The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>
Topics/Categories Filter?
2008 Election Affirmative Action Art Books Camp Of The Saints Crime Disparate Impact Diversity Economics Education Foreign Policy Genetics Golf Hispanics History Human Biodiversity #IBelieveInHavenMonahan Ideology Illegal Immigration Immigration IQ Iraq Late Obama Age Collapse McCain Men With Gold Chains Merkel's Boner Mexico Movies Music NAEP Obama Olympics Panhandling PISA Political Correctness Makes You Stupid Political Economy Politicians Politics Race Race/Ethnicity Real Estate Ricci Sports Terrorism Testing Tests War 100% Jussie Content 100% Jussie-free Content 100% Jussie-relevant Content 2012 Election 2016 Election 2020 Election 9/11 Aaron Sorkin Abortion Academia Access Journalism Acheivement Gap Achievement Gap AEY Affordable Family Formation Africa Agriculture AIDS Alexander Hamilton Allegory Alt Right American-Americans American History American Idol American Jews American Media American Prisons Amnesty Ancient DNA Animal Rights Wackos Anthropology Anti-Gentilism Anti-Semitism Antiquarianism Antiracism Apple Arabs Archaic DNA Architecture Arkham's Razor Armand Marie Leroi Aryans Asian Americans Asian Quotas Asians Assimilation Attila The Hun Attractive Nuisance Doctrine Australia Bad Poetry Baltimore Riots Banana Republicans Barack Obama Barbarians Barone Baseball Baseball Statistics Basketball #BasketOfDeplorables Becky Becky Bashing #BernieSoWhite Beyond Parody Billionaires Biodiversity Birth Order black Black Crime Black Lives Matter #BlackJobsMatter #BlackLiesMurder #BlackLiesSlaughter BlackLivesMatter Blacks Blog Blogging Blood Libel boats-in-the-water bodybuilding Border Security Brain Scans Brainwash Britain Brown Swan Bush Bush Administration Business Byzantine California Californication Campus Rape Canada Canadian Football League Players Are Slow #Cancel2022WorldCupinQatar Cancer Carlos Slim Carroll Quigley Cars Catfight Cecil Rhodes Censorship Charles Murray Charlie Hebdo Checheniest Chechen Of Them All Chechens Chetty Chicagoization China Christmas Songs Civil Liberties Civilization Clash Class Clinton Clock Boy clusterfake Coalition Coalition Of The Fringes Coen Brothers Cold War College Admission Columba Bush Community Reinvestment Act Compton Conflict Of Interest Conquistador-American Conspiracy Theories Constitutional Theory Coronavirus Comparisons Countrywide Cousin Marriage Cover Story Credulity Crimethink Crops crops-rotting-in-the-fields Crying Among The Farmland Ctrl-Left Cuba Culture Damnatio Memoriae Daniel Patrick Moynihan Danube Daren Acemoglu Darwinism David Foster Wallace David Reich De Ploribus Unum Death Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire Deep State Definitions Democratic Party Demographic Transition Demographics Department Of Justice Disease Disney Displaced And Refugees Diversity Before Diversity Diversity Depression Diversity Pokemon Points DNA Dogs Donald Trump Donme Dreams From My Father Drugs Dynasty E-books Edward Gibbon Efraim Diveroli Eisenhower Elizabeth Holmes Environment Erdogan Espionage Ethnic Nepotism EU Eugenics Eurabia Euro Europe European Union Evolutionary Psychology Extreme Vetting Fake News Fake Noose Fame Family Matters Feminism Feminists Ferguson Ferguson Shooting Fertility Film Finland Finnish Content Flight From White Flynn Effect Football Forecasts Foreign Policy France Francis Galton Francis Gary Powers Fraud Freakonomics Free Speech Freedom Of Speech Frontlash Funny Fuyou Game Of Nations Gangs Gemayel Clan Genealogy Gentrification George Floyd George Soros George W. Bush George Zimmerman Germans Germany Gladwell Global Warming Google graduate-degrees Graphs #GreatWhiteDefendantPrivilege Gregory Cochran Guest Workers Haim Saban Halloween Hamilton: An American Musical HammerHate hate Hate Crimes Fraud Hoax Hate Hoaxes Hate Hypochondria HateGraphs HateStat Health Hegira Height Height Privilege Hereditarianism Heroes Hillary Clinton Hispanic Hispanic Crime hitch Hodgepodge Holder Hollywood Homer Simpson Homicide Homicide Rate Houellebecq Housing Hox Hoxby Huddled Masses Hug Thug Human Genome Humor Hungary Hunt For The Great White Defendant Hypocrisy Ibn Khaldun Idiocracy immigration-policy-terminology Immigriping Incompetence India Indo-Europeans Inept Smears Inequality Infrastructure Intellectual Discourse Internet Interracial Marriage Intersectionality Invade Invite In Hock Invade The World Invite The World Iran Ireland Is It Good For The Jews? Is Love Colorblind Islam Islamic Jihad Islamophobia Islamophobiaphobia Israel Israel Lobby James Watson Japan Jared Diamond Jared Taylor Jason Richwine ¡Jeb! Jeb Bush Jewish Intellectuals Jews Joe Biden John Updike Jurassic World Jussie Smollett Kaboom Kerry Killinger Kevin MacDonald Kids These Days KKKrazy Glue Of The Coalition Of The Fringes Knot Racism Kurds LA LA Times Lame Jesse Jackson Imitations Lame News Late Ov Latinos Law Of Supply And Demand Lebanon Lèse-diversité Let's Talk About My Hair Libertarianism Lolita Loooong Books Mad Men Madoff Magic Dirt Magritte Male Delusions Manspreading Marcomentum! Marizela Marketing Major Postmodernism Mass Shootings Massachusetts Math Matthew Weiner Media Meritocracy Merkel Merkel Youth Mexican Mediocrity Michael Bloomberg Michael Fassbender Michael Jackson Michelle Ma Belle Microaggressions Military Milner Group Missing The Point Moore's Law Mormons Mortality Mortgage Moynihan's Law Of The Canadian Border Mozilo Mulatto Elite Muslims Nabokov National Assessment Of Educational Progress National Immigration Safety And Quality Board National Merit National Question Nature Vs. Nurture Ned Flanders Neocons Neoconservatives Nerds New Orleans New York New York City New York Mania New York Times Newspeak Neymar Nicholas Wade Nieto Night In The Museum NIMBY Nirvana No Child Left Behind No Proof Bush In League With Lucifer Nobel Prize #NobelsSoWhiteMale #NotOkay Obama Wright Obamanomics Obey Giant! Occam's Butterknife Occam's Razor Occam's Rubber Room Oil Open Borders Orban Orwell Ostensibly Jussie-free Content Out-of-Africa Palin Partly Inbred Extended Family Peace Personality P&G Philosophy Of Science Pics Or It Didn't Happen Piketty Plaques For Blacks Poetry Poland Political Correctness Political Philosophy Polls Polygamy Poor Reading Skills Population Growth Post-Modernism Prester John Profiling Projection Pronoun Crisis Prudence PSAT Psychology Psychometrics Public Schools Puerto Rico Putnam Pygmies Qatar rabbits rabbits-are-fast Race And Crime Race And Genomics Race And Iq Race/Crime Race Denialism Race Hustlers Race/IQ Race Riots Racial Profiling Racism Racist Brain Racist Objects Menace Racist Pumpkin Incident Red State Blue State redlining Redneck Dunkirk redundancy Refugee Boy #refugeeswelcome #RefugeesWelcomeInQatar Replicability Replication Republicans Retconning Rice Richard Dawkins RIP Ritholtz Robots Rolling Stone Roman Empire Rome Romney Ron Unz Rove Russian Spies sabermetrics Sabrina Rubin Erdely Sailer's First Law Of Female Journalism Saint Peter Tear Down This Gate! Sammy Sosa Sand States Sapir-Whorf SAT scandals School Science Science Denialism Science Fiction Self-Obsession Serbia Sex Differences Shakespeare Silicon Valley Skull And Bones Skunk Works Slavery Reparations Slavoj Zizek Soccer Sotomayor Southern Poverty Law Center SPLC Stabby Somali Stage Standardized Tests Comparisons Statistics Statue Of Liberty Statue Of Libertyism Status Statute Of Diversity Statute Of Immigration Statute Of Liberty Stereotypes Steroids Steve Jobs Steven Spielberg Steve's Rice Thresher Columns Stoppard Stuff White People Like Sub-replacement Fertility Submission Subprime Mortgage Crisis Subrealism Sweden syr T.S. Eliot Ta-Nehisi Coates Taki Ted Kennedy Television Texas The Actual El Guapo The Bell Curve "The Birds" Directed By Alfred Hitchock The Black Autumn The Eight Banditos The Essential Evil Of The Swiss The Gap The Golfocaust The Great Awokening The Kissing Billionaire The Lobby The Megaphone The Scramble For America The Simpsons The Way We Live Now The Zeroth Amendment To The Constitution Theranos Thomas Jefferson Tiger Mom Tiger Woods TIMSS TNC Tom Hanks Tom Wolfe Too Many White People Tragic Dirt Trayvon Martin Trope Derangement Syndrome Trudeau Trump Trump Derangement Syndrome Tsarnaev Turkey Twin Studies Twins Twintuition Twitter Unanswerable Questions Unbearable Whiteness Underperformin' Norman Mineta Union unwordly Used Car Dealers Moral Superiority Of Vampire Squid Vibrancy Victim-Americans Video Games Vietnam Virginia Tech Vote Fraud Vulcan Society Wall Street Warhol Watson Watsoned Waugh Weedparations White Death White Privilege White Supremacy Whiterpeople Who Is The Fairest Of Them All? Who Whom Whooping Cough And Whooping Cranes Why We Can't Have Nice Things Willful Ignorance Woke Capital World Cup World War G World War H World War Hair World War R World War T World War Weed World War Z Wretched Refuse Wretched Refuseism Writing Yamnaya Yezidis Yogi Berra's Restaurant You Maniacs You Blew It Up
Nothing found
 TeasersiSteve Blog

