The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection$
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
BlackRock Is Looking for the Black Elizabeth Holmes
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • B
Show CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Because American white men, such as Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Edison, and Robert Noyce, have a staggering historical track record of great inventions, that just proves that we should focus less on fostering innovation among white males — After all, what have white men ever invented for us (other than, more or less, everything)? — and more on those those who have repeatedly over the generations shown little evidence of technical creativity, such as black women:

The Diversity Pledge

Findings by the US Patent Office and leading researchers [i.e., Raj Chetty] show that women, people of color and veterans are significantly underrepresented as US patent inventors. All of the data suggest that the U.S. has missed out on the valuable innovation from millions of these Under-Represented Inventors (URIs).

We know these Under-Represented Inventors have to be out there somewhere, inventing away. They just have to. It’s a law of nature. After all, “we know that #diversity, #equity and #inclusion are key to innovation.”

Obviously, black women must have dreamed up countless genius innovations since 1619, but they’ve been too marginalized for us to notice.

So, to find out what great ideas are on black women’s minds, I’ve been reading black women writers’ op-eds in the NYT.

And it turns out that what they really want to tell us about is their hair.

 
Hide 118 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Black Americans are all part white. If Mexican mestizos can identify with their Conquistador ancestors, black Americans can with their world conquering, slave-trading, modernity inventing ones.

    • LOL: Mike Tre
    • Replies: @Wade Hampton
    @Triteleia Laxa

    Certainly, the Mexican mestizos seem to identify with us, given whom they elect to their presidency. But here in the land of multiculturalism, the greater the admixture of European genes, the greater the hostility toward purer Europeans, e.g. Colin Kaepernick, Shaun "Talcum X" King, TaNehisi Coates, Barack Obama, et al. It's almost as if they resent their European ancestry.

    , @Mike Tre
    @Triteleia Laxa

    You've proven to be a silly troll. Off to the ignore list with Thomm, John Plywood and the other hindus.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    , @Desiderius
    @Triteleia Laxa

    This unironically. Loury makes a similar argument, as does the movie Soul Power perhaps despite itself, certainly in contrast to the trailer.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    , @International Jew
    @Triteleia Laxa

    You've put your finger on something interesting; if Mestizos are "Hispanic" then your average US black is "British".

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    If Mexican mestizos can identify with their Conquistador ancestors, black Americans can [too] …
     
    Eyesight, and the invention of mirrors, cameras, etc. is a big snag: Blacks know they look quite different than Whites—this, among other things (different brains), is a big psychological barrier.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    , @anon
    @Triteleia Laxa

    If Mexican mestizos can identify with their Conquistador ancestors,

    Generally they don't. Mestizaje has been explained to at least one of you before. Please make a note of it this time.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  2. America, where the streets are paved with Diversity.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Yes, sir, we at the PTO appreciate that your invention cures cancer, reverses global warming, provides an inexhaustible source of free energy, and eliminates poverty and deforestation worldwide.


    That's all well and good, but we're not permitted to approve your patent application until and unless one hundred BIPOC patents have been granted on the same general terms. Perhaps you'd like to diversify your team a bit more, and come back again next week? There's a good lad.

    , @Skyler the Weird
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    That explains the potholes and uneven pavement.

    , @Hannah Katz
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I don't invest in any of the BlackRock financial products, including iShares ETF funds. A lot of the investment firms are trying to at least look woke, but BlackRock jumped off the deep end. Ariel Funds is a black firm that has mediocre performance with high cost mutual funds. No thanks.

    , @Anon
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    What is it with all the weird weird looking people in the US? The obese with shorts and tattoos and dirty hair, the tall gays that speak and stand exactly like women, the twins with orange hair, the stumpy gays with a buzz cut/long tendrils and long varnished nails, I can go on and on. Plus the green and purple hair on women. There’s white people on the street that look like Aztec high priests at the sacrifices.

    Granted, I see those in malls and in cheap chain stores mostly (do Kroger and Pottery Barn count as a cheap chain store?), but I am aghast.

  3. Isn’t BlackRock this giant corporation led by a Jewish billionaire that is buying all houses in the market?

    https://truthinplainsight.com/blackrock-is-buying-up-all-of-the-houses/

    So isn’t it clear by now that this whole “diversity” thing is just a scam pushed by rich people and big corporations to further fleece the middle class?

    And it’s not just BlackRock, look at al the big companies making that “pledge”:

    https://increasingdii.org/companies/

    There could arguably be a few Black women inventors out there. But this isn’t about that. They don’t really care about Black women inventors. Or Black women in general. They just care about what else they can get from you.

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Dumbo

    The woker you proclaim yourself to be, the harder you can work at hollowing out what 's left of the American middle class (Blatant Hypocrisy Alert: I see I personally own wads of several Blackrock funds, but I hereby proclaim my commitment to diversity and equity etc etc so it's all good.)

    , @J1234
    @Dumbo


    And it’s not just BlackRock, look at al the big companies making that “pledge”:

    There could arguably be a few Black women inventors out there. But this isn’t about that. They don’t really care about Black women inventors. Or Black women in general. They just care about what else they can get from you.
     

    I don't know if Steve gets his Olympics coverage directly from TV, but if he does, he has more stomach than I do. It isn't the games that bother me, it's the commercials. Moral and social guidance from large corporations via commercials is more repulsive and ridiculous than beauty and diet advice from Oprah via a talk show.

    My wife loves watching the Olympics, not so much the commercials, but we lost the remote for our TV, so she can't mute them...and I end up hearing them from the other room. There's one that especially makes me want to vomit, an "ad" that has something to do with adopting a kid with missing limbs from another country. After hearing it a half a dozen times, I asked her which company it was from, and she said, "VISA, I think..." then the logo appeared on the screen, "...no, Toyota."

    I broke out laughing. Not only the wrong company, but the wrong industry. They spend tens or scores of millions on those ads and my wife doesn't know who it's from after half a dozen viewings. Moral superiority seems to be even more ignore-able than beer ads. Maybe they should recruit the Swedish Bikini Team for their virtue signalling.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  4. If only people would hug more frequently we’d have ten thousand Black genderqueer Thomas Edisons.

  5. OT: Boston acting mayor Kim Janey (Black woman) says no to vax passports; ‘libs’ in the comments confused and angry:

    Janey says no plans for NYC-type restrictions, invoking slavery, birtherism

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/08/03/metro/janey-invokes-slavery-talking-about-new-york-city-gym-restaurant-covid-requirements/

    “When it comes to what businesses may choose to do, we know that those types of things are difficult to enforce when it comes to vaccines. There’s a long history in this country of people needing to show their papers whether we’re talking about this from the standpoint of, you know as a way to, after, during slavery, post slavery,” Janey said during a Tuesday public appearance, according to audio from WCVB. “As recent as, you know, what the immigrant population has to go through here. We heard Trump with the birth certificate nonsense.” (Before Trump was elected president, he publicly fueled false rumors and stoked conspiracy theories about Barack Obama’s birthplace.)

    Janey, who is the first woman and first Black Bostonian to serve as mayor, continued, “Here, we want to make sure that we are not doing anything that would further create a barrier for residents of Boston or disproportionately impact BIPOC communities.”

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    https://twitter.com/ScottMGreer/status/1422650528849403906?s=20

    All of this flows from our weakness and that weakness from our atomization (literally dis-integration). Join, or die.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @res

  6. Maybe if we look under that Black Rock we’ll find…

    Oh right that’s what this wild woke chase is designed to prevent.

    Related:

    [MORE]

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @beavertales
    @Desiderius

    Juliette Kayyem is the psychopath who tweeted that "Trump is the spiritual and operational leader of domestic terrorists" and must be "totally isolated" because "we're in the tactical phase of a counter-terrorism effort".

    "Juliette Kayyem was the most senior Arab-American female appointee in the Obama Administration.

    "On March 5, 2009 Janet Napolitano appointed Kayyem Assistant Secretary for Intergovernmental Affairs. On May 7, 2015, United States Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson appointed Kayyem to the Homeland Security Advisory Committee.

    "Kayyem serves as a senior advisor to NSO Group, an Israeli technology firm known for its Pegasus spying tool."

    This psycho shouldn't be anywhere near the levers of power, and should be deported to her native Lebanon ASAP.

  7. BlackRock Is Looking for the Black Elizabeth Holmes

    Did they check the Domestic Violence Database for Alabama?

    • LOL: Paperback Writer
  8. @Triteleia Laxa
    Black Americans are all part white. If Mexican mestizos can identify with their Conquistador ancestors, black Americans can with their world conquering, slave-trading, modernity inventing ones.

    Replies: @Wade Hampton, @Mike Tre, @Desiderius, @International Jew, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @anon

    Certainly, the Mexican mestizos seem to identify with us, given whom they elect to their presidency. But here in the land of multiculturalism, the greater the admixture of European genes, the greater the hostility toward purer Europeans, e.g. Colin Kaepernick, Shaun “Talcum X” King, TaNehisi Coates, Barack Obama, et al. It’s almost as if they resent their European ancestry.

  9. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    OT: Boston acting mayor Kim Janey (Black woman) says no to vax passports; ‘libs’ in the comments confused and angry:

    Janey says no plans for NYC-type restrictions, invoking slavery, birtherism

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/08/03/metro/janey-invokes-slavery-talking-about-new-york-city-gym-restaurant-covid-requirements/


    “When it comes to what businesses may choose to do, we know that those types of things are difficult to enforce when it comes to vaccines. There’s a long history in this country of people needing to show their papers whether we’re talking about this from the standpoint of, you know as a way to, after, during slavery, post slavery,” Janey said during a Tuesday public appearance, according to audio from WCVB. “As recent as, you know, what the immigrant population has to go through here. We heard Trump with the birth certificate nonsense.” (Before Trump was elected president, he publicly fueled false rumors and stoked conspiracy theories about Barack Obama’s birthplace.)

    Janey, who is the first woman and first Black Bostonian to serve as mayor, continued, “Here, we want to make sure that we are not doing anything that would further create a barrier for residents of Boston or disproportionately impact BIPOC communities.”
     

    Replies: @Desiderius

    All of this flows from our weakness and that weakness from our atomization (literally dis-integration). Join, or die.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Desiderius

    Greer's contention is already happening.

    Illegal immivaders run around with no ID, no masks, and no jabs while the government showers them with free shit.

    YT is facing a future as an infinite capacity pincushion with his ID, location, and purchases tracked, controlled, and taxed via the coming Fedcoin blockchain.

    , @res
    @Desiderius

    Scott Greer nailed that one.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  10. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve, they’re playing you.
    The real story is how they are buying up single-family homes and seeking to permanently DESTROY “affordable family formation”…
    They push this stuff because they predict you’ll take the bait…

    • Disagree: Hangnail Hans
    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Anonymous

    Or they're going big on inflation hedges.

    , @res
    @Anonymous

    I wonder how that is going to play out. Some discussion in
    https://www.unz.com/anepigone/inflation-wins-and-blackrock-knows-it

    , @Old Prude
    @Anonymous

    If politicians gave a fig about their constituents they would shut down this real estate vacuum cleaner right quick.

    If my grandmother was a bicycle she'd have wheels.

    If I had some ham I could have a ham sandwich, if I had some bread.

    If...

  11. • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Desiderius

    Have any of the Congressmen who let pharmaceutical companies advertise ever apologize and admit they should have just extended patent protection for a couple of years like Big Pharma originally wanted?

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Desiderius

    Desi, love the TV pharma ads. "Tell your Doctor if you are pregnant or plan on becoming pregnant." Tell your Doctor if you have high blood pressure or an enlarged heart." "Tell your Doctor if you have a pacemaker." I guess people use doctors who know nothing about their medical history.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Inquiring Mind

  12. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    America, where the streets are paved with Diversity.

    Replies: @Charon, @Skyler the Weird, @Hannah Katz, @Anon

    Yes, sir, we at the PTO appreciate that your invention cures cancer, reverses global warming, provides an inexhaustible source of free energy, and eliminates poverty and deforestation worldwide.

    That’s all well and good, but we’re not permitted to approve your patent application until and unless one hundred BIPOC patents have been granted on the same general terms. Perhaps you’d like to diversify your team a bit more, and come back again next week? There’s a good lad.

    • LOL: Hangnail Hans
  13. @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/walterkirn/status/1422698034815594503?s=20

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Buffalo Joe

    Have any of the Congressmen who let pharmaceutical companies advertise ever apologize and admit they should have just extended patent protection for a couple of years like Big Pharma originally wanted?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Redneck farmer

    Far as I can tell they’re selected for obtuseness, so the chance that they’re even aware of a problem approaches zero.

    I was always mystified by the Know Nothing Party but have finally gained an understanding how such a thing could arise and, as it happened, quickly fall. Let’s hope this one does as well.

  14. “Obviously, black women must have dreamed up countless genius innovations since 1619, but they’ve been too marginalized for us to notice.”

    They definitely have. Pancake batter for one (e.g. Aunt Jemimah). Unfortunately you don’t really see her hair in the picture on the label, but at least there’s evidence of a most practical innovation.

  15. @Triteleia Laxa
    Black Americans are all part white. If Mexican mestizos can identify with their Conquistador ancestors, black Americans can with their world conquering, slave-trading, modernity inventing ones.

    Replies: @Wade Hampton, @Mike Tre, @Desiderius, @International Jew, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @anon

    You’ve proven to be a silly troll. Off to the ignore list with Thomm, John Plywood and the other hindus.

    • Agree: Paperback Writer
    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Mike Tre

    Read this:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Viceroy_of_Ouidah

  16. @Anonymous
    Steve, they're playing you.
    The real story is how they are buying up single-family homes and seeking to permanently DESTROY "affordable family formation"...
    They push this stuff because they predict you'll take the bait...

    Replies: @Ralph L, @res, @Old Prude

    Or they’re going big on inflation hedges.

  17. A black man invented the Super Soaker..

    For everything else:

    https://blackinventionmyths.com/

    • Replies: @Neuday
    @Sick of Orcs


    A black man invented the Super Soaker..
     
    What if muh dik could shoot water 10 yards . . .
  18. The sad thing is that current elite policies (expensive, cramped housing, forced diversity, high crime rate) will actually reduce the number of “man in a shed” inventors/tinkerers.

    I mentioned way back meeting an inventor of that kind, he’d worked in defence industries then gone solo. Started work from school at 16 but his labs were in the garden of a property worth a million now, in a very low crime location. He’d done work for some very famous tech organisations both here and in the US.

    A modern counterpart wouldn’t get a job without £60k of student debt, and he’d live in a place with a tiny garden – and anyway, in large parts of the UK you just couldn’t leave expensive scientific equipment in a garden shed.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Back in 1981 my apartment mate's fiancee's father was the inventor of the foam in Nike Air. He operated out of his garage in Ventura County.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

  19. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    America, where the streets are paved with Diversity.

    Replies: @Charon, @Skyler the Weird, @Hannah Katz, @Anon

    That explains the potholes and uneven pavement.

    • LOL: res
  20. “We know that DIE is the key to innovation”. No we do NOT know this. This is an assertion that cannot be proved and indeed there is plenty of disconfirming evidence. The statement is basically a religious confession of faith. As has been pointed out, we now live in a theocracy, where the religion is DIE.

  21. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    America, where the streets are paved with Diversity.

