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Napoleon Bonaparte, RIP
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The most elegant “handshake link” of a living celebrity to Napoleon Bonaparte, who died 200 years ago this month, is likely via singer Paul McCartney, who was taught to oppose the Vietnam War in 1965 by mathematician Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), who grew up in the house of his grandfather, Prime Minister John Russell (1792-1878), who had a 90 minute interview with Napoleon on Elba in 1814.

There are of course other living people who knew Bertrand Russell, such as, likely, Queen Elizabeth II, but I like the McCartney connection.

Of course, one question is whether all these people who had face to face conversations shook hands. Perhaps etiquette required that the Emperor not shake hands?

Désirée Clary’s sister married Joseph Bonaparte and she became engaged to Napoleon before he broke it off when he fell in love with Josephine de Beauharnais. She eventually married Napoleon’s marshal Bernadotte, who became, curiously enough, the King of Sweden. She was initially an unpopular Queen of Sweden, being a Catholic whose main topic of conversation was how they did things better in Paris. But she couldn’t speak Swedish, which probably helped, and eventually she came to be tolerated as a royal eccentric.

There are probably other such two degrees of separation links to Napoleon.

I just reread Anthony Burgess’s 1974 historical novel, The Napoleon Symphony, which had floored me when I read it in high school or first year of college. Burgess had begun the novel as a screenplay for Stanley Kubrick, after their Beethoven-oriented movie A Clockwork Orange had been a hit in 1971.

Kubrick, being an alpha male movie director, had long wanted to make a biopic of Bonaparte’s life (rather like how after Gladiator was a hit in 2000, Scorsese, Gibson, Luhrman, and Stone all announced plans to make their own long-dreamt of Alexander the Great biopics). In the late 1960s, Kubrick was considering for the title role Ian Holm (Bilbo Baggins) and a rising young actor named Jack Nicholson.

Burgess, a semi-pro classical composer, came up with the clever idea of structuring Napoleon’s life story around Beethoven’s 1804 Third Symphony, the Eroica, which Beethoven had intended to dedicate to First Consul Bonaparte of the French Republic until he crowned himself Emperor. Beethoven then was going to tear up his score, but friends dissuaded him, which was good because the Eroica was a great leap forward both for Beethoven and for music, being both in the classical style of the last half century and the Romantic style of the 19th Century.

Kubrick liked Burgess’s idea but didn’t like his screenplay, so Burgess turned it into a novel.

Rereading Burgess’s book, I found it more difficult going than I had in the 1970s, when I was taking European history courses. For a historical novel, it’s intentionally lacking in exposition, instead plunging directly into dialogue. Burgess seems to assume that, well, of course, you already know who Bessières, Masséna, and Ney were. Morever, the plot follows Beethoven’s musical organization rather than the actual timeline, so the retreat from Russia in 1812 is the second movement and Napoleon’s great triumph at Austerlitz in 1805 is the finale.

Eventually, I got the hang of the book. It’s really quite good. But it did strike me that I must have been a lot smarter when I was 17.

Also, Burgess was considered a genius in the 1970s, one of the most celebrated authors in the English language, on a par with Nabokov, so putting a lot of effort into reading his books was assumed to be his rightful due. Nowadays, you don’t hear much about Burgess other than his Clockwork Orange.

 
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  1. Perhaps etiquette required that the Emperor not shake hands?

    Since Bonaparte was descended from Italian nobility, but not of royal blood, I wonder if that convention applied. He was emperor, ruler of his empire, but not a king, AFAIK.

    This account of Napoleon’s stay in Elba (and numerous visitors) is interesting.

    https://www.napoleon.org/en/history-of-the-two-empires/articles/a-sympathetic-ear-napoleon-elba-and-the-british-from-history-today-1994-vol-44/

    • Replies: @Getaclue
    @PiltdownMan

    He was a very, very smart man...smart enough to avoid Hell at his end:

    https://www.catholictextbookproject.com/post/napoleon-reconciled-with-god-may-5-1821

    , @Polistra
    @PiltdownMan

    Ooh! And Reg was just holding forth about palindromes in the last thread.

    'Elba' is (part of) the second or third-best palindrome of all, I reckon.

    Of course none can touch that other geographical notable...

    http://monovisions.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/vintage-panama-canal-construction-1904-1914-02.jpg

    Replies: @Pericles, @Joe Joe, @Mr. Anon, @Reg Cæsar

    , @epebble
    @PiltdownMan

    Talking of emperors, I once ran into emperor Naruhito

    https://cdn-japantimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/np_file_60863.jpeg

    in 1999, when he was a Crown Prince (Crowned in 2019) while travelling in the Shinkansen (Bullet train) from Tokyo to Kyoto/Osaka. What surprised me was how low key it was. No guns, no metal detectors, nothing. Just about half dozen imperial household help with a pair of golden ropes creating a moving walkway. The rail platform, with a few thousand travelers , was pin-drop silent. Very eerie. Later, I asked one of the onlookers what is happening, he whispered "Prince".

    Replies: @Skyler the Weird

    , @Macon Waters
    @PiltdownMan

    Able was I ere I saw Idris Elba.

  2. Funny – when I was a young man in the 1990s, I was always thought World War Two took place a million years ago.

    Now that I’m older, it seems that World War Two is more contemporary, more relevant and easier to understand. It might have something to do with the ubiquity of YouTube and new video-cleaning technology which makes the older war and political videos more modern-looking.

  3. How about handshake links to George Washington? There’s the famous John Quincy Adams-Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.-JFK link, bring it back one further link and Adams surely would have known Washington. Then the question is whether there are any living people who met Homes (d. 1935.)

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @prosa123

    Mr. Sailer previously described how we can try and establish a link to Newton, and commenter syonredux followed up and did so.


    https://www.unz.com/isteve/how-many-links-from-napoleon-to-a-beatle/?highlight=newton#comment-3866062

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/how-many-links-from-napoleon-to-a-beatle/?highlight=newton#comment-3866657

    , @syonredux
    @prosa123

    Problem with George Washington is that he was notoriously averse to shaking hands; he preferred bowing.

    Replies: @Muggles

  4. Of course, one question is whether all these people who had face to face conversations shook hands.

    It’s safe to assume that anyone documented to have met John L. Sullivan probably shook his hand.

    • Replies: @Orville H. Larson
    @Rapparee

    "Shake the hand that shook the hand of John L. Sullivan!"

  5. Lord John Russell was a midget. And thus potentially eligible for membership of the Lollipop Guild.

    Hope that helps.

  6. Flip says:

    I have never met Napoleon
    But I plan to find the time
    I have never met Napoleon
    But I plan to find the time, yes I do
    ‘Cause he looks so fine upon that hill
    They tell me he was lonely, he’s lonely still
    Those days are gone forever
    Over a long time ago, oh yeah

  7. Sir Paul served under a sergeant.


    That’s quite a reach to Napoleon Bonaparte. Wrong army too.

    BTW, I’ve already mentioned that I am three handshakes away from Adolf Hitler: 1) Wally Schirra, who worked three doors down from my father, 2) Wernher von Braun, 3) Adolf Hitler.

    • Replies: @theo the kraut
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I can beat that, kinda, just two steps: in Rome, on a damp late summer evening at the Tiber shore, the assistant personal librarian to Pope John Paul II chatted me up. Turned out he was cruising and lonely. I couldn't help him with any funny business, but we shook hands eventually, interesting guy. Trivia: he told the Pope about his urges and John Paul was cool with it (the church hates sin, but loves the sinner) he just shouldn't sin, no sweat. He sinned, though, *a lot.* He gave me a tour the next days around the local ecclesiastical cesspool, ethnographically very interesting. Reminds me of the story below, just with cassocks, skullcaps, and lots of funny business in confessionals and elsewhere.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2007/05/the-kingdom-in-the-closet/305774
    The Kingdom in the Closet
    Sodomy is punishable by death in Saudi Arabia, but gay life flourishes there. Why it is “easier to be gay than straight” in a society where everyone, homosexual and otherwise, lives in the closet

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri, @BB753, @Sean, @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Kibernetika
    @Buzz Mohawk

    BTW, I’ve already mentioned that I am three handshakes away from Adolf Hitler: 1) Wally Schirra, who worked three doors down from my father, 2) Wernher von Braun, 3) Adolf Hitler.

    Some family members described to me what it was like seeing that #3 guy in person. There was no handshaking, however, just viewing from a protected distance. There may have been some gestures exchanged, but who knows. I have no opinions on the matter, just stating family history.

    Did you ever get to meet Schirra at your dad's office?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @syonredux
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Come on, what with all the Nazis hiding out in Latin America, aren't we all three handshakes away from Adolph?


    https://twitter.com/PulpLibrarian/status/1390400020390858752

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Pericles, @Joe Stalin

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk


    BTW, I’ve already mentioned that I am three handshakes away from Adolf Hitler...
     
    I've had a couple of encounters with Walter Mondale, which puts me one degree away from everyone from César Chávez to Ronald Reagan to Leonid Brezhnev to Pope Paul VI. And a second, slightly more distant relationship to all of them, as my mother grew up very close to Geraldine Ferraro and would have had some acquaintances in common, if only at the candy store and dress shop. Oh, and a third, as I once e-mailed Peter Robinson, who wrote the "tear down this wall" speech for Reagan.

    Of course, everyone Steve has replied to here or by e-mail is one degree away from Margaret Thatcher, and thus one more from another Pope.

    Speaking of Leonid:

    Sleepy Joe Brezhnev: Learning from the Soviet Experience of Senile Leadership

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @J.Ross, @Ron Mexico, @David In TN

    , @Andrew Callinan
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I'm impressed! My planned comment about being a few handshakes away from Kurt 'n' Courtney and various other dipshits has been rendered shite. You really know how to piss on a man's parade.
    Regards,
    A.C

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  8. How could the Black Beethoven dedicate a symphony to an oppressive white male like Bonaparte?

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Escher

    Well, there's only one logical conclusion - Bonaparte was black too.

  9. @PiltdownMan

    Perhaps etiquette required that the Emperor not shake hands?
     
    Since Bonaparte was descended from Italian nobility, but not of royal blood, I wonder if that convention applied. He was emperor, ruler of his empire, but not a king, AFAIK.

    This account of Napoleon's stay in Elba (and numerous visitors) is interesting.

    https://www.napoleon.org/en/history-of-the-two-empires/articles/a-sympathetic-ear-napoleon-elba-and-the-british-from-history-today-1994-vol-44/

    Replies: @Getaclue, @Polistra, @epebble, @Macon Waters

    He was a very, very smart man…smart enough to avoid Hell at his end:

    https://www.catholictextbookproject.com/post/napoleon-reconciled-with-god-may-5-1821

  10. @prosa123
    How about handshake links to George Washington? There's the famous John Quincy Adams-Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.-JFK link, bring it back one further link and Adams surely would have known Washington. Then the question is whether there are any living people who met Homes (d. 1935.)

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @syonredux

  11. Kubrick, being an alpha male movie director, wanted to make a biopic of Bonaparte’s life

    Instead, he took the forgotten (then-and-now) minor novel Barry Lyndon and got his 19th-Century film fix out of that. I think a Napoleon bio pic would not have worked for Kubrick, he would’ve been hamstrung by history instead of being able to make the film he wanted.

    (rather like how after Gladiator was a hit in 2000, Scorsese, Gibson, Luhrman, and Stone all announced plans to make their own long-dreamt of Alexander the Great biopics).

    Interesting that Gibson made such an announcement, but unsurprisingly he never made it.

    Gibson’s extremely impressive but not-overly-long directorial career has been to make movies out of left field in genres abandoned or unpopular and make them hits. Braveheart hit it big when major sweeping historical epics with large-set battles were nonexistent and the film very likely was the catalyst for Gladiator. The Passion of the Christ was a big-hyped Jesus movie when studios were adverse to them. Hacksaw Ridge was a film celebrating a religious Christian pacifist’s refusal to fight in a war . None of those genres were selling at the time, all three were major hits, critically acclaimed, and are since mainstay repeat viewings.

    Gibson has a keen eye for finding genres that were once popular but have since gone out of style and making it work again. Film genius. I fully expect him to make a big-budget Western action pic one day (perhaps his own version of the O.K. Corral gun fight) and have it break box office numbers.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @R.G. Camara

    Gibson's Apocalypto was an astonishing movie. He spends a little time demonstrating just how far removed his protagonists are from modern man and then manages to force you to identify with their agonies.
    I could not watch it to the end.

  12. Anonymous[143] • Disclaimer says:

    The most elegant “handshake link” of a living celebrity to Napoleon Bonaparte, who died 200 years ago this month, is likely via singer Paul McCartney, who was taught to oppose the Vietnam War in 1965 by mathematician Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), who grew up in the house of his grandfather, Prime Minister John Russell (1792-1878), who had a 90 minute interview with Napoleon on Elba in 1814.

    Another way to look at this is that since these figures must’ve touched themselves down there at some point in their lives, if only to take a leak or what have you, it’s as if McCartney and Napoleon’s swords touched or crossed across time.

    Nixon knew about all this, which is why he didn’t “shake hands with anybody from San Francisco”:

    https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=126236&page=1

    gay people seemed to be next up on Nixon’s hit parade.

    “I won’t shake hands with anybody from San Francisco,” he said on one tape.

  13. @prosa123
    How about handshake links to George Washington? There's the famous John Quincy Adams-Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.-JFK link, bring it back one further link and Adams surely would have known Washington. Then the question is whether there are any living people who met Homes (d. 1935.)

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @syonredux

    Problem with George Washington is that he was notoriously averse to shaking hands; he preferred bowing.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @syonredux


    Problem with George Washington is that he was notoriously averse to shaking hands; he preferred bowing.
     
    My wife and I just watched a recent Jeopardy! show where the question was:

    What did George Washington do to set a precedent at the first presidential inauguration?

    Correct answer: Shake hands. (Rather than the then customary British practice of bowing.)


    So whether or not G. Washington was "adverse" to shaking hands or just, prior to becoming President, followed the custom observed by "British gentlemen."

    At the very minimum, if you elected him President he would shake a few hands at the ceremony.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @syonredux

  14. @Buzz Mohawk
    Sir Paul served under a sergeant.


    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/44/25/8f/44258fca87830ec919b0acec80f2fe65.jpg

    That's quite a reach to Napoleon Bonaparte. Wrong army too.

    BTW, I've already mentioned that I am three handshakes away from Adolf Hitler: 1) Wally Schirra, who worked three doors down from my father, 2) Wernher von Braun, 3) Adolf Hitler.

    Replies: @theo the kraut, @Kibernetika, @syonredux, @Reg Cæsar, @Andrew Callinan

    I can beat that, kinda, just two steps: in Rome, on a damp late summer evening at the Tiber shore, the assistant personal librarian to Pope John Paul II chatted me up. Turned out he was cruising and lonely. I couldn’t help him with any funny business, but we shook hands eventually, interesting guy. Trivia: he told the Pope about his urges and John Paul was cool with it (the church hates sin, but loves the sinner) he just shouldn’t sin, no sweat. He sinned, though, *a lot.* He gave me a tour the next days around the local ecclesiastical cesspool, ethnographically very interesting. Reminds me of the story below, just with cassocks, skullcaps, and lots of funny business in confessionals and elsewhere.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2007/05/the-kingdom-in-the-closet/305774
    The Kingdom in the Closet
    Sodomy is punishable by death in Saudi Arabia, but gay life flourishes there. Why it is “easier to be gay than straight” in a society where everyone, homosexual and otherwise, lives in the closet

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @theo the kraut

    This goes along with my thoughts that no matter what anybody says about it, or however open or closed, or politically in fashion or not, some things have always been around.

    I swear it seems now as if new generations of Americans are suckers for the political plays on this. Everything now is trumpeted as if it hasn't been going on forever, and as if nobody ever knew about it before, and as if nobody ever accepted it before.

    What is that line? "There is nothing new under the sun."

    Thank you for a fascinating story.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Prester John

    , @Almost Missouri
    @theo the kraut


    ethnographically very interesting.
     
    Back in John Paul II's heyday, I spent a week in Rome as the guest of an earnest young priest-in-training at the Pontifical Colleges. I met some of his colleagues at social events there. Other than one who struck me as clinically depressed, the others struck me as obviously gay. Given that my host intended to return to the small town Midwest of his origins to preach the gospel, while the others aspired more to the Vatican hierarchy, well, it implied certain conclusions about the state of affairs at the Catholic metropole in the Eternal City. Conclusions that are confirmed by accounts such as yours or Ann Barnhardt's, not to mention the current flagrantly gay Pope.

    My host seemed oblivious to this or was studiously ignoring it.

    Replies: @black sea, @Not Raul, @theo the kraut, @theo the kraut

    , @BB753
    @theo the kraut

    Vatican City is now more gay than Mikonos.

    , @Sean
    @theo the kraut


    Sodomy is punishable by death in Saudi Arabia, but gay life flourishes there. Why it is “easier to be gay than straight” in a society where everyone, homosexual and otherwise, lives in the closet
     
    Because WEIRD society maketh gay men miserable. Gays want straight men partners, and such men are not interested in sissies unless as a substitute because casual sex with women is all but impossible to get. Hence, boys get raped in Afghanistan, which has about the highest birthrate in the world.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @theo the kraut


    I can beat that, kinda, just two steps: in Rome,
     
    "Gimme two steps, gimme two steps, Mister, gimme two steps toward the door. Gimme two steps, gimme two steps, Mister, and you'll never see me no more... for sure!"
  15. @Buzz Mohawk
    Sir Paul served under a sergeant.


    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/44/25/8f/44258fca87830ec919b0acec80f2fe65.jpg

    That's quite a reach to Napoleon Bonaparte. Wrong army too.

    BTW, I've already mentioned that I am three handshakes away from Adolf Hitler: 1) Wally Schirra, who worked three doors down from my father, 2) Wernher von Braun, 3) Adolf Hitler.

    Replies: @theo the kraut, @Kibernetika, @syonredux, @Reg Cæsar, @Andrew Callinan

    BTW, I’ve already mentioned that I am three handshakes away from Adolf Hitler: 1) Wally Schirra, who worked three doors down from my father, 2) Wernher von Braun, 3) Adolf Hitler.

    Some family members described to me what it was like seeing that #3 guy in person. There was no handshaking, however, just viewing from a protected distance. There may have been some gestures exchanged, but who knows. I have no opinions on the matter, just stating family history.

    Did you ever get to meet Schirra at your dad’s office?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Kibernetika

    I don't know, but I imagine Wernher shook Adolph's hand if handshaking was common at the upper levels. Certainly they came into close contact.

    Yes, I met Schirra in his office when I was visiting my father's. Wally signed an Apollo 7 crew picture to me. On the wall behind his desk he had a large, sharp, photographic print of this picture he took on that mission:


    http://www.americaspace.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/s-ivb-500x500.jpg

    The first liquid-hydrogen-powered rocket ridden by men


    There was a cubic paperweight of transparent plastic atop a stack of work. A little, silver astronaut was floating inside.

    He didn't work with my father, as far as I know, but they shared a hallway for a couple of years.

    How did your family members come to see Hitler?

    Replies: @Kibernetika, @Polistra, @PiltdownMan

  16. I’m a couple contacts from Alan Turing. Me, brother in law, brother in law’s father, Alan Turing. Turing gave the kids Christmas and birthday presents when they were little. Then there’s; me, 2nd daughter and Gavin Newsom till 6th grade.

  17. @Kibernetika
    @Buzz Mohawk

    BTW, I’ve already mentioned that I am three handshakes away from Adolf Hitler: 1) Wally Schirra, who worked three doors down from my father, 2) Wernher von Braun, 3) Adolf Hitler.

    Some family members described to me what it was like seeing that #3 guy in person. There was no handshaking, however, just viewing from a protected distance. There may have been some gestures exchanged, but who knows. I have no opinions on the matter, just stating family history.

    Did you ever get to meet Schirra at your dad's office?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I don’t know, but I imagine Wernher shook Adolph’s hand if handshaking was common at the upper levels. Certainly they came into close contact.

    Yes, I met Schirra in his office when I was visiting my father’s. Wally signed an Apollo 7 crew picture to me. On the wall behind his desk he had a large, sharp, photographic print of this picture he took on that mission:


    The first liquid-hydrogen-powered rocket ridden by men

    There was a cubic paperweight of transparent plastic atop a stack of work. A little, silver astronaut was floating inside.

    He didn’t work with my father, as far as I know, but they shared a hallway for a couple of years.

    How did your family members come to see Hitler?

    • Replies: @Kibernetika
    @Buzz Mohawk

    @BuzzMohawk

    Yes, I met Schirra in his office when I was visiting my father’s. Wally signed an Apollo 7 crew picture to me. On the wall behind his desk he had a large, sharp, photographic print of this picture he took on that mission:

    That's damned cool!

    It'd be great if children today aspired to achieve escape velocity, instead of wanting to achieve sex transition.

    , @Polistra
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Which reminds me, are we going to have an office pool on when and where the Chinese contraption crashes to earth? Part of me wants a major disaster (Dimona, say) just so China lovers will have to ramp up their denial another notch.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @epebble

    , @PiltdownMan
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Yes, I met Schirra in his office when I was visiting my father’s. Wally signed an Apollo 7 crew picture to me.
     
    Unz.com needs a "Wow" button.
  18. What was it like re-reading the book? Did it floor you again?

  19. Allen Ginsburg claimed to have had a similar connection to Walt Whitman, but it didn’t involve handshakes.

    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @black sea

    LOL. I used to see Ginsburg buying groceries.

    Replies: @Kibernetika

    , @syonredux
    @black sea

    Well, if we're going to go Gay-wards, there's the Wilde-Whitman connection...and Wilde was "connected" to quite a few prominent men....


    No reporters were invited to witness the meeting between Whitman and Wilde. This was a strange choice for two dandyish men who loved self-promotion, but it was a canny one: they would each give separate interviews afterwards, and double the attention they received. In the two hours they’d spent together, both said they’d had a very pleasant time. “One of the first things I said was that I should call him ‘Oscar,’“ Whitman told a reporter afterwards. “’I like that so much,’ he answered, laying his hand on my knee. He seemed to me like a great big, splendid boy.”

     


    Turning the conversation back to Wilde, Whitman was anxious to know whether this young aesthete was going to have the courage to do something new with his poetry and his art movement. Would he dare to question the age’s pieties? What revolutions did he have in store? The white-beard urged the smooth-faced aesthete to have the courage of his opinions. ”Are not you young fellows going to shove the established idols aside?” he asked, as a goad to Wilde’s revolutionary spirit. In the newspaper articles that inevitably followed this encounter, the poets endorsed each other.Whitman bragged that “Wilde had the good sense to take a great fancy to me.” The feeling was mutual. Wilde felt he had won Whitman’s seal of approval. Years later, he told a friend, “the kiss of Walt Whitman is still on my lips.”
     
    https://lithub.com/when-wilde-met-whitman/


    https://www.nybooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/mendelsohn_1-111110.jpg


    https://musingwithclio.files.wordpress.com/2014/04/whitman1.jpg
    , @Pericles
    @black sea

    How many links to get to Gaetan Dugas?

  20. @black sea
    Allen Ginsburg claimed to have had a similar connection to Walt Whitman, but it didn't involve handshakes.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @syonredux, @Pericles

    LOL. I used to see Ginsburg buying groceries.

    • Replies: @Kibernetika
    @Buzz Mohawk

    LOL. I used to see Ginsburg buying groceries.

    It's OK to talk about PTSD :)

  21. You can shake one of Napoleon’s appendages even today. From Wikipedia:

    Napoleon’s penis was allegedly cut off in an autopsy shortly after his death in 1821.Since then it has passed through several owners, including A. S. W. Rosenbach, who exhibited it in New York City in 1927.It was purchased by John K. Lattimer in 1977, and is still held in his family, who keep it as a private item. It was described as similar to a “piece of leather or a shriveled eel”.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @rebel yell

    A couple of nice double entendre's in one simple line


    " is still held in his family, who keep it as a private item. "
     
    Well done .

    Replies: @sayless

  22. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Kibernetika

    I don't know, but I imagine Wernher shook Adolph's hand if handshaking was common at the upper levels. Certainly they came into close contact.

    Yes, I met Schirra in his office when I was visiting my father's. Wally signed an Apollo 7 crew picture to me. On the wall behind his desk he had a large, sharp, photographic print of this picture he took on that mission:


    http://www.americaspace.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/s-ivb-500x500.jpg

    The first liquid-hydrogen-powered rocket ridden by men


    There was a cubic paperweight of transparent plastic atop a stack of work. A little, silver astronaut was floating inside.

    He didn't work with my father, as far as I know, but they shared a hallway for a couple of years.