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter

From my new column in Taki’s Magazine:

As I’ve been known to point out, the “equity” that the all-conquering Diversity-Inclusion-Equity (DIE) crusade truly wants is your equity in your home. Current developments in Evanston, Ill., and Manhattan Beach, Calif., are starting to give us a sense of how today’s increasingly antiquarian white guilt will be leveraged into sizable handouts over supposed injustices in the distant past.

We live in an era bizarrely obsessed with real estate transactions of increasingly remote generations. For example, Amazon’s new TV series Them is about the horrors at the hands of whiteness faced by blacks moving to Compton, Calif., in 1953. For example, the first episode “Covenant” is about the supernaturally sinister power of restrictive covenants, which were abolished in 1948, but their bad juju powers live on, or something.

Read the whole thing there.

 

From the Daily Mail:

EXCLUSIVE: Daunte Wright had a warrant out for his arrest for attempted aggravated robbery charges after ‘choking and holding a woman at gunpoint for $820 in 2019,’ court papers reveal

By MARTIN GOULD FOR DAILYMAIL.COM and RUTH STYLES IN BROOKLYN CENTER, MINNESOTA, FOR DAILYMAIL.COM

PUBLISHED: 16:40 EDT, 13 April 2021

Daunte Wright choked a woman and threatened to shoot her if she did not hand over $820 she had stuffed in her bra, court papers obtained by DailyMail.com allege.

That is the case that led to a warrant for his arrest at the time he was shot and killed by police officer Kimberly Potter in Minnesota on Sunday, leading to days of unrest.

And online speculation that he did not know there was a warrant out for his arrest is false, DailyMail.com has learned. A letter returned to the court for having a wrong address was giving notice of a court date in August and had nothing to do with the warrant. …

Wright was due to face trial on a charge of attempted aggravated robbery – with a possible maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.

Charging papers say he and a second man, Emajay Driver went to a home shared by two women in Osseo, Minnesota ‘to party’ in December 2019. At the time, Wright was 19 and Driver was 18.

The women asked them to leave around 2.30 am on December 1, but they said they didn’t have a ride and the women – who are not identified in the court documents – allowed them to sleep on the floor.

In the morning, one of the women went to the bank to get her $820 rent money which she gave to the other woman and then left for work. As Wright, Driver and the second woman were leaving, Wright allegedly tried to hold up the woman.

‘The three of them were walking to the door to exit the apartment and defendant Wright turned around and blocked the door preventing victim from leaving,’ says the report, written by Osseo Police Officer Shane Mikkelson.

‘Defendant Wright then pulled a black handgun with silver trim out from either his right waistband or his right coat pocket and pointed it at victim and demanded the rent money,’ continued Mikkelson.

‘Victim said “Are you serious?” Defendant Wright replied: “Give me the f**king money, I know you have it.”

When the woman again asked him if he was serious, Wright is said to have replied: ‘I’m not playing around.’

Mikkelson’s report said: ‘The $820 cash was tucked in the victim’s bra and defendant Wright placed his hand around victim’s neck and choked her while trying to pull the cash from under her bra.

‘Victim was able to get loose from defendant Wright and started to kneel down and scream.’

After more yelling, Wright allegedly told the woman that he was going to shoot her unless he got the money.

‘Give me the money and we will leave,’ he allegedly said. ‘Give me the money and we will go.’

Mikkelson added: ‘Defendant Wright then tried to choke victim a second time and tried to take her money. Defendant Driver was telling her to give defendant Wright the money.

‘Defendant Driver then said: “Let’s go,” and the two defendants left and got into a white Cadillac and left the scene,’ wrote Mikkelson.

‘Afterwards, victim found that the cash was still in her bra.’

Mikkelson said the woman identified both Wright and Driver through photo line-ups.

Wright’s bail was originally set at $100,000 with orders that he should not contact the victim or any witnesses, refrain from drugs and alcohol and not have any weapons. A bond bailsman paid $40,000 for his release.

But his bail was revoked in July last year due to his ‘failure to not possess a firearm or ammunition’ and not keeping in touch with his probation officer, court papers show.

At that time a judge issued a warrant for his arrest, that was still outstanding on the day he died.