    Replies: @Charon, @Skyler the Weird, @Hannah Katz, @Anon

    I don’t invest in any of the BlackRock financial products, including iShares ETF funds. A lot of the investment firms are trying to at least look woke, but BlackRock jumped off the deep end. Ariel Funds is a black firm that has mediocre performance with high cost mutual funds. No thanks.

  22. @YetAnotherAnon
    The sad thing is that current elite policies (expensive, cramped housing, forced diversity, high crime rate) will actually reduce the number of "man in a shed" inventors/tinkerers.


    I mentioned way back meeting an inventor of that kind, he'd worked in defence industries then gone solo. Started work from school at 16 but his labs were in the garden of a property worth a million now, in a very low crime location. He'd done work for some very famous tech organisations both here and in the US.

    A modern counterpart wouldn't get a job without £60k of student debt, and he'd live in a place with a tiny garden - and anyway, in large parts of the UK you just couldn't leave expensive scientific equipment in a garden shed.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Back in 1981 my apartment mate’s fiancee’s father was the inventor of the foam in Nike Air. He operated out of his garage in Ventura County.

    • Thanks: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Steve Sailer

    You should have snaked your apartment mate and run off with his fiancee.

  23. @Desiderius
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    https://twitter.com/ScottMGreer/status/1422650528849403906?s=20

    All of this flows from our weakness and that weakness from our atomization (literally dis-integration). Join, or die.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @res

    Greer’s contention is already happening.

    Illegal immivaders run around with no ID, no masks, and no jabs while the government showers them with free shit.

    YT is facing a future as an infinite capacity pincushion with his ID, location, and purchases tracked, controlled, and taxed via the coming Fedcoin blockchain.

  24. @Triteleia Laxa
    Black Americans are all part white. If Mexican mestizos can identify with their Conquistador ancestors, black Americans can with their world conquering, slave-trading, modernity inventing ones.

    Replies: @Wade Hampton, @Mike Tre, @Desiderius, @International Jew, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @anon

    This unironically. Loury makes a similar argument, as does the movie Soul Power perhaps despite itself, certainly in contrast to the trailer.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Desiderius

    Yes, and I didn't mean it ironically. It is normal in human history for mixed peoples to identify with their conquering side, and all conquering produced some mixed peoples.

    The evidence is unclear, but I believe the latest is that Anglo-Saxons had a limited genetic impact on Britons, yet people easily identify as English, while retaining British of course.

  25. @Redneck farmer
    @Desiderius

    Have any of the Congressmen who let pharmaceutical companies advertise ever apologize and admit they should have just extended patent protection for a couple of years like Big Pharma originally wanted?

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Far as I can tell they’re selected for obtuseness, so the chance that they’re even aware of a problem approaches zero.

    I was always mystified by the Know Nothing Party but have finally gained an understanding how such a thing could arise and, as it happened, quickly fall. Let’s hope this one does as well.

  26. The absurdity of this statement is that every decent-sized company’s HR department is constantly on the lookout for ‘diverse’ talent and hiring managers know they will be handsomely rewarded if they actually find one of these great white whales that performs and can be showcased. That almost none of these companies grew from an idea into multi-billion market cap companies with any sort of diversity at all is conveniently forgotten.

    The trope that diversity improves performance is everywhere you look these days, but no one ever goes the extra step and cites a real-world example of that actually works in practice. It’s revealing but it is never called out.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Arclight

    If it were revealing it wouldn’t need to be called-out.

    Concealing is the point.

    , @res
    @Arclight


    every decent-sized company’s HR department is constantly on the lookout for ‘diverse’ talent and hiring managers know they will be handsomely rewarded if they actually find one of these great white whales that performs and can be showcased.
     
    Are there any headhunters who have made a large scale success of doing this? If I search for "diversity headhunter" there are plenty of results, but I don't know how to winnow the PR down to examples of tangible success.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Arclight

  27. Anon[709] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose
    America, where the streets are paved with Diversity.

    Replies: @Charon, @Skyler the Weird, @Hannah Katz, @Anon

    What is it with all the weird weird looking people in the US? The obese with shorts and tattoos and dirty hair, the tall gays that speak and stand exactly like women, the twins with orange hair, the stumpy gays with a buzz cut/long tendrils and long varnished nails, I can go on and on. Plus the green and purple hair on women. There’s white people on the street that look like Aztec high priests at the sacrifices.

    Granted, I see those in malls and in cheap chain stores mostly (do Kroger and Pottery Barn count as a cheap chain store?), but I am aghast.

  28. The Elizabeth Holmes trial seems to have eluded the mainstream media as I see almost no coverage. Top search hit was this CNBC piece:

    https://www.cnbc.com/2021/07/09/john-carreyrou-predicts-elizabeth-holmes-trial-outcome.html

    The last detailed report I saw looked like her defense was going to be some variation on:

    Everybody in Silicon Valley does this crap and the sexist pig government is persecuting woman Elizabeth Holmes because they are a bunch of sexist pigs.

    Carryou predicts they are going to get her for wire fraud. The most interesting development to me is she got herself pregnant and will be maximally visibly pregnant right around the time the jurors get to discuss how they are going to go on the verdict.

  29. @Desiderius
    @Triteleia Laxa

    This unironically. Loury makes a similar argument, as does the movie Soul Power perhaps despite itself, certainly in contrast to the trailer.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    Yes, and I didn’t mean it ironically. It is normal in human history for mixed peoples to identify with their conquering side, and all conquering produced some mixed peoples.

    The evidence is unclear, but I believe the latest is that Anglo-Saxons had a limited genetic impact on Britons, yet people easily identify as English, while retaining British of course.

  30. @Sick of Orcs
    A black man invented the Super Soaker..

    For everything else:

    https://blackinventionmyths.com/

    Replies: @Neuday

    A black man invented the Super Soaker..

    What if muh dik could shoot water 10 yards . . .

    • LOL: black sea
  31. @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Back in 1981 my apartment mate's fiancee's father was the inventor of the foam in Nike Air. He operated out of his garage in Ventura County.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

    You should have snaked your apartment mate and run off with his fiancee.

  32. @Arclight
    The absurdity of this statement is that every decent-sized company's HR department is constantly on the lookout for 'diverse' talent and hiring managers know they will be handsomely rewarded if they actually find one of these great white whales that performs and can be showcased. That almost none of these companies grew from an idea into multi-billion market cap companies with any sort of diversity at all is conveniently forgotten.

    The trope that diversity improves performance is everywhere you look these days, but no one ever goes the extra step and cites a real-world example of that actually works in practice. It's revealing but it is never called out.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @res

    If it were revealing it wouldn’t need to be called-out.

    Concealing is the point.

    • Agree: Unladen Swallow
  33. A little past time to expect it. The war on organic life is the heart of the troubles. There are three factions:

    The Poz, who’ve made excuses for forgetting everything humanity has passed down for thousands of years.

    The Woke, who make war on memory itself in pursuit of transorganic life.

    Us, upon whom they war.

  34. Might have something to do with this:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2021-04-07/blackrock-borrows-against-diversity

    That said, I don’t think that the kosher leadership of Blackrock mind paying the Danegeld. After all, these modern Danes are attacking the people that Blackrock leaders hate. Win, win.

  35. I’ve got a boatload of money invested in Black Rock managed financial instruments, and so far they’ve paid off handsomely. I’d like to know if this is just ritual virtue signaling for public relations purposes, or are they really serious and are following the US military down the hole into “woke” dysfunction.
    I’d like to think it’s the former, and this kabuki theater won’t affect their ongoing looting of the American economy for their and (a tiny little bit) my benefit.

    • Replies: @Morton's toes
    @Alfa158

    Pareto 80-20 rule or most work is make work.

    These hires will get near the bottom line only by a cascade of screw ups. It's like that gorgeous secretary who basically does not do anything except look great. Except they don't look great to you or I but beauty is a judgment call. They look great to who's running this.

  36. @Dumbo
    Isn't BlackRock this giant corporation led by a Jewish billionaire that is buying all houses in the market?

    https://truthinplainsight.com/blackrock-is-buying-up-all-of-the-houses/

    So isn't it clear by now that this whole "diversity" thing is just a scam pushed by rich people and big corporations to further fleece the middle class?

    And it's not just BlackRock, look at al the big companies making that "pledge":

    https://increasingdii.org/companies/

    There could arguably be a few Black women inventors out there. But this isn't about that. They don't really care about Black women inventors. Or Black women in general. They just care about what else they can get from you.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @J1234

    The woker you proclaim yourself to be, the harder you can work at hollowing out what ‘s left of the American middle class (Blatant Hypocrisy Alert: I see I personally own wads of several Blackrock funds, but I hereby proclaim my commitment to diversity and equity etc etc so it’s all good.)

  37. The Four Stages of Diversity

    1) White men do the hard work over decades to establish a profession, a body of knowledge, an institution or company with a successful process and a physical presence (e.g. a factory or hospital).

    2) White women scan the various professions and job sectors for opportunities to waltz in and coast on the foundation laid by white men. Not getting dirty out in the field but writing memos back at corporate.

    3) The men realize all-white-male is now a bad look and a little boring, so they open the doors to white women, as some of these are pretty competent in a limited sense, or at least fun and decorative

    4) The white women open the doors to less competent and no-fun white women and also, God help us, black women. Competent white men leave to restart at Step 1 somewhere else.

  38. @Triteleia Laxa
    Black Americans are all part white. If Mexican mestizos can identify with their Conquistador ancestors, black Americans can with their world conquering, slave-trading, modernity inventing ones.

    Replies: @Wade Hampton, @Mike Tre, @Desiderius, @International Jew, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @anon

    You’ve put your finger on something interesting; if Mestizos are “Hispanic” then your average US black is “British”.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @International Jew

    Yes, and this isn't different because of essential differences between the two peoples. Mixed race Africans in various ex-colonies often identify very strongly with the former colonial overclass.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  39. @International Jew
    @Triteleia Laxa

    You've put your finger on something interesting; if Mestizos are "Hispanic" then your average US black is "British".

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    Yes, and this isn’t different because of essential differences between the two peoples. Mixed race Africans in various ex-colonies often identify very strongly with the former colonial overclass.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    Mixed race Africans in various ex-colonies often identify very strongly with the former colonial overclass.
     
    Yes, but does the (former) colonial overclass identify strongly (if at all) with “mixed race Africans” of any provenance? I should hope not! Do you have the urge to twerk?

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  40. BlackRock Must be Financially Liquidated Immediately

    Larry Fink Musty Be Financially Liquidated Immediately

    I wrote this in June of 2021:

    I went through a bout of not enjoying any so-called INCLUSION during the deliberations of the plutocrats and the ruling class and the minions of the plutocrats when they were using massive levels of monetary extremism madness to massively reward the already bloated plutocrats with all their asset bubble gains and the government workers and the PPP scam recipients and the extra 600 dollars in the unemployment scam people and all the other scam artists who were at the trough of the privately-controlled Federal Reserve Bank.

    The Fed didn’t much care to be inclusive about monetary policy deliberations with regular White Core Americans or any other race of Americans but they sure as Hell were inclusive with Larry Phucking Fink of BlackRock.

    The sonofabitch plutocrats like Larry Fink of BlackRock want to forcibly include you in their crooked financial swindles that they cook up with Jay Powell and the other plutocrat-controlled stooges at the privately-controlled Federal Reserve Bank.

    That baby boomer Mulatto asshole Eric Holder says Whites are cowards when it comes to race but the banker whore Eric Holder ain’t including or being INCLUSIVE of all the White Core Americans more than willing to be honest about the RACE ISSUE in the USA.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/inclusion-means-excluding-you/#comment-4740501

  41. @Triteleia Laxa
    Black Americans are all part white. If Mexican mestizos can identify with their Conquistador ancestors, black Americans can with their world conquering, slave-trading, modernity inventing ones.

    Replies: @Wade Hampton, @Mike Tre, @Desiderius, @International Jew, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @anon

    If Mexican mestizos can identify with their Conquistador ancestors, black Americans can [too] …

    Eyesight, and the invention of mirrors, cameras, etc. is a big snag: Blacks know they look quite different than Whites—this, among other things (different brains), is a big psychological barrier.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I am sure that doesn't help, but it hasn't precluded such identification in other cases.

    What is missing in "white identity" that black people have decided they need? Or white progressives have also decided they need?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  42. Blackrock really needs to set more realistic goals.

    Like finding the Easter Bunny.

    Or Santa Claus.

  43. Destroy BlackRock Now!

    Financially Liquidate Billionaire Larry Fink Now!

    Nationalize The Federal Reserve Bank Now!

    I covered this stuff about BlackRock and Finkism In June of 2021:

    BlackRock is an evil and treasonous and immoral outfit dedicated to attacking and destroying the European Christian ancestral core of the USA and BlackRock is using central banker shysterism to attack and destroy AFFORDABLE FAMILY FORMATION in the USA.

    BlackRock is using the monetary extremism of the Federal Reserve Bank to grab hold of control of the residential real estate market in order to perpetuate WHITE GENOCIDE in the USA. The patriotic answer to the evil of BlackRock is to raise the federal funds rate to 6 percent and implode the asset bubble in real estate and then use local property tax hikes to squeeze the pips of BlackRock so hard they’ll start squeaking. BlackRock owned real estate must be taxed so high that Larry Fink will be screaming in horror before he is financially liquidated and then forcibly exiled to sub-Saharan Africa.

    BlackRock Must be Financially Liquidated Immediately!

    https://www.unz.com/anepigone/its-not-transitory-its-the-new-normal/#comment-4713959

  44. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    If Mexican mestizos can identify with their Conquistador ancestors, black Americans can [too] …
     
    Eyesight, and the invention of mirrors, cameras, etc. is a big snag: Blacks know they look quite different than Whites—this, among other things (different brains), is a big psychological barrier.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    I am sure that doesn’t help, but it hasn’t precluded such identification in other cases.

    What is missing in “white identity” that black people have decided they need? Or white progressives have also decided they need?

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    What is missing in “white identity” that black people have decided they need? Or white progressives have also decided they need?
     
    “Decided they need”? I’m not sure I follow…

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  45. @Desiderius
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    https://twitter.com/ScottMGreer/status/1422650528849403906?s=20

    All of this flows from our weakness and that weakness from our atomization (literally dis-integration). Join, or die.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @res

    Scott Greer nailed that one.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @res

    He nails a lot. Very useful bullshit/wishful thinking filter.

  46. @Triteleia Laxa
    Black Americans are all part white. If Mexican mestizos can identify with their Conquistador ancestors, black Americans can with their world conquering, slave-trading, modernity inventing ones.

    Replies: @Wade Hampton, @Mike Tre, @Desiderius, @International Jew, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @anon

    If Mexican mestizos can identify with their Conquistador ancestors,

    Generally they don’t. Mestizaje has been explained to at least one of you before. Please make a note of it this time.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @anon

    I'm guessing I know a lot more about Mexico than you.

    Replies: @anon

  47. @Anonymous
    Steve, they're playing you.
    The real story is how they are buying up single-family homes and seeking to permanently DESTROY "affordable family formation"...
    They push this stuff because they predict you'll take the bait...

