    • Replies: @David
    @Steve Sailer

    I don't know. I looked around and Procopius for example refers to manifestations of ethnicity, religion and class as all playing into the conflict. But by his time, the rivalry was two or three hundred years old.

    The organization behind a chariot racing team was call a "factione," origin of our word faction.

    Glancing through The Secret History, this line caught my eye:


    as the authorities in charge of the people did nothing to punish the criminals, these men became very daring; for crime, when encouraged to manifest itself openly, always increases enormously
     

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

  158. @El Dato
    @Achmed E. Newman

    https://mises.org/library/brilliant-confused-radicalism-george-orwell

    Jeff Riggenbach on Orwell's "1984" as an allegory to his experience in edukaschion:

    The will of the headmaster of St. Cyprian's — and the will of his wife, who ran the school with him — was imposed on the students in the form of a series of beatings — beatings administered, sometimes by the headmaster himself, sometimes by certain favored older boys who were, in effect, licensed to beat younger boys. "I … remember, more than once," Orwell writes, "being led out of the room in the middle of a Latin sentence, receiving a beating and then going straight ahead with the same sentence, just like that." All in all, Orwell wrote, attending St. Cyprian's was about "as bad as [being] in an army," but perhaps not quite as bad as being "in prison."

    "There are no laws or clear-cut rules of conduct for Winston Smith to obey; he, like a child, may transgress without meaning to. He must not only do what is right, he must be good."
     

    That's how it works.

    The vehicles for his breakthrough were a short, satirical novel called Animal Farm, which tells of the efforts of the animals at Manor Farm to overthrow their human rulers and establish a communist utopia under the leadership of the pigs — this was published in 1945 — and a much longer, brutally naturalistic novel of a totalitarian future called Nineteen Eighty-four, published in 1949. These two books made Orwell rich, but he was dead from tuberculosis before the winter of 1949–1950 had ended, aged 46, so he had precious little time to spend any of his new riches on anything but medical bills.

    A few years after Orwell's death, as I have noted, his unflattering memoir of his years at St. Cyprian's finally saw print in the United States. And when it did, it became the subject of an essay in the New Yorker by the British journalist Anthony West.

    West noted that "most of [the terrifying things in Nineteen Eighty-four] "clearly derive from the experience described in 'Such, Such Were the Joys.'" At St. Cyprians, West reminds his readers, "the headmaster's wife … seemed to be spying on Orwell all the time" and "seem[ed], by some kind of magical omniscience, to know what every boy does and even what he thinks."
     

    "Stand still, laddy! AOC is watching you!"

    Replies: @Stan Adams

  159. @El Dato
    @Verymuchalive


    Whatever their faults, the SNP have always been a strictly constitutional party.
     
    I guess he saw what was coming:

    SNP adherents telling people what they can't say in public ("unintendedly stirring up hate") and at home ("the exception to the Public Order Act 1986 which allows people to use otherwise illegal language in their own homes should be abolished")

    Humza Yousaf

    ... and Euro-Love to a degree that they want to go their own way and de-Brexit.

    Orwell was essentially a propagandist. You can’t take what he writes at face value.
     
    In retrospect, he had excellent judgement and a deep insight in political and psychological motiviations.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @Verymuchalive

    Today, all mainstream parties in the West are parties in name only. Conservative parties are Conservative In Name Only. Likewise, Liberal parties are LINOs, Socialist SINOs and Nationalist NINOs. All these parties now support a narrow range of Neolib-Neocon-Homoglobalist- Welfarist policies, differing only in degree.

    Parties of the same or similar names 60. 70, 80 years ago were completely different. To lump in decent, traditional nationalists of that period with the present globalist clique known as the SNP is a gross insult to the former.

  160. @Steve Sailer
    @David

    Has anybody ever figured out if the Blues and the Greens hated each other for some underlying reason such as ethnicity or religion or class of if they just hated each other because it was fun?

    Replies: @David

    I don’t know. I looked around and Procopius for example refers to manifestations of ethnicity, religion and class as all playing into the conflict. But by his time, the rivalry was two or three hundred years old.

    The organization behind a chariot racing team was call a “factione,” origin of our word faction.

    Glancing through The Secret History, this line caught my eye:

    as the authorities in charge of the people did nothing to punish the criminals, these men became very daring; for crime, when encouraged to manifest itself openly, always increases enormously

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    @David

    Chariot racing was popular in a number of large cities of the Roman Empire. The dominance of the Blues and the Greens goes back to Ancient Rome itself, hundreds of years before the Foundation of Constantinople (324AD). It's why Procopius uses a Latin word "Factio" and not a Greek word.
    Here's a short, informative article on the subject.
    https://penelope.uchicago.edu/~grout/encyclopaedia_romana/circusmaximus/factiones.html

  161. @slumber_j
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Is that's what Orwell is alluding to here--women's sexual excitement by violence? I guess it must be, although I haven't known any women who respond to combat sports that way, at least not overtly: generally they just wince and leave the room.