 

From the Washington Post’s news section:

Investigations
The rise of domestic extremism in America

Data shows a surge in homegrown incidents not seen in a quarter-century
By Robert O’Harrow Jr., Andrew Ba Tran and Derek Hawkins
April 12, 2021

Domestic terrorism incidents have soared to new highs in the United States, driven chiefly by white-supremacist, anti-Muslim and anti-government extremists on the far right, according to a Washington Post analysis of data compiled by the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Everybody who spent 2020 in a coma at the bottom of a salt mine would have to agree.

The surge reflects a growing threat from homegrown terrorism not seen in a quarter-century, with right-wing extremist attacks and plots greatly eclipsing those from the far left and causing more deaths, the analysis shows.

The number of all domestic terrorism incidents in the data peaked in 2020.

Who can forget all the right-wing extremist domestic terrorism incidents of 2020, such as, well, you know …

Since 2015, right-wing extremists have been involved in 267 plots or attacks and 91 fatalities, the data shows. At the same time, attacks and plots ascribed to far-left views accounted for 66 incidents leading to 19 deaths.

Later on they’ll admit the extremely contrived way they exclude BLM and Antifa violence.

… More than a quarter of right-wing incidents and just under half of the deaths in those incidents were caused by people who showed support for white supremacy or claimed to belong to groups espousing that ideology, the analysis shows.

Victims of all incidents in recent years represent a broad cross-section of American society, including Blacks, Jews, immigrants, LGBTQ individuals, Asians and other people of color who have been attacked by right-wing extremists wielding vehicles, guns, knives and fists.

Dozens of religious institutions — including mosques, synagogues and Black churches — as well as abortion clinics and government buildings, have been threatened, burned, bombed and hit with gunfire over the past six years. …

Both far-left and far-right attacks hit groundbreaking levels in 2020, the database shows, with far-right incidents still the much larger group.

The 73 far-right incidents were an all-time annual high in the CSIS database, which goes back to 1994.

And now they are going to list a whole bunch of notorious examples of far-right incidents in 2020.

Left-wing attacks reached 25 in 2020.

Oh, well, those incidents are so well-known, that they don’t actually have to list any. The numbers speak for themselves!

Those incidents include multiple attempts by extremists to derail trains to hinder oil pipeline construction and at least seven incidents in which police and their facilities were targeted with guns, firebombs and graffiti. The incidents included the burning of a Minneapolis police precinct during protests over the death of George Floyd.

But not the hundreds of fires set by Antifa in Portland? Not the CHAZ in Seattle? Not the assault on the White House and arson of the nearby church?

In August, a supporter of President Donald Trump was shot dead in Portland, Ore., by a suspected gunman who was a self-described antifa supporter. That killing was the only death last year attributed to far-left violence, the data shows. There were two deaths attributed to far-right attacks.

The many deaths caused by BLM (e.g., David Dorn) aren’t due to far-left extremism because BLM is moderate common-sense that everybody should bow down to.

… The Post focused its analysis primarily on far-right attacks since 2015 because they account for a clear majority of the rising domestic terrorism events and fatalities charted by the CSIS.

In other words, we focused on finding what we already had decided to find.

The far-right incidents last year broke into distinct waves emerging amid government shutdowns in the spring, widespread racial demonstrations in the summer and confrontations over the presidential election results in the late fall, The Post’s review of the CSIS data shows.

Who can forget when the Proud Boys looted all those stores last summer?

The CSIS database is one of the best public sources of information about domestic terrorism incidents, which the group’s analysts define as attacks or plots involving a deliberate use or threat of violence to achieve political goals, create a broad psychological impact or change government policy. That definition excludes many violent events, including incidents during nationwide unrest last year, because CSIS analysts could not determine whether attackers had a political or ideological motive.

Let’s repeat that last sentence: “That definition excludes many violent events, including incidents during nationwide unrest last year, because CSIS analysts could not determine whether attackers had a political or ideological motive.”

All those Antifa rioters with hammer & sickle and A for Anarchy symbols — who could possibly tell whether they had a political or ideological motive? And all the Black Lives Matter rioters — that’s not politics, that’s goodness. You must be a person of badness to even conceive of such a question.

One of the prevailing theories among far-right conservatives is about a “Great Replacement,” the belief that the White race is being replaced by people of color, according to a nationally representative survey of 1,000 American adults last month by the Chicago Project on Security and Threats at the University of Chicago.

The Post’s review of the database found 30 attacks or plots attributed to right-wing violence against Black Lives Matter since 2015, a large majority of them last year.

In contrast, everybody in 2020 who shouted “Black Lives Matter” was an utter saint.

Perpetrators beat BLM activists in the streets and attacked them with mace, knives, guns or explosives, records show. Right-wing extremists used their vehicles as weapons against activists, plowing into crowds of racial justice demonstrators on at least nine occasions over the past six years, according to The Post’s analysis.

Businesses affiliated with racial justice protests were vandalized and torched, among them a Black-owned coffee shop in Shoreline, Wash. It was pelted with molotov cocktails after midnight on Sept. 30 last year.

Whereas racial justice protesters were perfect gentlepersons around shops.

 

 

Probably the most internationally prestigious female author of the 21st Century is Elena Ferrante, who writes novels about girls growing up in Naples. But Ferrante is a pen name, and the identity of the writer or writers behind the pseudonym have never been announced.

From Literary Hub:

Have Italian Scholars Figured Out the Identity of Elena Ferrante?

Elisa Sotgiu on Reading Gender and Class in One of the Great Literary Mysteries of Our Time

March 31, 2021

When Claudio Gatti published an investigation into Elena Ferrante’s identity, a few years ago, he raised an outcry both in Italy and abroad. He had pried into the author’s privacy, violated her right to remain anonymous. It was unfair, it was irrelevant, we didn’t want to know.

Didn’t we? Yes and no. There was one conclusion that mattered in Gatti’s article: the person writing Ferrante’s novels was the translator Anita Raja, a woman.

Gatti showed, among other things, that Ms. Raja and her husband, Italian literary lion Domenico Starnone, had bought a very nice apartment for themselves after the Elena Ferrante royalties began to pour in.

That’s kind of like doxxing, so I’m not sure if I approve.

That was a relief. If you haven’t experienced firsthand how sexist Italian academics and journalists can be, it might be difficult to imagine how important Ferrante’s gender has been for all of us studying her work over the years. Before My Brilliant Friend was even published, there were rumors that Ferrante’s work had been authored by a man, and they intensified after the success of the Neapolitan Novels in the United States. I remember my advisor telling me about these speculations when I started working on Ferrante in 2015; we both scoffed at the misogyny that that kind of gossip implied, feeling like we were on the trenches of a mini culture war.

So when I first stumbled on a series of scholarly articles that, through stylometric analysis, identified Elena Ferrante as the Italian novelist Domenico Starnone (Anita Raja’s husband), I was not ready to lay down my weapons. At that time, I hadn’t read any of Starnone’s novels. I knew that he was a prolific author, that he had written about high school, and that his long, semi-autobiographical novel about his youth in Naples, Via Gemito, had won the prestigious Premio Strega. But I didn’t really care about him. When confronted with the idea that he might be the author of my beloved Neapolitan Novels, my first impulse was to push that information aside, not talk about it, and not think about it too much, either.