    Replies: @Ralph L, @res, @Old Prude

    I wonder how that is going to play out. Some discussion in
    https://www.unz.com/anepigone/inflation-wins-and-blackrock-knows-it

  48. @Arclight
    The absurdity of this statement is that every decent-sized company's HR department is constantly on the lookout for 'diverse' talent and hiring managers know they will be handsomely rewarded if they actually find one of these great white whales that performs and can be showcased. That almost none of these companies grew from an idea into multi-billion market cap companies with any sort of diversity at all is conveniently forgotten.

    The trope that diversity improves performance is everywhere you look these days, but no one ever goes the extra step and cites a real-world example of that actually works in practice. It's revealing but it is never called out.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @res

    every decent-sized company’s HR department is constantly on the lookout for ‘diverse’ talent and hiring managers know they will be handsomely rewarded if they actually find one of these great white whales that performs and can be showcased.

    Are there any headhunters who have made a large scale success of doing this? If I search for “diversity headhunter” there are plenty of results, but I don’t know how to winnow the PR down to examples of tangible success.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @res

    I doubt it. It's just not possible. The actual talent is too thin and anyone with real promise gets snatched up quickly. There are probably people who BRAG about doing this but if you dig down you realize that the people they are placing are mostly show horses who have white or Asian underlings who are doing the actual work.

    Last year I worked on a deal involving a private equity fund that is run by blacks - the reason this fund exists at all is that government/teacher pension funds steer money to them. The black who was ostensibly in charge was a good talker but it soon became clear that his #2 - a S. Asian, was the "numbers guy".

    It's like the thing about women making only 70% as much as men for the same work - if it was really true then corporations would hire only women and immediately increase their profits by 30%, sexism be damned. But it ain't true - American corporations have been hiring women without hesitation for well over a century for positions for which they were best suited (e.g. telephone operator, secretary, etc.). Those same corporations weren't hiring women at 30% off to be linemen or mechanics because they weren't suited to those jobs, not because they were suddenly sexist when it came to those positions.

    , @Arclight
    @res

    No, demand for top shelf 'diverse' white collar workers far outstrips supply.

    I have a close friend who is an executive at a major law firm that buys into the DIE stuff wholeheartedly, and each class of new associates has a healthy leavening of black and Latinos although a close look at the credentials reveals nearly all went to less prestigious law schools than the whites (not a ton of Asians) and don't have any of the extras like Order of the Coif, law review, etc. However, when it comes time to decide who makes partner, most of them will get passed over because they just don't have the talent, work ethic, or whatever to be trusted with high level legal work where real money is at stake. The few that do make it are apparently usually snatched away by the firm's clients who will overpay to have their own diverse general counsel teams.

    In my own field, it is not uncommon to have some black or (less often) Latinos to be the handshake people with local governments dominated by the same racial/ethnic demographic, but few of them do any of the actual heavy lifting. My spouse works in a creative field and it's very common these days for diverse people to get grant or municipal funding for their projects that turn into disorganized messes that eventually are bailed out with more money so they actually get done...eventually. To be fair, creatives are usually awful project managers, but all the same, my spouse has been asked to "advise" some of these projects to make sure behind the scenes things don't get too sidewise.

    Another facet of all this is that HR understands perfectly well that if you take on a diverse employee that doesn't perform, there is a lot more potential risk if you need to make a change - either demotion or dismissal. So whatever zeal there is for a more diverse workforce, in the back of the mind is the question of how likely is this person going to be a problem from a legal standpoint if they don't work out.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  49. @Triteleia Laxa
    @International Jew

    Yes, and this isn't different because of essential differences between the two peoples. Mixed race Africans in various ex-colonies often identify very strongly with the former colonial overclass.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Mixed race Africans in various ex-colonies often identify very strongly with the former colonial overclass.

    Yes, but does the (former) colonial overclass identify strongly (if at all) with “mixed race Africans” of any provenance? I should hope not! Do you have the urge to twerk?

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    There's no shortage of white people worldwide who happily identify with Obama.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Carroll Price

  50. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    Mixed race Africans in various ex-colonies often identify very strongly with the former colonial overclass.
     
    Yes, but does the (former) colonial overclass identify strongly (if at all) with “mixed race Africans” of any provenance? I should hope not! Do you have the urge to twerk?

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    There’s no shortage of white people worldwide who happily identify with Obama.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    There’s no shortage of white people worldwide who happily identify with Obama.
     
    Identify* with him, or use him as a virtue-signaling totem? I believe it’s the latter.

    That kind of condescension can be wearying for most Blacks (#110), especially those Blacks who pretend, racially, to be equals, or superior.

    *Some White bobos or aspiring bobos may identify with adult Obama-affiliated status markers like Harvard Law and arugula and Martha’s Vineyard, but not with his actual background (i.e., most probably don’t wish their dad was a drunk Kenyan who knocked up a dopey crescent-moon-faced White chick).

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    , @Carroll Price
    @Triteleia Laxa


    There’s no shortage of white people worldwide who happily identify with Obama.
     
    No where near as many as MLK.
  51. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I am sure that doesn't help, but it hasn't precluded such identification in other cases.

    What is missing in "white identity" that black people have decided they need? Or white progressives have also decided they need?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    What is missing in “white identity” that black people have decided they need? Or white progressives have also decided they need?

    “Decided they need”? I’m not sure I follow…

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I left a relationship once because I decided, or came to the realisation, that I needed to be less of an object in my main intimate dynamic.

    Many black people, consciously or not, have decided that "white" or plain "American" identity, fails to meet some of their needs.

    Many white people have done this too. What do you think these identities lack that those dissenters need?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @anon

  52. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    What is missing in “white identity” that black people have decided they need? Or white progressives have also decided they need?
     
    “Decided they need”? I’m not sure I follow…

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    I left a relationship once because I decided, or came to the realisation, that I needed to be less of an object in my main intimate dynamic.

    Many black people, consciously or not, have decided that “white” or plain “American” identity, fails to meet some of their needs.

    Many white people have done this too. What do you think these identities lack that those dissenters need?

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    Many black people, consciously or not, have decided that “white” or plain “American” identity, fails to meet some of their needs.
     
    Well, that’s obvious. They are not plain White Americans, and they know it. Most Blacks in White countries will have needs that can’t be (psychologically) met, unfortunately. This doesn’t mean personal tragedy for all individual Blacks in such a situation (some will do fine), but as an identifiable people they will always be less compatible if they are not in the absolute majority.

    Many white people have done this too. What do you think these identities lack that those dissenters need?
     
    With Whites in America, it’s more complicated: Among “dissenters” there are Jews who are not White but sometimes claim to be Whites, there are gays, there are general malcontents—the latter can be divided into subcategories of: class resentment, personal awkwardness, poor socialization/broken homes, etc. I can get into specifics if you have certain subgroups in mind, at the risk of stating the obvious as with Blacks above.

    In short, what dissenters of any kind in America ‘need’, depending on subgroup, is varying combinations of retribution, public validation, and profitable/sexual “tangibles” to be paid to them.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    , @anon
    @Triteleia Laxa

    I left a relationship once because I decided, or came to the realisation, that I needed to be less of an object in my main intimate dynamic.

    Female solipsism detected.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  53. The Diversity Pledge

    Findings by the NFL and leading researchers [i.e., Raj Chetty] show that women, Jews and Asians are significantly underrepresented as NFL cornerbacks. All of the data suggest that the U.S. has missed out on the valuable innovation from millions of these Under-Represented Athletes (URAs).

    • Agree: Carroll Price
  54. @res
    @Arclight


    every decent-sized company’s HR department is constantly on the lookout for ‘diverse’ talent and hiring managers know they will be handsomely rewarded if they actually find one of these great white whales that performs and can be showcased.
     
    Are there any headhunters who have made a large scale success of doing this? If I search for "diversity headhunter" there are plenty of results, but I don't know how to winnow the PR down to examples of tangible success.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Arclight

    I doubt it. It’s just not possible. The actual talent is too thin and anyone with real promise gets snatched up quickly. There are probably people who BRAG about doing this but if you dig down you realize that the people they are placing are mostly show horses who have white or Asian underlings who are doing the actual work.

    Last year I worked on a deal involving a private equity fund that is run by blacks – the reason this fund exists at all is that government/teacher pension funds steer money to them. The black who was ostensibly in charge was a good talker but it soon became clear that his #2 – a S. Asian, was the “numbers guy”.

    It’s like the thing about women making only 70% as much as men for the same work – if it was really true then corporations would hire only women and immediately increase their profits by 30%, sexism be damned. But it ain’t true – American corporations have been hiring women without hesitation for well over a century for positions for which they were best suited (e.g. telephone operator, secretary, etc.). Those same corporations weren’t hiring women at 30% off to be linemen or mechanics because they weren’t suited to those jobs, not because they were suddenly sexist when it came to those positions.

  55. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    There's no shortage of white people worldwide who happily identify with Obama.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Carroll Price

    There’s no shortage of white people worldwide who happily identify with Obama.

    Identify* with him, or use him as a virtue-signaling totem? I believe it’s the latter.

    That kind of condescension can be wearying for most Blacks (#110), especially those Blacks who pretend, racially, to be equals, or superior.

    *Some White bobos or aspiring bobos may identify with adult Obama-affiliated status markers like Harvard Law and arugula and Martha’s Vineyard, but not with his actual background (i.e., most probably don’t wish their dad was a drunk Kenyan who knocked up a dopey crescent-moon-faced White chick).

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    Some White bobos or aspiring bobos may identify with adult Obama-affiliated status markers like Harvard Law and arugula and Martha’s Vineyard
     
    I think you should adjust "white bobos" to "much of the global urban educated classes under 60." Obama was an aspirational figure for many people I know, all over the world.

    It is true that his skin colour and background made him more impressive to them, though, his background, if hard because of family drama, was still solidly upper-middle class.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Jenner Ickham Errican

  56. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I left a relationship once because I decided, or came to the realisation, that I needed to be less of an object in my main intimate dynamic.

    Many black people, consciously or not, have decided that "white" or plain "American" identity, fails to meet some of their needs.

    Many white people have done this too. What do you think these identities lack that those dissenters need?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @anon

    Many black people, consciously or not, have decided that “white” or plain “American” identity, fails to meet some of their needs.

    Well, that’s obvious. They are not plain White Americans, and they know it. Most Blacks in White countries will have needs that can’t be (psychologically) met, unfortunately. This doesn’t mean personal tragedy for all individual Blacks in such a situation (some will do fine), but as an identifiable people they will always be less compatible if they are not in the absolute majority.

    Many white people have done this too. What do you think these identities lack that those dissenters need?

    With Whites in America, it’s more complicated: Among “dissenters” there are Jews who are not White but sometimes claim to be Whites, there are gays, there are general malcontents—the latter can be divided into subcategories of: class resentment, personal awkwardness, poor socialization/broken homes, etc. I can get into specifics if you have certain subgroups in mind, at the risk of stating the obvious as with Blacks above.

    In short, what dissenters of any kind in America ‘need’, depending on subgroup, is varying combinations of retribution, public validation, and profitable/sexual “tangibles” to be paid to them.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    You have no understanding of the people who disagree with you. You see yourself at war, but you've decided that "intelligence" and "reconnaissance" are for losers.

    Black people, and white dissenters, find "white identity" and, its traditional proxy in America, "American identity," unsatisfying.

    Many of them are actually quite clear why, if you know how to see. For example, they find the lack of space to be emotionally expressive suffocating. It makes them feel like they can't breathe.

    They also need their feelings validated, but "whiteness" doesn't allow for just that, therefore they try to communicate their feelings into terms of objective facts, which they unconsciously perceive as the language of whiteness, which is them trying to be understood, in order to get those feelings validated.

    The white dissenters also feel they need to show these qualities to people in their society, which is why they are constantly, if ineptly, trying to teach these qualities to everyone else. They are the types who need to validate those around them.

    There's a lot more to it, but this is a good start for understanding.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  57. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    There’s no shortage of white people worldwide who happily identify with Obama.
     
    Identify* with him, or use him as a virtue-signaling totem? I believe it’s the latter.

    That kind of condescension can be wearying for most Blacks (#110), especially those Blacks who pretend, racially, to be equals, or superior.

    *Some White bobos or aspiring bobos may identify with adult Obama-affiliated status markers like Harvard Law and arugula and Martha’s Vineyard, but not with his actual background (i.e., most probably don’t wish their dad was a drunk Kenyan who knocked up a dopey crescent-moon-faced White chick).

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    Some White bobos or aspiring bobos may identify with adult Obama-affiliated status markers like Harvard Law and arugula and Martha’s Vineyard

    I think you should adjust “white bobos” to “much of the global urban educated classes under 60.” Obama was an aspirational figure for many people I know, all over the world.

    It is true that his skin colour and background made him more impressive to them, though, his background, if hard because of family drama, was still solidly upper-middle class.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Triteleia Laxa


    his background, if hard because of family drama, was still solidly upper-middle class.
     
    His grandma, who mostly raised him, was a bank teller who lived in a crappy high rise apartment and her husband worked in a furniture store. This is hardly upper middle class. It's barely middle class.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @Paperback Writer

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    I think you should adjust “white bobos” to “much of the global urban educated classes under 60.” Obama was an aspirational figure for many people I know, all over the world.
     
    That’s pretty sad/funny. Obama’s credential gathering, before being elected in part for his “storybook, man” identity (sarcastic Biden), was already done before by legions of (elite) Whites, in institutions created by White men. One can only be impressed by Obama’s trajectory from a patronizing (Oh, how wonderful!) or ignorant or tribal (We President now, byatch!) perspective.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  58. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I left a relationship once because I decided, or came to the realisation, that I needed to be less of an object in my main intimate dynamic.

    Many black people, consciously or not, have decided that "white" or plain "American" identity, fails to meet some of their needs.

    Many white people have done this too. What do you think these identities lack that those dissenters need?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @anon

    I left a relationship once because I decided, or came to the realisation, that I needed to be less of an object in my main intimate dynamic.

    Female solipsism detected.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @anon

    Why do you think you've detected that?

  59. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    Many black people, consciously or not, have decided that “white” or plain “American” identity, fails to meet some of their needs.
     
    Well, that’s obvious. They are not plain White Americans, and they know it. Most Blacks in White countries will have needs that can’t be (psychologically) met, unfortunately. This doesn’t mean personal tragedy for all individual Blacks in such a situation (some will do fine), but as an identifiable people they will always be less compatible if they are not in the absolute majority.

    Many white people have done this too. What do you think these identities lack that those dissenters need?
     
    With Whites in America, it’s more complicated: Among “dissenters” there are Jews who are not White but sometimes claim to be Whites, there are gays, there are general malcontents—the latter can be divided into subcategories of: class resentment, personal awkwardness, poor socialization/broken homes, etc. I can get into specifics if you have certain subgroups in mind, at the risk of stating the obvious as with Blacks above.

    In short, what dissenters of any kind in America ‘need’, depending on subgroup, is varying combinations of retribution, public validation, and profitable/sexual “tangibles” to be paid to them.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    You have no understanding of the people who disagree with you. You see yourself at war, but you’ve decided that “intelligence” and “reconnaissance” are for losers.

    Black people, and white dissenters, find “white identity” and, its traditional proxy in America, “American identity,” unsatisfying.

    Many of them are actually quite clear why, if you know how to see. For example, they find the lack of space to be emotionally expressive suffocating. It makes them feel like they can’t breathe.

    They also need their feelings validated, but “whiteness” doesn’t allow for just that, therefore they try to communicate their feelings into terms of objective facts, which they unconsciously perceive as the language of whiteness, which is them trying to be understood, in order to get those feelings validated.