    How did your family members come to see Hitler?

    Replies: @Kibernetika, @Polistra, @PiltdownMan

    @BuzzMohawk

    Yes, I met Schirra in his office when I was visiting my father’s. Wally signed an Apollo 7 crew picture to me. On the wall behind his desk he had a large, sharp, photographic print of this picture he took on that mission:

    That’s damned cool!

    It’d be great if children today aspired to achieve escape velocity, instead of wanting to achieve sex transition.

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
  23. @theo the kraut
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I can beat that, kinda, just two steps: in Rome, on a damp late summer evening at the Tiber shore, the assistant personal librarian to Pope John Paul II chatted me up. Turned out he was cruising and lonely. I couldn't help him with any funny business, but we shook hands eventually, interesting guy. Trivia: he told the Pope about his urges and John Paul was cool with it (the church hates sin, but loves the sinner) he just shouldn't sin, no sweat. He sinned, though, *a lot.* He gave me a tour the next days around the local ecclesiastical cesspool, ethnographically very interesting. Reminds me of the story below, just with cassocks, skullcaps, and lots of funny business in confessionals and elsewhere.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2007/05/the-kingdom-in-the-closet/305774
    The Kingdom in the Closet
    Sodomy is punishable by death in Saudi Arabia, but gay life flourishes there. Why it is “easier to be gay than straight” in a society where everyone, homosexual and otherwise, lives in the closet

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri, @BB753, @Sean, @Achmed E. Newman

    This goes along with my thoughts that no matter what anybody says about it, or however open or closed, or politically in fashion or not, some things have always been around.

    I swear it seems now as if new generations of Americans are suckers for the political plays on this. Everything now is trumpeted as if it hasn’t been going on forever, and as if nobody ever knew about it before, and as if nobody ever accepted it before.

    What is that line? “There is nothing new under the sun.”

    Thank you for a fascinating story.

    • Agree: ic1000
    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Everything now is trumpeted as if it hasn’t been going on forever, and as if nobody ever knew about it before, and as if nobody ever accepted it before.

    What is that line? “There is nothing new under the sun.”
     
    For my part, I sincerely hope that transsexualism is a flash in the pan.
    , @Prester John
    @Buzz Mohawk

    “There is nothing new under the sun.”

    True indeed. And that includes what I call the Bruce Jenner Syndrome. So-called "gender dysphoria" surely didn't start with Bruce/Caitlyn, any more than homosexuality started with, say, Elton John. The difference is that now it's out in the open. To what end, however, I don't know.

  24. @Buzz Mohawk
    @black sea

    LOL. I used to see Ginsburg buying groceries.

    Replies: @Kibernetika

    LOL. I used to see Ginsburg buying groceries.

    It’s OK to talk about PTSD 🙂

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
  25. My father was a soldier in Europe in the early 50s. While in Rome, in a private audience with Pope Pius XII and a group of other US soldiers, my father shook the hand of Pius XII. I think I can start a link with Pius XII, then Mussolini, then Hitler, then Hindenburg, then Emperor Willhelm, then Bismarck.

    • Replies: @John Up North
    @John Up North

    Napoleon III

  26. In high school, von Braun’s son’s nickname was “von Bomb.”

  27. So then the real question is whether or not Beethoven actually got to shake hands with Napoleon.

    Also of relevance from a music point of view, is whether or not PM John Russell shook hands with Beethoven. Because then the line of creative succession (via handshaking) would pass from Beethoven to Paul McCartney.

  28. @black sea
    Allen Ginsburg claimed to have had a similar connection to Walt Whitman, but it didn't involve handshakes.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @syonredux, @Pericles

    Well, if we’re going to go Gay-wards, there’s the Wilde-Whitman connection…and Wilde was “connected” to quite a few prominent men….

    No reporters were invited to witness the meeting between Whitman and Wilde. This was a strange choice for two dandyish men who loved self-promotion, but it was a canny one: they would each give separate interviews afterwards, and double the attention they received. In the two hours they’d spent together, both said they’d had a very pleasant time. “One of the first things I said was that I should call him ‘Oscar,’“ Whitman told a reporter afterwards. “’I like that so much,’ he answered, laying his hand on my knee. He seemed to me like a great big, splendid boy.”

    Turning the conversation back to Wilde, Whitman was anxious to know whether this young aesthete was going to have the courage to do something new with his poetry and his art movement. Would he dare to question the age’s pieties? What revolutions did he have in store? The white-beard urged the smooth-faced aesthete to have the courage of his opinions. ”Are not you young fellows going to shove the established idols aside?” he asked, as a goad to Wilde’s revolutionary spirit. In the newspaper articles that inevitably followed this encounter, the poets endorsed each other.Whitman bragged that “Wilde had the good sense to take a great fancy to me.” The feeling was mutual. Wilde felt he had won Whitman’s seal of approval. Years later, he told a friend, “the kiss of Walt Whitman is still on my lips.”

    https://lithub.com/when-wilde-met-whitman/

  29. Question: Are they having a homosexual relationship?

    • Replies: @Servant of Gla'aki
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Question: Are they having a homosexual relationship?
     
    No.

    No one's having physical relations with Frank Luntz.
  30. Just for fun, I looked at a list of well-known people who died 90 years ago, in 1931, and tried to figure if anyone alive today met one of them. It would have been in the person’s childhood and they may have no memory of the encounter. I’d say it’s quite possible: for example, one of Thomas Edison’s assistants at Menlo Park brought his young child to meet the famous man, or the same thing happened with one of Knute Rockne’s assistant coaches.
    Go back to a person who died 100 years ago and it’s way less likely. Lady Randolph Churchill was quite a socialite and it’s conceiveable that she called upon a social contact to see their new baby.

  31. @Buzz Mohawk
    Sir Paul served under a sergeant.


    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/44/25/8f/44258fca87830ec919b0acec80f2fe65.jpg

    That's quite a reach to Napoleon Bonaparte. Wrong army too.

    BTW, I've already mentioned that I am three handshakes away from Adolf Hitler: 1) Wally Schirra, who worked three doors down from my father, 2) Wernher von Braun, 3) Adolf Hitler.

    Replies: @theo the kraut, @Kibernetika, @syonredux, @Reg Cæsar, @Andrew Callinan

    Come on, what with all the Nazis hiding out in Latin America, aren’t we all three handshakes away from Adolph?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @syonredux


    ... aren’t we all three handshakes away from Adolph?
     
    Absolutely! Lots of people are.

    The man in the chair really has it going on. Babes and gold bars. He knows what's what.

    Replies: @Flip

    , @Pericles
    @syonredux

    A depiction of that time the Secret Service guys got busted in Cartagena.

    , @Joe Stalin
    @syonredux

    I had a high school Chemistry teacher who said she met Albert Einstein. He must have met enough foreign dignitaries to eventually get to Adolf Hitler.

  32. @syonredux
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Come on, what with all the Nazis hiding out in Latin America, aren't we all three handshakes away from Adolph?


    https://twitter.com/PulpLibrarian/status/1390400020390858752

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Pericles, @Joe Stalin

    … aren’t we all three handshakes away from Adolph?

    Absolutely! Lots of people are.

    The man in the chair really has it going on. Babes and gold bars. He knows what’s what.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Gold, guns, and groceries (and girls) as the survivalists say.

  33. @Buzz Mohawk
    Sir Paul served under a sergeant.


    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/44/25/8f/44258fca87830ec919b0acec80f2fe65.jpg

    That's quite a reach to Napoleon Bonaparte. Wrong army too.

    BTW, I've already mentioned that I am three handshakes away from Adolf Hitler: 1) Wally Schirra, who worked three doors down from my father, 2) Wernher von Braun, 3) Adolf Hitler.

    Replies: @theo the kraut, @Kibernetika, @syonredux, @Reg Cæsar, @Andrew Callinan

    BTW, I’ve already mentioned that I am three handshakes away from Adolf Hitler…

    I’ve had a couple of encounters with Walter Mondale, which puts me one degree away from everyone from César Chávez to Ronald Reagan to Leonid Brezhnev to Pope Paul VI. And a second, slightly more distant relationship to all of them, as my mother grew up very close to Geraldine Ferraro and would have had some acquaintances in common, if only at the candy store and dress shop. Oh, and a third, as I once e-mailed Peter Robinson, who wrote the “tear down this wall” speech for Reagan.

    Of course, everyone Steve has replied to here or by e-mail is one degree away from Margaret Thatcher, and thus one more from another Pope.

    Speaking of Leonid:

    Sleepy Joe Brezhnev: Learning from the Soviet Experience of Senile Leadership

    • Thanks: Ron Mexico
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar

    What really matters is how many handshakes we are away from Kevin Bacon.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @njguy73

    , @J.Ross
    @Reg Cæsar

    Brezhnev was ten, a hundred times the man Joe Biden is. Brezhnev at his worst was a product of a conformist academic and military meritocracy. Joseph Robinette Biden is essentially a homeless bathroom botherer begging for cigarettes.

    , @Ron Mexico
    @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks for sharing the Cornell Review opinion piece. Every time we travel to a hs basketball game or track meet I am reminded that, like "Epstein didn't kill himself", "Sleepy Joe didn't win the election." Atleast not Michigan. Hundreds of houses still have their Trump flags/signs.

    , @David In TN
    @Reg Cæsar

    I'm one handshake away from JFK and most all top Democrats of the 50s and 60s. I shook hands with the late Tennessee Governor Frank Clement.

  34. Most transwomen have interpersonal AGP: the sexual attraction to the fantasy of being perceived by other people as women. Thus, they want others to say they are women and insist on the idea that “transwomen are women”. Pronouns are vital for their sexual gratification. 2/N
    –Kirino Imouto, on Steve’s Twitter feed

    Somebody named Armstrong said those very words in a comment here. I don’t think he was kidding, either.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://i.ibb.co/TYRSk9Z/Capture-2021-05-08-02-47-17-2.png


    Some birthing people can perform chest feeding, some can't! What's the problem? WIC pays for formula.

    Doctors ignored her pain because she black! They said to her: I can't even hear you because you so black, woman.

    White people get they medication on demand. Which is why so many negroes end up addicted. Right? White supremacy.

    Maybe her kids came out premature because she was staying up all night partying, smoking, eating junk food, drinking, doing drugs, and fighting in the streets during her trimester? Naah, that's just my white supremacy talking again.

    PS: Check out them nails that birthing type person bringing into Congress

    PPS: gender-natural

    , @ic1000
    @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks. I found out that "AGP" stands for 'autogynephilic.' Here is a link to that Twitter thread by Kirino Imouto.

  35. In the early 2000s I shook hands with Lech Walesa after a presentation (through an interpreter) he had given. Now I should research how many people to whom I could be “connected”.

    • Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain
    @Charles

    I do hope you washed your hands thoroughly afterwards.

    , @Gaspar DeLaFunk
    @Charles

    I shook hands with Bobby Heenan!

  36. @theo the kraut
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I can beat that, kinda, just two steps: in Rome, on a damp late summer evening at the Tiber shore, the assistant personal librarian to Pope John Paul II chatted me up. Turned out he was cruising and lonely. I couldn't help him with any funny business, but we shook hands eventually, interesting guy. Trivia: he told the Pope about his urges and John Paul was cool with it (the church hates sin, but loves the sinner) he just shouldn't sin, no sweat. He sinned, though, *a lot.* He gave me a tour the next days around the local ecclesiastical cesspool, ethnographically very interesting. Reminds me of the story below, just with cassocks, skullcaps, and lots of funny business in confessionals and elsewhere.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2007/05/the-kingdom-in-the-closet/305774
    The Kingdom in the Closet
    Sodomy is punishable by death in Saudi Arabia, but gay life flourishes there. Why it is “easier to be gay than straight” in a society where everyone, homosexual and otherwise, lives in the closet

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri, @BB753, @Sean, @Achmed E. Newman

    ethnographically very interesting.

    Back in John Paul II’s heyday, I spent a week in Rome as the guest of an earnest young priest-in-training at the Pontifical Colleges. I met some of his colleagues at social events there. Other than one who struck me as clinically depressed, the others struck me as obviously gay. Given that my host intended to return to the small town Midwest of his origins to preach the gospel, while the others aspired more to the Vatican hierarchy, well, it implied certain conclusions about the state of affairs at the Catholic metropole in the Eternal City. Conclusions that are confirmed by accounts such as yours or Ann Barnhardt’s, not to mention the current flagrantly gay Pope.

    My host seemed oblivious to this or was studiously ignoring it.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Almost Missouri

    A friend of mine who lived in Rome once shared with me a common saying among the Romans: "Faith is manufactured here, and believed elsewhere."

    , @Not Raul
    @Almost Missouri

    Wait. The current Pope isn’t gay. Before he decided to become a priest, he had a girlfriend.

    The retired Pope, Benedict, might be gay.

    http://dish.andrewsullivan.com/2013/02/27/two-popes-one-secretary/

    Papa Ratzi (the retired Pope) might have more than just red loafers in his closet.

    https://shadowproof.com/2006/12/14/the-light-loafers-of-prada-papa-ratzi/amp/

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon

    , @theo the kraut
    @Almost Missouri

    > Other than one who struck me as clinically depressed, the others struck me as obviously gay. Given that my host intended to return to the small town Midwest of his origins to preach the gospel

    My guy was an earnest young priest-in-training, too, while working for the Pope. However, he intended to have himself transferred to NYC to **** himself to death to atone for his many sins, couldn't talk him out of that rather un-Catholic idea.* One day he showed me around the parish that he was assigned to in a honorary function, he didn't try to disguise his interest for me, but the young mothers would flock around him to have their babies blessed anyway, everybody ignored the obvious, they seemed to think that it goes with the territory of holy men.

    * I'm atheist myself, but if you're Catholic, you better mean it, I don't fancy funny business of any kind, I'm not a liberal any more...

    , @theo the kraut
    @Almost Missouri

    > the current flagrantly gay Pope.

    He's awful, but I are you sure about that detail?

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-22869399
    »Pope Francis is reported to have acknowledged the existence of a "gay lobby" inside the Vatican. He also said there was a "stream of corruption" [...] The Vatican would have to "see what we can do" about the "gay lobby" operating in the bureaucracy, he said. "It is true, it is there," the report quotes him as saying.«

  37. @Almost Missouri
    @theo the kraut


    ethnographically very interesting.
     
    Back in John Paul II's heyday, I spent a week in Rome as the guest of an earnest young priest-in-training at the Pontifical Colleges. I met some of his colleagues at social events there. Other than one who struck me as clinically depressed, the others struck me as obviously gay. Given that my host intended to return to the small town Midwest of his origins to preach the gospel, while the others aspired more to the Vatican hierarchy, well, it implied certain conclusions about the state of affairs at the Catholic metropole in the Eternal City. Conclusions that are confirmed by accounts such as yours or Ann Barnhardt's, not to mention the current flagrantly gay Pope.

    My host seemed oblivious to this or was studiously ignoring it.

    Replies: @black sea, @Not Raul, @theo the kraut, @theo the kraut

    A friend of mine who lived in Rome once shared with me a common saying among the Romans: “Faith is manufactured here, and believed elsewhere.”

  38. @PiltdownMan

    Perhaps etiquette required that the Emperor not shake hands?
     
    Since Bonaparte was descended from Italian nobility, but not of royal blood, I wonder if that convention applied. He was emperor, ruler of his empire, but not a king, AFAIK.

    This account of Napoleon's stay in Elba (and numerous visitors) is interesting.

    https://www.napoleon.org/en/history-of-the-two-empires/articles/a-sympathetic-ear-napoleon-elba-and-the-british-from-history-today-1994-vol-44/

    Replies: @Getaclue, @Polistra, @epebble, @Macon Waters

    Ooh! And Reg was just holding forth about palindromes in the last thread.

    ‘Elba’ is (part of) the second or third-best palindrome of all, I reckon.

    Of course none can touch that other geographical notable…

    • LOL: ic1000
    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Polistra

    I like this one:

    "A man, a plan, a canoe, pasta, heros, rajahs, a coloratura, maps, snipe, percale, macaroni, a gag, a banana bag, a tan, a tag, a banana bag again (or a camel), a crepe, pins, Spam, a rut, a Rolo, cash, a jar, sore hats, a peon, a canal-- Panama!"

    (Guy L Steele)

    , @Joe Joe
    @Polistra

    a man a plan a canal panama :-)

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Polistra

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUQDzj6R3p4

    Replies: @Polistra, @Sam Malone

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Polistra


    ‘Elba’ is (part of) the second or third-best palindrome of all, I reckon.

     

    Elba got only a palindrome. Nap's second, and final, exile got an entire card game. A solitare, naturally.



    Bicycle Cards: How to Play Napoleon at St. Helena


    By the way, the island's name rhymes with marina. Montanans beware. Jonathan, the oldest being on land at 188, has resided there since 1882.

    A JOURNEY TO ST. HELENA, HOME OF NAPOLEON’S LAST DAYS



    https://thumbs-prod.si-cdn.com/dJMhstqCmBnbS4yqhzkUfHw8ZXs=/1024x596/https://public-media.si-cdn.com/filer/1a/f9/1af9619f-6bd4-4c5c-b7e1-ed14c6c42b8d/apr2019_e16_sthelena.jpg
  39. @Buzz Mohawk
    @theo the kraut

    This goes along with my thoughts that no matter what anybody says about it, or however open or closed, or politically in fashion or not, some things have always been around.

    I swear it seems now as if new generations of Americans are suckers for the political plays on this. Everything now is trumpeted as if it hasn't been going on forever, and as if nobody ever knew about it before, and as if nobody ever accepted it before.

    What is that line? "There is nothing new under the sun."

    Thank you for a fascinating story.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Prester John

    Everything now is trumpeted as if it hasn’t been going on forever, and as if nobody ever knew about it before, and as if nobody ever accepted it before.

    What is that line? “There is nothing new under the sun.”

    For my part, I sincerely hope that transsexualism is a flash in the pan.

  40. What are the minimum number of “handshakes” from the last person imported to America as a slave from Africa in 1807 to an elderly person today? What implication does that have for us today?

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @B36

    Who cares and none.

    , @PiltdownMan
    @B36


    Woman identified as last survivor of US-African slave trade


    https://edition.cnn.com/2019/04/03/us/last-survivor-us-slave-trade-scli-intl/index.html

     

    It is entirely possible that somebody alive today met this person a very long time ago.
    , @PiltdownMan
    @B36




    Woman identified as last survivor of US-African slave trade


    https://edition.cnn.com/2019/04/03/us/last-survivor-us-slave-trade-scli-intl/index.html

     

    It is entirely possible that somebody alive today met this person a very long time ago.
    , @PiltdownMan
    @B36




    Woman identified as last survivor of US-African slave trade


    https://edition.cnn.com/2019/04/03/us/last-survivor-us-slave-trade-scli-intl/index.html

     

    It is entirely possible that somebody alive today met this person a very long time ago.
    , @Charlotte
    @B36

    The last slaves (illegally) imported from Africa arrived in 1859 on the Clotilde. Cudjoe Lewis to Zora Neale Hurston to Alan Lomax to Pete Seeger to Bob Dylan would be four handshakes . . . . I don’t know if Hurston ever met Senator Robert Taft, whom she campaigned for, but if she did, there are probably still a number of people alive who shook hands with him.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  41. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Kibernetika

    I don't know, but I imagine Wernher shook Adolph's hand if handshaking was common at the upper levels. Certainly they came into close contact.

    Yes, I met Schirra in his office when I was visiting my father's. Wally signed an Apollo 7 crew picture to me. On the wall behind his desk he had a large, sharp, photographic print of this picture he took on that mission:


    http://www.americaspace.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/s-ivb-500x500.jpg

    The first liquid-hydrogen-powered rocket ridden by men


    There was a cubic paperweight of transparent plastic atop a stack of work. A little, silver astronaut was floating inside.

    He didn't work with my father, as far as I know, but they shared a hallway for a couple of years.

    How did your family members come to see Hitler?

    Replies: @Kibernetika, @Polistra, @PiltdownMan

    Which reminds me, are we going to have an office pool on when and where the Chinese contraption crashes to earth? Part of me wants a major disaster (Dimona, say) just so China lovers will have to ramp up their denial another notch.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Polistra

    No matter where the Sino-trash lands, Ron Unz will write a 10,000 word article about how the debris was actually part of an American conspiracy to be blamed on China.

    , @epebble
    @Polistra

    SecDef has ruled out a shootdown. What would be the reaction if it ends up falling on the Pentagon, White House or the Capitol? They say the chances are like winning a Powerball; But, some people win a Powerball. We have spent $250,000,000,000 on "Missile Defense" and can't shoot down a locomotive size rocket on a well defined orbit?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  42. Local NPR disc jockey once called it the “Air-Roy-Ka”

    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @James Speaks

    In "The Magic Mountain" Mann has a character, a Frau Stohr, who constantly embarrasses her dining companions with her grotesque malaprops. When someone leaves the sanitarium to join his regiment, relapses, returns and dies, she suggests they play the "Erotica" symphony at his funeral.

  43. The Woke media has been full of nonentities spewing hatred at long dead Napper for ‘restoring slavery’ in Haiti. A real historian noted that Napoleon did not like going thus against one of the tenets of the Revolution, but was forced into it by ‘the bankers’. I grow tired of deranged and obsessive pygmies spewing abuse at great, world significant (certainly in this case)figures, for some deviation from Woke theology, centuries ago.

    • Replies: @Shango
    @Mulga Mumblebrain

    I don't understand. What did he do and why?

  44. @Charles
    In the early 2000s I shook hands with Lech Walesa after a presentation (through an interpreter) he had given. Now I should research how many people to whom I could be "connected".

    Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain, @Gaspar DeLaFunk

    I do hope you washed your hands thoroughly afterwards.

  45. @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk


    BTW, I’ve already mentioned that I am three handshakes away from Adolf Hitler...
     
    I've had a couple of encounters with Walter Mondale, which puts me one degree away from everyone from César Chávez to Ronald Reagan to Leonid Brezhnev to Pope Paul VI. And a second, slightly more distant relationship to all of them, as my mother grew up very close to Geraldine Ferraro and would have had some acquaintances in common, if only at the candy store and dress shop. Oh, and a third, as I once e-mailed Peter Robinson, who wrote the "tear down this wall" speech for Reagan.

    Of course, everyone Steve has replied to here or by e-mail is one degree away from Margaret Thatcher, and thus one more from another Pope.

    Speaking of Leonid:

    Sleepy Joe Brezhnev: Learning from the Soviet Experience of Senile Leadership

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @J.Ross, @Ron Mexico, @David In TN

    What really matters is how many handshakes we are away from Kevin Bacon.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I’m probably one handshake away. Bacon and his band played a local theater ate at a restaurant nearby beforehand. I’m guessing the chef/owner shook his hand, and I’m pretty sure I’ve shaken the chef/owner’s hand.

    Replies: @James Speaks

    , @njguy73
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Check out the website Oracle of Bacon.

    Turns out that the true center of Hollywood is Christopher Lee.

  46. Perhaps etiquette required that the Emperor not shake hands?

    Sure, a handshake, a slap on the back, a friendly poke in the ribs. But Napoleon was an arriviste.

    Here’s the old school: John Adams meeting George III.

    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2ye7z5

  47. What really matters is how many handshakes we are away from Kevin Bacon.

    Since Walter Mondale and Kevin Bacon undoubtedly met that is going to be 2 for Mr Caesar. This is how it almost always works. The most biggest shot you ever shook hands with is your path to anybody. I have shaken hands with somebody who shook hands with Walter Mondale so me and Mr C. are 2 jumps apart.

    Hey Reg a friend of a friend told me that aliens are among us.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Morton's toes


    Hey Reg a friend of a friend told me that aliens are among us.

     

    If your friend is Roy Beck, believe him.
  48. @Almost Missouri
    @theo the kraut


    ethnographically very interesting.
     
    Back in John Paul II's heyday, I spent a week in Rome as the guest of an earnest young priest-in-training at the Pontifical Colleges. I met some of his colleagues at social events there. Other than one who struck me as clinically depressed, the others struck me as obviously gay. Given that my host intended to return to the small town Midwest of his origins to preach the gospel, while the others aspired more to the Vatican hierarchy, well, it implied certain conclusions about the state of affairs at the Catholic metropole in the Eternal City. Conclusions that are confirmed by accounts such as yours or Ann Barnhardt's, not to mention the current flagrantly gay Pope.

    My host seemed oblivious to this or was studiously ignoring it.

    Replies: @black sea, @Not Raul, @theo the kraut, @theo the kraut

    Wait. The current Pope isn’t gay. Before he decided to become a priest, he had a girlfriend.