    I've always liked boxing, but I remember my maternal grandfather (who was himself very athletic) talking about how much he hated taking business associates to boxing matches in Chicago, starting in the 1930s. He was a lawyer and had ended up becoming house counsel to one of the biggest printing companies in the US, and at some point his portfolio came to include running a big paper mill subsidiary in Appleton, WI. Big printing and paper customers expected my grandfather to take them to the big fight, and the savagery of the fans appalled him: being among them was easily his least favorite aspect of his working life.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @prosa123, @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Is that’s what Orwell is alluding to here–women’s sexual excitement by violence?

    I don’t see what else he could possibly be referring to. Those saucy wenches were disgracing themselves!

  162. @al gore rhythms
    @Clyde

    If Orwell had lived to the age of 76 or so we could have seen an Orwell essay on Punk rock.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Speculating about Orwell’s political evolution if he’d lived to, say, 1990 is fun.

  163. @Trinity
    @El Dato

    As much as I think Jack Johnson is one of the most overrated boxers of all time, I have to own up and say he has to be one of the most courageous. Not so much in his selection of opponents, Johnson largely built his reputation on feasting on old and washed up Jim Jeffries who had to lose 100lbs and hadn't fought in 5 years, and beating up overstuffed middleweights like 5'7.5" 180lbs Tommy Burns and even smaller 5'7" Sam Langford. Another fight that Johnson made his reputation on was his fight with the middleweight champion at the time, Stanley Ketchel who stood all of 5'9" and barely scaled above the middleweight limit. The "fight" was agreed to be a rehearsed sparring bout until Ketchel decided to try and land a lucky punch. Johnson would knock out several of Ketchel's teeth after being floored by Ketchel.

    Lack of quality opponents aside, Johnson standing in there and fighting with tens of thousands of angry White spectators cursing him, taunting him, and begging for his blood would unnerve a mere mortal. I cannot think of any boxer past or present who could have dealt with that hostility and prevailed most of the time. Greg Haugen, another ballsy fighter, would brave over well over 100,000 hostile Mexicans when he went down to Mexico to take on legendary Julio Cesar Chavez. Haugen had angered the rabid Mexican fans and Chavez by suggesting Julio's record consisted of beating Mexican cab drivers. I am not sure that even Johnson faced that hostile of a crowd and to my knowledge even his fight with Willard and Jeffries did not approach well over 100,000 spectators.

    Replies: @Ed Case

    Johnson would knock out several of Ketchel’s teeth after being floored by Ketchel.

    Gunboat Smith said that ‘fight’ was a stew and that Ketchel won a couple of thousand off Johnson playing cards later that night [from In This Corner: 40 Champions Tell Their Story].
    Johnson beat all the best black heavyweightys before he beat Burns.
    Sure, he wouldn’t meet them after that, but as he said, there was no gate for 2 blacks fighting.

  164. ‘Tinku’ is a form of mock warfare between Andean villages in which combatants are still occasionally killed. Presumably it’s becoming less and less violent and will eventually be classifiable as a ‘sport’:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tinku

  165. @stillCARealist
    @Veracitor

    I think it's just that we all turned off our tv's and started staring at our phones and computers. Sports action doesn't really work on a small screen and when you're on the computer you're either working or playing a game (reading blogs is part of game-playing). Our new teams are our favorite youtubers or podcasters.

    what's funny is that it took so many of us so long to realize how boring the NBA is. I haven't watched a game in almost 5 years and I don't miss it at all.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Has hockey gotten more watchable on big screen TVs. I couldn’t follow the puck on 19″ cathode ray tube TVs.

    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve, I think you asked this question (and the thread had an interesting discussion on it) 2 or 3 years ago. It's ok; my memory plays tricks on me every now and then too...

    , @JimDandy
    @Steve Sailer

    Absolutely. 100%. In the last decade or so it became my favorite sport to watch on television. Now, with occasion exceptions, it's the only sport I watch on television.

  166. @anon
    @Tono Bungay

    Whatever one might think of the sports themselves, what are we to think about the competition to host the Olympic Games?

    Pretty obvious, isn't it?

    https://media.tenor.com/images/0872dddbf89c3ebd53f1f6cf05d7470a/tenor.gif

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The Olympics are becoming less popular to host, so the IOC rather than try to extract bribes and fancy new stadiums from competing countries, gave the next two Olympics to two old reliable giant cities with tons of existing stadia: Paris in 2024 and Los Angeles in 2028. About 30 years ago Paris built a 90,000 seat super stadium where the stands are on rails so it can host both World Cup finals and Olympic track. So it’s about time the Olympics went there after decades of the IOC extracting more bribes and concessions by saying to rivals, “Well, the obvious choice is Paris, but perhaps …”

    So it’s about time.

    And L.A. has the Coliseum and Rose Bowl, which are primitive 1920s stadiums but historic, plus Dodger and Angel Stadiums, which are by now historic too.

    It’s actually not that hard to host the Olympics or World Cup if you don’t feel obligated to build a whole bunch of new stadiums. L.A. did it on the cheap in 1984 and made a big profit.