I was hardly alone. Although the first of those stylometric articles, by Arjuna Tuzzi and Michele A Cortelazzo, came out in 2018—just at the moment when international publications on Ferrante were multiplying exponentially—it was hardly ever cited outside the field of digital humanities. On the rare occasion that it was mentioned, it was quickly dismissed: addressing the problem of Ferrante’s identity, it appears, is quite detrimental to any serious analysis of her writing for some scholars.

For someone interested, like I am, in the cultural history of our present, the creation of Elena Ferrante is a remarkable case study.

It is good practice among Ferrante scholars to declare that whatever her gender, what counts is that she chose to adopt a woman’s persona. But the fact remains that critics frequently (though reproachfully) cite Gatti when they want to discuss Anita Raja’s ideas about translation in relation to Ferrante, while they carefully ignore Tuzzi, Cortellazzo, Jacques Savoy, and the other nine scholars who confirmed that Ferrante’s and Starnone’s styles are often indistinguishable. Rachel Donadio was the only one who attempted (fruitfully) to put Ferrante’s and Starnone’s novels in conversation, but she did so in the pages of the The Atlantic and the The New York Times: the same comparison is very much a taboo in academia.

Let’s start from the beginning, then, and see what picture of Ferrante those articles allow us to trace. First of all, it’s useful to know that Tuzzi and Cortellazzo put together a large corpus for their analyses: 150 novels by 40 contemporary Italian novelists, balanced by gender and regional provenance. This body of texts was then used by a group of international experts who participated in a summer workshop at the University of Padova in 2017. They worked independently and with different methodological approaches but reached similar conclusions (the workshop proceedings are published here by the Padova University Press). While earlier investigations, like this one from 2006, relied on a simple comparison between Starnone and Ferrante, these scholars used less arbitrary methods. Georgios Mikros from Athens University, for example, used the textual corpus to train a machine-learning algorithm to profile authors (that is, identify their gender, age, and provenance) with a high degree of accuracy. This algorithm concluded that the person behind Elena Ferrante was a male over 60 years old from the region of Campania.

And that aging Neapolitan man looks suspiciously like Domenico Starnone: in Maciej Eder’s and Jan Rybicki’s visual representation of the corpus, Ferrante’s and Starnone’s novels occupy the same marginal spot, distant from the larger network of texts and connected to them only by Starnone’s first three novels, which were written between 1987 and 1991. In other words, both Starnone and Ferrante are highly original authors, different from every other Italian writer but very close to each other.

And she lists several more ways that digital literary analysts have piled up evidence linking Ferrante with the well-known male writer.

This suggests that in the future, even pseudonymous dissidents who are careful about op sec are in danger of getting doxed by techniques invented by digital literary scholars for artistic questions like this. As far back as the early 1990s, quantitative stylometric analysis suggested that the anonymous author of the bestselling roman a clef about the Clintons, Primary Colors, was Time political reporter Joe Klein, which Klein eventually admitted to be true.

At present, it still seems like a lot of skilled work to crack pseudonymous identities this way, but in the future, who knows?

… This data can be interpreted in different ways. At the beginning, it seems clear that Starnone is using Ferrante’s name when he wants to adopt a female first-person narrator, without worrying about changing his distinctive voice. Later, he might have worked towards a more marked differentiation of the two styles—or something else might have happened. Maybe a collaboration with Raja. One author, Rybicki, who had previous experience analyzing a couple’s writing efforts, doesn’t exclude that possibility.

If you assume the wife is the The Author, then it’s only natural to wonder how much help she got from her talented husband, the well-regarded novelist?

But if you assume the husband is The Author, then it’s only natural to wonder how much help he got from his skilled wife, the professional translator?

Maybe the husband always enjoyed help with his novels from his wife. Maybe the wife copy-edited her husband’s early novels into their current style, the way editor Gordon Lish edited short story author Raymond Carver into his famous style?

There are a lot of possibilities.

For example, in the Coen Brother’s 1941 Hollywood movie Barton Fink, the William Faulkner character (John Mahoney) is picking up paychecks as a screenwriter but is usually roaring drunk by mid-day. Yet his devoted secretary/mistress (Judy Davis) keeps turning in the required number of pages by 5 pm. Eventually she admits to Barton (John Turturro) that she wrote the great man’s last two novels.

The vast majority of novels are attributed to just one writer, but more dialogue-heavy writing like screenplays and plays often are attributed to two. Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle wrote many sci-fi novels independently, but their biggest successes were joint efforts.

In real life, he-man writer-director John Huston’s career was increasingly facilitated by the screenwriting skills of his secretary Gladys Hill, She eventually earned an Oscar nomination for co-writing The Man Who Would Be King with Huston.

… Starnone’s choice of writing as a man for a prestigious publisher and as a woman for a marginal one was consistent with the structure of the male-dominated Italian literary space.

… If being a woman author was a liability in Italy, it was much less so in the United States. In the decade from 2010 to 2019, women constituted 60 percent of shortlisted authors and 60 percent of winners of the National Book Award for Fiction, 52 percent of nominees and 60 percent of winners of the PEN/Faulkner Award, and 80 percent of winners of the National Book Critics Circle Award, just to mention some of the most important recognitions. While Ferrante gave global readers a “fever,” Domenico Starnone received critical attention in the US only with his 2014 novel Ties, which can be read as a sequel to Ferrante’s Days of Abandonment.

I’m not suggesting that the invention of Elena Ferrante was only a shrewd editorial enterprise. A female pen name might have been a way to avoid criticism …

So, unless you are the late Umberto Eco, it’s hard for an Italian man to make it big as a novelist in America, because American men don’t read novels much as the literary establishment isn’t very interested in trying to lure back male readers. So, brand diversification is smart: write as yourself in macho Italy and write under a female pen name in feminized America.

 

Tucker Carlson delivers a very clear statement of the facts on his Fox News show:

Tucker Carlson: The truth about demographic change and why Democrats want it

Native-born Americans of every race and class are being systematically disenfranchised. We need to start talking about it
By Tucker Carlson | Fox News

Last week, we said something on television that the usual chorus of hyperaggressive liars is now pretending was somehow highly controversial. Ordinarily, we’d ignore all of this. Once you’ve been denounced as a White supremacist for quoting Martin Luther King Jr., you realize such criticism is all just all another form of social control. Honestly, who cares what they think?

But in this one case, we thought it might be worth pausing to restate the original point, both because it was true and worth saying, and also because America badly needs a national conversation about it.

On Thursday:

Now, I know that the left and all the little gatekeepers on Twitter become literally hysterical if you use the term “replacement,” if you suggest that the Democratic Party is trying to replace the current electorate, the voters now casting ballots, with new people, more obedient voters from the Third World. But they become hysterical because that’s what’s happening, actually. …

So this matters on a bunch of different levels. But on the most basic level, it’s a voting rights question. In a democracy, one person equals one vote. If you change the population, you dilute the political power of the people who live there. So every time they import a new voter, I’d become disenfranchized as a current voter. So I don’t understand. I mean, every wants to make a racial issue out of it. “Oh, the White replacement.” No, no, no. This is a voting rights question. I have less political power because they’re importing a brand new electorate. Why should I sit back and take that? The power that I have as an American, guaranteed at birth, is one man, one vote, and they’re diluting it. No, they’re not allowed to do that. Why are we putting up with this?