    The white dissenters also feel they need to show these qualities to people in their society, which is why they are constantly, if ineptly, trying to teach these qualities to everyone else. They are the types who need to validate those around them.

    There’s a lot more to it, but this is a good start for understanding.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    You have no understanding of the people who disagree with you. You see yourself at war, but you’ve decided that “intelligence” and “reconnaissance” are for losers.
     
    I understand them fully: My adversaries do have a certain ‘logic’ to their respective positions. That doesn’t mean they deserve any more power, or deserve to keep the power they have.

    Black people, and white dissenters, find “white identity” and, its traditional proxy in America, “American identity,” unsatisfying.

    Many of them are actually quite clear why, if you know how to see. For example, they find the lack of space to be emotionally expressive suffocating. It makes them feel like they can’t breathe.
     

    I’ve long heard them—loud, and see them—clear, and acknowledge their complaints at face value. My advice is simple: Run away from (normal) Whites, physically, as far you can get! Emigrate! Breathe free, spread your wings, get yo freak on, whatever! In return, I advocate our American empire pulls our forces and NGOs from all countries that are likely to send us immigrants.

    They also need their feelings validated, but “whiteness” doesn’t allow for just that
     
    See above, they can emigrate…

    therefore they try to communicate their feelings into terms of objective facts
     
    THAT is false: Objective facts enrage them. They deny objective facts and sputter ad-hominem at, and censor if possible, the bearers of objective facts.

    The white dissenters also feel they need to show these qualities to people in their society, which is why they are constantly, if ineptly, trying to teach these qualities to everyone else. They are the types who need to validate those around them.
     
    Can you give examples of “these qualities”? I’m not sure what the above means…

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  60. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    Some White bobos or aspiring bobos may identify with adult Obama-affiliated status markers like Harvard Law and arugula and Martha’s Vineyard
     
    I think you should adjust "white bobos" to "much of the global urban educated classes under 60." Obama was an aspirational figure for many people I know, all over the world.

    It is true that his skin colour and background made him more impressive to them, though, his background, if hard because of family drama, was still solidly upper-middle class.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    his background, if hard because of family drama, was still solidly upper-middle class.

    His grandma, who mostly raised him, was a bank teller who lived in a crappy high rise apartment and her husband worked in a furniture store. This is hardly upper middle class. It’s barely middle class.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jack D

    I don't know many "barely middle class" people who attended expensive international schools in places like Indonesia while their mum socialised with the elite.

    Nevermind that he is the son of one of the most prominent members of the Kenyan elite.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Paperback Writer
    @Jack D


    His grandma, who mostly raised him, was a bank teller

     

    She was a Vice President of the Bank of Hawaii. He was raised by his Toot and Pops.

    who lived in a crappy high rise

     

    I don't know how crappy it was and neither do you.

    There used to be a contributor here named Spike, who was Hawaiian, and knew the place inside out. He'd be the one to tell us exactly where Obama was situated on the Hawaii prestige totem pole, and whether the high rise was crappy or middle class. My guess, being that they were haoles, is that it was middle class.

    Replies: @Alden

  61. @Jack D
    @Triteleia Laxa


    his background, if hard because of family drama, was still solidly upper-middle class.
     
    His grandma, who mostly raised him, was a bank teller who lived in a crappy high rise apartment and her husband worked in a furniture store. This is hardly upper middle class. It's barely middle class.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @Paperback Writer

    I don’t know many “barely middle class” people who attended expensive international schools in places like Indonesia while their mum socialised with the elite.

    Nevermind that he is the son of one of the most prominent members of the Kenyan elite.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Triteleia Laxa

    His mom was some kind of fringe hippy/eternal grad student type. Sometime she would get short term foundation gigs to "study village artisans" or other hippy dippy type crap. This is not a lucrative trade. They sent him to Indonesian public/Catholic school probably because they didn't have the $ to send him to an international school. I don't know why you think he did. Later in Hawaii he went to Punahou School, which is indeed a tony place, presumably as a scholarship student. Even then a place like that was dying to have blacks for "diversity" reasons, provided that they were clean and well behaved like Obama being raised in the household of his white grandparents.

    His father was at one time part of the Kenyan elite but his faction fell from favor and his mentor was assassinated and later in life he was most notable for being a pathetic alcoholic who lost both his legs because he kept getting into drunk driving accidents. In any case, Obama never saw one nickel from his father.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @Art Deco

  62. Remember the lady fired for dialing 911 when accosted by the black bird watcher in Central Park? She’s suing her employer for race and gender discrimination:

    https://bariweiss.substack.com/p/the-real-story-of-the-central-park

    She claims that his demeanor went from Hyde to Jekyll after she dialed 911.

  63. @res
    @Arclight


    every decent-sized company’s HR department is constantly on the lookout for ‘diverse’ talent and hiring managers know they will be handsomely rewarded if they actually find one of these great white whales that performs and can be showcased.
     
    Are there any headhunters who have made a large scale success of doing this? If I search for "diversity headhunter" there are plenty of results, but I don't know how to winnow the PR down to examples of tangible success.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Arclight

    No, demand for top shelf ‘diverse’ white collar workers far outstrips supply.

    I have a close friend who is an executive at a major law firm that buys into the DIE stuff wholeheartedly, and each class of new associates has a healthy leavening of black and Latinos although a close look at the credentials reveals nearly all went to less prestigious law schools than the whites (not a ton of Asians) and don’t have any of the extras like Order of the Coif, law review, etc. However, when it comes time to decide who makes partner, most of them will get passed over because they just don’t have the talent, work ethic, or whatever to be trusted with high level legal work where real money is at stake. The few that do make it are apparently usually snatched away by the firm’s clients who will overpay to have their own diverse general counsel teams.

    In my own field, it is not uncommon to have some black or (less often) Latinos to be the handshake people with local governments dominated by the same racial/ethnic demographic, but few of them do any of the actual heavy lifting. My spouse works in a creative field and it’s very common these days for diverse people to get grant or municipal funding for their projects that turn into disorganized messes that eventually are bailed out with more money so they actually get done…eventually. To be fair, creatives are usually awful project managers, but all the same, my spouse has been asked to “advise” some of these projects to make sure behind the scenes things don’t get too sidewise.

    Another facet of all this is that HR understands perfectly well that if you take on a diverse employee that doesn’t perform, there is a lot more potential risk if you need to make a change – either demotion or dismissal. So whatever zeal there is for a more diverse workforce, in the back of the mind is the question of how likely is this person going to be a problem from a legal standpoint if they don’t work out.

    • Agree: Jack D
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Arclight

    IIRC, you said in past posts that you are in the rental business. How is the rent/eviction moratorium working out for you?

    Replies: @Arclight

  64. @Desiderius
    Maybe if we look under that Black Rock we’ll find…

    Oh right that’s what this wild woke chase is designed to prevent.

    Related:



    https://twitter.com/L0m3z/status/1422784760775024640?s=20

    Replies: @beavertales

    Juliette Kayyem is the psychopath who tweeted that “Trump is the spiritual and operational leader of domestic terrorists” and must be “totally isolated” because “we’re in the tactical phase of a counter-terrorism effort”.

    “Juliette Kayyem was the most senior Arab-American female appointee in the Obama Administration.

    “On March 5, 2009 Janet Napolitano appointed Kayyem Assistant Secretary for Intergovernmental Affairs. On May 7, 2015, United States Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson appointed Kayyem to the Homeland Security Advisory Committee.

    “Kayyem serves as a senior advisor to NSO Group, an Israeli technology firm known for its Pegasus spying tool.”

    This psycho shouldn’t be anywhere near the levers of power, and should be deported to her native Lebanon ASAP.

  65. @anon
    @Triteleia Laxa

    I left a relationship once because I decided, or came to the realisation, that I needed to be less of an object in my main intimate dynamic.

    Female solipsism detected.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    Why do you think you’ve detected that?

  66. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jack D

    I don't know many "barely middle class" people who attended expensive international schools in places like Indonesia while their mum socialised with the elite.

    Nevermind that he is the son of one of the most prominent members of the Kenyan elite.

    Replies: @Jack D

    His mom was some kind of fringe hippy/eternal grad student type. Sometime she would get short term foundation gigs to “study village artisans” or other hippy dippy type crap. This is not a lucrative trade. They sent him to Indonesian public/Catholic school probably because they didn’t have the \$ to send him to an international school. I don’t know why you think he did. Later in Hawaii he went to Punahou School, which is indeed a tony place, presumably as a scholarship student. Even then a place like that was dying to have blacks for “diversity” reasons, provided that they were clean and well behaved like Obama being raised in the household of his white grandparents.

    His father was at one time part of the Kenyan elite but his faction fell from favor and his mentor was assassinated and later in life he was most notable for being a pathetic alcoholic who lost both his legs because he kept getting into drunk driving accidents. In any case, Obama never saw one nickel from his father.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jack D

    His grandfather "pulled some strings" to get him into Punahou. He also attended a private school in Indonesia as well as, briefly, a public school. I know some very rich people who sent their child to a public school for ideological reasons. Their child's stint was brief too.

    I suspect that, as with racism, Obama's autobiography massively exaggerates his family's supposed financial modesty. I just read that his "black", really half-Japanese half-black, classmate at Punahou, who Obama wrote he had intense discussions on racial identity with, didn't do much of that at all and felt that he was perceived as a rich, white kid at Punahou, just like Obama.

    Aren't there also strong CIA connections for Obama on his maternal side?

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    presumably as a scholarship student.

    Betcha they could afford the tuition.

  67. @Jack D
    @Triteleia Laxa

    His mom was some kind of fringe hippy/eternal grad student type. Sometime she would get short term foundation gigs to "study village artisans" or other hippy dippy type crap. This is not a lucrative trade. They sent him to Indonesian public/Catholic school probably because they didn't have the $ to send him to an international school. I don't know why you think he did. Later in Hawaii he went to Punahou School, which is indeed a tony place, presumably as a scholarship student. Even then a place like that was dying to have blacks for "diversity" reasons, provided that they were clean and well behaved like Obama being raised in the household of his white grandparents.

    His father was at one time part of the Kenyan elite but his faction fell from favor and his mentor was assassinated and later in life he was most notable for being a pathetic alcoholic who lost both his legs because he kept getting into drunk driving accidents. In any case, Obama never saw one nickel from his father.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @Art Deco

    His grandfather “pulled some strings” to get him into Punahou. He also attended a private school in Indonesia as well as, briefly, a public school. I know some very rich people who sent their child to a public school for ideological reasons. Their child’s stint was brief too.

    I suspect that, as with racism, Obama’s autobiography massively exaggerates his family’s supposed financial modesty. I just read that his “black”, really half-Japanese half-black, classmate at Punahou, who Obama wrote he had intense discussions on racial identity with, didn’t do much of that at all and felt that he was perceived as a rich, white kid at Punahou, just like Obama.

    Aren’t there also strong CIA connections for Obama on his maternal side?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Triteleia Laxa


    His grandfather “pulled some strings” to get him into Punahou.
     
    Don't make me laugh. What kind of strings? "I'll get you a good deal on that sofa"?

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  68. @anon
    @Triteleia Laxa

    If Mexican mestizos can identify with their Conquistador ancestors,

    Generally they don't. Mestizaje has been explained to at least one of you before. Please make a note of it this time.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    I’m guessing I know a lot more about Mexico than you.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Triteleia Laxa

    I’m guessing I know a lot more about Mexico than you.

    Should be easy for you, any of you, to demonstrate that.

    Start by explaining Mestizaje. But without using the URL I provided last time.

  69. @Dumbo
    Isn't BlackRock this giant corporation led by a Jewish billionaire that is buying all houses in the market?

    https://truthinplainsight.com/blackrock-is-buying-up-all-of-the-houses/

    So isn't it clear by now that this whole "diversity" thing is just a scam pushed by rich people and big corporations to further fleece the middle class?

    And it's not just BlackRock, look at al the big companies making that "pledge":

    https://increasingdii.org/companies/

    There could arguably be a few Black women inventors out there. But this isn't about that. They don't really care about Black women inventors. Or Black women in general. They just care about what else they can get from you.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @J1234

    And it’s not just BlackRock, look at al the big companies making that “pledge”:

    There could arguably be a few Black women inventors out there. But this isn’t about that. They don’t really care about Black women inventors. Or Black women in general. They just care about what else they can get from you.

    I don’t know if Steve gets his Olympics coverage directly from TV, but if he does, he has more stomach than I do. It isn’t the games that bother me, it’s the commercials. Moral and social guidance from large corporations via commercials is more repulsive and ridiculous than beauty and diet advice from Oprah via a talk show.

    My wife loves watching the Olympics, not so much the commercials, but we lost the remote for our TV, so she can’t mute them…and I end up hearing them from the other room. There’s one that especially makes me want to vomit, an “ad” that has something to do with adopting a kid with missing limbs from another country. After hearing it a half a dozen times, I asked her which company it was from, and she said, “VISA, I think…” then the logo appeared on the screen, “…no, Toyota.”

    I broke out laughing. Not only the wrong company, but the wrong industry. They spend tens or scores of millions on those ads and my wife doesn’t know who it’s from after half a dozen viewings. Moral superiority seems to be even more ignore-able than beer ads. Maybe they should recruit the Swedish Bikini Team for their virtue signalling.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @J1234

    "I broke out laughing. Not only the wrong company, but the wrong industry. They spend tens or scores of millions on those ads and my wife doesn’t know who it’s from after half a dozen viewings. "

    But she knows how very virtuous it is to adopt an African with missing limbs, and THAT'S the important message.

    https://i1.wp.com/stonetoss.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/race-mixing-advertising-comic.png

  70. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    Some White bobos or aspiring bobos may identify with adult Obama-affiliated status markers like Harvard Law and arugula and Martha’s Vineyard
     
    I think you should adjust "white bobos" to "much of the global urban educated classes under 60." Obama was an aspirational figure for many people I know, all over the world.

    It is true that his skin colour and background made him more impressive to them, though, his background, if hard because of family drama, was still solidly upper-middle class.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I think you should adjust “white bobos” to “much of the global urban educated classes under 60.” Obama was an aspirational figure for many people I know, all over the world.

    That’s pretty sad/funny. Obama’s credential gathering, before being elected in part for his “storybook, man” identity (sarcastic Biden), was already done before by legions of (elite) Whites, in institutions created by White men. One can only be impressed by Obama’s trajectory from a patronizing (Oh, how wonderful!) or ignorant or tribal (We President now, byatch!) perspective.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I don't think you need to be patronising to find someone becoming President impressive, whatever the advantages they derived from their skin colour. Obama is also educated urban upper-middle class in affect, which helps with the identifying.

    He's the type of person who many similar people around the world would want to share a craft beer with, while discussing Malcolm Gladwell, a little bit about sports, and where their children go to College. They might even swap stories of when they smoked cannabis when they were young or, if they became really good friends, they might sneak out and share a cigarette, unbeknownst to their respective spouses. I can also imagine him making a few interesting observations on how to get a good cleaner, which charities to support and whether organic wine is worth it.

    People like that, unsurprisingly, admired President Obama. He was them, if more tanned than most, and he was President.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  71. @Triteleia Laxa
    @anon

    I'm guessing I know a lot more about Mexico than you.

    Replies: @anon

    I’m guessing I know a lot more about Mexico than you.