    • Replies: @WIzard of Oz
    @Steve Sailer

    I didn't even know that Brisbane (capital of the state of Queensland) was bidding for the 2032 Olymoic Games, but, suddenly, last week, heard that it had "won". I am not aware of it having much adaptable infrastructure though I daresay its biggest Australian Rules football ground might be big enough as Mrlbourne's dual purpose Melbourne Cricket Ground was in 1956. Still, I remember the then head of the federal Treasury and I agreeing, in 1979, when Melbourne was again bidding for the Olympics that it would be better to lose it did: I think to Atlanta or the one after). So long as the Chinese go on buying our iron ore I suppose we will be able to afford a bit more of this conspicuous national consumption.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ed Case

    , @anon
    @Steve Sailer

    The Olympics are becoming less popular to host,

    That's kind of like writing "The MLB all-star game is becoming less popular to host", yet the cries and moans out of Atlanta merchants / restauranteurs / hoteliers this year were quite audible.

    The Olympics are a money making event for many in the host cities, just not necessarily for the cities themselves. All that said, I totally agree that it is more than about time the wealthy countries stopped building entire Olympic venues & villages. Even when the construction industry whines, it's not needed. It is not really infrastructure development.

  167. @Bragadocious
    The English are more responsible than anyone for poisoning international sports, Heysel Stadium in 1985 being exhibit A.

    They've even infected the Ryder Cup with their wankerish behavior, although in that case they suddenly put on their "European" hats and for 3 days pretend that they don't despise Spain and Germany. Then when it's over these ridiculous Brexiteers return to their regularly scheduled programming.

    Replies: @WIzard of Oz, @Anonymous

    I’ve tried hard to learn something from this but the only plain unassailable inference is that you don’t like the English, or at least your conception of the English. I wonder if you know any or could even tell the difference between different
    Scottish, Welsh, Irish and English accents, regional and class differences etc.

  168. @AKAHorace
    @El Dato


    Gee I don’t know Alfred. You are attacking the man for idealistically taking up arms against fascism? By that reasoning anyone on the Allied side who didn’t drop weapons Iraq style at the first sight of a Panzer III is probably in a state of sin, too.

    1) Narrowly escapes a Stalinist purge in a meatgrinder where he idealistically assumed the Reds were the good guys (having signed up with the non-Stalinist part of the Reds purely by accident)
     

    Of course there are other works warning about the problems of collectivism and manipulative uniparties, but for the english-speaking works, 1984 is the reference.

    Hi Dato,

    To add to your post, one reason that 1984 is so good is that parts of it are autobiographical. Orwell had briefly been a political prisoner in Barcelona (uncertain of his fate) and a policeman in Burma. His work during the war was with the BBC, where there were constant struggles about what he could and could not say and what would be good propaganda. In London, during the war there were the constant discomforts of rationing as well as V2 rockets ("steamers").

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Orwell had briefly been a political prisoner in Barcelona (uncertain of his fate)…

    He wrote about all this in Homage to Catalonia. There’s no allegory there though, as this book was a diary, not a novel. Because he was caught in the mass confusion in the local struggles between one Communist sect and another, Orwell had not realized that this struggle in Barcelona was part of a bigger picture, a big Commie on Commie struggle in the USSR, who supported the “Republicans”. That is, even by the end of the book, which is only a year later or so, as he wrote it up in France, I think, on the way home, he didn’t know the big picture.

    One thing Orwell wrote was that he had a lot of fondness for the Spanish people in general. When the police from one party went to search his apartment for weapons, no matter what else they tore up, they would not ask his wife to move off the bed and left it undisturbed. (Yeah, he brought his wife with him to a civil war. Who TF does that?)

    • Replies: @WIzard of Oz
    @Achmed E. Newman

    You old-fashioned chap! Couldn't a wife insist on going with him? Or maybe leading the way and dragging him along too?

    , @AKAHorace
    @Achmed E. Newman


    One thing Orwell wrote was that he had a lot of fondness for the Spanish people in general. When the police from one party went to search his apartment for weapons, no matter what else they tore up, they would not ask his wife to move off the bed and left it undisturbed. (Yeah, he brought his wife with him to a civil war. Who TF does that?)
     
    His wife was back in Barcelona away from the front. So he assumed that she would be safe there, not realizing that a second civil war would break out between POUM/anarchists and the communists. Not quite as foolish as you make it sound.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  169. @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    The Olympics are becoming less popular to host, so the IOC rather than try to extract bribes and fancy new stadiums from competing countries, gave the next two Olympics to two old reliable giant cities with tons of existing stadia: Paris in 2024 and Los Angeles in 2028. About 30 years ago Paris built a 90,000 seat super stadium where the stands are on rails so it can host both World Cup finals and Olympic track. So it's about time the Olympics went there after decades of the IOC extracting more bribes and concessions by saying to rivals, "Well, the obvious choice is Paris, but perhaps ..."

    So it's about time.

    And L.A. has the Coliseum and Rose Bowl, which are primitive 1920s stadiums but historic, plus Dodger and Angel Stadiums, which are by now historic too.

    It's actually not that hard to host the Olympics or World Cup if you don't feel obligated to build a whole bunch of new stadiums. L.A. did it on the cheap in 1984 and made a big profit.