At least one prediction came true right away, all those little gatekeepers on Twitter did become hysterical. They’ve spent the last four days jumping up and down furiously, trying once again to pull the show off the air. Once again, they will fail, though it is amusing to see them keep at it. (They get so enraged. It’s a riot.)

But why all the anger? If someone says something you think is wrong, is your first instinct to hurt them? Probably not. Normal people don’t respond that way. If you hear something you think is incorrect, you try to correct it. But getting the facts right is hardly the point of this exercise. The point is to prevent unauthorized conversations from starting in the first place. “Shut up, racist! No more questions!” You’ve heard that before.

You wonder how much longer they imagine Americans are going to go along with this; an entire country forced to lie about everything all the time. It can’t go on forever, but you can see why they’re trying it.

Demographic change is the key to the Democratic Party’s political ambitions. Let’s say that again for emphasis, because it is the secret to the entire immigration debate: Demographic change is the key to the Democratic Party’s political ambitions. In order to win and maintain power. Democrats plan to change the population of the country. They’re no longer trying to win you over with their program. They’re obviously not trying to improve your life. They don’t even really care about your vote anymore. Their goal is to make you irrelevant.

That is provably true. And because it’s true, it drives them absolutely crazy when you say it out loud. A hurt dog barks. They scream about how noting the obvious is immoral, that you’re a racist if you dare to repeat things that they themselves proudly say. Most people go along with this absurd standard and dutifully shut up; they don’t think they have a choice. But no matter what they’re allowed to say in public, everyone understands the truth: When you change who votes, you change who wins. That fact has nothing inherently to do with race or nationality. It’s the nature of democracy. It is always true. You can watch it happen for yourself and you probably have.

… Mass immigration increases the power of the Democratic Party, period. That’s the reason Democrats support it. It’s the only reason. If two hundred thousand immigrants from Poland showed up at our southern border tomorrow, Kamala Harris wouldn’t promise them health care. Why? Simple: Poles tend to vote Republican. That’s the difference. Democrats would deport those migrants immediately. No hand-wringing about how we’re a nation of immigrants. Hundreds of thousands of likely Republican voters massing in Tijuana would qualify as a national crisis. We’d have a border wall by Wednesday.

For Democrats, the point of immigration is not to show compassion to refugees, much less improve our country. It’s definitely not about racial justice. Mass immigration hurts African-Americans, perhaps more than anyone else. Immigration is a means to electoral advantage. It is about power. More Democratic voters mean more power for Democratic politicians. That’s the signature lesson of the state of California.

Between 1948 and 1992, the state of California voted for exactly one Democratic presidential candidate.

To be more clear about the phrasing, in the ten presidential elections from 1952 through 1988, LBJ in 1964 was the only Democrat to carry California.

The streak ended in 1992, before the Proposition 187 election of 1994 that is always blamed for Republican troubles. Note that the Republicans usually won by fairly narrow margins, and in 7 of those 10 races they had two California superstars, Nixon or Reagan, on the ticket. But still …

… Analysis of the 2012 presidential election, for example, showed that if you lived in the state of California in 1980, you probably still voted Republican. Your views hadn’t really changed. But as your state swelled with foreign voters, your views became irrelevant. Your political power, the power to control your own life, disappeared with the arrival of new people who diluted your vote. That was the whole point.

That’s not democracy, it’s cheating. Imagine watching a football game where one team decides to start the third quarter with an extra 40 players on the field. Would you consider that fair play? The Democratic Party did something very much like that in the state of California. They rigged the game with more people. They packed the electorate. As a result, Americans who grew up in California lost their most basic right in a democracy, the right to have their votes count.

… You’ve heard a lot lately about the necessity of Black political power. In California, that power is evaporating due to mass immigration. …

The left becomes unhinged if you point out that American voters are being replaced by Democratic Party loyalists from other countries. You’re absolutely not allowed to say that, but they’re allowed to say that. And they do. They say it all the time. They’ve done studies on it, written long books about it, talked about it endlessly on television, often in the ugliest racial terms. They’re not ashamed at all, they don’t think they have to be ashamed. In the fall of 2018, a columnist for The New York Times wrote a piece that was literally entitled “We Can Replace Them”. …

… It’s shocking if you think about it, and that’s why you’re not allowed to think about it. Thinking about what Kamala Harris is planning, Kamala Harris herself would like you to know, is deeply reprehensible and an affront to our values. In other words, submit to our scheme or you’re immoral.

If you heard prominent people talk like this in any other country, you’d be confused. A nation’s leadership class admitting they hope to replace their own citizens seems grotesque. If you believed in democracy, you would work to protect the potency of every citizen’s vote, obviously. You wonder if people even debate questions like this in countries that don’t hate themselves, like Japan or South Korea or Israel.

Go to the Anti-Defamation League’s (ADL) website sometime if you’d like a glimpse of what an unvarnished conversation about a country’s national interest might look like. In a short essay posted to the site, the ADL explains why the state of Israel should not allow more Arabs to become citizens with voting rights:

“With historically high birth rates among the Palestinians and a possible influx of Palestinian refugees and their descendants now living around the world,” the ADL explains, “Jews would quickly be a minority within a bi-national state, thus likely ending any semblance of equal representation and protections. In this situation, the Jewish population would be increasingly politically — and potentially physically — vulnerable.

“It is unrealistic and unacceptable,” the ADL continues, “to expect the State of Israel to voluntarily subvert its own sovereign existence and nationalist identity and become a vulnerable minority within what was once its own territory.”

Now, from Israel’s perspective, this makes perfect sense. Why would any democratic nation make its own citizens less powerful? Isn’t that the deepest betrayal of all? In the words of the ADL, why would a government subvert its own sovereign existence? Good question. Maybe ADL President Jonathan Greenblatt will join “Tucker Carlson Tonight” some time to explain and tell us whether that same principle applies to the United States. Most Americans believe it does. Unfortunately, most Americans don’t have a say in the matter.

Most Americans aren’t even allowed to have the conversation. … The leaders making these changes have no sympathy for their victims. They blame the country for its own suffering. You always hate the people you hurt.

That’s all true. Every honest person knows that it’s true. As long as we’re here, we’re going to keep saying it out loud.

This article is adapted from Tucker Carlson’s opening commentary on the April 12, 2021 edition of “Tucker Carlson Tonight.”

This is not to say that you would never agree to dilute the value of your vote by admitting immigrants: As I pointed out in 2005, I think of the issue as much like corporate management issuing new stock:

When I was getting an MBA many years ago, I was the favorite of an acerbic old Corporate Finance professor because I could be counted on to blurt out in class all the stupid misconceptions to which students are prone.

One day he asked: “If you were running a publicly traded company, would it be acceptable for you to create new stock and sell it for less than it was worth?”