    Should be easy for you, any of you, to demonstrate that.

    Start by explaining Mestizaje. But without using the URL I provided last time.

  72. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    You have no understanding of the people who disagree with you. You see yourself at war, but you've decided that "intelligence" and "reconnaissance" are for losers.

    Black people, and white dissenters, find "white identity" and, its traditional proxy in America, "American identity," unsatisfying.

    Many of them are actually quite clear why, if you know how to see. For example, they find the lack of space to be emotionally expressive suffocating. It makes them feel like they can't breathe.

    They also need their feelings validated, but "whiteness" doesn't allow for just that, therefore they try to communicate their feelings into terms of objective facts, which they unconsciously perceive as the language of whiteness, which is them trying to be understood, in order to get those feelings validated.

    The white dissenters also feel they need to show these qualities to people in their society, which is why they are constantly, if ineptly, trying to teach these qualities to everyone else. They are the types who need to validate those around them.

    There's a lot more to it, but this is a good start for understanding.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    You have no understanding of the people who disagree with you. You see yourself at war, but you’ve decided that “intelligence” and “reconnaissance” are for losers.

    I understand them fully: My adversaries do have a certain ‘logic’ to their respective positions. That doesn’t mean they deserve any more power, or deserve to keep the power they have.

    Black people, and white dissenters, find “white identity” and, its traditional proxy in America, “American identity,” unsatisfying.

    Many of them are actually quite clear why, if you know how to see. For example, they find the lack of space to be emotionally expressive suffocating. It makes them feel like they can’t breathe.

    I’ve long heard them—loud, and see them—clear, and acknowledge their complaints at face value. My advice is simple: Run away from (normal) Whites, physically, as far you can get! Emigrate! Breathe free, spread your wings, get yo freak on, whatever! In return, I advocate our American empire pulls our forces and NGOs from all countries that are likely to send us immigrants.

    They also need their feelings validated, but “whiteness” doesn’t allow for just that

    See above, they can emigrate…

    therefore they try to communicate their feelings into terms of objective facts

    THAT is false: Objective facts enrage them. They deny objective facts and sputter ad-hominem at, and censor if possible, the bearers of objective facts.

    The white dissenters also feel they need to show these qualities to people in their society, which is why they are constantly, if ineptly, trying to teach these qualities to everyone else. They are the types who need to validate those around them.

    Can you give examples of “these qualities”? I’m not sure what the above means…

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    I understand them fully: My adversaries do have a certain ‘logic’ to their respective positions. That doesn’t mean they deserve any more power, or deserve to keep the power they have.
     
    You don't feel they deserve these things, but they clearly do feel that way, and you simply telling them to leave isn't going to have the results you want. You will therefore need to improve yourself, especially your understanding of you and them, if you want to have an effect.

    Can you give examples of “these qualities”? I’m not sure what the above means…
     
    If someone says they "can't breathe" in great distress then that is likely how they feel, regardless of whether there is an objective physiological reason for it. It is also a horrible feeling. It would have worked out much better for Derek Chauvin had he taken that seriously, if not literally.

    It would be even better if more people would adopt that approach to their own feelings, and take them seriously, but not always literally. For many people, the attempt to frame their argument as objective just makes it come across as disingenuous and fraudulent. This is as true in politics as it is in personal relationships.

    E.g

    "Immigration is bad because white people built the US and so it is a white nation and so other people are objectively wrong in coming here."

    This is an example of a subjective argument disingenuously masquerading as an objective one. It would be more powerful and inarguable to say:

    "I feel more comfortable living in a place where people have long roots, like me. It reduces my anxiety around socialising and I find it easier to trust people. This is why I don't want further immigration. I value these things too much."

    I bet you if you learned to speak honestly, like that, you would find your opinion much more easily accepted by progressives.

    Replies: @ATBOTL, @Jenner Ickham Errican

  73. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    I think you should adjust “white bobos” to “much of the global urban educated classes under 60.” Obama was an aspirational figure for many people I know, all over the world.
     
    That’s pretty sad/funny. Obama’s credential gathering, before being elected in part for his “storybook, man” identity (sarcastic Biden), was already done before by legions of (elite) Whites, in institutions created by White men. One can only be impressed by Obama’s trajectory from a patronizing (Oh, how wonderful!) or ignorant or tribal (We President now, byatch!) perspective.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    I don’t think you need to be patronising to find someone becoming President impressive, whatever the advantages they derived from their skin colour. Obama is also educated urban upper-middle class in affect, which helps with the identifying.

    He’s the type of person who many similar people around the world would want to share a craft beer with, while discussing Malcolm Gladwell, a little bit about sports, and where their children go to College. They might even swap stories of when they smoked cannabis when they were young or, if they became really good friends, they might sneak out and share a cigarette, unbeknownst to their respective spouses. I can also imagine him making a few interesting observations on how to get a good cleaner, which charities to support and whether organic wine is worth it.

    People like that, unsurprisingly, admired President Obama. He was them, if more tanned than most, and he was President.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa

    What you write above is true, the White bobo class would indeed be right chuffed to have ex-president Barack as a friend or neighbor (tho cocktail conversation with Michelle might have its comedically awkward moments :) ), but there just aren’t that many Blacks with his affect and creds and celebrity to go around to satisfy White bobo status and ‘conscience’ needs.

    This thread started with your laughable supposition that Black Americans in general could, due to some White ancestry, “identify with their world conquering, slave-trading, modernity inventing [White ancestors].” Obama didn’t actually do that, though in some ways he mimicked their affect, he was a stereotypical postcolonialist self-pitying Black (showing his hand right away dans l’affair Skip Gates).

    Whites who patronized him with their votes and adulation did it because they felt virtuous because of his race—the cherry on top being his bobo consumerist, cultural, and credential affinities. He was their pet unicorn President. They identified with him like they ‘identify’ with their “rescue dogs”: Who’s a good boy? You are!

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  74. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    You have no understanding of the people who disagree with you. You see yourself at war, but you’ve decided that “intelligence” and “reconnaissance” are for losers.
     
    I understand them fully: My adversaries do have a certain ‘logic’ to their respective positions. That doesn’t mean they deserve any more power, or deserve to keep the power they have.

    Black people, and white dissenters, find “white identity” and, its traditional proxy in America, “American identity,” unsatisfying.

    Many of them are actually quite clear why, if you know how to see. For example, they find the lack of space to be emotionally expressive suffocating. It makes them feel like they can’t breathe.
     

    I’ve long heard them—loud, and see them—clear, and acknowledge their complaints at face value. My advice is simple: Run away from (normal) Whites, physically, as far you can get! Emigrate! Breathe free, spread your wings, get yo freak on, whatever! In return, I advocate our American empire pulls our forces and NGOs from all countries that are likely to send us immigrants.

    They also need their feelings validated, but “whiteness” doesn’t allow for just that
     
    See above, they can emigrate…

    therefore they try to communicate their feelings into terms of objective facts
     
    THAT is false: Objective facts enrage them. They deny objective facts and sputter ad-hominem at, and censor if possible, the bearers of objective facts.

    The white dissenters also feel they need to show these qualities to people in their society, which is why they are constantly, if ineptly, trying to teach these qualities to everyone else. They are the types who need to validate those around them.
     
    Can you give examples of “these qualities”? I’m not sure what the above means…

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    I understand them fully: My adversaries do have a certain ‘logic’ to their respective positions. That doesn’t mean they deserve any more power, or deserve to keep the power they have.

    You don’t feel they deserve these things, but they clearly do feel that way, and you simply telling them to leave isn’t going to have the results you want. You will therefore need to improve yourself, especially your understanding of you and them, if you want to have an effect.

    Can you give examples of “these qualities”? I’m not sure what the above means…

    If someone says they “can’t breathe” in great distress then that is likely how they feel, regardless of whether there is an objective physiological reason for it. It is also a horrible feeling. It would have worked out much better for Derek Chauvin had he taken that seriously, if not literally.

    It would be even better if more people would adopt that approach to their own feelings, and take them seriously, but not always literally. For many people, the attempt to frame their argument as objective just makes it come across as disingenuous and fraudulent. This is as true in politics as it is in personal relationships.

    E.g

    “Immigration is bad because white people built the US and so it is a white nation and so other people are objectively wrong in coming here.”

    This is an example of a subjective argument disingenuously masquerading as an objective one. It would be more powerful and inarguable to say:

    “I feel more comfortable living in a place where people have long roots, like me. It reduces my anxiety around socialising and I find it easier to trust people. This is why I don’t want further immigration. I value these things too much.”

    I bet you if you learned to speak honestly, like that, you would find your opinion much more easily accepted by progressives.

    • Replies: @ATBOTL
    @Triteleia Laxa


    I bet you if you learned to speak honestly, like that, you would find your opinion much more easily accepted by progressives.
     
    You are totally delusional, in the same way Charles Murray is.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    You don’t feel they deserve these things, but they clearly do feel that way, and you simply telling them to leave isn’t going to have the results you want. You don’t feel they deserve these things, but they clearly do feel that way, and you simply telling them to leave isn’t going to have the results you want.
     
    That is all very true. But perhaps you’re unfamiliar with my comments history. Me (and others) “telling them to leave” isn’t necessarily expecting them to leave (though it’s great if they do leave / don’t come)—it’s more of a courtesy ‘fair warning’. Should macrophage action (#135) begin in bloody earnest, our conscience is clean.

    You will therefore need to improve yourself, especially your understanding of you and them, if you want to have an effect.
     
    Are there some essential things I don’t understand? Name them—maybe I’ve missed something.

    If someone says they “can’t breathe” in great distress then that is likely how they feel, regardless of whether there is an objective physiological reason for it. It is also a horrible feeling. It would have worked out much better for Derek Chauvin had he taken that seriously, if not literally.
     
    Bad example. Every cop knows that line and every perp says that line since the Eric Garner brouhaha. Aesop’s Fable “The Boy Who Cried Wolf” addresses false claims of distress, and how they can negatively affect future claims of actual distress. If one resists arrest, the appropriate verbal response is “Stop resisting.” This also works:

    “I’m tryin’, I can’t breathe!”
    “Shaddup, asshole.”
    “I CAN’T!”
    “Are you fuckin’ stupid? SHADDUP!”
    “I CAN’T.”
    “That shit don’t work here.”
     
    https://twitter.com/balleralert/status/1267664589279371267

    A better example of “can’t breath” solutions germane to our conversation is expat commenter Jonathan Mason, who recognized his personally unsatisfactory situation in his homeland (#125, etc.—he cited Orwell’s Coming Up for Air) and, like the man in the music video I linked to there, hightailed it to more exotic climes. Jonathan didn’t stick around to fight his countrymen, he simply left. Bravo.

    For many people, the attempt to frame their argument as objective just makes it come across as disingenuous and fraudulent.
     
    Yes, that's an obvious, common pitfall for people incapable of objectivity.

    I bet you if you learned to speak honestly …
     
    Excuse me, what have I said that is dishonest?

    It would be more powerful and inarguable to say: …
     
    Hypothetically it would be, if the ‘other side’ cared. But they don’t, and in many cases are overtly hostile, so it’s Who/Whom all around. Therefore it’s wiser to skip the false ‘niceties’ and be blunt. That being said, I don’t revel in being rude or uncouth, exactly. I mean what I say, but I also like to impart some humor. And there’s a chance for them to ride along with me if they fix their attitude.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNjX3tQMygk

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  75. @Mike Tre
    @Triteleia Laxa

    You've proven to be a silly troll. Off to the ignore list with Thomm, John Plywood and the other hindus.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  76. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jack D

    His grandfather "pulled some strings" to get him into Punahou. He also attended a private school in Indonesia as well as, briefly, a public school. I know some very rich people who sent their child to a public school for ideological reasons. Their child's stint was brief too.

    I suspect that, as with racism, Obama's autobiography massively exaggerates his family's supposed financial modesty. I just read that his "black", really half-Japanese half-black, classmate at Punahou, who Obama wrote he had intense discussions on racial identity with, didn't do much of that at all and felt that he was perceived as a rich, white kid at Punahou, just like Obama.

    Aren't there also strong CIA connections for Obama on his maternal side?

    Replies: @Jack D

    His grandfather “pulled some strings” to get him into Punahou.

    Don’t make me laugh. What kind of strings? “I’ll get you a good deal on that sofa”?

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jack D

    That's how NPR characterises it from Dreams From My Father.

    I am not reading the original. It looks like a fantasy written for political consumption. Happy for you to correct me if you want to do the research.

    https://www.npr.org/2012/10/13/162786014/hawaii-prep-school-gave-obama-window-to-success

    Regardless, going to the fanciest high school on Hawaii is not an ordinary childhood, it is an upper-middle class and higher childhood, that fits in with a private school in Indonesia, with domestic servants and with a government minister father.

    Nor was Hawaii at the time obsessed with representation of black Americans. In all accounts except Obama's, he was just seen as another racial mix on a very racially mixed island. He went to that school because it was appropriate for him, not because he was an affirmative action case.

    I suppose class can mean many things, but I'd say, that since only a small percentage of children, especially at that time, paid out money for high school, they are above middle class almost by definition.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Art Deco

  77. @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/walterkirn/status/1422698034815594503?s=20

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Buffalo Joe

    Desi, love the TV pharma ads. “Tell your Doctor if you are pregnant or plan on becoming pregnant.” Tell your Doctor if you have high blood pressure or an enlarged heart.” “Tell your Doctor if you have a pacemaker.” I guess people use doctors who know nothing about their medical history.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Buffalo Joe

    You’d be surprised. The non-American ones are hit-or-miss at best and even the American ones may not be as up to speed on the literature as the average Twitter anon. At least their hearts seem a little more in it (and the top two I’ve had were Brahmin).

    As the saying goes doctors are cops and empires are notorious for having one nationality police another to lessen the risk of disloyalty to the regime. I don’t think I’d go quite that far but my confidence in the profession hasn’t increased after greater exposure. If you look at the pictures on the wall at Cleveland Clinic for instance there might be one white male in twenty.

    , @Inquiring Mind
    @Buffalo Joe

    You should be able to remind your doctor about these things;

    I attended a life-affirmation seminar for persons living with major mental illness -- there was a sense of obligation-to-attend with respect to my relationship to the organizer.

    The speeches were what you would expect that stigma against persons with major mental illness is a Bad Thing. One of the speakers, however, took the Cosby-esque approach of reminding members of The Community that if we are to battle stigma, persons with major mental illness need to stand up and take charge of their lives rather than adopting a passive approach as suffering from an illness out of their control. This man like many of the speakers is a "consumer", which is the term used for an advocate for the mentally ill who also has this condition.

    The message was just because you have major mental illness, this doesn't mean you don't have personal responsibility. One of the examples is "how you should prepare for a doctor's visit" and the importance of having a list of all the medicines you are taking when you have your visit with the psychiatrist, i.e., the health care professional who prescribed the multiple medicines you are taking.

    "Don't just assume the doctor knows about everything you are taking because, yes, they have your medical record but you are taking a lot of different medicines and you should have this information available because doctors are busy and may not look everything up."

    I had asked my regular doctor about the mental fog I experienced after the sedation for a colonoscopy. My doctor seeing me in the exam room with a clipboard replied, "We could refer you to the Memory Clinic for an evaluation, but you look pretty "high function" to me!"