    Replies: @WIzard of Oz, @anon

    I didn’t even know that Brisbane (capital of the state of Queensland) was bidding for the 2032 Olymoic Games, but, suddenly, last week, heard that it had “won”. I am not aware of it having much adaptable infrastructure though I daresay its biggest Australian Rules football ground might be big enough as Mrlbourne’s dual purpose Melbourne Cricket Ground was in 1956. Still, I remember the then head of the federal Treasury and I agreeing, in 1979, when Melbourne was again bidding for the Olympics that it would be better to lose it did: I think to Atlanta or the one after). So long as the Chinese go on buying our iron ore I suppose we will be able to afford a bit more of this conspicuous national consumption.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @WIzard of Oz

    Brisbane?

    That was the only bidder for the 2032 Olympics, although deciding 11 years ahead of time seems excessive.

    Brisbane is at only 27 degrees south, and agreed to the mid-winter late July time period that NBC in America likes due to the lack of other competition on TV. Melbourne 1956 and Sydney 2000 needed to use later in the year time slots that competed with the NFL on US TV.

    Australia is a great Olympics country, so I could see going back there a third time. On the other hand, Brisbane is kind of like putting the Olympics in San Diego: a nice, fast-growing place but only the third city of California, one without much history.

    OK, I can see the IOC's logic: Brisbane won't have BLM riots, even in 2032. Maybe we'll then go to Auckland in 2036 and Perth in 2040. Reykjavik in 2044.

    Replies: @Captain Tripps

    , @Ed Case
    @WIzard of Oz

    Brisbane has 4 Stadiums, the Brisbane Cricket Ground which holds 30,000, Lang Park which holds 52,000, ANZ Stadium at MacGregor [there was an AC/DC concert there a couple of years ago] and the Brisbane Exhibition Ground, which hosted Test Cricket in 1928 and 1931.

    The Exhibition Ground is the only one that hasn't been rebuilt in the last 20 years.
    For anyone who's never been here, Brisbane is the prettiest of the Australian Capital cities and the best served by freeways and tunnels.

  170. @Achmed E. Newman
    @AKAHorace


    Orwell had briefly been a political prisoner in Barcelona (uncertain of his fate)...
     
    He wrote about all this in Homage to Catalonia. There's no allegory there though, as this book was a diary, not a novel. Because he was caught in the mass confusion in the local struggles between one Communist sect and another, Orwell had not realized that this struggle in Barcelona was part of a bigger picture, a big Commie on Commie struggle in the USSR, who supported the "Republicans". That is, even by the end of the book, which is only a year later or so, as he wrote it up in France, I think, on the way home, he didn't know the big picture.

    One thing Orwell wrote was that he had a lot of fondness for the Spanish people in general. When the police from one party went to search his apartment for weapons, no matter what else they tore up, they would not ask his wife to move off the bed and left it undisturbed. (Yeah, he brought his wife with him to a civil war. Who TF does that?)

    Replies: @WIzard of Oz, @AKAHorace

    You old-fashioned chap! Couldn’t a wife insist on going with him? Or maybe leading the way and dragging him along too?

  171. @anon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Perhaps you could spend a few minutes reviewing Florida gun law, specifically focused on the state concealed carry permit regulations?

    Or just do a Duck search on her name?

    smh

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Thanks, #364. I had made an assumption he, then she, was a Fed. My apologies. That said, this Fried character is just a pettier tyrant rather than a bigger tyrant. The CCP licensees are some of the least criminal group in the country – way ahead of cops. Note that none of the Jan 6th crowd shot and murdered a woman from a few feet, and got off with not even an arrest, like Michael Leroy Byrd.

    The revoking of these licenses shows why it’s important for State to go to Constitutional Carry. As of now 20 already have!

    This is the Florida Commission regarding Jan 6th:

    “The deeply disturbing events that occurred at our nation’s Capitol on January 6th were sedition, treason, and domestic terrorism – and those individuals involved in the insurrection must be held accountable for attempting to subvert our democratic process,” Fried said in a news release.

    Pernicious, ridiculous lies as if they were told by the rulers of Oceania itself.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Achmed E. Newman

    OK "States" plural and "Commissioner"!

    , @anon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I had made an assumption he, then she, was a Fed.

    Why would you assume that? Seriously, a quick search takes seconds, far less time than it does to type out a rant.

    ...this Fried character is just a pettier tyrant rather than a bigger tyrant.

    She's just another pawn in the larger civil conflict.

  172. @WIzard of Oz
    @Steve Sailer

    I didn't even know that Brisbane (capital of the state of Queensland) was bidding for the 2032 Olymoic Games, but, suddenly, last week, heard that it had "won". I am not aware of it having much adaptable infrastructure though I daresay its biggest Australian Rules football ground might be big enough as Mrlbourne's dual purpose Melbourne Cricket Ground was in 1956. Still, I remember the then head of the federal Treasury and I agreeing, in 1979, when Melbourne was again bidding for the Olympics that it would be better to lose it did: I think to Atlanta or the one after). So long as the Chinese go on buying our iron ore I suppose we will be able to afford a bit more of this conspicuous national consumption.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ed Case

    Brisbane?

    That was the only bidder for the 2032 Olympics, although deciding 11 years ahead of time seems excessive.

    Brisbane is at only 27 degrees south, and agreed to the mid-winter late July time period that NBC in America likes due to the lack of other competition on TV. Melbourne 1956 and Sydney 2000 needed to use later in the year time slots that competed with the NFL on US TV.