    The retired Pope, Benedict, might be gay.

    http://dish.andrewsullivan.com/2013/02/27/two-popes-one-secretary/

    Papa Ratzi (the retired Pope) might have more than just red loafers in his closet.

    https://shadowproof.com/2006/12/14/the-light-loafers-of-prada-papa-ratzi/amp/

    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @Not Raul

    Pope Francis is the target of a campaign of hate, orchestrated by the gay Mafia he's the first pope to take on. Needless to say, in classic projection style, they accuse HIM as "soft on homos".

    The Church's hard line on homos is less theological than it is camo for the pedophile network: what, us? We officially hate them homos!

    This also means their hard line on everything else (divorce, birth control) was not cogitated by wise theologians but by closeted homos who hate marriage and weren't even priests (eg. Maritain and the other French homos in Paul VI's circle).

    https://counter-currents.com/2020/06/trad-queen-story-hour-part-ii-from-vatican-ii-to-john-paul-ii/

    Seriously, who takes advice on heterosexuality from this guy?

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Muhsz9boQQ8/Ucb6KOTzpPI/AAAAAAAAAWc/HRw-JRrEgGE/s1600/CARDINAL+RAYMOND+BURKE+6.gif

    Replies: @Not Raul, @Alden

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Not Raul

    Andy is just miffed that no bishops or even clean-cut young seminarians answered his Bareback City personal.

    The warnings in Scripture about questionable fruit can be applied to questionable fruits as well.


    https://www.wikigallery.org/paintings/247501-248000/247874/painting1.jpg


    https://biblepic.com/53/23333.jpg

    , @Anon
    @Not Raul

    Please! You deserve an emoji: 🙄

  49. @Reg Cæsar

    Most transwomen have interpersonal AGP: the sexual attraction to the fantasy of being perceived by other people as women. Thus, they want others to say they are women and insist on the idea that "transwomen are women". Pronouns are vital for their sexual gratification. 2/N
    --Kirino Imouto, on Steve's Twitter feed
     
    Somebody named Armstrong said those very words in a comment here. I don't think he was kidding, either.

    Replies: @Charon, @ic1000

    Some birthing people can perform chest feeding, some can’t! What’s the problem? WIC pays for formula.

    Doctors ignored her pain because she black! They said to her: I can’t even hear you because you so black, woman.

    White people get they medication on demand. Which is why so many negroes end up addicted. Right? White supremacy.

    Maybe her kids came out premature because she was staying up all night partying, smoking, eating junk food, drinking, doing drugs, and fighting in the streets during her trimester? Naah, that’s just my white supremacy talking again.

    PS: Check out them nails that birthing type person bringing into Congress

    PPS: gender-natural

  50. Anonymous[147] • Disclaimer says:

    My dad once shook hands with G. Gordon Liddy, who must have shaken hands with Nixon, who must have shaken hands with Eisenhower, who must have shaken hands with all sorts of bigwigs, but surely MacArthur, who likely shook hands with Pershing, who shook hands with…hmm…well, a bunch of important guys, and they all shook hands with a bunch of other important guys…. So that means that I —
    No, wait.
    I just realized that I have never shaken hands with my dad. I’ve hugged him and pecked him on the cheek and handed him a beer but never shaken his hand. I’ll rectify that forthwith.
    No, wait.
    If I try to shake his hand, he’s going to lock his hands behind his back and look at me suspiciously, demanding to know just where my hand has been and why am I suddenly trying to shake his hand.
    He knows me too well.

    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
  51. What really matters is how many handshakes we are away from Kevin Bacon.

    `

    I’ve met Bill Kauffman, who had a boyhood friend named Eggs Bacon. That trumps Kevin.

    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://i.pinimg.com/564x/f0/e4/e8/f0e4e8525d5da26fdbd99543e1b06995.jpg

  52. Silly. Literally millions of people have a “handshake link” whatever that is, with Napoleon. Or Jesus, for that matter.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @obwandiyag

    Quiz given to first year probability students in High School:

    What Is the Probability You Just Inhaled a Part of Lincoln's Last Breath?

    The answer may surprise you!

    https://www.thoughtco.com/probability-you-inhaled-part-lincolns-last-breath-3126600

  53. Anonymous[222] • Disclaimer says:

    The best books of the Naploeonic era are the Brigadier Gerard novels by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Well worth looking up.

    • Agree: dfordoom
  54. Anonymous[309] • Disclaimer says:

    OT:

    It’s just been revealed that California has declined in population for the first time in the state’s history(!)

    A classic example of the law of diminishing returns in action:

    If you make a ‘good’ so attractive that the hoi polloi pile in massively, sooner or later, by the mere fact of the hoi polloi piling in massively, it ceases to attract the hoi polloi, ie, it becomes worse than the place they piled in from.

    • Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Anonymous

    The White population in the United States has been declining for 5 years. The 2020 census will be the first which saw a decline in the white population from the previous census. 400 years of growth ended in 2016

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    , @AnotherDad
    @Anonymous


    It’s just been revealed that California has declined in population for the first time in the state’s history(!)
     
    A bad sign for the future of everywhere from Boise to Walla Walla.

    Was over at the neighbors a week or so back and the issue of DeSantis running came up. Husband didn't think so. Neighbor wife wanted him to stay put and keep things decent here. Said she was worried about the next election with all the people moving in. That they'll come here ... then make it just like there. Suggested they shouldn't be allowed to vote.

    Despite the year of blackety-black-black-black our fundamental problem isn't even racial, it's political: Minoritarianism.

    Some people are happy with the American nation--our people, history, language, social and political norms--our culture. And some aren't.

    We need separate nations.
    , @Uncle Dan
    @Anonymous

    Nobody goes there anymore more, it’s too crowded.

  55. @black sea
    Allen Ginsburg claimed to have had a similar connection to Walt Whitman, but it didn't involve handshakes.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @syonredux, @Pericles

    How many links to get to Gaetan Dugas?

  56. @syonredux
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Come on, what with all the Nazis hiding out in Latin America, aren't we all three handshakes away from Adolph?


    https://twitter.com/PulpLibrarian/status/1390400020390858752

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Pericles, @Joe Stalin

    A depiction of that time the Secret Service guys got busted in Cartagena.

  57. @Polistra
    @PiltdownMan

    Ooh! And Reg was just holding forth about palindromes in the last thread.

    'Elba' is (part of) the second or third-best palindrome of all, I reckon.

    Of course none can touch that other geographical notable...

    http://monovisions.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/vintage-panama-canal-construction-1904-1914-02.jpg

    Replies: @Pericles, @Joe Joe, @Mr. Anon, @Reg Cæsar

    I like this one:

    “A man, a plan, a canoe, pasta, heros, rajahs, a coloratura, maps, snipe, percale, macaroni, a gag, a banana bag, a tan, a tag, a banana bag again (or a camel), a crepe, pins, Spam, a rut, a Rolo, cash, a jar, sore hats, a peon, a canal– Panama!”

    (Guy L Steele)

    • Thanks: YetAnotherAnon, Polistra
  58. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar

    What really matters is how many handshakes we are away from Kevin Bacon.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @njguy73

    I’m probably one handshake away. Bacon and his band played a local theater ate at a restaurant nearby beforehand. I’m guessing the chef/owner shook his hand, and I’m pretty sure I’ve shaken the chef/owner’s hand.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @Dave Pinsen

    I'm one handshake away from Bob Dylan. There was a country-western-in-your-face group known as Kinky Friedman and the Texas Jewboys (though some of them were neither Texas nor MOT). Come to think of it, about half of Texas is one handshake away due to Kinky's frequent runs for office.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  59. This comment thread needs work. For instance, you guys call yourselves nazis and can’t spell Adolf correctly. What gives, even? That’s almost as bad as bragging about how connected you are to Kevin Bacon.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Polistra

    Adolph is the English spelling. German names are often Anglicised by people writing in English, e.g. Frederick the Great, Kaiser William, etc. It's a bit unusual for people to do it in the case of a historical figure as recent as Hitler.

  60. @Reg Cæsar

    What really matters is how many handshakes we are away from Kevin Bacon.

     

    `


    I've met Bill Kauffman, who had a boyhood friend named Eggs Bacon. That trumps Kevin.

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex

  61. I recall some interview on TV in which Burgess remarks on the insufficient masculinity of men who have never pinched a pretty girl in the elevator, or something like that. Not likely to pass the cancel test these days.

  62. D. K. says:

    An English friend of mine won a contest on a popular children’s show, and her prize was spending a day with John, Paul, George and Ringo, on the set of “Help!” (1965). During every break in the day’s shooting, they duly returned to entertain her. So, I might well be just a further two handshakes than Sir Paul from Napoleon Bonaparte!?!

    A then-acquaintance of mine, in Long Beach, worked intimately with Nancy Sinatra, back in the late-1980s, on a videodisc project about her father; so, I am fairly closely linked to ‘The Voice’, as well, and then only one shake further to everyone famous with whom he ever shook hands– from Major Bowes, in 1935, until Frank’s own death, sixty-three years later.

    I would be shocked if none of my aforementioned law-school classmates– ‘Mayor Jenny’, the King County Prosecuting Attorney, and his wife, an in-house Microsoft lawyer– have not shaken hands with Bill Gates, which would link us closely to everyone with whom he has shaken hands. Regardless, another of our classmates retired from Microsoft, before the old millennium even ended, and started her own foundation; so, I assume that she certainly would have shaken hands with Bill, during her tenure as one of his fairly high-ranking executives!?!

    My priestly brother was ordained by Pope Paul VI, in the largest ordination in the history of the Roman Catholic Church, and also served Mass for him, including at least one Christmas Midnight Mass. I doubt that he ever shook the Pope’s hand, though; it is more likely that he kissed it, instead. My brother did meet a lot of famous people, however, during his four years of studying in Rome, as American celebrities often stopped by his college during their visits to the Vatican, to meet the Pope or otherwise.

  63. If Carl Gutaf is in the mix, you might get one of the members of ABBA into the chain. Ya know … Waterloo then and now.

  64. @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk


    BTW, I’ve already mentioned that I am three handshakes away from Adolf Hitler...
     
    I've had a couple of encounters with Walter Mondale, which puts me one degree away from everyone from César Chávez to Ronald Reagan to Leonid Brezhnev to Pope Paul VI. And a second, slightly more distant relationship to all of them, as my mother grew up very close to Geraldine Ferraro and would have had some acquaintances in common, if only at the candy store and dress shop. Oh, and a third, as I once e-mailed Peter Robinson, who wrote the "tear down this wall" speech for Reagan.

    Of course, everyone Steve has replied to here or by e-mail is one degree away from Margaret Thatcher, and thus one more from another Pope.

    Speaking of Leonid:

    Sleepy Joe Brezhnev: Learning from the Soviet Experience of Senile Leadership

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @J.Ross, @Ron Mexico, @David In TN

    Brezhnev was ten, a hundred times the man Joe Biden is. Brezhnev at his worst was a product of a conformist academic and military meritocracy. Joseph Robinette Biden is essentially a homeless bathroom botherer begging for cigarettes.

    • Thanks: Bill Jones
  65. @Charles
    In the early 2000s I shook hands with Lech Walesa after a presentation (through an interpreter) he had given. Now I should research how many people to whom I could be "connected".

    Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain, @Gaspar DeLaFunk

    I shook hands with Bobby Heenan!

  66. Eventually, I got the hang of the book. It’s really quite good. But it did strike me that I must have been a lot smarter when I was 17.

    Also, Burgess was considered a genius in the 1970s, one of the most celebrated authors in the English language, on a par with Nabokov, so putting a lot of effort into reading his books was assumed to be his rightful due. Nowadays, you don’t hear much about Burgess other than his Clockwork Orange.

    Rereading is frequently disappointing.

    Nabokov’s stature has grown over years, mostly because some acclaimed novelists praised him (Updike, Pynchon,…). But he is, I guess, also almost forgotten by readers.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Bardon Kaldian

    On the recommendation of, I believe, a commenter here, I picked up and started reading some of the works of Flannery O’Connor. Big mistake. Just dreadful. Give me O’Brian or Fraser any day. Life is too short not to enjoy.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    , @syonredux
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Nabokov’s stature has grown over years, mostly because some acclaimed novelists praised him (Updike, Pynchon,…). But he is, I guess, also almost forgotten by readers.
     
    Dunno. I recently re-read Lolita for a class I was teaching, and I'm still tremendously impressed by the dazzling literary style of the thing.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara

    , @y78654
    @Bardon Kaldian

    What are you talking about. Nabokov is still widely read.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  67. @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk


    BTW, I’ve already mentioned that I am three handshakes away from Adolf Hitler...
     
    I've had a couple of encounters with Walter Mondale, which puts me one degree away from everyone from César Chávez to Ronald Reagan to Leonid Brezhnev to Pope Paul VI. And a second, slightly more distant relationship to all of them, as my mother grew up very close to Geraldine Ferraro and would have had some acquaintances in common, if only at the candy store and dress shop. Oh, and a third, as I once e-mailed Peter Robinson, who wrote the "tear down this wall" speech for Reagan.

    Of course, everyone Steve has replied to here or by e-mail is one degree away from Margaret Thatcher, and thus one more from another Pope.

    Speaking of Leonid:

    Sleepy Joe Brezhnev: Learning from the Soviet Experience of Senile Leadership

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @J.Ross, @Ron Mexico, @David In TN

    Thanks for sharing the Cornell Review opinion piece. Every time we travel to a hs basketball game or track meet I am reminded that, like “Epstein didn’t kill himself”, “Sleepy Joe didn’t win the election.” Atleast not Michigan. Hundreds of houses still have their Trump flags/signs.

  68. @theo the kraut
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I can beat that, kinda, just two steps: in Rome, on a damp late summer evening at the Tiber shore, the assistant personal librarian to Pope John Paul II chatted me up. Turned out he was cruising and lonely. I couldn't help him with any funny business, but we shook hands eventually, interesting guy. Trivia: he told the Pope about his urges and John Paul was cool with it (the church hates sin, but loves the sinner) he just shouldn't sin, no sweat. He sinned, though, *a lot.* He gave me a tour the next days around the local ecclesiastical cesspool, ethnographically very interesting. Reminds me of the story below, just with cassocks, skullcaps, and lots of funny business in confessionals and elsewhere.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2007/05/the-kingdom-in-the-closet/305774
    The Kingdom in the Closet
    Sodomy is punishable by death in Saudi Arabia, but gay life flourishes there. Why it is “easier to be gay than straight” in a society where everyone, homosexual and otherwise, lives in the closet

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri, @BB753, @Sean, @Achmed E. Newman

    Vatican City is now more gay than Mikonos.

  69. Anon[156] • Disclaimer says:

    Here’s my tenuous Burgess connection. In November 1972 I rented a house on Ibiza with Peter Halliday and his lovely Swiss girlfriend. Peter claimed his brother’s ex was Anthony burgess’s second wife (the Italian translator). The brother, Roy Halliday, was the “father” on Burgess son’s birth certificate as Anthony was still married to his first wife. Anyway Peter had met burgess a few times and was a big fan of his writing and he lent me several of burgess’s books to read while we weren’t drinking (Ibiza was not yet the “destination” in 72.).
    Btw we were in Spain trying to find a cheap sailboat. The effort fell apart however and I never heard from them after Christmas of 72, but I am reading now where brother Roy died in a sailing accident so maybe it was all for the best we never found a boat.

    • Replies: @Antiwar7
    @Anon

    Interesting, thanks.

  70. This article is like a peak into the Anglo-race soul.

  71. Yet again OT, sorry, but just wanted to draw to your attention a remarkable story (if true) in The Paper Of Record.

    Apparently ITV (the second TV broadcaster in the UK), the Metropolitan Police, MI5 and the British Navy joined together in a plot/conspiracy to attempt to record the alleged murderers of Stephen Lawrence incriminating themselves. ITV gave them an interview, “paid” them with a week in Scotland – house bugged, phones bugged, even their karts bugged when they went golfing. The taped conversations (in pre-digital age) were apparently picked up by helicopter, transferred to an RN sub, and sent by secure link to the Met in London*.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9555317/The-submarine-sent-sink-Stephen-Lawrences-killers.html

    The State really, really wanted a conviction. I’ve never heard the like. If only all white murder victims got that kind of attention.

    In the end they had to wait for a newly-privatised Government forensics lab to “discover” a “previously overlooked” spot of Lawrence’s blood, only detectable by massive DNA amplification on an item of clothing worn by one of the accused. This may (or may not) have been kosher, but there were a lot of incentives to get a conviction at any cost.

    * this is the bit I find least believable – surely there were more efficient ways of doing it?

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Even I was amazed at that. I knew it took £50m to secure a conviction, and only after they removed the 800-year-old double jeopardy protection from English law so they could try the defendants a second time.

    Also from England, a rerun of The Good Life comes with a viewer warning for offensive content because there is a scene in one episode where Margo wears an apron with a picture of the Robinson's jam golliwog mascot.

  72. Napoleon had his coup. We seem to have lost our–much more functional–republic with a whimper not a bang.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @AnotherDad


    Napoleon had his coup. We seem to have lost our–much more functional–republic with a whimper not a bang.
     
    Napoleon overthrew (sorta) the Directorate, a kind of revolutionary central committee.

    Our current government leadership, no matter how crooked, etc. , isn't that yet. Elections were held. Yes some funny business but no convincing evidence that Trump actually won.

    So no, the proverbial Man on Horseback is a bad idea. Or do you already have a fave generalissimo picked out to lead us out of the storm?
  73. @Buzz Mohawk
    Sir Paul served under a sergeant.


    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/44/25/8f/44258fca87830ec919b0acec80f2fe65.jpg

    That's quite a reach to Napoleon Bonaparte. Wrong army too.

    BTW, I've already mentioned that I am three handshakes away from Adolf Hitler: 1) Wally Schirra, who worked three doors down from my father, 2) Wernher von Braun, 3) Adolf Hitler.

    Replies: @theo the kraut, @Kibernetika, @syonredux, @Reg Cæsar, @Andrew Callinan

    I’m impressed! My planned comment about being a few handshakes away from Kurt ‘n’ Courtney and various other dipshits has been rendered shite. You really know how to piss on a man’s parade.
    Regards,
    A.C

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Andrew Callinan

    LOL. I have long thought that I would enjoy meeting Courtney, Leader of Hole.


    http://images1.fanpop.com/images/photos/1500000/Hole-courtney-love-1536122-800-600.jpg


    Salutations to you! Don't wash that hand. Use it! LOL.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  74. Steve, you’re probably never gonna relate to this but tonight I was sinking piss with my boy and I brought up the subject of you.

    He couldn’t understand a life lived in a half clothes cupboard or why anyone pays attention to you, he’s a tactile boy, first year carpentry apprentice.

    I tried to explain how you post about things that explain core symptoms, but he refused to believe a man like you, a Darwinian man like you could ever excuse the long standing example of faggotry that you’ve become.

    I tried to tell him that today essay posting low T types is what masculinity is all about.

    How bronze age faggot combined with low T steve was the end point of alt-right but by this time he’s switched off and was talking to some *** internet.

    How do you reach out to kids like that?

    To let them know it’s not them it’s us? That faggotry isn’t gennetic but you’d best be getting an aids test

  75. Sean says:
    @theo the kraut
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I can beat that, kinda, just two steps: in Rome, on a damp late summer evening at the Tiber shore, the assistant personal librarian to Pope John Paul II chatted me up. Turned out he was cruising and lonely. I couldn't help him with any funny business, but we shook hands eventually, interesting guy. Trivia: he told the Pope about his urges and John Paul was cool with it (the church hates sin, but loves the sinner) he just shouldn't sin, no sweat. He sinned, though, *a lot.* He gave me a tour the next days around the local ecclesiastical cesspool, ethnographically very interesting. Reminds me of the story below, just with cassocks, skullcaps, and lots of funny business in confessionals and elsewhere.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2007/05/the-kingdom-in-the-closet/305774
    The Kingdom in the Closet
    Sodomy is punishable by death in Saudi Arabia, but gay life flourishes there. Why it is “easier to be gay than straight” in a society where everyone, homosexual and otherwise, lives in the closet

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri, @BB753, @Sean, @Achmed E. Newman

    Sodomy is punishable by death in Saudi Arabia, but gay life flourishes there. Why it is “easier to be gay than straight” in a society where everyone, homosexual and otherwise, lives in the closet

    Because WEIRD society maketh gay men miserable. Gays want straight men partners, and such men are not interested in sissies unless as a substitute because casual sex with women is all but impossible to get. Hence, boys get raped in Afghanistan, which has about the highest birthrate in the world.

  76. @Polistra
    @PiltdownMan

    Ooh! And Reg was just holding forth about palindromes in the last thread.

    'Elba' is (part of) the second or third-best palindrome of all, I reckon.

    Of course none can touch that other geographical notable...

    http://monovisions.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/vintage-panama-canal-construction-1904-1914-02.jpg

    Replies: @Pericles, @Joe Joe, @Mr. Anon, @Reg Cæsar

    a man a plan a canal panama 🙂

  77. @Buzz Mohawk
    @theo the kraut

    This goes along with my thoughts that no matter what anybody says about it, or however open or closed, or politically in fashion or not, some things have always been around.

    I swear it seems now as if new generations of Americans are suckers for the political plays on this. Everything now is trumpeted as if it hasn't been going on forever, and as if nobody ever knew about it before, and as if nobody ever accepted it before.

    What is that line? "There is nothing new under the sun."

    Thank you for a fascinating story.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Prester John

    “There is nothing new under the sun.”

    True indeed. And that includes what I call the Bruce Jenner Syndrome. So-called “gender dysphoria” surely didn’t start with Bruce/Caitlyn, any more than homosexuality started with, say, Elton John. The difference is that now it’s out in the open. To what end, however, I don’t know.

  78. All history is celebrated through American TV talking points, after all Americans were the first to walk upon the moon and liberated Jews from Dachau

    Everyone knows that Amwrican TV is 100% true and that Europeans were Nazis who enaged in wholesale slander porno propoganda

    If there is one thing allies stood for it was as everything Napoleon fought for

    A one world Europe directed from America

  79. which living person has the longest “shortest hand-shaking link” to Napoleon? Some Andaman fisher, a tribal hunter deep in the Amazon rain forest or a Khoisan living in the desert?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Erik Sieven

    Right, North Sentinel Island in the Andamans would be a good guess, unless you expanded handshake to include "National Geographic photographer shot with an arrow."

  80. Steve, like Vox Day, I don’t think you’re as smart as you think you are, you dismiss conspiracy theory like a retard at his parent’s demand he eat breakfast.

    Most of everything you post is hearsay praise of big state government operatives, you love a Rhodes based USA something you’ve made no disguise of your standards.

    All your urgings are war bromides I don’t think you’d want your own boy to die for the anti-nazi absurd clown world you represent.

  81. Anonymous[301] • Disclaimer says:

    WGAS

  82. I was once in the same room as Paul McCartney at the time when a female friend of mine was dating a good friend of McCartney’s brother Mike, but it is quite awkward meeting such a famous person when they are trying to be polite and you are trying not to appear to be gauche, so I failed to take the opportunity to shake his hand and connect myself to Napoleon.

    I was also once in an audience where Bertrand Russell was speaking on the campaign for nuclear disarmament, but again I failed to take the opportunity to shake his philosophical hand and connect myself to Napoleon.

    I also attended the funeral of Sir Winston Churchill, but was unable to shake his hand which must have shaken many hands with links to history.

    To think that I could have been a contender.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    I was once in the same room as Paul McCartney...
     
    Well, I would regularly get pierogies at the Russian tea place in St Paul. The proprietor's brother ran Pete's Guitar in the other half of the duplex, and once sold an axe to George Harrison. There were pictures posted in the tea room to prove it. (And George met Her Majesty!)

    Pete is long gone and Nick the pierogi man retired. They were postwar child refugees from the Ukraine. (News articles posted to prove that.) I don't know if they'd appreciate the place to get pierogies over in Minneapolis now:


    https://www.hammerandsicklempls.com


    https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/5ca26ea08dfc8c1312e65796/1554402925341-621F4WVNBVZQ6SAAKQBQ/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kJXS4O2JJw-4Bxx2EGURI4xZw-zPPgdn4jUwVcJE1ZvWQUxwkmyExglNqGp0IvTJZUJFbgE-7XRK3dMEBRBhUpx-G5vab-Jj4qaYMcyScXRwb5d0HL9H8KozxRNqObeUBl-4geVfqC6qQPRrOhy8Y6g/web-DateNight-Hammer.png?format=500w

  83. Also, Burgess was considered a genius in the 1970s, one of the most celebrated authors in the English language, on a par with Nabokov, so putting a lot of effort into reading his books was assumed to be his rightful due. Nowadays, you don’t hear much about Burgess other than his Clockwork Orange.