  78. @Jack D
    @Triteleia Laxa


    His grandfather “pulled some strings” to get him into Punahou.
     
    Don't make me laugh. What kind of strings? "I'll get you a good deal on that sofa"?

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    That’s how NPR characterises it from Dreams From My Father.

    I am not reading the original. It looks like a fantasy written for political consumption. Happy for you to correct me if you want to do the research.

    https://www.npr.org/2012/10/13/162786014/hawaii-prep-school-gave-obama-window-to-success

    Regardless, going to the fanciest high school on Hawaii is not an ordinary childhood, it is an upper-middle class and higher childhood, that fits in with a private school in Indonesia, with domestic servants and with a government minister father.

    Nor was Hawaii at the time obsessed with representation of black Americans. In all accounts except Obama’s, he was just seen as another racial mix on a very racially mixed island. He went to that school because it was appropriate for him, not because he was an affirmative action case.

    I suppose class can mean many things, but I’d say, that since only a small percentage of children, especially at that time, paid out money for high school, they are above middle class almost by definition.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Triteleia Laxa

    The arrogance causes the ignorance as much as the other way around. They can’t wrap their minds around the real so don’t even try and mock those who do.

    , @Art Deco
    @Triteleia Laxa

    His grandmother was one of the vice presidents at the Bank of Hawaii. There's a certain amount of title inflation in banking and the affluence of the professional-managerial class vis a vis the rest of the country was less pronounced in 1970 than it is today, but her employment was enough to make the family haut bourgeois by the standards of the era. Consumption patterns are different in Honolulu. (It's common if not modal for affluent people to live in high-rise condos rather than in detached houses). Madelyn Dunham was as early as 1966 the primary earner in the marriage and by 1975 her husband was all but retired, fitfully selling insurance out of their apartment. There were just two grandchildren and the Dunham's apartment on Beretania Street was kind of a dump. The tuition payments to Punahou were their visible extravagance. (I'd wager they were also subsidizing their insufferable daughter).

    Note, Punahou had an enrollment of 2,000. There were shy of 700,000 people on Oahu at the time. That one school would have accounted for about 1.6% of total primary and secondary enrollment on the island. Note, in an average county in the United States, private school enrollment then accounted for about 9% of the total student population, with the bulk of those attending schools set up by the Catholic diocese or religious orders. (By way of example, in the county I grew up in > 85% of the private school population was enrolled in Catholic schools; the county was of a population similar to that of Oahu, but all the non-Catholic private schools together did not have 2,000 students enrolled). I'm gonna wager the school wasn't all that exclusive.

    Replies: @Ralph L

  79. All of the data suggest that the U.S. has missed out on the valuable innovation from millions of these Under-Represented Inventors (URIs).

    All of the data?

    All?

    Oh, I can’t wait to see that data.

    Please, give us the link to all of the data!!

  80. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    I understand them fully: My adversaries do have a certain ‘logic’ to their respective positions. That doesn’t mean they deserve any more power, or deserve to keep the power they have.
     
    You don't feel they deserve these things, but they clearly do feel that way, and you simply telling them to leave isn't going to have the results you want. You will therefore need to improve yourself, especially your understanding of you and them, if you want to have an effect.

    Can you give examples of “these qualities”? I’m not sure what the above means…
     
    If someone says they "can't breathe" in great distress then that is likely how they feel, regardless of whether there is an objective physiological reason for it. It is also a horrible feeling. It would have worked out much better for Derek Chauvin had he taken that seriously, if not literally.

    It would be even better if more people would adopt that approach to their own feelings, and take them seriously, but not always literally. For many people, the attempt to frame their argument as objective just makes it come across as disingenuous and fraudulent. This is as true in politics as it is in personal relationships.

    E.g

    "Immigration is bad because white people built the US and so it is a white nation and so other people are objectively wrong in coming here."

    This is an example of a subjective argument disingenuously masquerading as an objective one. It would be more powerful and inarguable to say:

    "I feel more comfortable living in a place where people have long roots, like me. It reduces my anxiety around socialising and I find it easier to trust people. This is why I don't want further immigration. I value these things too much."

    I bet you if you learned to speak honestly, like that, you would find your opinion much more easily accepted by progressives.

    Replies: @ATBOTL, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I bet you if you learned to speak honestly, like that, you would find your opinion much more easily accepted by progressives.

    You are totally delusional, in the same way Charles Murray is.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @ATBOTL

    I have all sorts of dissident thoughts and I can share them with all sorts of people. Having the ability to calm anyone and see them more clearly than they see themselves helps, but, ultimately, people don't readily object to authentic expression.

  81. @Alfa158
    I’ve got a boatload of money invested in Black Rock managed financial instruments, and so far they’ve paid off handsomely. I’d like to know if this is just ritual virtue signaling for public relations purposes, or are they really serious and are following the US military down the hole into “woke” dysfunction.
    I’d like to think it’s the former, and this kabuki theater won’t affect their ongoing looting of the American economy for their and (a tiny little bit) my benefit.

    Replies: @Morton's toes

    Pareto 80-20 rule or most work is make work.

    These hires will get near the bottom line only by a cascade of screw ups. It’s like that gorgeous secretary who basically does not do anything except look great. Except they don’t look great to you or I but beauty is a judgment call. They look great to who’s running this.

  82. “…women, people of color and veterans are significantly underrepresented as US patent inventors.”

    Wanna know why?

    Because they haven’t invented anything!

  83. @Anonymous
    Steve, they're playing you.
    The real story is how they are buying up single-family homes and seeking to permanently DESTROY "affordable family formation"...
    They push this stuff because they predict you'll take the bait...

    Replies: @Ralph L, @res, @Old Prude

    If politicians gave a fig about their constituents they would shut down this real estate vacuum cleaner right quick.

    If my grandmother was a bicycle she’d have wheels.

    If I had some ham I could have a ham sandwich, if I had some bread.

    If…

  84. @Buffalo Joe
    @Desiderius

    Desi, love the TV pharma ads. "Tell your Doctor if you are pregnant or plan on becoming pregnant." Tell your Doctor if you have high blood pressure or an enlarged heart." "Tell your Doctor if you have a pacemaker." I guess people use doctors who know nothing about their medical history.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Inquiring Mind

    You’d be surprised. The non-American ones are hit-or-miss at best and even the American ones may not be as up to speed on the literature as the average Twitter anon. At least their hearts seem a little more in it (and the top two I’ve had were Brahmin).

    As the saying goes doctors are cops and empires are notorious for having one nationality police another to lessen the risk of disloyalty to the regime. I don’t think I’d go quite that far but my confidence in the profession hasn’t increased after greater exposure. If you look at the pictures on the wall at Cleveland Clinic for instance there might be one white male in twenty.

  85. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jack D

    That's how NPR characterises it from Dreams From My Father.

    I am not reading the original. It looks like a fantasy written for political consumption. Happy for you to correct me if you want to do the research.

    https://www.npr.org/2012/10/13/162786014/hawaii-prep-school-gave-obama-window-to-success

    Regardless, going to the fanciest high school on Hawaii is not an ordinary childhood, it is an upper-middle class and higher childhood, that fits in with a private school in Indonesia, with domestic servants and with a government minister father.

    Nor was Hawaii at the time obsessed with representation of black Americans. In all accounts except Obama's, he was just seen as another racial mix on a very racially mixed island. He went to that school because it was appropriate for him, not because he was an affirmative action case.

    I suppose class can mean many things, but I'd say, that since only a small percentage of children, especially at that time, paid out money for high school, they are above middle class almost by definition.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Art Deco

    The arrogance causes the ignorance as much as the other way around. They can’t wrap their minds around the real so don’t even try and mock those who do.

  86. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I don't think you need to be patronising to find someone becoming President impressive, whatever the advantages they derived from their skin colour. Obama is also educated urban upper-middle class in affect, which helps with the identifying.

    He's the type of person who many similar people around the world would want to share a craft beer with, while discussing Malcolm Gladwell, a little bit about sports, and where their children go to College. They might even swap stories of when they smoked cannabis when they were young or, if they became really good friends, they might sneak out and share a cigarette, unbeknownst to their respective spouses. I can also imagine him making a few interesting observations on how to get a good cleaner, which charities to support and whether organic wine is worth it.

    People like that, unsurprisingly, admired President Obama. He was them, if more tanned than most, and he was President.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    What you write above is true, the White bobo class would indeed be right chuffed to have ex-president Barack as a friend or neighbor (tho cocktail conversation with Michelle might have its comedically awkward moments 🙂 ), but there just aren’t that many Blacks with his affect and creds and celebrity to go around to satisfy White bobo status and ‘conscience’ needs.

    This thread started with your laughable supposition that Black Americans in general could, due to some White ancestry, “identify with their world conquering, slave-trading, modernity inventing [White ancestors].” Obama didn’t actually do that, though in some ways he mimicked their affect, he was a stereotypical postcolonialist self-pitying Black (showing his hand right away dans l’affair Skip Gates).

    Whites who patronized him with their votes and adulation did it because they felt virtuous because of his race—the cherry on top being his bobo consumerist, cultural, and credential affinities. He was their pet unicorn President. They identified with him like they ‘identify’ with their “rescue dogs”: Who’s a good boy? You are!

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I never said Obama did that, but I did say it is possible for people who are just partly white to see that part as welcome in their identity.

    There are many examples of this among black people all over the world, just not very much in America.

    The Obama thing was your diversion because you said that, while my observation about the rest of the world may be true, no white people would identify back. I gave Obama as an example of why you were obviously wrong.

    You don't seem to believe that any white people see black people in any way that isn't racist. That's your problem.

  87. @res
    @Desiderius

    Scott Greer nailed that one.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    He nails a lot. Very useful bullshit/wishful thinking filter.

  88. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    I understand them fully: My adversaries do have a certain ‘logic’ to their respective positions. That doesn’t mean they deserve any more power, or deserve to keep the power they have.
     
    You don't feel they deserve these things, but they clearly do feel that way, and you simply telling them to leave isn't going to have the results you want. You will therefore need to improve yourself, especially your understanding of you and them, if you want to have an effect.

    Can you give examples of “these qualities”? I’m not sure what the above means…
     
    If someone says they "can't breathe" in great distress then that is likely how they feel, regardless of whether there is an objective physiological reason for it. It is also a horrible feeling. It would have worked out much better for Derek Chauvin had he taken that seriously, if not literally.

    It would be even better if more people would adopt that approach to their own feelings, and take them seriously, but not always literally. For many people, the attempt to frame their argument as objective just makes it come across as disingenuous and fraudulent. This is as true in politics as it is in personal relationships.

    E.g

    "Immigration is bad because white people built the US and so it is a white nation and so other people are objectively wrong in coming here."

    This is an example of a subjective argument disingenuously masquerading as an objective one. It would be more powerful and inarguable to say:

    "I feel more comfortable living in a place where people have long roots, like me. It reduces my anxiety around socialising and I find it easier to trust people. This is why I don't want further immigration. I value these things too much."

    I bet you if you learned to speak honestly, like that, you would find your opinion much more easily accepted by progressives.

    Replies: @ATBOTL, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    You don’t feel they deserve these things, but they clearly do feel that way, and you simply telling them to leave isn’t going to have the results you want. You don’t feel they deserve these things, but they clearly do feel that way, and you simply telling them to leave isn’t going to have the results you want.

    That is all very true. But perhaps you’re unfamiliar with my comments history. Me (and others) “telling them to leave” isn’t necessarily expecting them to leave (though it’s great if they do leave / don’t come)—it’s more of a courtesy ‘fair warning’. Should macrophage action (#135) begin in bloody earnest, our conscience is clean.

    You will therefore need to improve yourself, especially your understanding of you and them, if you want to have an effect.

    Are there some essential things I don’t understand? Name them—maybe I’ve missed something.

    If someone says they “can’t breathe” in great distress then that is likely how they feel, regardless of whether there is an objective physiological reason for it. It is also a horrible feeling. It would have worked out much better for Derek Chauvin had he taken that seriously, if not literally.

    Bad example. Every cop knows that line and every perp says that line since the Eric Garner brouhaha. Aesop’s Fable “The Boy Who Cried Wolf” addresses false claims of distress, and how they can negatively affect future claims of actual distress. If one resists arrest, the appropriate verbal response is “Stop resisting.” This also works:

    “I’m tryin’, I can’t breathe!”
    “Shaddup, asshole.”
    “I CAN’T!”
    “Are you fuckin’ stupid? SHADDUP!”
    “I CAN’T.”
    “That shit don’t work here.”

    A better example of “can’t breath” solutions germane to our conversation is expat commenter Jonathan Mason, who recognized his personally unsatisfactory situation in his homeland (#125, etc.—he cited Orwell’s Coming Up for Air) and, like the man in the music video I linked to there, hightailed it to more exotic climes. Jonathan didn’t stick around to fight his countrymen, he simply left. Bravo.

    For many people, the attempt to frame their argument as objective just makes it come across as disingenuous and fraudulent.

    Yes, that’s an obvious, common pitfall for people incapable of objectivity.

    I bet you if you learned to speak honestly …

    Excuse me, what have I said that is dishonest?

    It would be more powerful and inarguable to say: …

    Hypothetically it would be, if the ‘other side’ cared. But they don’t, and in many cases are overtly hostile, so it’s Who/Whom all around. Therefore it’s wiser to skip the false ‘niceties’ and be blunt. That being said, I don’t revel in being rude or uncouth, exactly. I mean what I say, but I also like to impart some humor. And there’s a chance for them to ride along with me if they fix their attitude.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    So much delusion, I have no idea how to reply.


    Should macrophage action (#135) begin in bloody earnest, our conscience is clean.
     
    Yes, your conscience would be clean, because if macrophage action were to occur, you'd be dead. I might be dead too, despite being more of a hippy than a fascist, as I would most certainly go to the wall for you.

    Surely you can see your position? Surely the reality of things can intrude into your hubris?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  89. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    You don’t feel they deserve these things, but they clearly do feel that way, and you simply telling them to leave isn’t going to have the results you want. You don’t feel they deserve these things, but they clearly do feel that way, and you simply telling them to leave isn’t going to have the results you want.
     
    That is all very true. But perhaps you’re unfamiliar with my comments history. Me (and others) “telling them to leave” isn’t necessarily expecting them to leave (though it’s great if they do leave / don’t come)—it’s more of a courtesy ‘fair warning’. Should macrophage action (#135) begin in bloody earnest, our conscience is clean.

    You will therefore need to improve yourself, especially your understanding of you and them, if you want to have an effect.
     
    Are there some essential things I don’t understand? Name them—maybe I’ve missed something.

    If someone says they “can’t breathe” in great distress then that is likely how they feel, regardless of whether there is an objective physiological reason for it. It is also a horrible feeling. It would have worked out much better for Derek Chauvin had he taken that seriously, if not literally.
     
    Bad example. Every cop knows that line and every perp says that line since the Eric Garner brouhaha. Aesop’s Fable “The Boy Who Cried Wolf” addresses false claims of distress, and how they can negatively affect future claims of actual distress. If one resists arrest, the appropriate verbal response is “Stop resisting.” This also works:

    “I’m tryin’, I can’t breathe!”
    “Shaddup, asshole.”
    “I CAN’T!”
    “Are you fuckin’ stupid? SHADDUP!”
    “I CAN’T.”
    “That shit don’t work here.”
     
    https://twitter.com/balleralert/status/1267664589279371267

    A better example of “can’t breath” solutions germane to our conversation is expat commenter Jonathan Mason, who recognized his personally unsatisfactory situation in his homeland (#125, etc.—he cited Orwell’s Coming Up for Air) and, like the man in the music video I linked to there, hightailed it to more exotic climes. Jonathan didn’t stick around to fight his countrymen, he simply left. Bravo.