“Sure,” I confidently announced. “Our duty is to maximize our stockholders’ wealth, and while selling the stock for less than its worth would harm our current shareholders, it would benefit our new shareholders who buy the underpriced stock, so it all comes out in the wash. Right?”

“Wrong!” He thundered. “Your obligation is to your current stockholders, not to somebody who might buy the stock in the future.”

That same logic applies to the valuable right of being an American citizen and living in America.

The Democrats are like a crooked corporate management conspiring with outsiders to boost their power by selling their allies stock too cheap, thus defrauding the current shareholders.

I’d like to someday see what Tucker could do with making that analogy comprehensible.

As I may have mentioned, I run iSteve fundraisers in April, August, and December.

Large or small, I find each donation to be a personal message of encouragement to keep doing what I’m doing. I more or less figured out the basic logic of the 21st Century, which hasn’t made me popular, but with your support I can keep on keeping on pointing out how the world works.

Here are eight ways for you to contribute:

First: You can use Paypal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. Paypal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual. (Monthly is nice.)

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:

Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA 91617

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution via VDARE by clicking here.

Please don’t forget to click my name at the VDARE site so the money goes to me: first, click on “Earmark your donation,” then click on “Steve Sailer:”

VDARE has been kiboshed from use of Paypal for being, I dunno, EVIL. But you can give via credit cards, Bitcoin, Ethereum and Litecoin, check, money order, or stock.

Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

Fourth: Most banks now allow fee-free money transfers via Zelle.

If you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay/Zelle. Just tell WF SurePay/Zelle to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) Please note, there is no 2.9% fee like with Paypal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Fifth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay/Zelle (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay/Zelle to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with Paypal or Google Wallet, so this is also good for large contributions.

Zelle might work with other banks too. Here’s a Zelle link for CitiBank. And Bank of America.

Zelle is really a good system: easy to use and the fees are nonexistent, unlike, say, Paypal.

 

Sixth: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address (that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Seventh: You can use Bitcoin using Coinbase. Coinbase payments are not tax deductible. Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Eighth: At one reader’s request, I recently added Square as an 8th fundraising medium, although I’m vague on how it works. If you want to use Square, send me an email telling me how much to send you an invoice for. Or, if you know an easier way for us to use Square, please let me know.

Thanks.

 

From the New York Times news section:

Minnesota Officer Who Shot Daunte Wright Meant to Fire Taser, Chief Says

Officials from Brooklyn Center said that the fatal shooting was an “accidental discharge,” and released body-camera video of the encounter.

By Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs and Julie Bosman
April 12, 2021

BROOKLYN CENTER, Minn. — The police officer who killed a man in a Minneapolis suburb on Sunday did so accidentally, officials said Monday, releasing a graphic body-camera video that appeared to depict the officer shouting, “Taser!” before firing her gun.

“It is my belief that the officer had the intention to deploy their Taser, but instead shot Mr. Wright with a single bullet,” Chief Tim Gannon of the Brooklyn Center Police Department said of the shooting on Sunday of Daunte Wright, 20, during a traffic stop. “This appears to me, from what I viewed, and the officer’s reaction and distress immediately after, that this was an accidental discharge that resulted in a tragic death of Mr. Wright.”

The officer, who was not publicly identified, has been placed on administrative leave, officials said. Chief Gannon said that Mr. Wright had been initially pulled over because of an expired registration on the vehicle he was driving. The video showed a brief struggle between Mr. Wright and police officers before one of the officers fired her gun.

After the officer fired, she is heard on the video saying, “Holy shit. I just shot him.”

In the hours after the shooting on Sunday afternoon, protests, violence and looting broke out in Brooklyn Center, a suburb of 30,000 people north of Minneapolis. The shooting comes amid a national reckoning over police misconduct and the killings of Black people by the police; Mr. Wright was Black. City officials did not identify the race of the police officer.

At no point does the article state that the inept shooter was a “woman” or was “female.” But if you read carefully, you might notice the pronouns “her” and “she.” But Shattering The Stereotype that black men are always gunned down by racist white male cops is not a high priority at the Times.

This sounds like the Botham Jean shooting in which the accountant was killed in his own apartment by a confused woman cop who thought she was at her own apartment door because she’d gotten off at the wrong floor of the building.

A big difference, however, is that Mr. Jean was wholly innocent (and his survivors in his family behaved superbly to avoid stoking racial hate), while Mr. Wright was wanted for arrest on a gross misdemeanor warrant. And he was arrested for aggravated robbery in February. (Aggravated robbery is robbery using a dangerous weapon.)

As a post-George Floyd Black man (by the way, in the spirit of the times, shouldn’t “man” be capitalized when used with Black? E.g., “A Black Man punched up at a white-privileged white male, who was hospitalized with a broken skull.”), Mr. Wright enjoys the protection of the new Zeroth Amendment of the Bill of Rights: “No Black Man need submit to arrest unless he’s damn well in the mood to be arrested.”

So his getting back in the car, presumably intending to drive off unarrested (or perhaps to grab a gun and start shooting), is what made the incompetent woman cop grab for her taser and instead come up with her gun.

From another NYT article:

He was facing two misdemeanor charges after the Minneapolis police said he had carried a pistol without a permit and had run from officers last June.

In other words, the cops on Sunday were already scared, with good reason, when they got out of the squad car that Wright might be packing an illegal gun again and that he might either use it on them or again flee arrest.

Adrenaline, it’s a helluva drug.

By the way, that reminds me that the Biden Administration is making a big push on gun control … at the same time that the Biden-aligned Establishment is pushing against enforcing existing gun control laws on people who carry illegal concealed weapons as long as they are black: Why are we constantly trying to arrest black men who are merely found to be carrying an illegal handgun? What harm has a black man packing an undocumented pistol ever caused anybody? Why are cops being distracted from the real murder menace: white men with scary-looking rifles?

Democrats are so blinded by racist hate that they have no clue what effective gun control looks like even though their media wing saw it up close and personal in New York: It looks like Bloomberg Era NYPD arresting dirtbags carrying illegal handguns. That drove the NYC murder rate down to Yogi Berra Era levels.

 

As I’ve often pointed out, the news media insists that everything it reports on must be a trend even if it’s just interesting: e.g., “Why Are Women Increasingly Falling in Love with Death Row Murderers?” In reality, nobody knows whether women are increasingly falling in love with Death Row murderers, but the topic is simply interesting, as Tracey Ullman has been pointing out for the last quarter of a century. It would be perfectly reasonable to write about the reasons women fall in love with Death Row murderers without contending that it’s a growing trend. But you are supposed to write about increasing phenomenon.

Thus, if I were a normal journalist, I’d entitle this post something like: “Why Are Journalists Increasingly Framing Everything As an Upward Trend?” But, in truth, I don’t know that this media practice is rising in frequency. It seems pretty common as far back as I can remember.

But there’s one thing that is not a trend. From the New York Times opinion section:

Transgender Childhood Is Not a ‘Trend’
As far back as historians have found evidence of transgender people, they’ve found transgender children.

By Jules Gill-Peterson
Ms. Gill-Peterson is an associate professor of English at the University of Pittsburgh and the author of “Histories of the Transgender Child.”

If you can’t trust a professor of English for a valid grasp of statistics, who can you trust?