    Australia is a great Olympics country, so I could see going back there a third time. On the other hand, Brisbane is kind of like putting the Olympics in San Diego: a nice, fast-growing place but only the third city of California, one without much history.

    OK, I can see the IOC’s logic: Brisbane won’t have BLM riots, even in 2032. Maybe we’ll then go to Auckland in 2036 and Perth in 2040. Reykjavik in 2044.

    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
    @Steve Sailer

    Olympics Committee needs to think much further outside the box, I like the choice of Brisbane; and any other up and coming 2nd or 3rd tier city in relatively prosperous countries. Barcelona in '92 was a great choice. All the big, established global cities have already hosted the Games, some multiple times. The Committee should consider places like Venice, Marseille, Bangkok, etc. for the Summer Games. Although, the Winter Games are held in cool, off-the-beaten path places (but the Winter Games are more a niche thing).

    But I think the Aussies should have offered up Darwin, which would be much more pleasant for competition during the southern hemisphere winter than Brisbane. Or maybe even Perth.

    Yeah, yeah, I know; established infrastructure to support the games, blah, blah, blah. Hey if the Brazilians can get Rio up to speed for 2016, the Aussies can get Darwin or Perth up to speed by 2032!

  173. @Achmed E. Newman
    @anon

    Thanks, #364. I had made an assumption he, then she, was a Fed. My apologies. That said, this Fried character is just a pettier tyrant rather than a bigger tyrant. The CCP licensees are some of the least criminal group in the country - way ahead of cops. Note that none of the Jan 6th crowd shot and murdered a woman from a few feet, and got off with not even an arrest, like Michael Leroy Byrd.

    The revoking of these licenses shows why it's important for State to go to Constitutional Carry. As of now 20 already have!

    This is the Florida Commission regarding Jan 6th:


    “The deeply disturbing events that occurred at our nation’s Capitol on January 6th were sedition, treason, and domestic terrorism – and those individuals involved in the insurrection must be held accountable for attempting to subvert our democratic process,” Fried said in a news release.
     
    Pernicious, ridiculous lies as if they were told by the rulers of Oceania itself.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @anon

    OK “States” plural and “Commissioner“!

  174. @Anonymous
    @Bill P

    He was very tall. Are big guys at a disadvantage in this game?

    Replies: @Mr Mox

    He was very tall. Are big guys at a disadvantage in this game?

    Sometimes, yes.

    • Replies: @Bubba
    @Mr Mox

    Those guys look like a group of over-excited, effete Hollywood homosexuals at the 1979 Academy Awards ceremony finding out that "La Cage aux Folles" beat out "The Deer Hunter" for Best Movie.

  175. @Anon
    @njguy73


    The Olympic stopped being an international sporting movement sometime around 1983. It is now an global athletic brand.
     
    Hasn't the Olympics always been an aggregation of sporting federations who just put on their normal world championships using their normal officials and rules? The Olympics brand is and has always been wrapped around that. I don't know if this was true in the very early days, but it's been true since way before 1983.

    The Olympic Committee does have a certain amount of power. When they wanted to add snowboarding to the sports lineup they had trouble dealing with the potheads at the International Snowboarding Federation. The Committee then went to the International Ski Federation, who organize Olympic skiing events, and suggested that if they were to create a snowboarding division the Nagano Olympics would be waiting. One major dreadlocked snowboarder did end up boycotting Nagano, but hey, it's the Olympics, and by 2002 the International Snowboarding Federation had completely disbanded. The sponsors, the money, the careers, the mainstream media: The Olympics will win in the end, except for the major national sports like soccer and basketball.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anon, @njguy73

    What I mean by “brand” is “marketing tool” or “way of selling stuff.”

  176. @Achmed E. Newman
    @AKAHorace


    Orwell had briefly been a political prisoner in Barcelona (uncertain of his fate)...
     
    He wrote about all this in Homage to Catalonia. There's no allegory there though, as this book was a diary, not a novel. Because he was caught in the mass confusion in the local struggles between one Communist sect and another, Orwell had not realized that this struggle in Barcelona was part of a bigger picture, a big Commie on Commie struggle in the USSR, who supported the "Republicans". That is, even by the end of the book, which is only a year later or so, as he wrote it up in France, I think, on the way home, he didn't know the big picture.

    One thing Orwell wrote was that he had a lot of fondness for the Spanish people in general. When the police from one party went to search his apartment for weapons, no matter what else they tore up, they would not ask his wife to move off the bed and left it undisturbed. (Yeah, he brought his wife with him to a civil war. Who TF does that?)

    Replies: @WIzard of Oz, @AKAHorace

    One thing Orwell wrote was that he had a lot of fondness for the Spanish people in general. When the police from one party went to search his apartment for weapons, no matter what else they tore up, they would not ask his wife to move off the bed and left it undisturbed. (Yeah, he brought his wife with him to a civil war. Who TF does that?)

    His wife was back in Barcelona away from the front. So he assumed that she would be safe there, not realizing that a second civil war would break out between POUM/anarchists and the communists. Not quite as foolish as you make it sound.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @AKAHorace

    Yeah, I just got done reading it a few months ago. However, the war was spread all over that part of Spain. How did he know that the other side would not take Barcelona? I suppose it'd be like leaving your family in Richmond, Virginia during the War Between the States. You don't count on your side losing. That is, except that she came with him from England.