    In the fall of 1972, as a miserable freshman at one of my state’s cow colleges (Purdue), I did a bit of writing that one of my professors thought well enough of that I ended up with an invitation to a “Literary Awards Banquet,” there to be presented with my Laurel and Hearty Handshake. Guest speaker and hander-out of the honors: Anthony Burgess. Not sure what the formal requirements for “genius” are, but there was certainly a brilliant writer and a complete master of his language. Yes, today he’s known only for A Clockwork Orange, which is unfortunate (not that there’s anything wrong with Orange). His best, I think, are the Enderby novels, although many others would be in the conversation. I’m certain that he wouldn’t remember shaking my hand, but I’m way more than certain that I’ll never forget having shaken his.

    • Thanks: sayless
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reactionary Utopian


    ... as a miserable freshman at one of my state’s cow colleges (Purdue)...
     
    You should not seriously consider or even joke that your alma matter, Purdue, is a "cow college," unless cows are sacred to you. Both the first man and the last man to ever stand on another world earned their engineering degrees at Purdue. The First Man turned down MIT.

    As a lowly Buffalo, I say, Go Boilermakers!

    Replies: @D. K.

    , @D. K.
    @Reactionary Utopian

    Do you recall the name of that Purdue professor, by any chance?

    I transferred to Purdue as a junior, switching to a double-major in English and General History, and graduated 43 years ago, next week. Amazingly, there still is one active English professor there whom I had had as a teacher (for a course on "The Canterbury Tales"-- which he made us read in the original Middle English!):

    https://cla.purdue.edu/directory/profiles/shaun-hughes.html

    There is even only one emeritus professor listed whom I had had for a course, back in my first semester at Purdue, forty-five years ago. (I subsequently lived across the street from him and his family, for a few years.)

    A few years ago, I went through the interests of all of the English faculty at Purdue, and almost all of them seemed to be pure Critical Theory adherents. Sigh....

    https://cla.purdue.edu/academic/english/directory/index.html

    Replies: @Reactionary Utopian

  84. Was it Paul or Billy Shears?

  85. @syonredux
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Come on, what with all the Nazis hiding out in Latin America, aren't we all three handshakes away from Adolph?


    https://twitter.com/PulpLibrarian/status/1390400020390858752

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Pericles, @Joe Stalin

    I had a high school Chemistry teacher who said she met Albert Einstein. He must have met enough foreign dignitaries to eventually get to Adolf Hitler.

  86. @Jonathan Mason
    I was once in the same room as Paul McCartney at the time when a female friend of mine was dating a good friend of McCartney's brother Mike, but it is quite awkward meeting such a famous person when they are trying to be polite and you are trying not to appear to be gauche, so I failed to take the opportunity to shake his hand and connect myself to Napoleon.

    I was also once in an audience where Bertrand Russell was speaking on the campaign for nuclear disarmament, but again I failed to take the opportunity to shake his philosophical hand and connect myself to Napoleon.

    I also attended the funeral of Sir Winston Churchill, but was unable to shake his hand which must have shaken many hands with links to history.

    To think that I could have been a contender.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I was once in the same room as Paul McCartney…

    Well, I would regularly get pierogies at the Russian tea place in St Paul. The proprietor’s brother ran Pete’s Guitar in the other half of the duplex, and once sold an axe to George Harrison. There were pictures posted in the tea room to prove it. (And George met Her Majesty!)

    Pete is long gone and Nick the pierogi man retired. They were postwar child refugees from the Ukraine. (News articles posted to prove that.) I don’t know if they’d appreciate the place to get pierogies over in Minneapolis now:

    https://www.hammerandsicklempls.com

  87. Also, Burgess was considered a genius in the 1970s, one of the most celebrated authors in the English language, on a par with Nabokov, so putting a lot of effort into reading his books was assumed to be his rightful due. Nowadays, you don’t hear much about Burgess other than his Clockwork Orange.

    I think it was Martin Amis who wrote well on the subject of Burgess’s (who I think was a friend of Kingsley’s) refreshingly normal exurban semi-detached existence while he wrote some of the weirdest shit ever–before he resorted to tax-exile in his Monegasque hellhole anyway. Burgess was conservative in every sense but the artistic, and that can’t have served his reputation well in the decades since his death.

    From his Wikipedia entry:

    Burgess was a Conservative (though, as he clarified in an interview with The Paris Review, his political views could be considered “a kind of anarchism” since his ideal of a “Catholic Jacobite imperial monarch” wasn’t practicable[51]), a (lapsed) Catholic and Monarchist, harbouring a distaste for all republics.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @slumber_j


    Burgess was conservative in every sense but the artistic, and that can’t have served his reputation well in the decades since his death.
     
    Sometimes Conquest's Law works in reverse-- Burgess, Schoenberg, Eliot, Ted Nugent...

    ...refreshingly normal exurban semi-detached existence
     
    Galt MacDermot was a bourgeois Canadian living such a life on Staten Island-- he had five kids--when he got mixed up with the Hair guys. Dad was a diplomat. How square can you get?
    , @Pericles
    @slumber_j

    Lol, the hellscape that is Monaco. Why didn't we stay in Birmingham?

    https://c8.alamy.com/comp/P63133/monte-carlo-monaco-beautiful-fountain-in-front-of-the-grand-casino-with-tourists-passing-by-P63133.jpg

  88. The thing about these handshake-link things is that you only have to have shaken hands with one really connected person to be at an order of remove or two from just about everyone ever. Once you’ve shaken hands with the King of Spain or whomever, you’re pretty much done.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan, Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @slumber_j

    You're right, of course, but...


    https://media.giphy.com/media/RGy0AxSryCv84/giphy.gif

    Replies: @slumber_j

    , @Lurker
    @slumber_j


    Once you’ve shaken hands with the King of Spain or whomever, you’re pretty much done.
     
    Yes. One shake with a well connected person, a node in the network, and someone long lived too, that extends their handshake reach (and thus one's own) both in time and numbers.

    My dad interviewed Prince Philip some years ago and certainly shook his hand, so that puts me within a few steps of a ton of interesting people from the last 100 years. Meaning I'm only few steps away from others commenting here.

    He's interviewed other interesting characters too, so my links are reinforced that way as well.
  89. Off (interesting) topic, but I thought you might be interested. At 4:20 in Bannon’s Warroom podcast Episode 931, Matt Gaetz says (talking about the sad, sad RINO rump party members like Romney and Cheney “…if you are an invade everywhere, invite everyone Republican…”

    You are doing the Lord’s work. Despite lacking a major media outlet, your concepts are filtering out into the broader world of non-insane political thought.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Wade Hampton

    You do realize that Matt Gaetz is clown world personified, right?

    Replies: @Coemgen

  90. @PiltdownMan

    Perhaps etiquette required that the Emperor not shake hands?
     
    Since Bonaparte was descended from Italian nobility, but not of royal blood, I wonder if that convention applied. He was emperor, ruler of his empire, but not a king, AFAIK.

    This account of Napoleon's stay in Elba (and numerous visitors) is interesting.

    https://www.napoleon.org/en/history-of-the-two-empires/articles/a-sympathetic-ear-napoleon-elba-and-the-british-from-history-today-1994-vol-44/

    Replies: @Getaclue, @Polistra, @epebble, @Macon Waters

    Talking of emperors, I once ran into emperor Naruhito

    in 1999, when he was a Crown Prince (Crowned in 2019) while travelling in the Shinkansen (Bullet train) from Tokyo to Kyoto/Osaka. What surprised me was how low key it was. No guns, no metal detectors, nothing. Just about half dozen imperial household help with a pair of golden ropes creating a moving walkway. The rail platform, with a few thousand travelers , was pin-drop silent. Very eerie. Later, I asked one of the onlookers what is happening, he whispered “Prince”.

    • Replies: @Skyler the Weird
    @epebble

    In Denmark in 2008 I was eating lunch at Ida Davidsen's the famous Smørrebrød place. Guy in front of me looked like a well dressed businessman. He got his order we bumped we both said excuse me. I got my order and when I got back to the table my Danish companion said you just bumped Prince Frederich. Never would have known as everything over there is so laid back. I wonder if one of his ancestors bumped Napoleon, Bernadotte or Gustavus Adolphus?

    Replies: @Ralph L

  91. @slumber_j

    Also, Burgess was considered a genius in the 1970s, one of the most celebrated authors in the English language, on a par with Nabokov, so putting a lot of effort into reading his books was assumed to be his rightful due. Nowadays, you don’t hear much about Burgess other than his Clockwork Orange.
     
    I think it was Martin Amis who wrote well on the subject of Burgess's (who I think was a friend of Kingsley's) refreshingly normal exurban semi-detached existence while he wrote some of the weirdest shit ever--before he resorted to tax-exile in his Monegasque hellhole anyway. Burgess was conservative in every sense but the artistic, and that can't have served his reputation well in the decades since his death.

    From his Wikipedia entry:

    Burgess was a Conservative (though, as he clarified in an interview with The Paris Review, his political views could be considered "a kind of anarchism" since his ideal of a "Catholic Jacobite imperial monarch" wasn't practicable[51]), a (lapsed) Catholic and Monarchist, harbouring a distaste for all republics.
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Pericles

    Burgess was conservative in every sense but the artistic, and that can’t have served his reputation well in the decades since his death.

    Sometimes Conquest’s Law works in reverse– Burgess, Schoenberg, Eliot, Ted Nugent…

    …refreshingly normal exurban semi-detached existence

    Galt MacDermot was a bourgeois Canadian living such a life on Staten Island– he had five kids–when he got mixed up with the Hair guys. Dad was a diplomat. How square can you get?

    • Thanks: slumber_j

  92. [MORE]

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @MEH 0910

    She was born the day after Barack Obama.

    Replies: @Curle, @MEH 0910

    , @slumber_j
    @MEH 0910

    This cannot be a good omen.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    , @danand
    @MEH 0910

    https://youtu.be/WyF8RHM1OCg

    This Whitesnake music video is how/where most became aware of Tawny, quite the sensation in 1987.

    As for myself, Tawny's adventures in the "Land of the Yik-Yak", are it:

    https://flic.kr/p/2kXqGiR

    "The Perils of Gwendoline in the Land of the Yik-Yak" (original title Gwendoline) is a 1984 French action comedy directed by Just Jaeckin, starring Tawny Kitaen.

    , @AnotherDad
    @MEH 0910

    Other than hair matches name???

    (Am i supposed to know this person?)

    Replies: @dfordoom

    , @syonredux
    @MEH 0910

    RIP Tawny. You definitely left your mark on millions of pubescent boys:


    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/95/e7/31/95e731157d193d79cf23e036a6408215--tawny-kitaen-s-hair.jpg






    At least we've still got Phoebe Cates:



    https://ilarge.lisimg.com/image/12988060/1048full-phoebe-cates.jpg

    Replies: @Anon

  93. @theo the kraut
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I can beat that, kinda, just two steps: in Rome, on a damp late summer evening at the Tiber shore, the assistant personal librarian to Pope John Paul II chatted me up. Turned out he was cruising and lonely. I couldn't help him with any funny business, but we shook hands eventually, interesting guy. Trivia: he told the Pope about his urges and John Paul was cool with it (the church hates sin, but loves the sinner) he just shouldn't sin, no sweat. He sinned, though, *a lot.* He gave me a tour the next days around the local ecclesiastical cesspool, ethnographically very interesting. Reminds me of the story below, just with cassocks, skullcaps, and lots of funny business in confessionals and elsewhere.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2007/05/the-kingdom-in-the-closet/305774
    The Kingdom in the Closet
    Sodomy is punishable by death in Saudi Arabia, but gay life flourishes there. Why it is “easier to be gay than straight” in a society where everyone, homosexual and otherwise, lives in the closet

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri, @BB753, @Sean, @Achmed E. Newman

    I can beat that, kinda, just two steps: in Rome,

    “Gimme two steps, gimme two steps, Mister, gimme two steps toward the door. Gimme two steps, gimme two steps, Mister, and you’ll never see me no more… for sure!”

  94. I’ve elbow-bumped a guy who fist-bumped guy who may have fisted Anthony Fauci and/or known him in the Biblical sense, if that helps. Luckily there are wipes and sanitizer around EVERYWHERE nowadays.

  95. ‘Elba’ is (part of) the second or third-best palindrome of all, I reckon.

    Doc, note, I dissent. A fast never prevents a fatness. I diet on cod.

  96. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/TMZ/status/1391024597047283713

    https://twitter.com/Variety/status/1391029975306940418

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @slumber_j, @danand, @AnotherDad, @syonredux

    She was born the day after Barack Obama.

    • Thanks: MEH 0910
    • Replies: @Curle
    @Reg Cæsar

    Maybe it’s because I like Frampton, but there’s something interesting about this:

    “ Kitaen, whose credits include 'The Perils of Gwendoline' and "After Midnight," was a precocious child who got the showbiz bug at 14, when she saw Peter Frampton at Balboa Stadium in San Diego. She got a backstage pass and saw the All-Access VIP treatment Peter's GF, Penny, received, and that was it. She was hooked.”

    I’ve never heard a guy express a similar motivation.

    , @MEH 0910
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://twitter.com/BarackObama/status/1391106025269440516

    https://twitter.com/BarackObama/status/1391106043900579842


    https://twitter.com/MichelleObama/status/1391120337115525124

  97. @Reg Cæsar

    Most transwomen have interpersonal AGP: the sexual attraction to the fantasy of being perceived by other people as women. Thus, they want others to say they are women and insist on the idea that "transwomen are women". Pronouns are vital for their sexual gratification. 2/N
    --Kirino Imouto, on Steve's Twitter feed
     
    Somebody named Armstrong said those very words in a comment here. I don't think he was kidding, either.

    Replies: @Charon, @ic1000

    Thanks. I found out that “AGP” stands for ‘autogynephilic.’ Here is a link to that Twitter thread by Kirino Imouto.

  98. Steve mentioned that Kubrick considered Sir Ian Holm for the role of Napoleon and identitied Holm by one of his now most recognizable roles, Bilbo Baggins in The Lord of the Rings and Hobbit movie. I was disappointed to see that Steve didn’t mention that Holm actually played Napoleon on screen not once but twice: in Time Bandits (1981) and 20 years later in The Emperor’s New Clothes (2001).

    • Thanks: MEH 0910
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Percy Gryce

    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/movies/movie-news/ian-holm-dead-chariots-fire-alien-bilbo-baggins-actor-was-88-1075500/


    At 5-foot-6, Holm was always an excellent candidate to play a certain pint-sized French emperor, and he did so three times, in the 1974 nine-part miniseries Napoleon and Love, in Gilliam’s Time Bandits (1981) and in The Emperor’s New Clothes (2001).
     
    https://twitter.com/edgarwright/status/1273959302533963777

    Replies: @Pericles

    , @PiltdownMan
    @Percy Gryce


    Steve mentioned that Kubrick considered Sir Ian Holm for the role of Napoleon ...
     
    I once saw a Soviet-Italian epic style movie, Waterloo, in an art-movie theater in lower Manhattan. It starred Rod Steiger as Napoleon, with him narrating his reminiscence of the great battle and the assumptions and errors he made. Christopher Plummer played the Duke of Wellington. I liked it.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsW2brnlE44

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DcWJrzK0wU
  99. ‘…He may have met Napoleon III when he was exiled to England, who was Napoleon’s nephew but I’m not 100% sure if they did…’

    That inspires a wild one. If memory serves, Napoleon III had a son or some younger relative who managed to get speared to death by a Zulu while with the British Army in South Africa.

    Not exactly a handshake link, but perhaps from Napoleon I to some present-day Zulu politician?

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Colin Wright

    That was Napoleon 3’s son his only child. Family lived in England after his father’s defeat. Joined the British army. Allegedly everyone of his many wounds were in front, not in back. Proof he didn’t try to run. Hailed for his bravery at the funeral. It was that famous British vs Zulu battle. Don’t remember the name.

    What a waste of his young life. War for the Jewish British empire.

    Replies: @David In TN

  100. When I was 12 LBJ shook my hand and he had done so with FDR who shook Stalin’s hand who had shaken with Lenin. He had shaken hands with the greatest Russian ever, the anarchist Peter Kropotkin, who told him collectivism was the path to ruin and despotism. Lenin thought he was an honorable old revolutionary but a dotty old man

    That is the line of handshakes I like the most. For me

  101. ‘…Eventually, I got the hang of the book. It’s really quite good. But it did strike me that I must have been a lot smarter when I was 17…’

    One does sometimes get a sneaking suspicion to that effect.

  102. Aren’t all of us deplorables literally Hitler and therefore zero handshakes away?

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
  103. Curle says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    @MEH 0910

    She was born the day after Barack Obama.

    Replies: @Curle, @MEH 0910

    Maybe it’s because I like Frampton, but there’s something interesting about this:

    “ Kitaen, whose credits include ‘The Perils of Gwendoline’ and “After Midnight,” was a precocious child who got the showbiz bug at 14, when she saw Peter Frampton at Balboa Stadium in San Diego. She got a backstage pass and saw the All-Access VIP treatment Peter’s GF, Penny, received, and that was it. She was hooked.”

    I’ve never heard a guy express a similar motivation.

  104. @slumber_j
    The thing about these handshake-link things is that you only have to have shaken hands with one really connected person to be at an order of remove or two from just about everyone ever. Once you've shaken hands with the King of Spain or whomever, you're pretty much done.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Lurker

    You’re right, of course, but…

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Fair enough--although judging from your handle you're maybe gonna be oversensitive to the buzz kill hahahaha lol.

    Maybe it's time to start drinking again.

  105. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/TMZ/status/1391024597047283713

    https://twitter.com/Variety/status/1391029975306940418

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @slumber_j, @danand, @AnotherDad, @syonredux

    This cannot be a good omen.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @slumber_j


    This cannot be a good omen.
     
    p.s. At least I'm not alone in feeling this way... I texted this to a friend, who replied: "Kali Yuga incoming."
  106. @Buzz Mohawk
    @slumber_j

    You're right, of course, but...


    https://media.giphy.com/media/RGy0AxSryCv84/giphy.gif

    Replies: @slumber_j

    Fair enough–although judging from your handle you’re maybe gonna be oversensitive to the buzz kill hahahaha lol.

    Maybe it’s time to start drinking again.

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
  107. @Percy Gryce
    Steve mentioned that Kubrick considered Sir Ian Holm for the role of Napoleon and identitied Holm by one of his now most recognizable roles, Bilbo Baggins in The Lord of the Rings and Hobbit movie. I was disappointed to see that Steve didn't mention that Holm actually played Napoleon on screen not once but twice: in Time Bandits (1981) and 20 years later in The Emperor's New Clothes (2001).

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @PiltdownMan

    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/movies/movie-news/ian-holm-dead-chariots-fire-alien-bilbo-baggins-actor-was-88-1075500/

    At 5-foot-6, Holm was always an excellent candidate to play a certain pint-sized French emperor, and he did so three times, in the 1974 nine-part miniseries Napoleon and Love, in Gilliam’s Time Bandits (1981) and in The Emperor’s New Clothes (2001).

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @MEH 0910

    Alas, too tall to play Robert Reich.

  108. @slumber_j
    @MEH 0910

    This cannot be a good omen.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    This cannot be a good omen.

    p.s. At least I’m not alone in feeling this way… I texted this to a friend, who replied: “Kali Yuga incoming.”

  109. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:

    re-reading novels one should never’ve read in the first place is, as sundar pichai would say, not cool.

    the number of novels worth reading is less than 100 mein steve.

    this brings up a very interesting point.

    neurotic fascination has it’s own (false) weltanschauung…

    namely, that the world is endlessly complex, that the info-gourmand can never be too discerning in his taste.

    this is gay steve.

    you should be blogging about Brideshead not Scoop inter alia.

    about the von karajan studio recordings of wagner and not beethoven.

    about monk and not ellington.

    about wilfrid owen and not ezra pound.

    about pizza and not coquilles st jacques.
    etc.

    • Replies: @odilo againo
    @anon

    fewer than 100 mein steve.

    i'm so ashamed. i should gas myself.

    now i know why steve asks for donations.

    http://peopleshistoryarchive.org/sites/default/files/stickers/2012_obey_001.jpg

    if steve won't take the land dive into Chiloé Island or south and would eschew the world's oldest institution...at least he can visit the point doom beach and hear the waves and know that UN-ironically American Gigolo is top 20 fil-uhms ever made.

  110. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar

    What really matters is how many handshakes we are away from Kevin Bacon.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @njguy73

    Check out the website Oracle of Bacon.

    Turns out that the true center of Hollywood is Christopher Lee.

  111. @anon
    re-reading novels one should never've read in the first place is, as sundar pichai would say, not cool.

    the number of novels worth reading is less than 100 mein steve.

    this brings up a very interesting point.

    neurotic fascination has it's own (false) weltanschauung...

    namely, that the world is endlessly complex, that the info-gourmand can never be too discerning in his taste.

    this is gay steve.

    you should be blogging about Brideshead not Scoop inter alia.

    about the von karajan studio recordings of wagner and not beethoven.

    about monk and not ellington.

    about wilfrid owen and not ezra pound.

    about pizza and not coquilles st jacques.
    etc.

    Replies: @odilo againo

    fewer than 100 mein steve.

    i’m so ashamed. i should gas myself.

    now i know why steve asks for donations.

    if steve won’t take the land dive into Chiloé Island or south and would eschew the world’s oldest institution…at least he can visit the point doom beach and hear the waves and know that UN-ironically American Gigolo is top 20 fil-uhms ever made.

  112. Kylie says:

    I saw Anthony Burgess give a lecture back in Fall 1974. I recall him saying his mother played piano to accompany the flickers but Wikipedia tells me I misremembered, that his father played piano in a public house. How ordinary. My version is obviously superior.

    Since young film buffs were still all het up about the film, A Clockwork Orange, which was released a few years earlier, I imagine that’s why he was asked to lecture. Why he agreed to appear at my rinky dink state school, I do not know. He was very ugly and very vain, which caused me in my naivete to conclude that he must be very talented.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Kylie

    Burgess narrated documentaries, gave lectures, and cadged drinks about as industriously as he cranked out novels. His output was truly amazing.

  113. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/TMZ/status/1391024597047283713

    https://twitter.com/Variety/status/1391029975306940418

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @slumber_j, @danand, @AnotherDad, @syonredux

    This Whitesnake music video is how/where most became aware of Tawny, quite the sensation in 1987.

    As for myself, Tawny’s adventures in the “Land of the Yik-Yak”, are it:

    gw

    “The Perils of Gwendoline in the Land of the Yik-Yak” (original title Gwendoline) is a 1984 French action comedy directed by Just Jaeckin, starring Tawny Kitaen.

  114. @Erik Sieven
    which living person has the longest "shortest hand-shaking link" to Napoleon? Some Andaman fisher, a tribal hunter deep in the Amazon rain forest or a Khoisan living in the desert?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Right, North Sentinel Island in the Andamans would be a good guess, unless you expanded handshake to include “National Geographic photographer shot with an arrow.”

  115. @Reactionary Utopian

    Also, Burgess was considered a genius in the 1970s, one of the most celebrated authors in the English language, on a par with Nabokov, so putting a lot of effort into reading his books was assumed to be his rightful due. Nowadays, you don’t hear much about Burgess other than his Clockwork Orange.
     
    In the fall of 1972, as a miserable freshman at one of my state's cow colleges (Purdue), I did a bit of writing that one of my professors thought well enough of that I ended up with an invitation to a "Literary Awards Banquet," there to be presented with my Laurel and Hearty Handshake. Guest speaker and hander-out of the honors: Anthony Burgess. Not sure what the formal requirements for "genius" are, but there was certainly a brilliant writer and a complete master of his language. Yes, today he's known only for A Clockwork Orange, which is unfortunate (not that there's anything wrong with Orange). His best, I think, are the Enderby novels, although many others would be in the conversation. I'm certain that he wouldn't remember shaking my hand, but I'm way more than certain that I'll never forget having shaken his.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @D. K.

    … as a miserable freshman at one of my state’s cow colleges (Purdue)…

    You should not seriously consider or even joke that your alma matter, Purdue, is a “cow college,” unless cows are sacred to you. Both the first man and the last man to ever stand on another world earned their engineering degrees at Purdue. The First Man turned down MIT.

    As a lowly Buffalo, I say, Go Boilermakers!