April 5, 2021

The high visibility of transgender youth in this country is quite recent, but transgender children themselves are not. Indeed, as far back as historians like me have found evidence of transgender people, we have found transgender children. …

If there were a few of a thing in the past and there are many of a thing in the present, that can’t possibly be described as a “trend” because reasons.

In the Arkansas state legislature, Joseph Backholm, a senior fellow at the Family Research Council, appeared in front of a House committee reviewing legislation that would ban gender-affirming health care for transgender youth. (The bill was vetoed by Gov. Asa Hutchinson on Monday.) Mr. Backholm’s argument in favor of the bill opened with the premise that “the recent increase in those claiming to be transgender can only be described as astronomical” and framed transgender identity as a “cultural phenomenon” of 21st-century teenagers.

The idea that transgender youth are new and poorly understood, and therefore should be treated with intense caution and scrutiny, is reinforced by many opponents of trans children’s access to health care and sports. Perhaps the most literal example is Lisa Littman’s coining of the phrase “rapid onset gender dysphoria” (ROGD), for a supposed condition in which children “suddenly” become transgender because of peer influence and experience gender dysphoria without any warning — to their parents, that is.

Of course, parents can’t possibly be aware of the true gender of their children. What do parents know about their children’s preferences in toys, clothes, cartoons, activities, and the like? Are you purporting that children demand that their parents provide them with gender specific accoutrements? I mean, if I ever had any children, I’d raise them in a completely gender neutral fashion. I’m sure that they’d play equally enthusiastically with whatever purportedly gender-specific toys I choose to give them. Are you saying that I’d be a bad parent and cause my children to cry on Christmas morning by not catering to their gender-stereotypical demands?

ROGD is not a formal mental health diagnosis, and the journal that published Dr. Littman’s article issued a correction and an apology after an outpouring of criticism from doctors and advocates.

In other words, you don’t dare offend the Trans Woke online militia. It’s almost as if M-to-F ex-men are the Navy SEALs of the Woke, who are man-for-man the highest IQ and most aggressive hit-men of Wokeness.

Yet the term is still widely cited by right-wing media and was also offered without context by Mr. Backholm in his testimony to the Arkansas House.

These lines from Abigail Shrier’s 2020 book, “Irreversible Damage: The Transgender Craze Seducing Our Daughters,”

Which I reviewed here in “Poison, Mutilate, and Sterilize.”

capture the tenor of the skepticism floating around online: “Three decades ago, these girls might have hankered for liposuction while their physical forms wasted away. Two decades ago, today’s trans-identified teens might have ‘discovered’ a repressed memory of childhood trauma. Today’s diagnostic craze isn’t demonic possession — it’s ‘gender dysphoria.’”

But Ms. Shrier’s claim is not supported by the fact that children like Val have lived transgender lives long before, not to mention during, each of the time periods that she invokes when girls would have supposedly sought out a different path than transition. Transgender children from every region in the country and many different backgrounds have been able to transition as far back as medical opportunities have been available.

A 17-year-old girl grew up in a small town in Missouri in the early 1940s and went to see her family doctor for advice. In 1969, a 15-year-old trans girl moved from rural Ohio to Columbus to live with her sister and find a doctor who could provide gender-affirming care. Around the same time in Los Angeles, a teenager started hormones, changed her name and enrolled in a new school as a girl. And in 1973, a doctor in upstate New York familiarized himself with trans medicine in order to offer hormones and, when the time was right, a referral for top surgery for a 15-year-old trans boy.

Proof that this is not a trend!!!!

How can you claim that adolescent girls with smartphones who suddenly decide, like most of their online friends, that therefore they are boys, are vulnerable to fads?

 

With rioting back in the news, let me point out that I recently reviewed Andy Ngo’s book Unmasked: Inside Antifa’s Radical Plan to Destroy Democracy.

But, let me also point out that, being an old coot, I can’t actually distinguish clearly in my mind between Andy Ngo and Ian Miles Cheong, who has a pretty great Twitter account:

That reminds me: I run iSteve fundraisers in April, August, and December.

Large or small, I find each donation to be a personal message of encouragement to keep doing what I’m doing. I more or less figured out the basic logic of the 21st Century, which hasn’t made me popular, but with your support I can keep on keeping on pointing out how the world works.

Here are eight ways for you to contribute:

First: You can use Paypal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. Paypal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual. (Monthly is nice.)

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:

Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA 91617

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution via VDARE by clicking here.

Please don’t forget to click my name at the VDARE site so the money goes to me: first, click on “Earmark your donation,” then click on “Steve Sailer:”

VDARE has been kiboshed from use of Paypal for being, I dunno, EVIL. But you can give via credit cards, Bitcoin, Ethereum and Litecoin, check, money order, or stock.

Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

Fourth: Most banks now allow fee-free money transfers via Zelle.

If you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay/Zelle. Just tell WF SurePay/Zelle to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) Please note, there is no 2.9% fee like with Paypal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Fifth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay/Zelle (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay/Zelle to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with Paypal or Google Wallet, so this is also good for large contributions.

Zelle might work with other banks too. Here’s a Zelle link for CitiBank. And Bank of America.

Zelle is really a good system: easy to use and the fees are nonexistent, unlike, say, Paypal.

 

Sixth: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address (that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Seventh: You can use Bitcoin using Coinbase. Coinbase payments are not tax deductible. Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Eighth: At one reader’s request, I recently added Square as an 8th fundraising medium, although I’m vague on how it works. If you want to use Square, send me an email telling me how much to send you an invoice for. Or, if you know an easier way for us to use Square, please let me know.

Thanks.

 

Hideki Matsuyama held on for a one stroke victory in the Masters, the first ever major championship for a Japanese man. Veteran Washington Post sports columnist Tom Boswell explains why closing out an international victory is such a struggle for Japanese athletes:

For decades, I have watched the way the press from Japan obsessively covers its athletes, especially in golf and baseball, sports in which it shares a common, profound passion with America. You have to see it to believe it. It is adoration and judgment, celebrity and imminent disgrace, the highest honor and profound loss of face, pressed close against each other.

A dozen or dozens of reporters and photographers will follow just one player from Japan, reporting his (or her) every move day after day, sometimes month after month. No doubt, the royals in Great Britain have it worse for ludicrous levels of scrutiny over trivialities and flaws. But for many years, whenever a player from Japan has been in contention at any major, especially the Masters, everywhere he looked he would see a moving mass of photographers and reporters from his country.

What was different this year? Because of the pandemic, there were strict limits on press access — in number and proximity. You might as well have banned a firing squad, especially for the shy Matsuyama.

“Being in front of the media is still difficult,” Matsuyama said this week. “It’s not my favorite thing to do, to stand and answer questions. And so with fewer media, it’s been a lot less stressful for me, and I’ve enjoyed this week.” …

Japan’s infatuation with golf ignited after a televised competition in 1957, when top pros Torakichi Nakamura and Koichi Ono beat Sam Snead and Jimmy Demaret in the Canada Cup, with Nakamura winning individual honors by seven shots. In a sport dominated by Americans, Japan had competed in an international competition and won handily.