    Granted, there was still the idea that the fighting would only be between combatants, with civilians left alone. Those ideas went by the wayside soon after ...

    Replies: @AKAHorace

  177. @AKAHorace
    @Achmed E. Newman


    One thing Orwell wrote was that he had a lot of fondness for the Spanish people in general. When the police from one party went to search his apartment for weapons, no matter what else they tore up, they would not ask his wife to move off the bed and left it undisturbed. (Yeah, he brought his wife with him to a civil war. Who TF does that?)
     
    His wife was back in Barcelona away from the front. So he assumed that she would be safe there, not realizing that a second civil war would break out between POUM/anarchists and the communists. Not quite as foolish as you make it sound.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Yeah, I just got done reading it a few months ago. However, the war was spread all over that part of Spain. How did he know that the other side would not take Barcelona? I suppose it’d be like leaving your family in Richmond, Virginia during the War Between the States. You don’t count on your side losing. That is, except that she came with him from England.

    Granted, there was still the idea that the fighting would only be between combatants, with civilians left alone. Those ideas went by the wayside soon after …

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Yeah, I just got done reading it a few months ago. However, the war was spread all over that part of Spain. How did he know that the other side would not take Barcelona? I suppose it’d be like leaving your family in Richmond, Virginia during the War Between the States. You don’t count on your side losing. That is, except that she came with him from England.
     
    The most recent war fought between modern states was the Great War, a slow moving war with trenches and advances of a few kilometres a day at most. From Orwells description in Homage to Catalonia this also seems to have been the case on section of the front. So having your wife in Barcelona probably seemed safe (although I read somewhere that she was unfaithful to him).

    She may also have wanted to be there for ideological reasons. Orwell has a good description of the revolutionary enthusiasm of Barcelona at the time. To both Orwell and his wife the Republicans were the good guys, so the idea that anything could go wrong within their movement was inconceivable.
  178. Nerds shouldn’t be judging sports any more than Joe Namath should be discussing vapor lock.

    • Replies: @Bubba
    @Sick of Orcs

    Here you go...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ym-4Dnqyz-U

  179. Today’s Olympics have little to do with nations. Team GB has even adopted ‘unity in diversity’ as the theme for Tokyo.

    At the 1984 Los Angeles Games they at least presented Francis Morgan Ayodélé Thompson, a part Nigerian mulatto, as an English decathlete competing against a tough West German rival in the form of Jürgen Hingsen.

    37 years later Japan has Naomi Osaka. However, to normies she is a hāfu like Sean Lennon. Koreans have a similar term.

  180. @Bill P
    Orwell's distaste for sports has its origins in his childhood. He was lousy at sports and got roughed up when he played. He really hated football (soccer).

    Frankly, I can tell from photos that he would have been an easy (and amusing) tackle.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jonathan Mason, @Anonymous, @Djkjcgjj, @TheJester

    Although I can be competitive and intimidating when it MATTERS, I have a different reason for disliking competitive games and sports … precisely because THEY DON’T MATTER. Lacking a reason, I feel uncomfortable with the feelings aroused in undoing my competitors … or occasionally finding myself similarly undone FOR NO REASON. Hence, no chess, card games, or competitive sports in my life. Racing against the clock as a measure of performance when riding my bicycle or swimming is a completely different matter.

    Carrying this further, I find it puzzling how the French, let’s say, can identify with a soccer team that consists wholly of African players. What connections do the Africans have with the French? (I increasingly find the same void with American NFL teams.) I grasp for connections … but always find that the connections suggest pathologies of one kind or another.

  181. @epebble
    @guest007

    Rice is primarily a STEM school, hence there is no Zero-sum mindset prevalent in Ivies. Similar to Caltech.

    Replies: @guest007

    Rice University has 4,000 undergraduates. Cal tech has 1,000. Not exactly the same type of schools considering that Rice plays Division I football.

    A good comparison is the University of Central Florida has 57,000 undergraduates almost the same number as the entire Ivy Leagues. As an academic pointed out, one does not change society by admitting a few more women or minorities to the Ivy Leagues.

  182. @Steve Sailer
    @stillCARealist

    Has hockey gotten more watchable on big screen TVs. I couldn't follow the puck on 19" cathode ray tube TVs.

    Replies: @Captain Tripps, @JimDandy

    Steve, I think you asked this question (and the thread had an interesting discussion on it) 2 or 3 years ago. It’s ok; my memory plays tricks on me every now and then too…

  183. Anonymous[235] • Disclaimer says:
    @James J O'Meara
    @Bardon Kaldian

    "why on earth would someone cheer for a team not representing his tribe?"

    Don't know. But it's definitely a White thing. The proprietor of castefootball.us observed long ago that White people will watch anyone playing a sport, but other races/ethnics will only watch "their tribe".

    Meritocracy? Like, "we welcome any high IQ immigrants!"

    Hence, adding ethnics to your team is a no-brainer. You add their people to your paying fans, and the White fans stay. Integrating baseball was an easy business decision.