    • Thanks: Antiwar7
    • Replies: @D. K.
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Also, two of the three astronauts who died in the "Apollo 1" fire, on January 27, 1967, were Purdue Boilermakers: 'Gus' Grissom and Roger Chaffee (alongside Ed White, a graduate of West Point and the University of Michigan). When I was an English major at Purdue, my classes were all in Heavilon Hall, which was next door to Grissom Hall. The west-side doorway of Grissom Hall, which faced the nearby east-side doorway of Heavilon Hall, had a life-size, full-colored, cardboard cutout of 'Gus' Grissom in his Apollo spacesuit. The building was recently gutted and rebuilt:

    https://engineering.purdue.edu/IE/aboutus/aboutus/facilities/facilities-celebration

    "The building is named for the late Virgil I. 'Gus' Grissom, one of the original NASA Project Mercury astronauts and the second American to fly in space."

    Oddly, there is no mention of his shocking death in the "Apollo 1" capsule (let alone of his infamous landing in Liberty Bell 7, when the emergency bolts blew the hatch off of the capsule, nearly causing Grissom to drown!).

  116. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/TMZ/status/1391024597047283713

    https://twitter.com/Variety/status/1391029975306940418

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @slumber_j, @danand, @AnotherDad, @syonredux

    Other than hair matches name???

    (Am i supposed to know this person?)

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @AnotherDad


    (Am i supposed to know this person?)
     
    Gwendoline was a great movie, but you wouldn't approve.
  117. @Almost Missouri
    @theo the kraut


    ethnographically very interesting.
     
    Back in John Paul II's heyday, I spent a week in Rome as the guest of an earnest young priest-in-training at the Pontifical Colleges. I met some of his colleagues at social events there. Other than one who struck me as clinically depressed, the others struck me as obviously gay. Given that my host intended to return to the small town Midwest of his origins to preach the gospel, while the others aspired more to the Vatican hierarchy, well, it implied certain conclusions about the state of affairs at the Catholic metropole in the Eternal City. Conclusions that are confirmed by accounts such as yours or Ann Barnhardt's, not to mention the current flagrantly gay Pope.

    My host seemed oblivious to this or was studiously ignoring it.

    Replies: @black sea, @Not Raul, @theo the kraut, @theo the kraut

    > Other than one who struck me as clinically depressed, the others struck me as obviously gay. Given that my host intended to return to the small town Midwest of his origins to preach the gospel

    My guy was an earnest young priest-in-training, too, while working for the Pope. However, he intended to have himself transferred to NYC to **** himself to death to atone for his many sins, couldn’t talk him out of that rather un-Catholic idea.* One day he showed me around the parish that he was assigned to in a honorary function, he didn’t try to disguise his interest for me, but the young mothers would flock around him to have their babies blessed anyway, everybody ignored the obvious, they seemed to think that it goes with the territory of holy men.

    * I’m atheist myself, but if you’re Catholic, you better mean it, I don’t fancy funny business of any kind, I’m not a liberal any more…

  118. @Anonymous
    OT:

    It's just been revealed that California has declined in population for the first time in the state's history(!)

    A classic example of the law of diminishing returns in action:

    If you make a 'good' so attractive that the hoi polloi pile in massively, sooner or later, by the mere fact of the hoi polloi piling in massively, it ceases to attract the hoi polloi, ie, it becomes worse than the place they piled in from.

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @AnotherDad, @Uncle Dan

    The White population in the United States has been declining for 5 years. The 2020 census will be the first which saw a decline in the white population from the previous census. 400 years of growth ended in 2016

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    "The White population in the United States has been declining for 5 years. "

    As somebody said on twitter, the number of Americans is shrinking, but the number of American dollars is increasing exponentially.

  119. @Almost Missouri
    @theo the kraut


    ethnographically very interesting.
     
    Back in John Paul II's heyday, I spent a week in Rome as the guest of an earnest young priest-in-training at the Pontifical Colleges. I met some of his colleagues at social events there. Other than one who struck me as clinically depressed, the others struck me as obviously gay. Given that my host intended to return to the small town Midwest of his origins to preach the gospel, while the others aspired more to the Vatican hierarchy, well, it implied certain conclusions about the state of affairs at the Catholic metropole in the Eternal City. Conclusions that are confirmed by accounts such as yours or Ann Barnhardt's, not to mention the current flagrantly gay Pope.

    My host seemed oblivious to this or was studiously ignoring it.

    Replies: @black sea, @Not Raul, @theo the kraut, @theo the kraut

    > the current flagrantly gay Pope.

    He’s awful, but I are you sure about that detail?

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-22869399
    »Pope Francis is reported to have acknowledged the existence of a “gay lobby” inside the Vatican. He also said there was a “stream of corruption” […] The Vatican would have to “see what we can do” about the “gay lobby” operating in the bureaucracy, he said. “It is true, it is there,” the report quotes him as saying.«

  120. D. K. says:
    @Reactionary Utopian

    Also, Burgess was considered a genius in the 1970s, one of the most celebrated authors in the English language, on a par with Nabokov, so putting a lot of effort into reading his books was assumed to be his rightful due. Nowadays, you don’t hear much about Burgess other than his Clockwork Orange.
     
    In the fall of 1972, as a miserable freshman at one of my state's cow colleges (Purdue), I did a bit of writing that one of my professors thought well enough of that I ended up with an invitation to a "Literary Awards Banquet," there to be presented with my Laurel and Hearty Handshake. Guest speaker and hander-out of the honors: Anthony Burgess. Not sure what the formal requirements for "genius" are, but there was certainly a brilliant writer and a complete master of his language. Yes, today he's known only for A Clockwork Orange, which is unfortunate (not that there's anything wrong with Orange). His best, I think, are the Enderby novels, although many others would be in the conversation. I'm certain that he wouldn't remember shaking my hand, but I'm way more than certain that I'll never forget having shaken his.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @D. K.

    Do you recall the name of that Purdue professor, by any chance?

    I transferred to Purdue as a junior, switching to a double-major in English and General History, and graduated 43 years ago, next week. Amazingly, there still is one active English professor there whom I had had as a teacher (for a course on “The Canterbury Tales”– which he made us read in the original Middle English!):

    https://cla.purdue.edu/directory/profiles/shaun-hughes.html

    There is even only one emeritus professor listed whom I had had for a course, back in my first semester at Purdue, forty-five years ago. (I subsequently lived across the street from him and his family, for a few years.)

    A few years ago, I went through the interests of all of the English faculty at Purdue, and almost all of them seemed to be pure Critical Theory adherents. Sigh….

    https://cla.purdue.edu/academic/english/directory/index.html

    • Replies: @Reactionary Utopian
    @D. K.


    Do you recall the name of that Purdue professor, by any chance?
     
    I wish I could remember who I had for freshman composition, but I’ve had too many birthdays since then. It was required for pretty much everyone, so I’m fairly sure my professor would have been someone low-level, who caught the academic drudgery.

    Later, I took my elective hours in literature courses, because I liked them. I can certainly remember who my Shakespeare instructor: A. A. deVitis. There was a man who was passionate about his subject. I can still remember him, perched on the edge of a desk, reeling off page after page, putting the music into it. Great teacher.

    Replies: @D. K.

  121. @Anonymous
    OT:

    It's just been revealed that California has declined in population for the first time in the state's history(!)

    A classic example of the law of diminishing returns in action:

    If you make a 'good' so attractive that the hoi polloi pile in massively, sooner or later, by the mere fact of the hoi polloi piling in massively, it ceases to attract the hoi polloi, ie, it becomes worse than the place they piled in from.

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @AnotherDad, @Uncle Dan

    It’s just been revealed that California has declined in population for the first time in the state’s history(!)

    A bad sign for the future of everywhere from Boise to Walla Walla.

    Was over at the neighbors a week or so back and the issue of DeSantis running came up. Husband didn’t think so. Neighbor wife wanted him to stay put and keep things decent here. Said she was worried about the next election with all the people moving in. That they’ll come here … then make it just like there. Suggested they shouldn’t be allowed to vote.

    Despite the year of blackety-black-black-black our fundamental problem isn’t even racial, it’s political: Minoritarianism.

    Some people are happy with the American nation–our people, history, language, social and political norms–our culture. And some aren’t.

    We need separate nations.

  122. @Polistra
    @PiltdownMan

    Ooh! And Reg was just holding forth about palindromes in the last thread.

    'Elba' is (part of) the second or third-best palindrome of all, I reckon.

    Of course none can touch that other geographical notable...

    http://monovisions.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/vintage-panama-canal-construction-1904-1914-02.jpg

    Replies: @Pericles, @Joe Joe, @Mr. Anon, @Reg Cæsar

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Mr. Anon

    Ran out of THANKS and LOLs but that is epic!
    Never saw it before though I do know the original.

    , @Sam Malone
    @Mr. Anon

    That is pretty good, thanks.

  123. All I known is we need a Napoleon now.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Peterike

    Anyone strong enough to save the Republic is more likely to ruin it--quickly instead of slowly.

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Peterike

    "we need a Napoleon now"

    Roof Top Koreans, Mariachi Mexicans, and now a French cherub. Whilst in Egypt Napoleon sought wisdom from the ancients but found the Rosetta Stone instead. Will American white men discover a talisman that'll bring them the strength to save my life of leisure from intrusive racist black ladies and poison-pimping technocrats?

  124. @Anonymous
    OT:

    It's just been revealed that California has declined in population for the first time in the state's history(!)

    A classic example of the law of diminishing returns in action:

    If you make a 'good' so attractive that the hoi polloi pile in massively, sooner or later, by the mere fact of the hoi polloi piling in massively, it ceases to attract the hoi polloi, ie, it becomes worse than the place they piled in from.

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @AnotherDad, @Uncle Dan

    Nobody goes there anymore more, it’s too crowded.

  125. @Peterike
    All I known is we need a Napoleon now.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @SunBakedSuburb

    Anyone strong enough to save the Republic is more likely to ruin it–quickly instead of slowly.

  126. @Andrew Callinan
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I'm impressed! My planned comment about being a few handshakes away from Kurt 'n' Courtney and various other dipshits has been rendered shite. You really know how to piss on a man's parade.
    Regards,
    A.C

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    LOL. I have long thought that I would enjoy meeting Courtney, Leader of Hole.

    Salutations to you! Don’t wash that hand. Use it! LOL.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk



    I’m impressed! My planned comment about being a few handshakes away from Kurt ‘n’ Courtney...
     
    LOL. I have long thought that I would enjoy meeting Courtney, Leader of Hole.


     

    Cobain lived 9,899 days. He will be have been dead that long this coming Wednesday. (This is not counting time in utero.)

    John Lennon passed that dark mark on February 6th.

  127. jill says:

    BBC broadcast: Napoleon’s Retreat from Moscow
    In Our Time
    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss why Napoleon invaded Russia in 1812, thought he was victorious yet had to retreat, losing most of his army and, soon after, his empire.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0008jd2

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/search?q=in+our+time

  128. @Polistra
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Which reminds me, are we going to have an office pool on when and where the Chinese contraption crashes to earth? Part of me wants a major disaster (Dimona, say) just so China lovers will have to ramp up their denial another notch.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @epebble

    No matter where the Sino-trash lands, Ron Unz will write a 10,000 word article about how the debris was actually part of an American conspiracy to be blamed on China.

  129. D. K. says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reactionary Utopian


    ... as a miserable freshman at one of my state’s cow colleges (Purdue)...
     
    You should not seriously consider or even joke that your alma matter, Purdue, is a "cow college," unless cows are sacred to you. Both the first man and the last man to ever stand on another world earned their engineering degrees at Purdue. The First Man turned down MIT.

    As a lowly Buffalo, I say, Go Boilermakers!

    Replies: @D. K.

    Also, two of the three astronauts who died in the “Apollo 1” fire, on January 27, 1967, were Purdue Boilermakers: ‘Gus’ Grissom and Roger Chaffee (alongside Ed White, a graduate of West Point and the University of Michigan). When I was an English major at Purdue, my classes were all in Heavilon Hall, which was next door to Grissom Hall. The west-side doorway of Grissom Hall, which faced the nearby east-side doorway of Heavilon Hall, had a life-size, full-colored, cardboard cutout of ‘Gus’ Grissom in his Apollo spacesuit. The building was recently gutted and rebuilt:

    https://engineering.purdue.edu/IE/aboutus/aboutus/facilities/facilities-celebration

    “The building is named for the late Virgil I. ‘Gus’ Grissom, one of the original NASA Project Mercury astronauts and the second American to fly in space.”

    Oddly, there is no mention of his shocking death in the “Apollo 1” capsule (let alone of his infamous landing in Liberty Bell 7, when the emergency bolts blew the hatch off of the capsule, nearly causing Grissom to drown!).

  130. @PiltdownMan

    Perhaps etiquette required that the Emperor not shake hands?
     
    Since Bonaparte was descended from Italian nobility, but not of royal blood, I wonder if that convention applied. He was emperor, ruler of his empire, but not a king, AFAIK.

    This account of Napoleon's stay in Elba (and numerous visitors) is interesting.

    https://www.napoleon.org/en/history-of-the-two-empires/articles/a-sympathetic-ear-napoleon-elba-and-the-british-from-history-today-1994-vol-44/

    Replies: @Getaclue, @Polistra, @epebble, @Macon Waters

    Able was I ere I saw Idris Elba.

  131. Alden says:
    @Colin Wright
    '...He may have met Napoleon III when he was exiled to England, who was Napoleon's nephew but I'm not 100% sure if they did...'

    That inspires a wild one. If memory serves, Napoleon III had a son or some younger relative who managed to get speared to death by a Zulu while with the British Army in South Africa.

    Not exactly a handshake link, but perhaps from Napoleon I to some present-day Zulu politician?

    Replies: @Alden

    That was Napoleon 3’s son his only child. Family lived in England after his father’s defeat. Joined the British army. Allegedly everyone of his many wounds were in front, not in back. Proof he didn’t try to run. Hailed for his bravery at the funeral. It was that famous British vs Zulu battle. Don’t remember the name.

    What a waste of his young life. War for the Jewish British empire.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    @Alden

    He died in the 1879 British-Zulu war in South Africa. Napoleon III's son was titled The Prince Imperial. He was "presented" at a big gathering in England, hoping the Third Republic would implode and he would be called to France. The Prince Imperial waited a few years, nothing happened. Then the Zulu war broke out and he offered to join the British Army as an observer.

    The Bonaparte Prince went out on patrols. The last one resulted in his death when he lost his horse and his companions ran off.

  132. @Polistra
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Which reminds me, are we going to have an office pool on when and where the Chinese contraption crashes to earth? Part of me wants a major disaster (Dimona, say) just so China lovers will have to ramp up their denial another notch.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @epebble

    SecDef has ruled out a shootdown. What would be the reaction if it ends up falling on the Pentagon, White House or the Capitol? They say the chances are like winning a Powerball; But, some people win a Powerball. We have spent $250,000,000,000 on “Missile Defense” and can’t shoot down a locomotive size rocket on a well defined orbit?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @epebble

    1) If you already know where it is going to come down, and if that area is unpopulated, then you don't have to do anything.

    2) If you "shoot it," you then reveal to the whole world what your real capabilities are in that regard, and you don't want to do that.

    3) "Shooting it down," actually would mean only breaking it up into more pieces -- NOT changing its trajectory, so you would merely make it potentially more damaging across a wider area. It is coming down, and you do not "shoot it down," you can only shoot it and break it up.

    Probably everyone here does not know or does not remember when Skylab, the American space station from the 1970s, came down. I think its pieces landed somewhere in Australia.

    Most of the Earth's surface is water and empty land. It is highly unlikely that any space debris will land on human beings or any of their stuff, though it is possible.

    Replies: @epebble, @Polistra, @Alden

  133. @rebel yell
    You can shake one of Napoleon's appendages even today. From Wikipedia:

    Napoleon's penis was allegedly cut off in an autopsy shortly after his death in 1821.Since then it has passed through several owners, including A. S. W. Rosenbach, who exhibited it in New York City in 1927.It was purchased by John K. Lattimer in 1977, and is still held in his family, who keep it as a private item. It was described as similar to a "piece of leather or a shriveled eel".

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    A couple of nice double entendre’s in one simple line

    ” is still held in his family, who keep it as a private item. “

    Well done .

    • Replies: @sayless
    @Bill Jones

    That's indecent. They should give it a proper burial.

  134. @James Speaks
    Local NPR disc jockey once called it the “Air-Roy-Ka”

    Replies: @James J O'Meara

    In “The Magic Mountain” Mann has a character, a Frau Stohr, who constantly embarrasses her dining companions with her grotesque malaprops. When someone leaves the sanitarium to join his regiment, relapses, returns and dies, she suggests they play the “Erotica” symphony at his funeral.

  135. Ian Holm did finally play Napoleon in Time Bandits with Sean Connery as Agamemnon.

  136. @Not Raul
    @Almost Missouri

    Wait. The current Pope isn’t gay. Before he decided to become a priest, he had a girlfriend.

    The retired Pope, Benedict, might be gay.

    http://dish.andrewsullivan.com/2013/02/27/two-popes-one-secretary/

    Papa Ratzi (the retired Pope) might have more than just red loafers in his closet.

    https://shadowproof.com/2006/12/14/the-light-loafers-of-prada-papa-ratzi/amp/

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon

    Pope Francis is the target of a campaign of hate, orchestrated by the gay Mafia he’s the first pope to take on. Needless to say, in classic projection style, they accuse HIM as “soft on homos”.

    The Church’s hard line on homos is less theological than it is camo for the pedophile network: what, us? We officially hate them homos!

    This also means their hard line on everything else (divorce, birth control) was not cogitated by wise theologians but by closeted homos who hate marriage and weren’t even priests (eg. Maritain and the other French homos in Paul VI’s circle).

    https://counter-currents.com/2020/06/trad-queen-story-hour-part-ii-from-vatican-ii-to-john-paul-ii/

    Seriously, who takes advice on heterosexuality from this guy?

    • Thanks: Not Raul
    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @James J O'Meara

    That’s a very interesting link, James. Thanks.

    , @Alden
    @James J O'Meara

    No more than Mrs Obama and Mrs Trump spend on a single outfit. Obviously he believes in layering. I like red. Wish it were more in style. I believe 4 of the items on the list are variations of gown or robe. And 2 types of hat.

  137. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Anonymous

    The White population in the United States has been declining for 5 years. The 2020 census will be the first which saw a decline in the white population from the previous census. 400 years of growth ended in 2016

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “The White population in the United States has been declining for 5 years. “

    As somebody said on twitter, the number of Americans is shrinking, but the number of American dollars is increasing exponentially.

  138. @epebble
    @PiltdownMan

    Talking of emperors, I once ran into emperor Naruhito

    https://cdn-japantimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/np_file_60863.jpeg

    in 1999, when he was a Crown Prince (Crowned in 2019) while travelling in the Shinkansen (Bullet train) from Tokyo to Kyoto/Osaka. What surprised me was how low key it was. No guns, no metal detectors, nothing. Just about half dozen imperial household help with a pair of golden ropes creating a moving walkway. The rail platform, with a few thousand travelers , was pin-drop silent. Very eerie. Later, I asked one of the onlookers what is happening, he whispered "Prince".

    Replies: @Skyler the Weird

    In Denmark in 2008 I was eating lunch at Ida Davidsen’s the famous Smørrebrød place. Guy in front of me looked like a well dressed businessman. He got his order we bumped we both said excuse me. I got my order and when I got back to the table my Danish companion said you just bumped Prince Frederich. Never would have known as everything over there is so laid back. I wonder if one of his ancestors bumped Napoleon, Bernadotte or Gustavus Adolphus?

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Skyler the Weird

    Did he leave on a bicycle?

  139. @Bardon Kaldian

    Eventually, I got the hang of the book. It’s really quite good. But it did strike me that I must have been a lot smarter when I was 17.

    Also, Burgess was considered a genius in the 1970s, one of the most celebrated authors in the English language, on a par with Nabokov, so putting a lot of effort into reading his books was assumed to be his rightful due. Nowadays, you don’t hear much about Burgess other than his Clockwork Orange.
     

    Rereading is frequently disappointing.

    Nabokov's stature has grown over years, mostly because some acclaimed novelists praised him (Updike, Pynchon,...). But he is, I guess, also almost forgotten by readers.

    Replies: @JMcG, @syonredux, @y78654

    On the recommendation of, I believe, a commenter here, I picked up and started reading some of the works of Flannery O’Connor. Big mistake. Just dreadful. Give me O’Brian or Fraser any day. Life is too short not to enjoy.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @JMcG

    OK, here's a short list of mostly short works I guess you won't read

    https://i.gifer.com/3Ypm.gif

    Chekhov: Ionych; My Life; Grasshopper; Duel
    Camus: The Fall
    Mann: Lotte in Weimar/Beloved returns
    Twain: The Mysterious Stranger
    Jefferies: The Story of my Heart
    Shalamov: Kolyma Tales
    London: Before Adam
    Hamsun: Hunger
    Greene: The Power and the Glory
    Martin Du Gard: Jean Barois
    Kafka: In the Penal Colony
    Berger: Little Big Man
    Coetzee: The Master of Petersburg
    Garcia Marquez: The General in His Labyrinth
    ....

  140. @Buzz Mohawk
    @syonredux


    ... aren’t we all three handshakes away from Adolph?
     
    Absolutely! Lots of people are.

    The man in the chair really has it going on. Babes and gold bars. He knows what's what.

    Replies: @Flip

    Gold, guns, and groceries (and girls) as the survivalists say.

  141. @Morton's toes

    What really matters is how many handshakes we are away from Kevin Bacon.
     
    Since Walter Mondale and Kevin Bacon undoubtedly met that is going to be 2 for Mr Caesar. This is how it almost always works. The most biggest shot you ever shook hands with is your path to anybody. I have shaken hands with somebody who shook hands with Walter Mondale so me and Mr C. are 2 jumps apart.

    Hey Reg a friend of a friend told me that aliens are among us.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Hey Reg a friend of a friend told me that aliens are among us.

    If your friend is Roy Beck, believe him.

  142. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Andrew Callinan

    LOL. I have long thought that I would enjoy meeting Courtney, Leader of Hole.


    http://images1.fanpop.com/images/photos/1500000/Hole-courtney-love-1536122-800-600.jpg


    Salutations to you! Don't wash that hand. Use it! LOL.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I’m impressed! My planned comment about being a few handshakes away from Kurt ‘n’ Courtney…

    LOL. I have long thought that I would enjoy meeting Courtney, Leader of Hole.

    Cobain lived 9,899 days. He will be have been dead that long this coming Wednesday. (This is not counting time in utero.)

    John Lennon passed that dark mark on February 6th.

  143. @epebble
    @Polistra

    SecDef has ruled out a shootdown. What would be the reaction if it ends up falling on the Pentagon, White House or the Capitol? They say the chances are like winning a Powerball; But, some people win a Powerball. We have spent $250,000,000,000 on "Missile Defense" and can't shoot down a locomotive size rocket on a well defined orbit?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    1) If you already know where it is going to come down, and if that area is unpopulated, then you don’t have to do anything.

    2) If you “shoot it,” you then reveal to the whole world what your real capabilities are in that regard, and you don’t want to do that.

    3) “Shooting it down,” actually would mean only breaking it up into more pieces — NOT changing its trajectory, so you would merely make it potentially more damaging across a wider area. It is coming down, and you do not “shoot it down,” you can only shoot it and break it up.

    Probably everyone here does not know or does not remember when Skylab, the American space station from the 1970s, came down. I think its pieces landed somewhere in Australia.

    Most of the Earth’s surface is water and empty land. It is highly unlikely that any space debris will land on human beings or any of their stuff, though it is possible.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Buzz Mohawk

    What will they do, if at 200,000 ft altitude, they estimate it may hit Pentagon or White House or Manhattan? Say, with 1% probability?

    , @Polistra
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The other thing is that as soon as you do anything at all, you get to assume responsibility for everything that follows. Which may be a lot of downside.

    Chinese, it turns out, are much like Africans. They don't have to accept responsibility for much of anything, really. That's the white man's role. Even the Japanese, who do maintain a culture of responsibility: aren't they dumping radioactive waste into the ocean right now? Could America or a European country get away with that?

    Answer: they'd never even try.

    , @Alden
    @Buzz Mohawk

    It landed last night in the Indian Ocean way south of Sri Lanka so no damage done.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @epebble

  144. @obwandiyag
    Silly. Literally millions of people have a "handshake link" whatever that is, with Napoleon. Or Jesus, for that matter.

    Replies: @epebble

    Quiz given to first year probability students in High School:

    What Is the Probability You Just Inhaled a Part of Lincoln’s Last Breath?