    For many people, the attempt to frame their argument as objective just makes it come across as disingenuous and fraudulent.
     
    Yes, that's an obvious, common pitfall for people incapable of objectivity.

    I bet you if you learned to speak honestly …
     
    Excuse me, what have I said that is dishonest?

    It would be more powerful and inarguable to say: …
     
    Hypothetically it would be, if the ‘other side’ cared. But they don’t, and in many cases are overtly hostile, so it’s Who/Whom all around. Therefore it’s wiser to skip the false ‘niceties’ and be blunt. That being said, I don’t revel in being rude or uncouth, exactly. I mean what I say, but I also like to impart some humor. And there’s a chance for them to ride along with me if they fix their attitude.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNjX3tQMygk

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    So much delusion, I have no idea how to reply.

    Should macrophage action (#135) begin in bloody earnest, our conscience is clean.

    Yes, your conscience would be clean, because if macrophage action were to occur, you’d be dead. I might be dead too, despite being more of a hippy than a fascist, as I would most certainly go to the wall for you.

    Surely you can see your position? Surely the reality of things can intrude into your hubris?

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    Surely you can see your position? Surely the reality of things can intrude into your hubris?
     
    It’s not hubris. It’s recognizing humanity.

    If you need a ‘logical’ explanation: It’s HBD. A math equation. A chemical reaction. A physics experiment: Schrödinger's Cat playing with Chekhov’s Gun. We will see our position when the box opens (again).

    If you need a Romantic explanation, there are many religions to choose from. Or, one can simply observe and be in Awe of it all.

    I must say this is very sweet:


    I might be dead too, despite being more of a hippy than a fascist, as I would most certainly go to the wall for you.
     

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  90. @ATBOTL
    @Triteleia Laxa


    I bet you if you learned to speak honestly, like that, you would find your opinion much more easily accepted by progressives.
     
    You are totally delusional, in the same way Charles Murray is.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    I have all sorts of dissident thoughts and I can share them with all sorts of people. Having the ability to calm anyone and see them more clearly than they see themselves helps, but, ultimately, people don’t readily object to authentic expression.

  91. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    So much delusion, I have no idea how to reply.


    Should macrophage action (#135) begin in bloody earnest, our conscience is clean.
     
    Yes, your conscience would be clean, because if macrophage action were to occur, you'd be dead. I might be dead too, despite being more of a hippy than a fascist, as I would most certainly go to the wall for you.

    Surely you can see your position? Surely the reality of things can intrude into your hubris?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Surely you can see your position? Surely the reality of things can intrude into your hubris?

    It’s not hubris. It’s recognizing humanity.

    If you need a ‘logical’ explanation: It’s HBD. A math equation. A chemical reaction. A physics experiment: Schrödinger’s Cat playing with Chekhov’s Gun. We will see our position when the box opens (again).

    If you need a Romantic explanation, there are many religions to choose from. Or, one can simply observe and be in Awe of it all.

    I must say this is very sweet:

    I might be dead too, despite being more of a hippy than a fascist, as I would most certainly go to the wall for you.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    The position you can't see and appreciate is your total powerlessness.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  92. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    Surely you can see your position? Surely the reality of things can intrude into your hubris?
     
    It’s not hubris. It’s recognizing humanity.

    If you need a ‘logical’ explanation: It’s HBD. A math equation. A chemical reaction. A physics experiment: Schrödinger's Cat playing with Chekhov’s Gun. We will see our position when the box opens (again).

    If you need a Romantic explanation, there are many religions to choose from. Or, one can simply observe and be in Awe of it all.

    I must say this is very sweet:


    I might be dead too, despite being more of a hippy than a fascist, as I would most certainly go to the wall for you.
     

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    The position you can’t see and appreciate is your total powerlessness.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    your total powerlessness
     
    My observations in this discussion are not about me, as an individual. I’m talking about greater (earthly) events. But perhaps you have some Knowledge you’d like to share with me, a mere mortal? I was not unmoved by your kind words earlier.

    Er, assuming you’re actually a lady :) :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwfErYUoqx8

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  93. • Replies: @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Did you read the actual SMH story?

    1. The coal plants in question are in developing countries in Asia. If there are any blackouts they will be in Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippine, etc., not in the Western world.

    2. They plan to keep operating the plants for up to 15 years in cooperation with local governments while they gradually phase in renewable power. They are not going to buy them and shut them tomorrow like the way that GM bought up the electric street car lines of LA in order to shut them down and sell diesel buses.

    So "who ready for planned deliberate blackouts" is totally misleading. Wyatt gets a zero in reading comprehension, unless he is intentionally trying to mislead the lazy reader.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @Johann Ricke
    @Desiderius

    The funds will discover, at the end of the 15 years, that contracts unfavorable to non-Western countries have a way of being renegotiated on more favorable terms to those countries or torn up altogether. This is especially true in an era where the payment of reparations rather than gunboat diplomacy by the West is the norm.

  94. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    The position you can't see and appreciate is your total powerlessness.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    your total powerlessness

    My observations in this discussion are not about me, as an individual. I’m talking about greater (earthly) events. But perhaps you have some Knowledge you’d like to share with me, a mere mortal? I was not unmoved by your kind words earlier.

    Er, assuming you’re actually a lady 🙂 :

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I have tried, but I can't see how your comments are different from what a pure power fantasy would be.

    I have no problem with that, but I hope that you're not mistaking your fun for something that you should bind your emotions and actions to.

    It is like Ender's Game, but in reverse.

  95. @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/tummymuncher/status/1422903482902884356?s=20

    Replies: @Jack D, @Johann Ricke

    Did you read the actual SMH story?

    1. The coal plants in question are in developing countries in Asia. If there are any blackouts they will be in Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippine, etc., not in the Western world.

    2. They plan to keep operating the plants for up to 15 years in cooperation with local governments while they gradually phase in renewable power. They are not going to buy them and shut them tomorrow like the way that GM bought up the electric street car lines of LA in order to shut them down and sell diesel buses.

    So “who ready for planned deliberate blackouts” is totally misleading. Wyatt gets a zero in reading comprehension, unless he is intentionally trying to mislead the lazy reader.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Jack D

    What's the limiting principle that would prevent them doing the same or worse stateside? Certainly the replies to the original post are salivating at the prospect.

  96. Right, that settles it. I’m changing my pension fund. It’s just been taken over by BlackRock and I’m being hit with this kind of ESG crap about climate change and sucking up to minorities. BlackRock may have money to burn on this rubbish, but at least it isn’t going to be mine. I’ll be going with a boutique domestic fund that’s small enough to be overweight small caps and not yet rich enough to waste clients money on ESG spin.

  97. @J1234
    @Dumbo


    And it’s not just BlackRock, look at al the big companies making that “pledge”:

    There could arguably be a few Black women inventors out there. But this isn’t about that. They don’t really care about Black women inventors. Or Black women in general. They just care about what else they can get from you.
     

    I don't know if Steve gets his Olympics coverage directly from TV, but if he does, he has more stomach than I do. It isn't the games that bother me, it's the commercials. Moral and social guidance from large corporations via commercials is more repulsive and ridiculous than beauty and diet advice from Oprah via a talk show.

    My wife loves watching the Olympics, not so much the commercials, but we lost the remote for our TV, so she can't mute them...and I end up hearing them from the other room. There's one that especially makes me want to vomit, an "ad" that has something to do with adopting a kid with missing limbs from another country. After hearing it a half a dozen times, I asked her which company it was from, and she said, "VISA, I think..." then the logo appeared on the screen, "...no, Toyota."

    I broke out laughing. Not only the wrong company, but the wrong industry. They spend tens or scores of millions on those ads and my wife doesn't know who it's from after half a dozen viewings. Moral superiority seems to be even more ignore-able than beer ads. Maybe they should recruit the Swedish Bikini Team for their virtue signalling.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “I broke out laughing. Not only the wrong company, but the wrong industry. They spend tens or scores of millions on those ads and my wife doesn’t know who it’s from after half a dozen viewings. “

    But she knows how very virtuous it is to adopt an African with missing limbs, and THAT’S the important message.

  98. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa

    What you write above is true, the White bobo class would indeed be right chuffed to have ex-president Barack as a friend or neighbor (tho cocktail conversation with Michelle might have its comedically awkward moments :) ), but there just aren’t that many Blacks with his affect and creds and celebrity to go around to satisfy White bobo status and ‘conscience’ needs.

    This thread started with your laughable supposition that Black Americans in general could, due to some White ancestry, “identify with their world conquering, slave-trading, modernity inventing [White ancestors].” Obama didn’t actually do that, though in some ways he mimicked their affect, he was a stereotypical postcolonialist self-pitying Black (showing his hand right away dans l’affair Skip Gates).

    Whites who patronized him with their votes and adulation did it because they felt virtuous because of his race—the cherry on top being his bobo consumerist, cultural, and credential affinities. He was their pet unicorn President. They identified with him like they ‘identify’ with their “rescue dogs”: Who’s a good boy? You are!

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    I never said Obama did that, but I did say it is possible for people who are just partly white to see that part as welcome in their identity.

    There are many examples of this among black people all over the world, just not very much in America.

    The Obama thing was your diversion because you said that, while my observation about the rest of the world may be true, no white people would identify back. I gave Obama as an example of why you were obviously wrong.

    You don’t seem to believe that any white people see black people in any way that isn’t racist. That’s your problem.

  99. Interesting about veterans being underrepresented insofar as inventors. But as Juan Rico from Heinlein’s ‘Starship Troopers’ states… “Don’t ask me to sketch the circuitry of a suit; I can’t. But I understand that some very good concert violinists can’t build a violin, either.”

    And that got me to thinking about how blacks are highly represented in entertainment; music, movies, sports, etc. But are they really responsible for their success? Sure they’re talented, but like Rico above, if no one built cameras, microphones, internet, radio and television stations, recording equipment and a multitude of other devices to transmit those actions, wouldn’t talented efforts be restricted to an amphitheater in the park… or a grassy field attended by a few? It’s not in fact the singer that makes a good singer popular, but the inventions which bring that talent to the masses… otherwise that vaunted talent is strictly provincial and localized.

    And who built what brings that musical talent, sports excellence and acting to you?

    I’ve mentioned this before, and as others have pointed out, it extends to the maintenance of every other modern convenience that everyone alive enjoys. Once the ants are terminated and / or decide to keep their good to themselves, that grasshopper will starve…

    I was going to end the prior paragraph with ‘…and winter is coming!’ but that was too cliche for words; though it’s exactly what Aesop wrote!

  100. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Triteleia Laxa


    your total powerlessness
     
    My observations in this discussion are not about me, as an individual. I’m talking about greater (earthly) events. But perhaps you have some Knowledge you’d like to share with me, a mere mortal? I was not unmoved by your kind words earlier.

    Er, assuming you’re actually a lady :) :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwfErYUoqx8

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    I have tried, but I can’t see how your comments are different from what a pure power fantasy would be.

    I have no problem with that, but I hope that you’re not mistaking your fun for something that you should bind your emotions and actions to.

    It is like Ender’s Game, but in reverse.

  101. Attention Mary C. Daly, Fed President of the San Francisco branch of the organized crime syndicate that controls the monetary system of the USA:

    How about halting the electronically conjuring up the dollars to buy the mortgage-backed securities and raise the federal funds rate to 6 percent?

    Why not give that a try, you nasty liar banker with the Laurie Anderson hair cut?

    BlackRock and Larry Fink and Mary C. Daly of the San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank are colluding and conspiring to attack and destroy AFFORDABLE FAMILY FORMATION in the USA.

    BlackRock and Larry Fink and San Francisco Fed President Mary C. Daly are using monetary policy and mass legal immigration and mass illegal immigration as weapons to drive the cost of housing through the roof and young Americans are being cut out of the ability to have AFFORDABLE FAMILY FORMATION.

    Gretchen Thornberry has it right:

    HOW DARE YOU?

  102. @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Did you read the actual SMH story?

    1. The coal plants in question are in developing countries in Asia. If there are any blackouts they will be in Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippine, etc., not in the Western world.

    2. They plan to keep operating the plants for up to 15 years in cooperation with local governments while they gradually phase in renewable power. They are not going to buy them and shut them tomorrow like the way that GM bought up the electric street car lines of LA in order to shut them down and sell diesel buses.

    So "who ready for planned deliberate blackouts" is totally misleading. Wyatt gets a zero in reading comprehension, unless he is intentionally trying to mislead the lazy reader.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    What’s the limiting principle that would prevent them doing the same or worse stateside? Certainly the replies to the original post are salivating at the prospect.

  103. @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/tummymuncher/status/1422903482902884356?s=20

    Replies: @Jack D, @Johann Ricke

    The funds will discover, at the end of the 15 years, that contracts unfavorable to non-Western countries have a way of being renegotiated on more favorable terms to those countries or torn up altogether. This is especially true in an era where the payment of reparations rather than gunboat diplomacy by the West is the norm.

  104. @Buffalo Joe
    @Desiderius

    Desi, love the TV pharma ads. "Tell your Doctor if you are pregnant or plan on becoming pregnant." Tell your Doctor if you have high blood pressure or an enlarged heart." "Tell your Doctor if you have a pacemaker." I guess people use doctors who know nothing about their medical history.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Inquiring Mind

    You should be able to remind your doctor about these things;

    I attended a life-affirmation seminar for persons living with major mental illness — there was a sense of obligation-to-attend with respect to my relationship to the organizer.

    The speeches were what you would expect that stigma against persons with major mental illness is a Bad Thing. One of the speakers, however, took the Cosby-esque approach of reminding members of The Community that if we are to battle stigma, persons with major mental illness need to stand up and take charge of their lives rather than adopting a passive approach as suffering from an illness out of their control. This man like many of the speakers is a “consumer”, which is the term used for an advocate for the mentally ill who also has this condition.

    The message was just because you have major mental illness, this doesn’t mean you don’t have personal responsibility. One of the examples is “how you should prepare for a doctor’s visit” and the importance of having a list of all the medicines you are taking when you have your visit with the psychiatrist, i.e., the health care professional who prescribed the multiple medicines you are taking.

    “Don’t just assume the doctor knows about everything you are taking because, yes, they have your medical record but you are taking a lot of different medicines and you should have this information available because doctors are busy and may not look everything up.”

    I had asked my regular doctor about the mental fog I experienced after the sedation for a colonoscopy. My doctor seeing me in the exam room with a clipboard replied, “We could refer you to the Memory Clinic for an evaluation, but you look pretty “high function” to me!”

  105. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jack D

    That's how NPR characterises it from Dreams From My Father.

    I am not reading the original. It looks like a fantasy written for political consumption. Happy for you to correct me if you want to do the research.

    https://www.npr.org/2012/10/13/162786014/hawaii-prep-school-gave-obama-window-to-success

    Regardless, going to the fanciest high school on Hawaii is not an ordinary childhood, it is an upper-middle class and higher childhood, that fits in with a private school in Indonesia, with domestic servants and with a government minister father.