    EG: the "Brooklyn" Dodgers had several Jewish stars. When the team moved to LA, suddenly Jews couldn't play baseball, only Hispanics.

    The working out of this today in entertainment, politics, etc. is obvious. Whites hire/vote for blacks etc., blacks etc. hire/vote for their own, soon only blacks etc. have jobs/run the country.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    Well it’s like horse-racing. Nobody cares about the nationality of a particular horse, only how fast it can run.

  184. @Steve Sailer
    @WIzard of Oz

    Brisbane?

    That was the only bidder for the 2032 Olympics, although deciding 11 years ahead of time seems excessive.

    Brisbane is at only 27 degrees south, and agreed to the mid-winter late July time period that NBC in America likes due to the lack of other competition on TV. Melbourne 1956 and Sydney 2000 needed to use later in the year time slots that competed with the NFL on US TV.

    Australia is a great Olympics country, so I could see going back there a third time. On the other hand, Brisbane is kind of like putting the Olympics in San Diego: a nice, fast-growing place but only the third city of California, one without much history.

    OK, I can see the IOC's logic: Brisbane won't have BLM riots, even in 2032. Maybe we'll then go to Auckland in 2036 and Perth in 2040. Reykjavik in 2044.

    Replies: @Captain Tripps

    Olympics Committee needs to think much further outside the box, I like the choice of Brisbane; and any other up and coming 2nd or 3rd tier city in relatively prosperous countries. Barcelona in ’92 was a great choice. All the big, established global cities have already hosted the Games, some multiple times. The Committee should consider places like Venice, Marseille, Bangkok, etc. for the Summer Games. Although, the Winter Games are held in cool, off-the-beaten path places (but the Winter Games are more a niche thing).

    But I think the Aussies should have offered up Darwin, which would be much more pleasant for competition during the southern hemisphere winter than Brisbane. Or maybe even Perth.

    Yeah, yeah, I know; established infrastructure to support the games, blah, blah, blah. Hey if the Brazilians can get Rio up to speed for 2016, the Aussies can get Darwin or Perth up to speed by 2032!

  185. anon[193] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    The Olympics are becoming less popular to host, so the IOC rather than try to extract bribes and fancy new stadiums from competing countries, gave the next two Olympics to two old reliable giant cities with tons of existing stadia: Paris in 2024 and Los Angeles in 2028. About 30 years ago Paris built a 90,000 seat super stadium where the stands are on rails so it can host both World Cup finals and Olympic track. So it's about time the Olympics went there after decades of the IOC extracting more bribes and concessions by saying to rivals, "Well, the obvious choice is Paris, but perhaps ..."

    So it's about time.

    And L.A. has the Coliseum and Rose Bowl, which are primitive 1920s stadiums but historic, plus Dodger and Angel Stadiums, which are by now historic too.

    It's actually not that hard to host the Olympics or World Cup if you don't feel obligated to build a whole bunch of new stadiums. L.A. did it on the cheap in 1984 and made a big profit.

    Replies: @WIzard of Oz, @anon

    The Olympics are becoming less popular to host,

    That’s kind of like writing “The MLB all-star game is becoming less popular to host”, yet the cries and moans out of Atlanta merchants / restauranteurs / hoteliers this year were quite audible.

    The Olympics are a money making event for many in the host cities, just not necessarily for the cities themselves. All that said, I totally agree that it is more than about time the wealthy countries stopped building entire Olympic venues & villages. Even when the construction industry whines, it’s not needed. It is not really infrastructure development.

  186. anon[193] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    @anon

    Thanks, #364. I had made an assumption he, then she, was a Fed. My apologies. That said, this Fried character is just a pettier tyrant rather than a bigger tyrant. The CCP licensees are some of the least criminal group in the country - way ahead of cops. Note that none of the Jan 6th crowd shot and murdered a woman from a few feet, and got off with not even an arrest, like Michael Leroy Byrd.

    The revoking of these licenses shows why it's important for State to go to Constitutional Carry. As of now 20 already have!

    This is the Florida Commission regarding Jan 6th:


    “The deeply disturbing events that occurred at our nation’s Capitol on January 6th were sedition, treason, and domestic terrorism – and those individuals involved in the insurrection must be held accountable for attempting to subvert our democratic process,” Fried said in a news release.
     
    Pernicious, ridiculous lies as if they were told by the rulers of Oceania itself.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @anon

    I had made an assumption he, then she, was a Fed.

    Why would you assume that? Seriously, a quick search takes seconds, far less time than it does to type out a rant.

    …this Fried character is just a pettier tyrant rather than a bigger tyrant.

    She’s just another pawn in the larger civil conflict.

  187. Anonymous[216] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bragadocious
    The English are more responsible than anyone for poisoning international sports, Heysel Stadium in 1985 being exhibit A.

    They've even infected the Ryder Cup with their wankerish behavior, although in that case they suddenly put on their "European" hats and for 3 days pretend that they don't despise Spain and Germany. Then when it's over these ridiculous Brexiteers return to their regularly scheduled programming.

    Replies: @WIzard of Oz, @Anonymous

    Bollocks!

  188. @Sick of Orcs
    Nerds shouldn't be judging sports any more than Joe Namath should be discussing vapor lock.