    The answer may surprise you!

    https://www.thoughtco.com/probability-you-inhaled-part-lincolns-last-breath-3126600

  145. My haplogroups (ancient DNA/lineage) are the exact same as Napoleon on both sides of my family. My maternal group is H and paternal group is E-M34.

  146. @Not Raul
    @Almost Missouri

    Wait. The current Pope isn’t gay. Before he decided to become a priest, he had a girlfriend.

    The retired Pope, Benedict, might be gay.

    http://dish.andrewsullivan.com/2013/02/27/two-popes-one-secretary/

    Papa Ratzi (the retired Pope) might have more than just red loafers in his closet.

    https://shadowproof.com/2006/12/14/the-light-loafers-of-prada-papa-ratzi/amp/

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon

    Andy is just miffed that no bishops or even clean-cut young seminarians answered his Bareback City personal.

    The warnings in Scripture about questionable fruit can be applied to questionable fruits as well.

  147. @Kylie
    I saw Anthony Burgess give a lecture back in Fall 1974. I recall him saying his mother played piano to accompany the flickers but Wikipedia tells me I misremembered, that his father played piano in a public house. How ordinary. My version is obviously superior.

    Since young film buffs were still all het up about the film, A Clockwork Orange, which was released a few years earlier, I imagine that's why he was asked to lecture. Why he agreed to appear at my rinky dink state school, I do not know. He was very ugly and very vain, which caused me in my naivete to conclude that he must be very talented.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Burgess narrated documentaries, gave lectures, and cadged drinks about as industriously as he cranked out novels. His output was truly amazing.

  148. @JMcG
    @Bardon Kaldian

    On the recommendation of, I believe, a commenter here, I picked up and started reading some of the works of Flannery O’Connor. Big mistake. Just dreadful. Give me O’Brian or Fraser any day. Life is too short not to enjoy.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    OK, here’s a short list of mostly short works I guess you won’t read

    Chekhov: Ionych; My Life; Grasshopper; Duel
    Camus: The Fall
    Mann: Lotte in Weimar/Beloved returns
    Twain: The Mysterious Stranger
    Jefferies: The Story of my Heart
    Shalamov: Kolyma Tales
    London: Before Adam
    Hamsun: Hunger
    Greene: The Power and the Glory
    Martin Du Gard: Jean Barois
    Kafka: In the Penal Colony
    Berger: Little Big Man
    Coetzee: The Master of Petersburg
    Garcia Marquez: The General in His Labyrinth
    ….

  149. @R.G. Camara

    Kubrick, being an alpha male movie director, wanted to make a biopic of Bonaparte’s life
     
    Instead, he took the forgotten (then-and-now) minor novel Barry Lyndon and got his 19th-Century film fix out of that. I think a Napoleon bio pic would not have worked for Kubrick, he would've been hamstrung by history instead of being able to make the film he wanted.

    (rather like how after Gladiator was a hit in 2000, Scorsese, Gibson, Luhrman, and Stone all announced plans to make their own long-dreamt of Alexander the Great biopics).
     

    Interesting that Gibson made such an announcement, but unsurprisingly he never made it.

    Gibson's extremely impressive but not-overly-long directorial career has been to make movies out of left field in genres abandoned or unpopular and make them hits. Braveheart hit it big when major sweeping historical epics with large-set battles were nonexistent and the film very likely was the catalyst for Gladiator. The Passion of the Christ was a big-hyped Jesus movie when studios were adverse to them. Hacksaw Ridge was a film celebrating a religious Christian pacifist's refusal to fight in a war . None of those genres were selling at the time, all three were major hits, critically acclaimed, and are since mainstay repeat viewings.

    Gibson has a keen eye for finding genres that were once popular but have since gone out of style and making it work again. Film genius. I fully expect him to make a big-budget Western action pic one day (perhaps his own version of the O.K. Corral gun fight) and have it break box office numbers.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    Gibson’s Apocalypto was an astonishing movie. He spends a little time demonstrating just how far removed his protagonists are from modern man and then manages to force you to identify with their agonies.
    I could not watch it to the end.

  150. @slumber_j
    The thing about these handshake-link things is that you only have to have shaken hands with one really connected person to be at an order of remove or two from just about everyone ever. Once you've shaken hands with the King of Spain or whomever, you're pretty much done.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Lurker

    Once you’ve shaken hands with the King of Spain or whomever, you’re pretty much done.

    Yes. One shake with a well connected person, a node in the network, and someone long lived too, that extends their handshake reach (and thus one’s own) both in time and numbers.

    My dad interviewed Prince Philip some years ago and certainly shook his hand, so that puts me within a few steps of a ton of interesting people from the last 100 years. Meaning I’m only few steps away from others commenting here.

    He’s interviewed other interesting characters too, so my links are reinforced that way as well.

    • Thanks: slumber_j
  151. @B36
    What are the minimum number of "handshakes" from the last person imported to America as a slave from Africa in 1807 to an elderly person today? What implication does that have for us today?

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @PiltdownMan, @PiltdownMan, @PiltdownMan, @Charlotte

    Who cares and none.

  152. @Skyler the Weird
    @epebble

    In Denmark in 2008 I was eating lunch at Ida Davidsen's the famous Smørrebrød place. Guy in front of me looked like a well dressed businessman. He got his order we bumped we both said excuse me. I got my order and when I got back to the table my Danish companion said you just bumped Prince Frederich. Never would have known as everything over there is so laid back. I wonder if one of his ancestors bumped Napoleon, Bernadotte or Gustavus Adolphus?

    Replies: @Ralph L

    Did he leave on a bicycle?

  153. @D. K.
    @Reactionary Utopian

    Do you recall the name of that Purdue professor, by any chance?

    I transferred to Purdue as a junior, switching to a double-major in English and General History, and graduated 43 years ago, next week. Amazingly, there still is one active English professor there whom I had had as a teacher (for a course on "The Canterbury Tales"-- which he made us read in the original Middle English!):

    https://cla.purdue.edu/directory/profiles/shaun-hughes.html

    There is even only one emeritus professor listed whom I had had for a course, back in my first semester at Purdue, forty-five years ago. (I subsequently lived across the street from him and his family, for a few years.)

    A few years ago, I went through the interests of all of the English faculty at Purdue, and almost all of them seemed to be pure Critical Theory adherents. Sigh....

    https://cla.purdue.edu/academic/english/directory/index.html

    Replies: @Reactionary Utopian

    Do you recall the name of that Purdue professor, by any chance?

    I wish I could remember who I had for freshman composition, but I’ve had too many birthdays since then. It was required for pretty much everyone, so I’m fairly sure my professor would have been someone low-level, who caught the academic drudgery.

    Later, I took my elective hours in literature courses, because I liked them. I can certainly remember who my Shakespeare instructor: A. A. deVitis. There was a man who was passionate about his subject. I can still remember him, perched on the edge of a desk, reeling off page after page, putting the music into it. Great teacher.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @Reactionary Utopian

    I had a young Jewish woman (whose face and voice I still can remember, but not her name) for my Shakespeare teacher, and, alas, I was very disappointed-- albeit not as much as while I was trudging through Chaucer in Middle English! At least my copy of "The Riverside Shakespeare" was a good investment. I bought it new at the University Book Store for, I think, $18.50, and I still have it as part of my personal library. On the whole, I was more impressed with my History professors at Purdue than I was with my English professors.

    Replies: @Reactionary Utopian

  154. @Anon
    Here’s my tenuous Burgess connection. In November 1972 I rented a house on Ibiza with Peter Halliday and his lovely Swiss girlfriend. Peter claimed his brother’s ex was Anthony burgess’s second wife (the Italian translator). The brother, Roy Halliday, was the “father” on Burgess son’s birth certificate as Anthony was still married to his first wife. Anyway Peter had met burgess a few times and was a big fan of his writing and he lent me several of burgess’s books to read while we weren’t drinking (Ibiza was not yet the “destination” in 72.).
    Btw we were in Spain trying to find a cheap sailboat. The effort fell apart however and I never heard from them after Christmas of 72, but I am reading now where brother Roy died in a sailing accident so maybe it was all for the best we never found a boat.

    Replies: @Antiwar7

    Interesting, thanks.

  155. I thought Burgess’ book, The Wanting Seed, had some interesting ideas, and was extreme, in some senses, when I read it (like Sailer, as a youngster). I recommend it.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Antiwar7

    If I remember rightly, The Wanting Seed featured a government encouraging people to be gay in order to keep the population down, with the help of the slogan "It's Sapiens to be Homo!"

  156. @Bill Jones
    @rebel yell

    A couple of nice double entendre's in one simple line


    " is still held in his family, who keep it as a private item. "
     
    Well done .

    Replies: @sayless

    That’s indecent. They should give it a proper burial.

  157. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/TMZ/status/1391024597047283713

    https://twitter.com/Variety/status/1391029975306940418

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @slumber_j, @danand, @AnotherDad, @syonredux

    RIP Tawny. You definitely left your mark on millions of pubescent boys:

    At least we’ve still got Phoebe Cates:

    • Replies: @Anon
    @syonredux

    To quote the comment just above yours, "That's indecent". Couldn't you at least have had the decency to place such a risque image behind the MORE tag? What do you take us for here, a bunch of lecherous old Jews or something?

    Replies: @syonredux

  158. Of course, one question is whether all these people who had face to face conversations shook hands. Perhaps etiquette required that the Emperor not shake hands?

    I’m sure Nappy grasped hands with his brothers…..Which provides a lot of possibilities. For example, Jérôme Bonaparte (Nappy’s youngest brother) married an American woman named Elizabeth Patterson, and she bore him a son, one Jérôme Napoléon Bonaparte:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C3%A9r%C3%B4me_Napol%C3%A9on_Bonaparte

    Jérôme, in turn, fathered Charles Joseph Bonaparte, who went on to serve as Theodore Roosevelt’s Secretary of the Navy:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Joseph_Bonaparte

    TR shook a lotta hands during his lifetime….

  159. @Peterike
    All I known is we need a Napoleon now.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @SunBakedSuburb

    “we need a Napoleon now”

    Roof Top Koreans, Mariachi Mexicans, and now a French cherub. Whilst in Egypt Napoleon sought wisdom from the ancients but found the Rosetta Stone instead. Will American white men discover a talisman that’ll bring them the strength to save my life of leisure from intrusive racist black ladies and poison-pimping technocrats?

  160. “Burgess had begun the novel as a screenplay for Stanley Kubrick, after their Beethoven-oriented movie A Clockwork Orange had been a hit in 1971.”

    I thought that Kubrick’s Napoleon Movie was scotched before it got off the ground, after Dino de Laurentis’ Waterloo came out in 1970. The studios figured that one movie on the era was enough, especially as Waterloo didn’t do very well at the box office (I thought it was a pretty good movie).

  161. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Kibernetika

    I don't know, but I imagine Wernher shook Adolph's hand if handshaking was common at the upper levels. Certainly they came into close contact.

    Yes, I met Schirra in his office when I was visiting my father's. Wally signed an Apollo 7 crew picture to me. On the wall behind his desk he had a large, sharp, photographic print of this picture he took on that mission:


    http://www.americaspace.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/s-ivb-500x500.jpg

    The first liquid-hydrogen-powered rocket ridden by men


    There was a cubic paperweight of transparent plastic atop a stack of work. A little, silver astronaut was floating inside.

    He didn't work with my father, as far as I know, but they shared a hallway for a couple of years.

    How did your family members come to see Hitler?

    Replies: @Kibernetika, @Polistra, @PiltdownMan

    Yes, I met Schirra in his office when I was visiting my father’s. Wally signed an Apollo 7 crew picture to me.

    Unz.com needs a “Wow” button.

  162. @Percy Gryce
    Steve mentioned that Kubrick considered Sir Ian Holm for the role of Napoleon and identitied Holm by one of his now most recognizable roles, Bilbo Baggins in The Lord of the Rings and Hobbit movie. I was disappointed to see that Steve didn't mention that Holm actually played Napoleon on screen not once but twice: in Time Bandits (1981) and 20 years later in The Emperor's New Clothes (2001).

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @PiltdownMan

    Steve mentioned that Kubrick considered Sir Ian Holm for the role of Napoleon …

    I once saw a Soviet-Italian epic style movie, Waterloo, in an art-movie theater in lower Manhattan. It starred Rod Steiger as Napoleon, with him narrating his reminiscence of the great battle and the assumptions and errors he made. Christopher Plummer played the Duke of Wellington. I liked it.

  163. @syonredux
    @prosa123

    Problem with George Washington is that he was notoriously averse to shaking hands; he preferred bowing.

    Replies: @Muggles

    Problem with George Washington is that he was notoriously averse to shaking hands; he preferred bowing.

    My wife and I just watched a recent Jeopardy! show where the question was:

    What did George Washington do to set a precedent at the first presidential inauguration?

    Correct answer: Shake hands. (Rather than the then customary British practice of bowing.)

    So whether or not G. Washington was “adverse” to shaking hands or just, prior to becoming President, followed the custom observed by “British gentlemen.”

    At the very minimum, if you elected him President he would shake a few hands at the ceremony.

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    @Muggles

    "Yuri Gagarin and every other cosmonaut did this before their rocket launch."

    "What is "scent mark" the tire of the van bringing them to the launch site?"

    Yuri did before boarding what Alan Shepard had to "do" in his suit. For everyone since then, it is supposed to be for good luck.

    I met a guy who may have been the first "space tourist", paying the Russians for a ride to the ISS. I was dying to ask but didn't on whether he participated in this ritual.

    , @syonredux
    @Muggles

    Speaking of Washington and shaking hands, here's a fun reddit:


    What is the smallest chain of handshakes between George Washington and Barack Obama?

    One of the contributors got it down to five steps;


    Obama-Clinton

    Clinton-Kennedy

    Kennedy-Holmes

    Holmes-J.Q. Adams

    J.Q. Adams-Washington

     

    https://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/2gex95/what_is_the_smallest_chain_of_handshakes_between/
  164. @Reg Cæsar
    @MEH 0910

    She was born the day after Barack Obama.

    Replies: @Curle, @MEH 0910


    [MORE]

  165. @AnotherDad
    Napoleon had his coup. We seem to have lost our--much more functional--republic with a whimper not a bang.

    Replies: @Muggles

    Napoleon had his coup. We seem to have lost our–much more functional–republic with a whimper not a bang.

    Napoleon overthrew (sorta) the Directorate, a kind of revolutionary central committee.

    Our current government leadership, no matter how crooked, etc. , isn’t that yet. Elections were held. Yes some funny business but no convincing evidence that Trump actually won.

    So no, the proverbial Man on Horseback is a bad idea. Or do you already have a fave generalissimo picked out to lead us out of the storm?

  166. @Buzz Mohawk
    @epebble

    1) If you already know where it is going to come down, and if that area is unpopulated, then you don't have to do anything.

    2) If you "shoot it," you then reveal to the whole world what your real capabilities are in that regard, and you don't want to do that.

    3) "Shooting it down," actually would mean only breaking it up into more pieces -- NOT changing its trajectory, so you would merely make it potentially more damaging across a wider area. It is coming down, and you do not "shoot it down," you can only shoot it and break it up.

    Probably everyone here does not know or does not remember when Skylab, the American space station from the 1970s, came down. I think its pieces landed somewhere in Australia.

    Most of the Earth's surface is water and empty land. It is highly unlikely that any space debris will land on human beings or any of their stuff, though it is possible.

    Replies: @epebble, @Polistra, @Alden

    What will they do, if at 200,000 ft altitude, they estimate it may hit Pentagon or White House or Manhattan? Say, with 1% probability?

  167. @Muggles
    @syonredux


    Problem with George Washington is that he was notoriously averse to shaking hands; he preferred bowing.
     
    My wife and I just watched a recent Jeopardy! show where the question was:

    What did George Washington do to set a precedent at the first presidential inauguration?

    Correct answer: Shake hands. (Rather than the then customary British practice of bowing.)


    So whether or not G. Washington was "adverse" to shaking hands or just, prior to becoming President, followed the custom observed by "British gentlemen."

    At the very minimum, if you elected him President he would shake a few hands at the ceremony.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @syonredux

    “Yuri Gagarin and every other cosmonaut did this before their rocket launch.”

    “What is “scent mark” the tire of the van bringing them to the launch site?”

    Yuri did before boarding what Alan Shepard had to “do” in his suit. For everyone since then, it is supposed to be for good luck.

    I met a guy who may have been the first “space tourist”, paying the Russians for a ride to the ISS. I was dying to ask but didn’t on whether he participated in this ritual.

  168. Im reading historian William Doyles work on The French Revolution…..he has a pronounced anti Marxist perspective that i dont totally agree with but i do like his thesis that basically the French economic & political systems under the Louis kings had grown so corrupt and rotten and so resistant to change that there was a sudden “knee-jerk” move to reform that brought the entire rotten system down on itself in a matter of months….

  169. @Dave Pinsen
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I’m probably one handshake away. Bacon and his band played a local theater ate at a restaurant nearby beforehand. I’m guessing the chef/owner shook his hand, and I’m pretty sure I’ve shaken the chef/owner’s hand.

    Replies: @James Speaks

    I’m one handshake away from Bob Dylan. There was a country-western-in-your-face group known as Kinky Friedman and the Texas Jewboys (though some of them were neither Texas nor MOT). Come to think of it, about half of Texas is one handshake away due to Kinky’s frequent runs for office.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @James Speaks

    Kinky Friedman was a college roommate of mine's summer camp counselor. We went to see him a few times.

    Replies: @Curle, @Reg Cæsar, @James Speaks

  170. @James Speaks
    @Dave Pinsen

    I'm one handshake away from Bob Dylan. There was a country-western-in-your-face group known as Kinky Friedman and the Texas Jewboys (though some of them were neither Texas nor MOT). Come to think of it, about half of Texas is one handshake away due to Kinky's frequent runs for office.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Kinky Friedman was a college roommate of mine’s summer camp counselor. We went to see him a few times.

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Steve Sailer

    “If there’s one thing I can’t stand it’s an ethnocentric racist.” Hilarious.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer



    There was a country-western-in-your-face group known as Kinky Friedman and the Texas Jewboys...

     

    Kinky Friedman was a college roommate of mine’s summer camp counselor. We went to see him a few times.

     

    Joke Kinky told between songs at the Fine Line in Minneapolis 25-30 years ago :

    What did Jesus say to the Mexicans?

    "Don't do anything till I get back."

    Replies: @Flip

    , @James Speaks
    @Steve Sailer


    Kinky Friedman was a college roommate of mine’s summer camp counselor.
     
    That just registered. No comment.
  171. D. K. says:
    @Reactionary Utopian
    @D. K.


    Do you recall the name of that Purdue professor, by any chance?
     
    I wish I could remember who I had for freshman composition, but I’ve had too many birthdays since then. It was required for pretty much everyone, so I’m fairly sure my professor would have been someone low-level, who caught the academic drudgery.

    Later, I took my elective hours in literature courses, because I liked them. I can certainly remember who my Shakespeare instructor: A. A. deVitis. There was a man who was passionate about his subject. I can still remember him, perched on the edge of a desk, reeling off page after page, putting the music into it. Great teacher.

    Replies: @D. K.

    I had a young Jewish woman (whose face and voice I still can remember, but not her name) for my Shakespeare teacher, and, alas, I was very disappointed– albeit not as much as while I was trudging through Chaucer in Middle English! At least my copy of “The Riverside Shakespeare” was a good investment. I bought it new at the University Book Store for, I think, $18.50, and I still have it as part of my personal library. On the whole, I was more impressed with my History professors at Purdue than I was with my English professors.

    • Replies: @Reactionary Utopian
    @D. K.

    I still have mine, too! (Riverside Shakespeare, that is.) Mighty thin stock used for those pages. Like a Bible, and for the same reason, of course.

    One other thing I remember about University Bookstore, from the dark ages of the early 1970s, was looking through the glass at the Texas Instruments SR-10. I think they were asking about $100 for one, a small fortune to me in those days (in-state tuition and fees were $375 per semester, for which you could take as many hours as you wanted!). I used a slide rule all through my undergraduate years, by the end of which scientific calculators were pretty affordable; but I was a physics major, and what my instructors looked for in students' work was the final algebraic expression for "the answer" and the work by which it was derived. They explicitly said that "slide rule accuracy" was quite sufficient for the numerical answer, by which they meant three significant figures. And, as I say, they didn't much care about the number anyway.

    In that same year, 1972, one of the professors in the School of Science (an obsolete name, these days) was at a "freshman honors seminar" one evening, and had brought with him an early HP calculator that was programmable! Not only were we lowly students crowded around him, marveling at this wonder, but so were the other professors who were present in the crowd, craning their necks to see The Future. This machine had, of course, only volatile memory, so a program, once written, was recorded on some magnetic medium. I'm wanting to say it was a strip that you "swiped" through a slot in the calculator, but my own memory is getting a little volatile, and that may not be correct. I actually did not own a calculator until I was a year into my career in optical engineering, when I acquired an HP-11C, not only programmable but with nonvolatile memory, and quite affordable. I still have it, and it still works fine, on those rare occasions when I exercise it. HP used to be a fine, fine company.

    Enough boomer nostalgia from me for this morning. More than enough, I suspect.

    Replies: @D. K., @JMcG

  172. @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk


    BTW, I’ve already mentioned that I am three handshakes away from Adolf Hitler...
     
    I've had a couple of encounters with Walter Mondale, which puts me one degree away from everyone from César Chávez to Ronald Reagan to Leonid Brezhnev to Pope Paul VI. And a second, slightly more distant relationship to all of them, as my mother grew up very close to Geraldine Ferraro and would have had some acquaintances in common, if only at the candy store and dress shop. Oh, and a third, as I once e-mailed Peter Robinson, who wrote the "tear down this wall" speech for Reagan.

    Of course, everyone Steve has replied to here or by e-mail is one degree away from Margaret Thatcher, and thus one more from another Pope.

    Speaking of Leonid:

    Sleepy Joe Brezhnev: Learning from the Soviet Experience of Senile Leadership

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @J.Ross, @Ron Mexico, @David In TN

    I’m one handshake away from JFK and most all top Democrats of the 50s and 60s. I shook hands with the late Tennessee Governor Frank Clement.

  173. Sadly, Napoleon XIV hasn’t had a hit in 55 years, although he just turned 83 this week.

  174. @B36
    What are the minimum number of "handshakes" from the last person imported to America as a slave from Africa in 1807 to an elderly person today? What implication does that have for us today?

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @PiltdownMan, @PiltdownMan, @PiltdownMan, @Charlotte

  175. @B36
    What are the minimum number of "handshakes" from the last person imported to America as a slave from Africa in 1807 to an elderly person today? What implication does that have for us today?

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @PiltdownMan, @PiltdownMan, @PiltdownMan, @Charlotte

  176. @B36
    What are the minimum number of "handshakes" from the last person imported to America as a slave from Africa in 1807 to an elderly person today? What implication does that have for us today?

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @PiltdownMan, @PiltdownMan, @PiltdownMan, @Charlotte

    Woman identified as last survivor of US-African slave trade

    https://edition.cnn.com/2019/04/03/us/last-survivor-us-slave-trade-scli-intl/index.html

    It is entirely possible that somebody alive today met this person a very long time ago.

  177. @B36
    What are the minimum number of "handshakes" from the last person imported to America as a slave from Africa in 1807 to an elderly person today? What implication does that have for us today?

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @PiltdownMan, @PiltdownMan, @PiltdownMan, @Charlotte

    The last slaves (illegally) imported from Africa arrived in 1859 on the Clotilde. Cudjoe Lewis to Zora Neale Hurston to Alan Lomax to Pete Seeger to Bob Dylan would be four handshakes . . . . I don’t know if Hurston ever met Senator Robert Taft, whom she campaigned for, but if she did, there are probably still a number of people alive who shook hands with him.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Charlotte

    Questlove’s Ancestors Were on the Last Known Slave Ship
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qz4gFJqZcP4


    In this clip, Questlove is left speechless upon discovering his ancestors were on the last known slave ship to come to America in 1860.
     

    Questlove Discovers His Original African Ancestry
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9wrN-SjRoQ

    In this clip, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. explains how he found Questlove's original African ancestor, his third great grandfather Charlie Louis.
     

    Replies: @Curle

  178. @Alden
    @Colin Wright

    That was Napoleon 3’s son his only child. Family lived in England after his father’s defeat. Joined the British army. Allegedly everyone of his many wounds were in front, not in back. Proof he didn’t try to run. Hailed for his bravery at the funeral. It was that famous British vs Zulu battle. Don’t remember the name.

    What a waste of his young life. War for the Jewish British empire.