    Nor was Hawaii at the time obsessed with representation of black Americans. In all accounts except Obama's, he was just seen as another racial mix on a very racially mixed island. He went to that school because it was appropriate for him, not because he was an affirmative action case.

    I suppose class can mean many things, but I'd say, that since only a small percentage of children, especially at that time, paid out money for high school, they are above middle class almost by definition.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Art Deco

    His grandmother was one of the vice presidents at the Bank of Hawaii. There’s a certain amount of title inflation in banking and the affluence of the professional-managerial class vis a vis the rest of the country was less pronounced in 1970 than it is today, but her employment was enough to make the family haut bourgeois by the standards of the era. Consumption patterns are different in Honolulu. (It’s common if not modal for affluent people to live in high-rise condos rather than in detached houses). Madelyn Dunham was as early as 1966 the primary earner in the marriage and by 1975 her husband was all but retired, fitfully selling insurance out of their apartment. There were just two grandchildren and the Dunham’s apartment on Beretania Street was kind of a dump. The tuition payments to Punahou were their visible extravagance. (I’d wager they were also subsidizing their insufferable daughter).

    Note, Punahou had an enrollment of 2,000. There were shy of 700,000 people on Oahu at the time. That one school would have accounted for about 1.6% of total primary and secondary enrollment on the island. Note, in an average county in the United States, private school enrollment then accounted for about 9% of the total student population, with the bulk of those attending schools set up by the Catholic diocese or religious orders. (By way of example, in the county I grew up in > 85% of the private school population was enrolled in Catholic schools; the county was of a population similar to that of Oahu, but all the non-Catholic private schools together did not have 2,000 students enrolled). I’m gonna wager the school wasn’t all that exclusive.

    • Thanks: Triteleia Laxa
    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Art Deco

    I’m gonna wager the school wasn’t all that exclusive.

    My best friend growing up was at Punahou when BO was in HS. He's bright but mildly dyslexic and went to 3 selective private schools for most of 1-12 because they moved several times. His ambitious mother really wanted him to go there because of its reputation as the "best" school in the state. I'm sure they had a few rich and connected but not terribly bright students.

  106. @Jack D
    @Triteleia Laxa

    His mom was some kind of fringe hippy/eternal grad student type. Sometime she would get short term foundation gigs to "study village artisans" or other hippy dippy type crap. This is not a lucrative trade. They sent him to Indonesian public/Catholic school probably because they didn't have the $ to send him to an international school. I don't know why you think he did. Later in Hawaii he went to Punahou School, which is indeed a tony place, presumably as a scholarship student. Even then a place like that was dying to have blacks for "diversity" reasons, provided that they were clean and well behaved like Obama being raised in the household of his white grandparents.

    His father was at one time part of the Kenyan elite but his faction fell from favor and his mentor was assassinated and later in life he was most notable for being a pathetic alcoholic who lost both his legs because he kept getting into drunk driving accidents. In any case, Obama never saw one nickel from his father.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @Art Deco

    presumably as a scholarship student.

    Betcha they could afford the tuition.

  107. Joe Biden Has been Bought And Paid For By Larry Fink And BlackRock

    Trump Also Whored Himself Out To Larry Fink And BlackRock

    Larry Fink and the money-grubbing scum at the evil BlackRock Organized Crime Syndicate have completely captured the US federal government and they are using the monetary policy extremism of the privately-controlled Federal Reserve Bank to loot the citizens of the USA.

    The rancid Republican Party led by Mitch McConnell and Kevin McCarthy have crawled into bed with Larry Fink and BlackRock and the evil and treasonous politician whores in the Republican Party are doing everything in their power to drive housing costs through the roof.

    Fat ass Trump is eating cheeseburgers at his golf club in Bedminster, New Jersey, and Trump was a whore for Larry Fink and BlackRock long before that twat from Scranton named Joe Biden was.

    BlackRock Must Be Destroyed!

    Larry Fink Must be Financially Liquidated!

  108. @Arclight
    @res

    No, demand for top shelf 'diverse' white collar workers far outstrips supply.

    I have a close friend who is an executive at a major law firm that buys into the DIE stuff wholeheartedly, and each class of new associates has a healthy leavening of black and Latinos although a close look at the credentials reveals nearly all went to less prestigious law schools than the whites (not a ton of Asians) and don't have any of the extras like Order of the Coif, law review, etc. However, when it comes time to decide who makes partner, most of them will get passed over because they just don't have the talent, work ethic, or whatever to be trusted with high level legal work where real money is at stake. The few that do make it are apparently usually snatched away by the firm's clients who will overpay to have their own diverse general counsel teams.

    In my own field, it is not uncommon to have some black or (less often) Latinos to be the handshake people with local governments dominated by the same racial/ethnic demographic, but few of them do any of the actual heavy lifting. My spouse works in a creative field and it's very common these days for diverse people to get grant or municipal funding for their projects that turn into disorganized messes that eventually are bailed out with more money so they actually get done...eventually. To be fair, creatives are usually awful project managers, but all the same, my spouse has been asked to "advise" some of these projects to make sure behind the scenes things don't get too sidewise.

    Another facet of all this is that HR understands perfectly well that if you take on a diverse employee that doesn't perform, there is a lot more potential risk if you need to make a change - either demotion or dismissal. So whatever zeal there is for a more diverse workforce, in the back of the mind is the question of how likely is this person going to be a problem from a legal standpoint if they don't work out.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    IIRC, you said in past posts that you are in the rental business. How is the rent/eviction moratorium working out for you?

    • Replies: @Arclight
    @Jim Don Bob

    Although I am totally opposed to it, it hasn't been a major issue for us. Obviously last April/May 2020 there was a spike in rent delinquencies but right now things are pretty much normal in terms of what percentage of people are paying their rent. Our properties carry several months of reserves to cover total operating expenses, so if you have a few percentage of people not paying, you can absorb it for quite awhile although of course that means burning through money that was really intended for bigger ticket repairs and things like that. This is a bigger problem for older properties of course, since their reserves tend to be a lot leaner because of more frequent major maintenance items.

    The reality for most landlords is if you have a decent tenant, you work something out with them if they fall behind - it's way more expensive to go through the effort of eviction, turning the unit and so on than if you figure out how to help them get straight over time (mind you, I'm talking like a single missed month - more than that and they will never catch up in general). Under the old moratorium you could still boot people for reasons other than non-payment. Not sure if that out is present in the latest.

    That said, most of what I am used to dealing with are 50 units or more, so it's easier to deal with because we have a lot of units where we set aside part of the gross annual rental income into our reserves. If you own a duplex and one of them stops paying rent, you are probably raiding your own savings right out of the gate.

  109. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    There's no shortage of white people worldwide who happily identify with Obama.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Carroll Price

    There’s no shortage of white people worldwide who happily identify with Obama.

    No where near as many as MLK.

  110. @Jack D
    @Triteleia Laxa


    his background, if hard because of family drama, was still solidly upper-middle class.
     
    His grandma, who mostly raised him, was a bank teller who lived in a crappy high rise apartment and her husband worked in a furniture store. This is hardly upper middle class. It's barely middle class.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @Paperback Writer

    His grandma, who mostly raised him, was a bank teller

    She was a Vice President of the Bank of Hawaii. He was raised by his Toot and Pops.

    who lived in a crappy high rise

    I don’t know how crappy it was and neither do you.

    There used to be a contributor here named Spike, who was Hawaiian, and knew the place inside out. He’d be the one to tell us exactly where Obama was situated on the Hawaii prestige totem pole, and whether the high rise was crappy or middle class. My guess, being that they were haoles, is that it was middle class.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Paperback Writer

    Obama attended the most expensive and prestige private school in the state. No scholarship, grandparents paid the tuition. Grandma was a bank VP. Grandpa was a communist, well both were communists. Grandpa didn’t work Spent his time with Frank Marshall Davis, head of the communist party if Hawaii, such as it was.

    Whoever Obama’s father was, he was black. Grandparents, like most communist parents of girls, pushed their daughters to marry and have children with black men both to break segregation and produce mixed race warriors to fight for their cause.

    My opinion is was a long term communist plan to produce mixed race radical politicians. Didn’t work with Obama. Racist but not communist. White Biden is much more communist economically and politically than Obama ever was.

    It was a big 2 bedroom apartment plenty of space for a couple and one kid. In those days, woman couldn’t get mortgages even if they were very high earners. Grandpa Dunham didn’t work. Might be why they never bought a house. Or maybe it was communist ideology at the time to not buy real estate. The Dunhams were very committed to the cause. Shoving their 17 year old daughter into some black man’s bed. But that was standard communism 1930 to 1970. Breed mixed race babies for the cause.

  111. @Art Deco
    @Triteleia Laxa

    His grandmother was one of the vice presidents at the Bank of Hawaii. There's a certain amount of title inflation in banking and the affluence of the professional-managerial class vis a vis the rest of the country was less pronounced in 1970 than it is today, but her employment was enough to make the family haut bourgeois by the standards of the era. Consumption patterns are different in Honolulu. (It's common if not modal for affluent people to live in high-rise condos rather than in detached houses). Madelyn Dunham was as early as 1966 the primary earner in the marriage and by 1975 her husband was all but retired, fitfully selling insurance out of their apartment. There were just two grandchildren and the Dunham's apartment on Beretania Street was kind of a dump. The tuition payments to Punahou were their visible extravagance. (I'd wager they were also subsidizing their insufferable daughter).

    Note, Punahou had an enrollment of 2,000. There were shy of 700,000 people on Oahu at the time. That one school would have accounted for about 1.6% of total primary and secondary enrollment on the island. Note, in an average county in the United States, private school enrollment then accounted for about 9% of the total student population, with the bulk of those attending schools set up by the Catholic diocese or religious orders. (By way of example, in the county I grew up in > 85% of the private school population was enrolled in Catholic schools; the county was of a population similar to that of Oahu, but all the non-Catholic private schools together did not have 2,000 students enrolled). I'm gonna wager the school wasn't all that exclusive.

    Replies: @Ralph L

    I’m gonna wager the school wasn’t all that exclusive.

    My best friend growing up was at Punahou when BO was in HS. He’s bright but mildly dyslexic and went to 3 selective private schools for most of 1-12 because they moved several times. His ambitious mother really wanted him to go there because of its reputation as the “best” school in the state. I’m sure they had a few rich and connected but not terribly bright students.

  112. They’ll find a black woman figure head at 700K a year. She’ll be surrounded by White Indian and Asian men who do the real work.

    The real problem is finding a black woman who isn’t an arrogant aggressive domineering incompetent witch. A black woman who will allow all her assistants do the real work. And not cause endless squabbles and problems. Best bet might be an actress. Who will behave as if she’s on set. Like a normal person.

    If I were Black Rock executive recruiter I’d ask movie producer Tyler Perry. He’s got a whole crew of black actresses who play various roles. Black Lady executive is one of the roles in his movies. Make up a resume and offer one of his actresses that do nothing Dream job: token 700K a year black woman CEO.

  113. @Paperback Writer
    @Jack D


    His grandma, who mostly raised him, was a bank teller

     

    She was a Vice President of the Bank of Hawaii. He was raised by his Toot and Pops.

    who lived in a crappy high rise

     

    I don't know how crappy it was and neither do you.

    There used to be a contributor here named Spike, who was Hawaiian, and knew the place inside out. He'd be the one to tell us exactly where Obama was situated on the Hawaii prestige totem pole, and whether the high rise was crappy or middle class. My guess, being that they were haoles, is that it was middle class.

    Replies: @Alden

    Obama attended the most expensive and prestige private school in the state. No scholarship, grandparents paid the tuition. Grandma was a bank VP. Grandpa was a communist, well both were communists. Grandpa didn’t work Spent his time with Frank Marshall Davis, head of the communist party if Hawaii, such as it was.

    Whoever Obama’s father was, he was black. Grandparents, like most communist parents of girls, pushed their daughters to marry and have children with black men both to break segregation and produce mixed race warriors to fight for their cause.

    My opinion is was a long term communist plan to produce mixed race radical politicians. Didn’t work with Obama. Racist but not communist. White Biden is much more communist economically and politically than Obama ever was.

    It was a big 2 bedroom apartment plenty of space for a couple and one kid. In those days, woman couldn’t get mortgages even if they were very high earners. Grandpa Dunham didn’t work. Might be why they never bought a house. Or maybe it was communist ideology at the time to not buy real estate. The Dunhams were very committed to the cause. Shoving their 17 year old daughter into some black man’s bed. But that was standard communism 1930 to 1970. Breed mixed race babies for the cause.

  114. The Internet says that the most prestigious private high school in Hawaii is Iolani. Punahou is #2.

    But the Internet isn’t an authoritative source, so make of it what you will.

    Only Spike can tell us the real dirt.

    I’ve read that he did get scholarships. But again, that’s all from the internet, so who knows?

    What is established is that Grandma wasn’t a “crappy bank teller.”

    And saying that they “shoved” their daughter into someone’s bed is totally crass.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Paperback Writer

    I think in the 70's, Punahou was the school for Anglos, Iolani for native Hawaiians and Asians. I remember my friend's mother saying something like that at the time. It was typical of her to research all that before they even moved there from No. Virginia. She was an early helicopter mom of an only child.

  115. @Paperback Writer
    The Internet says that the most prestigious private high school in Hawaii is Iolani. Punahou is #2.

    But the Internet isn't an authoritative source, so make of it what you will.

    Only Spike can tell us the real dirt.

    I've read that he did get scholarships. But again, that's all from the internet, so who knows?

    What is established is that Grandma wasn't a "crappy bank teller."

    And saying that they "shoved" their daughter into someone's bed is totally crass.

    Replies: @Ralph L

    I think in the 70’s, Punahou was the school for Anglos, Iolani for native Hawaiians and Asians. I remember my friend’s mother saying something like that at the time. It was typical of her to research all that before they even moved there from No. Virginia. She was an early helicopter mom of an only child.

  116. @Jim Don Bob
    @Arclight

    IIRC, you said in past posts that you are in the rental business. How is the rent/eviction moratorium working out for you?

    Replies: @Arclight

    Although I am totally opposed to it, it hasn’t been a major issue for us. Obviously last April/May 2020 there was a spike in rent delinquencies but right now things are pretty much normal in terms of what percentage of people are paying their rent. Our properties carry several months of reserves to cover total operating expenses, so if you have a few percentage of people not paying, you can absorb it for quite awhile although of course that means burning through money that was really intended for bigger ticket repairs and things like that. This is a bigger problem for older properties of course, since their reserves tend to be a lot leaner because of more frequent major maintenance items.

    The reality for most landlords is if you have a decent tenant, you work something out with them if they fall behind – it’s way more expensive to go through the effort of eviction, turning the unit and so on than if you figure out how to help them get straight over time (mind you, I’m talking like a single missed month – more than that and they will never catch up in general). Under the old moratorium you could still boot people for reasons other than non-payment. Not sure if that out is present in the latest.

    That said, most of what I am used to dealing with are 50 units or more, so it’s easier to deal with because we have a lot of units where we set aside part of the gross annual rental income into our reserves. If you own a duplex and one of them stops paying rent, you are probably raiding your own savings right out of the gate.

    • Thanks: Jim Don Bob

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
How America was neoconned into World War IV
Analyzing the History of a Controversial Movement
The JFK Assassination and the 9/11 Attacks?