    Replies: @Bubba

    Here you go…

  189. @Mr Mox
    @Anonymous

    He was very tall. Are big guys at a disadvantage in this game?

    Sometimes, yes.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2IDUXLvgcU&ab_channel=GeoBeatsAnimals

    Replies: @Bubba

    Those guys look like a group of over-excited, effete Hollywood homosexuals at the 1979 Academy Awards ceremony finding out that “La Cage aux Folles” beat out “The Deer Hunter” for Best Movie.

  190. @WIzard of Oz
    @Steve Sailer

    I didn't even know that Brisbane (capital of the state of Queensland) was bidding for the 2032 Olymoic Games, but, suddenly, last week, heard that it had "won". I am not aware of it having much adaptable infrastructure though I daresay its biggest Australian Rules football ground might be big enough as Mrlbourne's dual purpose Melbourne Cricket Ground was in 1956. Still, I remember the then head of the federal Treasury and I agreeing, in 1979, when Melbourne was again bidding for the Olympics that it would be better to lose it did: I think to Atlanta or the one after). So long as the Chinese go on buying our iron ore I suppose we will be able to afford a bit more of this conspicuous national consumption.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ed Case

    Brisbane has 4 Stadiums, the Brisbane Cricket Ground which holds 30,000, Lang Park which holds 52,000, ANZ Stadium at MacGregor [there was an AC/DC concert there a couple of years ago] and the Brisbane Exhibition Ground, which hosted Test Cricket in 1928 and 1931.

    The Exhibition Ground is the only one that hasn’t been rebuilt in the last 20 years.
    For anyone who’s never been here, Brisbane is the prettiest of the Australian Capital cities and the best served by freeways and tunnels.

  191. @David
    @Steve Sailer

    I don't know. I looked around and Procopius for example refers to manifestations of ethnicity, religion and class as all playing into the conflict. But by his time, the rivalry was two or three hundred years old.

    The organization behind a chariot racing team was call a "factione," origin of our word faction.

    Glancing through The Secret History, this line caught my eye:


    as the authorities in charge of the people did nothing to punish the criminals, these men became very daring; for crime, when encouraged to manifest itself openly, always increases enormously
     

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

    Chariot racing was popular in a number of large cities of the Roman Empire. The dominance of the Blues and the Greens goes back to Ancient Rome itself, hundreds of years before the Foundation of Constantinople (324AD). It’s why Procopius uses a Latin word “Factio” and not a Greek word.
    Here’s a short, informative article on the subject.
    https://penelope.uchicago.edu/~grout/encyclopaedia_romana/circusmaximus/factiones.html

  192. @Achmed E. Newman
    @AKAHorace

    Yeah, I just got done reading it a few months ago. However, the war was spread all over that part of Spain. How did he know that the other side would not take Barcelona? I suppose it'd be like leaving your family in Richmond, Virginia during the War Between the States. You don't count on your side losing. That is, except that she came with him from England.

    Granted, there was still the idea that the fighting would only be between combatants, with civilians left alone. Those ideas went by the wayside soon after ...

    Replies: @AKAHorace

    Yeah, I just got done reading it a few months ago. However, the war was spread all over that part of Spain. How did he know that the other side would not take Barcelona? I suppose it’d be like leaving your family in Richmond, Virginia during the War Between the States. You don’t count on your side losing. That is, except that she came with him from England.

    The most recent war fought between modern states was the Great War, a slow moving war with trenches and advances of a few kilometres a day at most. From Orwells description in Homage to Catalonia this also seems to have been the case on section of the front. So having your wife in Barcelona probably seemed safe (although I read somewhere that she was unfaithful to him).

    She may also have wanted to be there for ideological reasons. Orwell has a good description of the revolutionary enthusiasm of Barcelona at the time. To both Orwell and his wife the Republicans were the good guys, so the idea that anything could go wrong within their movement was inconceivable.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  193. @Steve Sailer
    @stillCARealist

    Has hockey gotten more watchable on big screen TVs. I couldn't follow the puck on 19" cathode ray tube TVs.

    Replies: @Captain Tripps, @JimDandy

    Absolutely. 100%. In the last decade or so it became my favorite sport to watch on television. Now, with occasion exceptions, it’s the only sport I watch on television.

  194. @Steve Sailer
    @Ray P

    People used to praise "Shooting an Elephant" for its leftist sentiments, but I always thought that the obvious message was: Us animal-loving Englishmen are degrading ourselves by having to rule a bunch of backward Burmese who forced me to shoot the elephant.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Stan Adams, @Jonathan Mason

    People used to praise “Shooting an Elephant” for its leftist sentiments, but I always thought that the obvious message was: Us animal-loving Englishmen are degrading ourselves by having to rule a bunch of backward Burmese who forced me to shoot the elephant.

    I think Orwell, who was a police officer at the time, spoke about the universal dilemma faced by law enforcement in having to do things that make no sense so as to please the public (and politicians).

    In the story in question, the elephant, which had run amok in the market place, had blown itself out and was now peacefully grazing, having forgotten about whatever had caused it to go nuts. Orwell was expected, by the custom of the place to now execute the elephant, and in the process destroy a valuable piece of commercial property equivalent to a truck today.

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