    Replies: @David In TN

    He died in the 1879 British-Zulu war in South Africa. Napoleon III’s son was titled The Prince Imperial. He was “presented” at a big gathering in England, hoping the Third Republic would implode and he would be called to France. The Prince Imperial waited a few years, nothing happened. Then the Zulu war broke out and he offered to join the British Army as an observer.

    The Bonaparte Prince went out on patrols. The last one resulted in his death when he lost his horse and his companions ran off.

  179. @Steve Sailer
    @James Speaks

    Kinky Friedman was a college roommate of mine's summer camp counselor. We went to see him a few times.

    Replies: @Curle, @Reg Cæsar, @James Speaks

    “If there’s one thing I can’t stand it’s an ethnocentric racist.” Hilarious.

  180. @Polistra
    @PiltdownMan

    Ooh! And Reg was just holding forth about palindromes in the last thread.

    'Elba' is (part of) the second or third-best palindrome of all, I reckon.

    Of course none can touch that other geographical notable...

    http://monovisions.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/vintage-panama-canal-construction-1904-1914-02.jpg

    Replies: @Pericles, @Joe Joe, @Mr. Anon, @Reg Cæsar

    ‘Elba’ is (part of) the second or third-best palindrome of all, I reckon.

    Elba got only a palindrome. Nap’s second, and final, exile got an entire card game. A solitare, naturally.

    Bicycle Cards: How to Play Napoleon at St. Helena

    By the way, the island’s name rhymes with marina. Montanans beware. Jonathan, the oldest being on land at 188, has resided there since 1882.

    A JOURNEY TO ST. HELENA, HOME OF NAPOLEON’S LAST DAYS

  181. @Bardon Kaldian

    Eventually, I got the hang of the book. It’s really quite good. But it did strike me that I must have been a lot smarter when I was 17.

    Also, Burgess was considered a genius in the 1970s, one of the most celebrated authors in the English language, on a par with Nabokov, so putting a lot of effort into reading his books was assumed to be his rightful due. Nowadays, you don’t hear much about Burgess other than his Clockwork Orange.
     

    Rereading is frequently disappointing.

    Nabokov's stature has grown over years, mostly because some acclaimed novelists praised him (Updike, Pynchon,...). But he is, I guess, also almost forgotten by readers.

    Replies: @JMcG, @syonredux, @y78654

    Nabokov’s stature has grown over years, mostly because some acclaimed novelists praised him (Updike, Pynchon,…). But he is, I guess, also almost forgotten by readers.

    Dunno. I recently re-read Lolita for a class I was teaching, and I’m still tremendously impressed by the dazzling literary style of the thing.

    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @syonredux

    Nabokov was a crypto Jewish nobleman and a spook, whose "books" (written by a team at Langley, as per usual) were part of Operation Chaos.

    "The next year Nabokov was awarded a tenured professorship at Cornell, skipping any
    assistant professorships. Noble Jews skip right to the top, whatever they are doing.
    While there, he was allegedly an immensely popular lecturer, and his most notable pupils
    were Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Thomas Pynchon (Vera, who graded all of the students’
    papers, remembered him having the strangest handwriting she had ever seen). Pynchon
    must have learned a thing or two from Nabokov: “If they get you asking the wrong
    questions, they don’t have to worry about the answers” (Gravity’s Rainbow p 251). "

    http://mileswmathis.com/nab.pdf

    Replies: @syonredux

  182. @Buzz Mohawk
    @epebble

    1) If you already know where it is going to come down, and if that area is unpopulated, then you don't have to do anything.

    2) If you "shoot it," you then reveal to the whole world what your real capabilities are in that regard, and you don't want to do that.

    3) "Shooting it down," actually would mean only breaking it up into more pieces -- NOT changing its trajectory, so you would merely make it potentially more damaging across a wider area. It is coming down, and you do not "shoot it down," you can only shoot it and break it up.

    Probably everyone here does not know or does not remember when Skylab, the American space station from the 1970s, came down. I think its pieces landed somewhere in Australia.

    Most of the Earth's surface is water and empty land. It is highly unlikely that any space debris will land on human beings or any of their stuff, though it is possible.

    Replies: @epebble, @Polistra, @Alden

    The other thing is that as soon as you do anything at all, you get to assume responsibility for everything that follows. Which may be a lot of downside.

    Chinese, it turns out, are much like Africans. They don’t have to accept responsibility for much of anything, really. That’s the white man’s role. Even the Japanese, who do maintain a culture of responsibility: aren’t they dumping radioactive waste into the ocean right now? Could America or a European country get away with that?

    Answer: they’d never even try.

  183. @Steve Sailer
    @James Speaks

    Kinky Friedman was a college roommate of mine's summer camp counselor. We went to see him a few times.

    Replies: @Curle, @Reg Cæsar, @James Speaks

    There was a country-western-in-your-face group known as Kinky Friedman and the Texas Jewboys…

    Kinky Friedman was a college roommate of mine’s summer camp counselor. We went to see him a few times.

    Joke Kinky told between songs at the Fine Line in Minneapolis 25-30 years ago :

    What did Jesus say to the Mexicans?

    “Don’t do anything till I get back.”

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Reg Cæsar

    “They ain’t making’ Jews like Jesus anymore”

  184. @Muggles
    @syonredux


    Problem with George Washington is that he was notoriously averse to shaking hands; he preferred bowing.
     
    My wife and I just watched a recent Jeopardy! show where the question was:

    What did George Washington do to set a precedent at the first presidential inauguration?

    Correct answer: Shake hands. (Rather than the then customary British practice of bowing.)


    So whether or not G. Washington was "adverse" to shaking hands or just, prior to becoming President, followed the custom observed by "British gentlemen."

    At the very minimum, if you elected him President he would shake a few hands at the ceremony.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @syonredux

    Speaking of Washington and shaking hands, here’s a fun reddit:

    What is the smallest chain of handshakes between George Washington and Barack Obama?

    One of the contributors got it down to five steps;

    Obama-Clinton

    Clinton-Kennedy

    Kennedy-Holmes

    Holmes-J.Q. Adams

    J.Q. Adams-Washington

    What is the smallest chain of handshakes between George Washington and Barack Obama? from AskHistorians

  185. @AnotherDad
    @MEH 0910

    Other than hair matches name???

    (Am i supposed to know this person?)

    Replies: @dfordoom

    (Am i supposed to know this person?)

    Gwendoline was a great movie, but you wouldn’t approve.

  186. @Mr. Anon
    @Polistra

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUQDzj6R3p4

    Replies: @Polistra, @Sam Malone

    Ran out of THANKS and LOLs but that is epic!
    Never saw it before though I do know the original.

  187. @John Up North
    My father was a soldier in Europe in the early 50s. While in Rome, in a private audience with Pope Pius XII and a group of other US soldiers, my father shook the hand of Pius XII. I think I can start a link with Pius XII, then Mussolini, then Hitler, then Hindenburg, then Emperor Willhelm, then Bismarck.

    Replies: @John Up North

    Napoleon III

  188. I’ve met/chatted with/shook hands with Margaret Mead/Thomas Szasz/ Dennis Rodman/ Robert Nozick/Oscar Robertson/ McCoy Tyner /Red Rodney/Gerald Ford(when President)/Robert Jarvik/ Marilyn Vos Savant/Mark Murphy/Neal Armstrong/ Milton Friedman/ Charles Koch/ Murray Rothbard/Newt Gingrich/ Lou Holtz/Ara Parsegian/Mario Lemieux /Mike Singleterry/Jerry Corsi / PJ O’Roark/Don Donoher/Henry Heimlich/Scott Wentworth/George Will/ David Horowitz/John von Ohlen/Joe Lovano/ Lawrence Einhorn/Alex Frazier/ Roger Moore/ Martha DiLaurentis/ cousin of Maz who was with him Game 7
    Attended lectures of Albert Sabin and Mailer
    Seen Trump (1st time around) and W and McGovern campaign

    Not bad for small town Ohio kid
    Imagine next order or two of separation from above list
    Not bragging
    Just the way my life went
    Only a few would have remembered me
    Famous people meet lots of people
    Many times was tongue tied or had trouble coming up with something interesting to say

  189. The Emperor is not dead.

  190. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/ColumbiaBugle/status/1390846643222638593

    Question: Are they having a homosexual relationship?

    Replies: @Servant of Gla'aki

    Question: Are they having a homosexual relationship?

    No.

    No one’s having physical relations with Frank Luntz.

  191. Before they were the Cleveland Indians, they were the Cleveland Napoleons. Is it time to disinter the General?

    Cleveland Indians surveying fans about what they would like to see in team’s new name

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Reg Cæsar

    Whatever the new name, it will soon be deemed racist sexist transist something non woke. Better something like Cleveland football team. City is named after a White man of privilege. All
    WMOPs are inherently evil so the name of the city should be changed too. Perhaps NE Midwest Gulag # 185.

  192. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer



    There was a country-western-in-your-face group known as Kinky Friedman and the Texas Jewboys...

     

    Kinky Friedman was a college roommate of mine’s summer camp counselor. We went to see him a few times.

     

    Joke Kinky told between songs at the Fine Line in Minneapolis 25-30 years ago :

    What did Jesus say to the Mexicans?

    "Don't do anything till I get back."

    Replies: @Flip

    “They ain’t making’ Jews like Jesus anymore”

  193. @Buzz Mohawk
    @epebble

    1) If you already know where it is going to come down, and if that area is unpopulated, then you don't have to do anything.

    2) If you "shoot it," you then reveal to the whole world what your real capabilities are in that regard, and you don't want to do that.

    3) "Shooting it down," actually would mean only breaking it up into more pieces -- NOT changing its trajectory, so you would merely make it potentially more damaging across a wider area. It is coming down, and you do not "shoot it down," you can only shoot it and break it up.

    Probably everyone here does not know or does not remember when Skylab, the American space station from the 1970s, came down. I think its pieces landed somewhere in Australia.

    Most of the Earth's surface is water and empty land. It is highly unlikely that any space debris will land on human beings or any of their stuff, though it is possible.

    Replies: @epebble, @Polistra, @Alden

    It landed last night in the Indian Ocean way south of Sri Lanka so no damage done.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Alden

    Yes. That is a typical outcome.

    I believe SARS-CoV-2 would behave much the same way too if we would just stop panicking about it, stop trying to "shoot it down," stop interfering, and let it proceed on its trajectory.

    We are only making things worse -- and prolonging them.

    , @epebble
    @Alden

    The next launch is in May–June 2022, so we get to enjoy the excitement all over again.

  194. @Reg Cæsar
    Before they were the Cleveland Indians, they were the Cleveland Napoleons. Is it time to disinter the General?


    Cleveland Indians surveying fans about what they would like to see in team's new name

    Replies: @Alden

    Whatever the new name, it will soon be deemed racist sexist transist something non woke. Better something like Cleveland football team. City is named after a White man of privilege. All
    WMOPs are inherently evil so the name of the city should be changed too. Perhaps NE Midwest Gulag # 185.

  195. @Escher
    How could the Black Beethoven dedicate a symphony to an oppressive white male like Bonaparte?

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Well, there’s only one logical conclusion – Bonaparte was black too.

  196. @Polistra
    This comment thread needs work. For instance, you guys call yourselves nazis and can't spell Adolf correctly. What gives, even? That's almost as bad as bragging about how connected you are to Kevin Bacon.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Adolph is the English spelling. German names are often Anglicised by people writing in English, e.g. Frederick the Great, Kaiser William, etc. It’s a bit unusual for people to do it in the case of a historical figure as recent as Hitler.

  197. @YetAnotherAnon
    Yet again OT, sorry, but just wanted to draw to your attention a remarkable story (if true) in The Paper Of Record.

    Apparently ITV (the second TV broadcaster in the UK), the Metropolitan Police, MI5 and the British Navy joined together in a plot/conspiracy to attempt to record the alleged murderers of Stephen Lawrence incriminating themselves. ITV gave them an interview, "paid" them with a week in Scotland - house bugged, phones bugged, even their karts bugged when they went golfing. The taped conversations (in pre-digital age) were apparently picked up by helicopter, transferred to an RN sub, and sent by secure link to the Met in London*.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9555317/The-submarine-sent-sink-Stephen-Lawrences-killers.html

    The State really, really wanted a conviction. I've never heard the like. If only all white murder victims got that kind of attention.

    In the end they had to wait for a newly-privatised Government forensics lab to "discover" a "previously overlooked" spot of Lawrence's blood, only detectable by massive DNA amplification on an item of clothing worn by one of the accused. This may (or may not) have been kosher, but there were a lot of incentives to get a conviction at any cost.


    * this is the bit I find least believable - surely there were more efficient ways of doing it?

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Even I was amazed at that. I knew it took £50m to secure a conviction, and only after they removed the 800-year-old double jeopardy protection from English law so they could try the defendants a second time.

    Also from England, a rerun of The Good Life comes with a viewer warning for offensive content because there is a scene in one episode where Margo wears an apron with a picture of the Robinson’s jam golliwog mascot.

  198. @syonredux
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Nabokov’s stature has grown over years, mostly because some acclaimed novelists praised him (Updike, Pynchon,…). But he is, I guess, also almost forgotten by readers.
     
    Dunno. I recently re-read Lolita for a class I was teaching, and I'm still tremendously impressed by the dazzling literary style of the thing.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara

    Nabokov was a crypto Jewish nobleman and a spook, whose “books” (written by a team at Langley, as per usual) were part of Operation Chaos.

    “The next year Nabokov was awarded a tenured professorship at Cornell, skipping any
    assistant professorships. Noble Jews skip right to the top, whatever they are doing.
    While there, he was allegedly an immensely popular lecturer, and his most notable pupils
    were Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Thomas Pynchon (Vera, who graded all of the students’
    papers, remembered him having the strangest handwriting she had ever seen). Pynchon
    must have learned a thing or two from Nabokov: “If they get you asking the wrong
    questions, they don’t have to worry about the answers” (Gravity’s Rainbow p 251). ”

    http://mileswmathis.com/nab.pdf

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @James J O'Meara

    Did James Jesus Angleton lead the team? Just imagine the squad of ghostwriters that he would have been able to assemble: TS Eliot, William Empson, EE Cummings, William Carlos Williams, Ezra Pound, ....

  199. @Alden
    @Buzz Mohawk

    It landed last night in the Indian Ocean way south of Sri Lanka so no damage done.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @epebble

    Yes. That is a typical outcome.

    I believe SARS-CoV-2 would behave much the same way too if we would just stop panicking about it, stop trying to “shoot it down,” stop interfering, and let it proceed on its trajectory.

    We are only making things worse — and prolonging them.

  200. @Alden
    @Buzz Mohawk

    It landed last night in the Indian Ocean way south of Sri Lanka so no damage done.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @epebble

    The next launch is in May–June 2022, so we get to enjoy the excitement all over again.

  201. @Charlotte
    @B36

    The last slaves (illegally) imported from Africa arrived in 1859 on the Clotilde. Cudjoe Lewis to Zora Neale Hurston to Alan Lomax to Pete Seeger to Bob Dylan would be four handshakes . . . . I don’t know if Hurston ever met Senator Robert Taft, whom she campaigned for, but if she did, there are probably still a number of people alive who shook hands with him.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    Questlove’s Ancestors Were on the Last Known Slave Ship

    In this clip, Questlove is left speechless upon discovering his ancestors were on the last known slave ship to come to America in 1860.

    [MORE]

    Questlove Discovers His Original African Ancestry

    In this clip, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. explains how he found Questlove’s original African ancestor, his third great grandfather Charlie Louis.

    • Replies: @Curle
    @MEH 0910

    Apparently mortality during the Middle Passage was approx. 10%. Studies of the North Atlantic passage of whites from Europe appears to vary from equivalent rates to half that rate. Mortality for 17th century white indentured servants was ~ 30% in first three years in the colonies. Allegedly much higher than for slaves.

    For some reason dying young from overwork is a less compelling story than living but being a slave at least according to our rulers. I’m not sure which is the more compelling story for the rulers, living as a slave or dying prematurely in a concentration camp (some dying from overwork as the indentured servants died). Regardless, the story that is not compelling for our rulers is the premature death of white indentured servants. Wonder why?

  202. @Mulga Mumblebrain
    The Woke media has been full of nonentities spewing hatred at long dead Napper for 'restoring slavery' in Haiti. A real historian noted that Napoleon did not like going thus against one of the tenets of the Revolution, but was forced into it by 'the bankers'. I grow tired of deranged and obsessive pygmies spewing abuse at great, world significant (certainly in this case)figures, for some deviation from Woke theology, centuries ago.

    Replies: @Shango

    I don’t understand. What did he do and why?

  203. Curle says:
    @MEH 0910
    @Charlotte

    Questlove’s Ancestors Were on the Last Known Slave Ship
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qz4gFJqZcP4


    In this clip, Questlove is left speechless upon discovering his ancestors were on the last known slave ship to come to America in 1860.
     

    Questlove Discovers His Original African Ancestry
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9wrN-SjRoQ

    In this clip, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. explains how he found Questlove's original African ancestor, his third great grandfather Charlie Louis.
     

    Replies: @Curle

    Apparently mortality during the Middle Passage was approx. 10%. Studies of the North Atlantic passage of whites from Europe appears to vary from equivalent rates to half that rate. Mortality for 17th century white indentured servants was ~ 30% in first three years in the colonies. Allegedly much higher than for slaves.

    For some reason dying young from overwork is a less compelling story than living but being a slave at least according to our rulers. I’m not sure which is the more compelling story for the rulers, living as a slave or dying prematurely in a concentration camp (some dying from overwork as the indentured servants died). Regardless, the story that is not compelling for our rulers is the premature death of white indentured servants. Wonder why?

  204. @Antiwar7
    I thought Burgess' book, The Wanting Seed, had some interesting ideas, and was extreme, in some senses, when I read it (like Sailer, as a youngster). I recommend it.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    If I remember rightly, The Wanting Seed featured a government encouraging people to be gay in order to keep the population down, with the help of the slogan “It’s Sapiens to be Homo!”

  205. @Wade Hampton
    Off (interesting) topic, but I thought you might be interested. At 4:20 in Bannon’s Warroom podcast Episode 931, Matt Gaetz says (talking about the sad, sad RINO rump party members like Romney and Cheney “…if you are an invade everywhere, invite everyone Republican…”

    You are doing the Lord’s work. Despite lacking a major media outlet, your concepts are filtering out into the broader world of non-insane political thought.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    You do realize that Matt Gaetz is clown world personified, right?

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @Corvinus

    Instead of calling yourself “Corvinus” why don’t you call yourself Bonxie or Skua. You are much more simpatico with a skua (kleptoparasite) than with a crow.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  206. @James J O'Meara
    @syonredux

    Nabokov was a crypto Jewish nobleman and a spook, whose "books" (written by a team at Langley, as per usual) were part of Operation Chaos.

    "The next year Nabokov was awarded a tenured professorship at Cornell, skipping any
    assistant professorships. Noble Jews skip right to the top, whatever they are doing.
    While there, he was allegedly an immensely popular lecturer, and his most notable pupils
    were Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Thomas Pynchon (Vera, who graded all of the students’
    papers, remembered him having the strangest handwriting she had ever seen). Pynchon
    must have learned a thing or two from Nabokov: “If they get you asking the wrong
    questions, they don’t have to worry about the answers” (Gravity’s Rainbow p 251). "

    http://mileswmathis.com/nab.pdf

    Replies: @syonredux

    Did James Jesus Angleton lead the team? Just imagine the squad of ghostwriters that he would have been able to assemble: TS Eliot, William Empson, EE Cummings, William Carlos Williams, Ezra Pound, ….

  207. @Rapparee

    Of course, one question is whether all these people who had face to face conversations shook hands.
     
    It's safe to assume that anyone documented to have met John L. Sullivan probably shook his hand.

    Replies: @Orville H. Larson

    “Shake the hand that shook the hand of John L. Sullivan!”

  208. @James J O'Meara
    @Not Raul

    Pope Francis is the target of a campaign of hate, orchestrated by the gay Mafia he's the first pope to take on. Needless to say, in classic projection style, they accuse HIM as "soft on homos".

    The Church's hard line on homos is less theological than it is camo for the pedophile network: what, us? We officially hate them homos!

    This also means their hard line on everything else (divorce, birth control) was not cogitated by wise theologians but by closeted homos who hate marriage and weren't even priests (eg. Maritain and the other French homos in Paul VI's circle).

    https://counter-currents.com/2020/06/trad-queen-story-hour-part-ii-from-vatican-ii-to-john-paul-ii/

    Seriously, who takes advice on heterosexuality from this guy?

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Muhsz9boQQ8/Ucb6KOTzpPI/AAAAAAAAAWc/HRw-JRrEgGE/s1600/CARDINAL+RAYMOND+BURKE+6.gif

    Replies: @Not Raul, @Alden

    That’s a very interesting link, James. Thanks.

  209. Ian Holm did get to play Napoleon: in Terry Gilliam’s “Time Bandits”, as a bitter little man with a short-man complex. He gave a hilarious performance.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Bizarro World Observer

    Ian Holm looked a lot like a fairer colored Bonaparte. Nicholson would have been good but Holm really looked like him.

    Replies: @Sam Malone

  210. @Bizarro World Observer
    Ian Holm did get to play Napoleon: in Terry Gilliam's "Time Bandits", as a bitter little man with a short-man complex. He gave a hilarious performance.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Ian Holm looked a lot like a fairer colored Bonaparte. Nicholson would have been good but Holm really looked like him.

    • Replies: @Sam Malone
    @Steve Sailer

    I'm shocked that after bringing up Ian Holm in the piece you didn't mention that he indeed wound up playing Napoleon in "The Emperor's New Clothes", 2001, which is well worth a watch.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  211. @Corvinus
    @Wade Hampton

    You do realize that Matt Gaetz is clown world personified, right?

    Replies: @Coemgen

    Instead of calling yourself “Corvinus” why don’t you call yourself Bonxie or Skua. You are much more simpatico with a skua (kleptoparasite) than with a crow.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Coemgen

    The fact of the matter is I have truth on my side. You? Well, you support a clown.

  212. @Bardon Kaldian

    Eventually, I got the hang of the book. It’s really quite good. But it did strike me that I must have been a lot smarter when I was 17.

    Also, Burgess was considered a genius in the 1970s, one of the most celebrated authors in the English language, on a par with Nabokov, so putting a lot of effort into reading his books was assumed to be his rightful due. Nowadays, you don’t hear much about Burgess other than his Clockwork Orange.
     

    Rereading is frequently disappointing.

    Nabokov's stature has grown over years, mostly because some acclaimed novelists praised him (Updike, Pynchon,...). But he is, I guess, also almost forgotten by readers.

    Replies: @JMcG, @syonredux, @y78654

    What are you talking about. Nabokov is still widely read.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @y78654

    Nabokov appears to be much more famous today than Updike, who had a similar prose style.

    Replies: @Dissident, @syonredux

  213. @syonredux
    @MEH 0910

    RIP Tawny. You definitely left your mark on millions of pubescent boys:


    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/95/e7/31/95e731157d193d79cf23e036a6408215--tawny-kitaen-s-hair.jpg






    At least we've still got Phoebe Cates:



    https://ilarge.lisimg.com/image/12988060/1048full-phoebe-cates.jpg

    Replies: @Anon

    To quote the comment just above yours, “That’s indecent”. Couldn’t you at least have had the decency to place such a risque image behind the MORE tag? What do you take us for here, a bunch of lecherous old Jews or something?

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Anon

    My theory was that the chaste image of the divine Phoebe would compensate for the risqué photo of Tawny.

  214. @y78654
    @Bardon Kaldian

    What are you talking about. Nabokov is still widely read.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Nabokov appears to be much more famous today than Updike, who had a similar prose style.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @Steve Sailer

    Of interest:

    Mr. Updike’s Planet (Frederick C. Crews, The New York Review of Books, December, 1986)

    Sample excerpts below. Full-article requires registration.


    After eleven novels and thirty books, however, our most prolific and various man of letters remains curiously out of focus and resistant to consensus.
     

    With so much data at hand, why the blurred image? In part the problem can be traced to mixed signals from Updike. In his autobiographical reflections he sometimes depicts himself as a modernist wordsmith, a down-home avatar of Proust and Joyce who lives for the aesthetic frisson. Elsewhere, though, he plays the religious philosopher, aligning himself with such theological heavyweights as Berdyaev, Kierkegaard, and Karl Barth. In still other passages he turns debonair and implies, in light verse as well as prose, that we should count him among the long-vanished Algonquin wits. But keep reading and sooner or later you will find him insisting that he is merely another “dumb American” harboring the usual lowbrow prejudices. It is largely by chance, if you believe this last Updike, that he works for The New Yorker instead of selling Toyotas in the sticks.
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @syonredux
    @Steve Sailer

    Overproduction worked against Updike. Who has the time to read all that work? Plus, unlike Nabokov and Lolita (Or Burgess and A CLOCKWORK ORANGE), there is no easy pick in Updike's corpus for the this-is-the-one-one-work-by-this-guy-that-you-have-to-read category.

  215. @Steve Sailer
    @y78654

    Nabokov appears to be much more famous today than Updike, who had a similar prose style.

    Replies: @Dissident, @syonredux

    Of interest:

    Mr. Updike’s Planet (Frederick C. Crews, The New York Review of Books, December, 1986)

    Sample excerpts below. Full-article requires registration.

    After eleven novels and thirty books, however, our most prolific and various man of letters remains curiously out of focus and resistant to consensus.

    [MORE]

    With so much data at hand, why the blurred image? In part the problem can be traced to mixed signals from Updike. In his autobiographical reflections he sometimes depicts himself as a modernist wordsmith, a down-home avatar of Proust and Joyce who lives for the aesthetic frisson. Elsewhere, though, he plays the religious philosopher, aligning himself with such theological heavyweights as Berdyaev, Kierkegaard, and Karl Barth. In still other passages he turns debonair and implies, in light verse as well as prose, that we should count him among the long-vanished Algonquin wits. But keep reading and sooner or later you will find him insisting that he is merely another “dumb American” harboring the usual lowbrow prejudices. It is largely by chance, if you believe this last Updike, that he works for The New Yorker instead of selling Toyotas in the sticks.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Dissident

    Updike was a typical American who happened to be a Nabokovian literary genius, kind of like how Mike Trout is a regular guy who happens to be the best baseball player of his generation.

  216. @Dissident
    @Steve Sailer

    Of interest:

    Mr. Updike’s Planet (Frederick C. Crews, The New York Review of Books, December, 1986)

    Sample excerpts below. Full-article requires registration.


    After eleven novels and thirty books, however, our most prolific and various man of letters remains curiously out of focus and resistant to consensus.
     

    With so much data at hand, why the blurred image? In part the problem can be traced to mixed signals from Updike. In his autobiographical reflections he sometimes depicts himself as a modernist wordsmith, a down-home avatar of Proust and Joyce who lives for the aesthetic frisson. Elsewhere, though, he plays the religious philosopher, aligning himself with such theological heavyweights as Berdyaev, Kierkegaard, and Karl Barth. In still other passages he turns debonair and implies, in light verse as well as prose, that we should count him among the long-vanished Algonquin wits. But keep reading and sooner or later you will find him insisting that he is merely another “dumb American” harboring the usual lowbrow prejudices. It is largely by chance, if you believe this last Updike, that he works for The New Yorker instead of selling Toyotas in the sticks.
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Updike was a typical American who happened to be a Nabokovian literary genius, kind of like how Mike Trout is a regular guy who happens to be the best baseball player of his generation.

    • Thanks: Dissident
  217. Getting back towards the original topic: my mother-in-law is 92 years old, having been born not long before the Crash of 1929. She has often spoken of a great aunt of hers whom she visited when she was ten years old who was then in her early 90s, thus she would have been born around 1850 or so.

    It is quite conceivable, perhaps even highly likely, that this aged relative met someone of a similar vintage when she was a young girl in the early 1860s. That person would have been born in 1770 or earlier, and would potentially have vivid recollection of life as a colonial subject prior to the American Revolution.

    Thus, the entire history of the United States proper occurred within the slightly-above-average lifespans of just three individuals. We really are an extraordinarily young nation.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Geschrei

    My Dad, who died in 1996 knew his grandfather who fought in the civil war as a teen.🇸🇴

  218. @D. K.
    @Reactionary Utopian

    I had a young Jewish woman (whose face and voice I still can remember, but not her name) for my Shakespeare teacher, and, alas, I was very disappointed-- albeit not as much as while I was trudging through Chaucer in Middle English! At least my copy of "The Riverside Shakespeare" was a good investment. I bought it new at the University Book Store for, I think, $18.50, and I still have it as part of my personal library. On the whole, I was more impressed with my History professors at Purdue than I was with my English professors.

    Replies: @Reactionary Utopian

    I still have mine, too! (Riverside Shakespeare, that is.) Mighty thin stock used for those pages. Like a Bible, and for the same reason, of course.

    One other thing I remember about University Bookstore, from the dark ages of the early 1970s, was looking through the glass at the Texas Instruments SR-10. I think they were asking about $100 for one, a small fortune to me in those days (in-state tuition and fees were $375 per semester, for which you could take as many hours as you wanted!). I used a slide rule all through my undergraduate years, by the end of which scientific calculators were pretty affordable; but I was a physics major, and what my instructors looked for in students’ work was the final algebraic expression for “the answer” and the work by which it was derived. They explicitly said that “slide rule accuracy” was quite sufficient for the numerical answer, by which they meant three significant figures. And, as I say, they didn’t much care about the number anyway.

    In that same year, 1972, one of the professors in the School of Science (an obsolete name, these days) was at a “freshman honors seminar” one evening, and had brought with him an early HP calculator that was programmable! Not only were we lowly students crowded around him, marveling at this wonder, but so were the other professors who were present in the crowd, craning their necks to see The Future. This machine had, of course, only volatile memory, so a program, once written, was recorded on some magnetic medium. I’m wanting to say it was a strip that you “swiped” through a slot in the calculator, but my own memory is getting a little volatile, and that may not be correct. I actually did not own a calculator until I was a year into my career in optical engineering, when I acquired an HP-11C, not only programmable but with nonvolatile memory, and quite affordable. I still have it, and it still works fine, on those rare occasions when I exercise it. HP used to be a fine, fine company.

    Enough boomer nostalgia from me for this morning. More than enough, I suspect.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @Reactionary Utopian

    My father, who worked under Chief Justice John Robert's father at Bethlehem Steel, turned fifty on the day that his favorite show-- "All in the Family"-- debuted, in 1971. The older kids got together and presented him with an electronic calculator. It cost $100.00 (the equivalent of about $654.00, now, fifty years later)-- and the most advanced feature that it had was calculating square roots! I still use the modest Texas Instruments BA-35 calculator that I bought at Tower Books, on Queen Anne Hill, in October 1986, on the eve of my first Statistics exam in graduate business school, at the U.W. I forget how much I paid for it; but, nearly thirty-five years later, I have yet to need to change its battery!

    I had two housemates, during my two undergraduate years at Purdue, who were in your class, having previously roomed together, for all four of their undergraduate years, at Cary Quadrangle. One of them worked as a temporary clerk at the University Book Store, during the opening rush of the 1977 Autumn Semester. He spent his evenings, for a couple of weeks, calling up cute co-eds, whose names and phone numbers he had gotten off of their checks, when they bought their text books, etc., at the book store!

    , @JMcG
    @Reactionary Utopian

    I have a 15c in my drawer, and a 15c app that runs on my phone. I have to shift mental gears to use a non-RPN calculator now. Cheers!

    Replies: @Reactionary Utopian

  219. @Reactionary Utopian
    @D. K.

    I still have mine, too! (Riverside Shakespeare, that is.) Mighty thin stock used for those pages. Like a Bible, and for the same reason, of course.

    One other thing I remember about University Bookstore, from the dark ages of the early 1970s, was looking through the glass at the Texas Instruments SR-10. I think they were asking about $100 for one, a small fortune to me in those days (in-state tuition and fees were $375 per semester, for which you could take as many hours as you wanted!). I used a slide rule all through my undergraduate years, by the end of which scientific calculators were pretty affordable; but I was a physics major, and what my instructors looked for in students' work was the final algebraic expression for "the answer" and the work by which it was derived. They explicitly said that "slide rule accuracy" was quite sufficient for the numerical answer, by which they meant three significant figures. And, as I say, they didn't much care about the number anyway.

    In that same year, 1972, one of the professors in the School of Science (an obsolete name, these days) was at a "freshman honors seminar" one evening, and had brought with him an early HP calculator that was programmable! Not only were we lowly students crowded around him, marveling at this wonder, but so were the other professors who were present in the crowd, craning their necks to see The Future. This machine had, of course, only volatile memory, so a program, once written, was recorded on some magnetic medium. I'm wanting to say it was a strip that you "swiped" through a slot in the calculator, but my own memory is getting a little volatile, and that may not be correct. I actually did not own a calculator until I was a year into my career in optical engineering, when I acquired an HP-11C, not only programmable but with nonvolatile memory, and quite affordable. I still have it, and it still works fine, on those rare occasions when I exercise it. HP used to be a fine, fine company.

    Enough boomer nostalgia from me for this morning. More than enough, I suspect.

    Replies: @D. K., @JMcG

    My father, who worked under Chief Justice John Robert’s father at Bethlehem Steel, turned fifty on the day that his favorite show– “All in the Family”– debuted, in 1971. The older kids got together and presented him with an electronic calculator. It cost $100.00 (the equivalent of about $654.00, now, fifty years later)– and the most advanced feature that it had was calculating square roots! I still use the modest Texas Instruments BA-35 calculator that I bought at Tower Books, on Queen Anne Hill, in October 1986, on the eve of my first Statistics exam in graduate business school, at the U.W. I forget how much I paid for it; but, nearly thirty-five years later, I have yet to need to change its battery!

    I had two housemates, during my two undergraduate years at Purdue, who were in your class, having previously roomed together, for all four of their undergraduate years, at Cary Quadrangle. One of them worked as a temporary clerk at the University Book Store, during the opening rush of the 1977 Autumn Semester. He spent his evenings, for a couple of weeks, calling up cute co-eds, whose names and phone numbers he had gotten off of their checks, when they bought their text books, etc., at the book store!

  220. “ that I bought at Tower Books, on Queen Anne Hill, in October 1986,”

    And by 2011 the Tower stores were all gone.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @Curle

    "Creative destruction!" as my business-school professors would have put it, back then. Sigh....

    Replies: @Curle

  221. @Curle
    “ that I bought at Tower Books, on Queen Anne Hill, in October 1986,”

    And by 2011 the Tower stores were all gone.

    Replies: @D. K.

    “Creative destruction!” as my business-school professors would have put it, back then. Sigh….

    • Agree: Curle
    • Replies: @Curle
    @D. K.

    Funnier still (maybe) along a similar gallows humor route that same year or the next I was taking a class in monopoly law.

    Replies: @D. K.

  222. @Coemgen
    @Corvinus

    Instead of calling yourself “Corvinus” why don’t you call yourself Bonxie or Skua. You are much more simpatico with a skua (kleptoparasite) than with a crow.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    The fact of the matter is I have truth on my side. You? Well, you support a clown.

  223. @Geschrei
    Getting back towards the original topic: my mother-in-law is 92 years old, having been born not long before the Crash of 1929. She has often spoken of a great aunt of hers whom she visited when she was ten years old who was then in her early 90s, thus she would have been born around 1850 or so.

    It is quite conceivable, perhaps even highly likely, that this aged relative met someone of a similar vintage when she was a young girl in the early 1860s. That person would have been born in 1770 or earlier, and would potentially have vivid recollection of life as a colonial subject prior to the American Revolution.

    Thus, the entire history of the United States proper occurred within the slightly-above-average lifespans of just three individuals. We really are an extraordinarily young nation.

    Replies: @Alden

    My Dad, who died in 1996 knew his grandfather who fought in the civil war as a teen.🇸🇴

  224. @James J O'Meara
    @Not Raul

    Pope Francis is the target of a campaign of hate, orchestrated by the gay Mafia he's the first pope to take on. Needless to say, in classic projection style, they accuse HIM as "soft on homos".

    The Church's hard line on homos is less theological than it is camo for the pedophile network: what, us? We officially hate them homos!

    This also means their hard line on everything else (divorce, birth control) was not cogitated by wise theologians but by closeted homos who hate marriage and weren't even priests (eg. Maritain and the other French homos in Paul VI's circle).

    https://counter-currents.com/2020/06/trad-queen-story-hour-part-ii-from-vatican-ii-to-john-paul-ii/

    Seriously, who takes advice on heterosexuality from this guy?

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Muhsz9boQQ8/Ucb6KOTzpPI/AAAAAAAAAWc/HRw-JRrEgGE/s1600/CARDINAL+RAYMOND+BURKE+6.gif

    Replies: @Not Raul, @Alden

    No more than Mrs Obama and Mrs Trump spend on a single outfit. Obviously he believes in layering. I like red. Wish it were more in style. I believe 4 of the items on the list are variations of gown or robe. And 2 types of hat.

  225. @D. K.
    @Curle

    "Creative destruction!" as my business-school professors would have put it, back then. Sigh....

    Replies: @Curle

    Funnier still (maybe) along a similar gallows humor route that same year or the next I was taking a class in monopoly law.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @Curle

    I already was a practicing attorney, working half-way up in Seattle's tallest skyscraper, while I was working on my M.B.A. In one class, we were taught that a corporation's only obligation, aside from abiding by the law, was to maximize its profits. In another class, we were taught that the only way for a business to maximize its profits was for it to hold monopoly power in its particular market. Yet, during my couple of years at the U.W. Graduate School of Business, I never could get anyone else, whether a student or a professor, to agree with my claim that all businesses desire to be monopolies. My fellows always insisted that all businesses want is a free market in which they could compete fairly on the merits. In the words of Yul Brynner: "Is a puzzlement."

    Replies: @Curle

  226. @Curle
    @D. K.

    Funnier still (maybe) along a similar gallows humor route that same year or the next I was taking a class in monopoly law.

    Replies: @D. K.

    I already was a practicing attorney, working half-way up in Seattle’s tallest skyscraper, while I was working on my M.B.A. In one class, we were taught that a corporation’s only obligation, aside from abiding by the law, was to maximize its profits. In another class, we were taught that the only way for a business to maximize its profits was for it to hold monopoly power in its particular market. Yet, during my couple of years at the U.W. Graduate School of Business, I never could get anyone else, whether a student or a professor, to agree with my claim that all businesses desire to be monopolies. My fellows always insisted that all businesses want is a free market in which they could compete fairly on the merits. In the words of Yul Brynner: “Is a puzzlement.”

    • Replies: @Curle
    @D. K.

    Well, at least South Africa worked out as planned. :)

    Replies: @D. K.

  227. @Steve Sailer
    @James Speaks

    Kinky Friedman was a college roommate of mine's summer camp counselor. We went to see him a few times.

    Replies: @Curle, @Reg Cæsar, @James Speaks

    Kinky Friedman was a college roommate of mine’s summer camp counselor.

    That just registered. No comment.

  228. @Reactionary Utopian
    @D. K.

    I still have mine, too! (Riverside Shakespeare, that is.) Mighty thin stock used for those pages. Like a Bible, and for the same reason, of course.

    One other thing I remember about University Bookstore, from the dark ages of the early 1970s, was looking through the glass at the Texas Instruments SR-10. I think they were asking about $100 for one, a small fortune to me in those days (in-state tuition and fees were $375 per semester, for which you could take as many hours as you wanted!). I used a slide rule all through my undergraduate years, by the end of which scientific calculators were pretty affordable; but I was a physics major, and what my instructors looked for in students' work was the final algebraic expression for "the answer" and the work by which it was derived. They explicitly said that "slide rule accuracy" was quite sufficient for the numerical answer, by which they meant three significant figures. And, as I say, they didn't much care about the number anyway.

    In that same year, 1972, one of the professors in the School of Science (an obsolete name, these days) was at a "freshman honors seminar" one evening, and had brought with him an early HP calculator that was programmable! Not only were we lowly students crowded around him, marveling at this wonder, but so were the other professors who were present in the crowd, craning their necks to see The Future. This machine had, of course, only volatile memory, so a program, once written, was recorded on some magnetic medium. I'm wanting to say it was a strip that you "swiped" through a slot in the calculator, but my own memory is getting a little volatile, and that may not be correct. I actually did not own a calculator until I was a year into my career in optical engineering, when I acquired an HP-11C, not only programmable but with nonvolatile memory, and quite affordable. I still have it, and it still works fine, on those rare occasions when I exercise it. HP used to be a fine, fine company.

    Enough boomer nostalgia from me for this morning. More than enough, I suspect.

    Replies: @D. K., @JMcG

    I have a 15c in my drawer, and a 15c app that runs on my phone. I have to shift mental gears to use a non-RPN calculator now. Cheers!

    • Replies: @Reactionary Utopian
    @JMcG

    Ah, the 15C. That one had a lot more memory, I think. An annoying limitation on the 11C: if your program was lengthy, you'd have to start swapping memory locations for additional program memory. On the other hand, it was cool that you had that option.

    So, there's an emulator that runs on the phone? Great! I'm going to have to get that. Like you, I can use a non-RPN calculator, but I kind of hate it.

  229. @D. K.
    @Curle

    I already was a practicing attorney, working half-way up in Seattle's tallest skyscraper, while I was working on my M.B.A. In one class, we were taught that a corporation's only obligation, aside from abiding by the law, was to maximize its profits. In another class, we were taught that the only way for a business to maximize its profits was for it to hold monopoly power in its particular market. Yet, during my couple of years at the U.W. Graduate School of Business, I never could get anyone else, whether a student or a professor, to agree with my claim that all businesses desire to be monopolies. My fellows always insisted that all businesses want is a free market in which they could compete fairly on the merits. In the words of Yul Brynner: "Is a puzzlement."

    Replies: @Curle

    Well, at least South Africa worked out as planned. 🙂

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @Curle

    In the early 1990s, when I still lived in Seattle, I had a female friend who was from South Africa. She returned to Cape Town, after earning her master's degree, to practice her new profession, there, as a psychological counselor. As far as I can tell, from a quick Internet search, she is still doing so. I would not be willing to change places with her, not even for all of the wealth that her maternal grandfather had accumulated, during the "bad old days" of apartheid. Why she went back there, rather than back to the Netherlands, where she also had citizenship, "[i]s [also] a puzzlement."

  230. @Curle
    @D. K.

    Well, at least South Africa worked out as planned. :)

    Replies: @D. K.

    In the early 1990s, when I still lived in Seattle, I had a female friend who was from South Africa. She returned to Cape Town, after earning her master’s degree, to practice her new profession, there, as a psychological counselor. As far as I can tell, from a quick Internet search, she is still doing so. I would not be willing to change places with her, not even for all of the wealth that her maternal grandfather had accumulated, during the “bad old days” of apartheid. Why she went back there, rather than back to the Netherlands, where she also had citizenship, “[i]s [also] a puzzlement.”

  231. @Not Raul
    @Almost Missouri

    Wait. The current Pope isn’t gay. Before he decided to become a priest, he had a girlfriend.

    The retired Pope, Benedict, might be gay.

    http://dish.andrewsullivan.com/2013/02/27/two-popes-one-secretary/

    Papa Ratzi (the retired Pope) might have more than just red loafers in his closet.

    https://shadowproof.com/2006/12/14/the-light-loafers-of-prada-papa-ratzi/amp/

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon

    Please! You deserve an emoji: 🙄

  232. Cary Quad! My home for three years. (I got married after the third year, and decamped to married student housing, out by the airport.) Two years in Cary NE, one in NW.

    I ran in the Cary Nude Winter Olympics, January ’73. I completed two laps before guys started throwing down firecrackers and water balloons. That did it for me. That spring, we started hearing about a thing called “streaking.” I think we started it.

    Your housemate with the phone numbers: I like his style.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @Reactionary Utopian

    I think that both of my friends ran in the Cary Quad Nude Olympics; I remember for certain that at least one of them said that he did. Whether that was in your freshman year or not, I do not recall.

  233. @slumber_j

    Also, Burgess was considered a genius in the 1970s, one of the most celebrated authors in the English language, on a par with Nabokov, so putting a lot of effort into reading his books was assumed to be his rightful due. Nowadays, you don’t hear much about Burgess other than his Clockwork Orange.
     
    I think it was Martin Amis who wrote well on the subject of Burgess's (who I think was a friend of Kingsley's) refreshingly normal exurban semi-detached existence while he wrote some of the weirdest shit ever--before he resorted to tax-exile in his Monegasque hellhole anyway. Burgess was conservative in every sense but the artistic, and that can't have served his reputation well in the decades since his death.

    From his Wikipedia entry:

    Burgess was a Conservative (though, as he clarified in an interview with The Paris Review, his political views could be considered "a kind of anarchism" since his ideal of a "Catholic Jacobite imperial monarch" wasn't practicable[51]), a (lapsed) Catholic and Monarchist, harbouring a distaste for all republics.
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Pericles

    Lol, the hellscape that is Monaco. Why didn’t we stay in Birmingham?

  234. @MEH 0910
    @Percy Gryce

    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/movies/movie-news/ian-holm-dead-chariots-fire-alien-bilbo-baggins-actor-was-88-1075500/


    At 5-foot-6, Holm was always an excellent candidate to play a certain pint-sized French emperor, and he did so three times, in the 1974 nine-part miniseries Napoleon and Love, in Gilliam’s Time Bandits (1981) and in The Emperor’s New Clothes (2001).
     
    https://twitter.com/edgarwright/status/1273959302533963777

    Replies: @Pericles

    Alas, too tall to play Robert Reich.

  235. • Replies: @D. K.
    @MEH 0910

    . . . and Marsha Hunt slides into first place:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_living_actors_from_the_Golden_Age_of_Hollywood

  236. @Anon
    @syonredux

    To quote the comment just above yours, "That's indecent". Couldn't you at least have had the decency to place such a risque image behind the MORE tag? What do you take us for here, a bunch of lecherous old Jews or something?

    Replies: @syonredux

    My theory was that the chaste image of the divine Phoebe would compensate for the risqué photo of Tawny.

  237. @Steve Sailer
    @y78654

    Nabokov appears to be much more famous today than Updike, who had a similar prose style.

    Replies: @Dissident, @syonredux

    Overproduction worked against Updike. Who has the time to read all that work? Plus, unlike Nabokov and Lolita (Or Burgess and A CLOCKWORK ORANGE), there is no easy pick in Updike’s corpus for the this-is-the-one-one-work-by-this-guy-that-you-have-to-read category.

  238. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1392283410362732549

    https://twitter.com/Variety/status/1392236756204802049

    Replies: @D. K.

  239. @Reactionary Utopian
    Cary Quad! My home for three years. (I got married after the third year, and decamped to married student housing, out by the airport.) Two years in Cary NE, one in NW.

    I ran in the Cary Nude Winter Olympics, January '73. I completed two laps before guys started throwing down firecrackers and water balloons. That did it for me. That spring, we started hearing about a thing called "streaking." I think we started it.

    Your housemate with the phone numbers: I like his style.

    Replies: @D. K.

    I think that both of my friends ran in the Cary Quad Nude Olympics; I remember for certain that at least one of them said that he did. Whether that was in your freshman year or not, I do not recall.

  240. @JMcG
    @Reactionary Utopian

    I have a 15c in my drawer, and a 15c app that runs on my phone. I have to shift mental gears to use a non-RPN calculator now. Cheers!

    Replies: @Reactionary Utopian

    Ah, the 15C. That one had a lot more memory, I think. An annoying limitation on the 11C: if your program was lengthy, you’d have to start swapping memory locations for additional program memory. On the other hand, it was cool that you had that option.

    So, there’s an emulator that runs on the phone? Great! I’m going to have to get that. Like you, I can use a non-RPN calculator, but I kind of hate it.

    • Agree: JMcG
  241. @Mr. Anon
    @Polistra

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUQDzj6R3p4

    Replies: @Polistra, @Sam Malone

    That is pretty good, thanks.

  242. @Steve Sailer
    @Bizarro World Observer

    Ian Holm looked a lot like a fairer colored Bonaparte. Nicholson would have been good but Holm really looked like him.

    Replies: @Sam Malone

    I’m shocked that after bringing up Ian Holm in the piece you didn’t mention that he indeed wound up playing Napoleon in “The Emperor’s New Clothes”, 2001, which is well worth a watch.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Sam Malone

    What other actors have had several roles playing the same historical character besides Ian Holm / Napoleon.

    Dan Hedaya looks a lot like Richard Nixon, but I think he's only been cast once. Hedaya has similar dark curly hair and the same hairline as Nixon. But you can fake that pretty easily in makeup.

  243. @Sam Malone
    @Steve Sailer

    I'm shocked that after bringing up Ian Holm in the piece you didn't mention that he indeed wound up playing Napoleon in "The Emperor's New Clothes", 2001, which is well worth a watch.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    What other actors have had several roles playing the same historical character besides Ian Holm / Napoleon.

    Dan Hedaya looks a lot like Richard Nixon, but I think he’s only been cast once. Hedaya has similar dark curly hair and the same hairline as Nixon. But you can fake that pretty easily in makeup.

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