… In 1980 at the U.S. Open, I followed for four days as Isao Aoki, a Hall of Famer, went head-to-head with Jack Nicklaus in the same group. “Jack’s Back!” was the headline from that two-shot win over Aoki. But Nicklaus had to set a U.S. Open scoring record to hold him off.

From that day, Japan, its players, its press and its public has waited and hoped for the country’s first winner of a men’s major.

There are four major championships per year in golf (and in tennis).

It has been a long 41 years.

How many microscopes has Matsuyama been under for the past 10 years as he finished in the top 10 in seven majors but frequently showed nerves? Few players, even excellent ones, can suddenly find it in themselves and their games to win “out of nowhere.” But Matsuyama, despite his long drought, just did it. …

On Sunday, everything did not come together for Matsuyama. In fact, things almost came apart, both early and late. That makes his win more admirable, not less. …

Hideki Matsuyama, who spent Saturday’s rain delay playing games on his phone in his car, did not ask to be a symbol of his golf-loving nation’s quest for a major champion. But when the moment came, he was equal to it — by one shot. If your heart is kind, give a thanks for that.

 

Not surprisingly, Asian-0wned businesses are being ransacked:

We need our weaves!

Democrat government officials are being their usual helpful selves:

 

 

From KTLA in Los Angeles:

Irvine police: Man kidnapped, tried to sexually assault woman in retaliation for anti-Asian hate crimes

Erika Martin
2 days ago

A man was arrested after attacking a woman in her car outside her Irvine apartment building, holding her hostage and attempting to sexually assault her in retaliation for recent hate crimes against Asian Americans, police said Friday.

Michael Sangbong Rhee, 37, of Lake Forest, targeted a woman sitting in her car outside her apartment in the area of Harvard Avenue and Coronado around 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Irvine police said in a news release. …

Rhee was booked on $1 million bail on suspicion of kidnapping with the intent to commit a sexual assault. Inmate records showed he remained in custody Friday night.

The woman he assaulted was of Asian descent herself, but detectives say they believe he targeted her because he thought she was white “based on the totality of the investigation and statements made by Rhee.”

Police say they will ask the Orange County District Attorney’s Office to file hate crime charges against Rhee because the attack was in retaliation for recent hate incidents targeting Asian Americans.

That reminds me: I run iSteve fundraisers in April, August, and December.

Large or small, I find each donation to be a personal message of encouragement to keep doing what I’m doing. I more or less figured out the basic logic of the 21st Century, which hasn’t made me popular, but with your support I can keep on keeping on pointing out how the world works.

Here are eight ways for you to contribute:

First: You can use Paypal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. Paypal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual. (Monthly is nice.)

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:

Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA 91617

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution via VDARE by clicking here.

Please don’t forget to click my name at the VDARE site so the money goes to me: first, click on “Earmark your donation,” then click on “Steve Sailer:”

VDARE has been kiboshed from use of Paypal for being, I dunno, EVIL. But you can give via credit cards, Bitcoin, Ethereum and Litecoin, check, money order, or stock.

Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

Fourth: Most banks now allow fee-free money transfers via Zelle.

If you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay/Zelle. Just tell WF SurePay/Zelle to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) Please note, there is no 2.9% fee like with Paypal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Fifth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay/Zelle (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay/Zelle to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with Paypal or Google Wallet, so this is also good for large contributions.

Zelle might work with other banks too. Here’s a Zelle link for CitiBank. And Bank of America.

Zelle is really a good system: easy to use and the fees are nonexistent, unlike, say, Paypal.

 

Sixth: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address (that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Seventh: You can use Bitcoin using Coinbase. Coinbase payments are not tax deductible. Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Eighth: At one reader’s request, I recently added Square as an 8th fundraising medium, although I’m vague on how it works. If you want to use Square, send me an email telling me how much to send you an invoice for. Or, if you know an easier way for us to use Square, please let me know.

Thanks.

 

From Yahoo News:

A Racial Reckoning at Yale’s Center for Emotional Intelligence

Tue, April 6, 2021, 7:01 PM·19 min read

A lot of Yahoo News content is reprinted from other sources. This originally comes from The 74, which I’d never heard of before. The article explains “Disclosures: The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation provides financial support to RULER and The 74. The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative provides financial support to the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and The 74.”

As schools across the country grapple with issues of historical discrimination, the director of a prominent SEL [Social Emotional Learning] program argued that some inclusion efforts could get its curriculum “banned,” according to emails obtained by The 74.

Attending a mostly white boarding school in Connecticut allowed Dena Simmons to escape the danger of her poor, Black and Latino neighborhood in the Bronx, New York. But it also separated her from her culture and made her feel like she didn’t belong. “There is emotional damage done when young people can’t be themselves,” she said six years ago during a TED Talk that has received almost 1.4 million views.

That’s why Simmons, who became assistant director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence in 2018, worked to make the center’s popular K-12 program on understanding feelings more meaningful for marginalized students. She pushed to include figures such as former President Barack Obama

You can’t get much more marginalized than Barack Obama.

Did Obama say he’d show up? Or did the date interfere with the arrival of his copy of New York Review of Books on Martha’s Vineyard?

and girls’ education activist Malala Yousafzai in lessons and challenged teachers with bold statements about schools being systems of white supremacy.

Her drive for cultural relevance, however, repeatedly clashed with the views of her supervisor, Marc Brackett, the center’s prominent director and best-selling author of Permission to Feel.

It’s almost as if the black woman wanted the job of her white male boss.

“The political examples automatically alienate people (Black or white) and we can’t judge people for being Democrats or Republicans,” Brackett wrote Simmons in one of several emails and documents shared with The 74.

His insistence on staying on the political sidelines ran afoul of Simmons and others at the Yale center who viewed his stance as tone deafness toward issues of historical injustice. Their lessons — for example, using a book about a transgender boy to teach about feeling understood — might get the curriculum “banned” in some parts of the country, Brackett said in one email. The conflict has put the center in the middle of a controversy that has rippled from the university to the larger world of what has come to be known as social-emotional learning.

Simmons, 37, resigned from her position in January, seven months after she was targeted by anonymous racial slurs during an online Yale event to memorialize the death of George Floyd. She left, she told the university at the time, due to a “hostile work environment” at the center, where she was subjected to “unconsented hair touching”

Here’s a technical question: Is the Great Hair-Touching Crisis of Our Times funnier each time I cite another example of it, the way the “cleft stick” joke is funnier each time Waugh brings it up again in Scoop? Or is enough enough and hair-touching is into diminishing returns?

My thinking has been that I’ll begin phasing it out when lots of other sources start pointing it out. But so far, I don’t believe even the Babylon Bee has made it a Thing.

and once received a reprimand from a supervisor for calling out social-emotional learning practices she viewed as harmful to students of color.

In interviews, four other former staffers supported her account, describing what they saw as an unwelcome atmosphere at the center toward issues of diversity and inclusion.

“There was no emotional intelligence afforded me,” Simmons told the 74. “I hope to push the field and institutions to do better — to put their actions where they say their values are.”

In a lengthy statement on her resignation sent to roughly 2,500 schools and organizations it works with around the world, center leaders said they were “deeply disheartened by our colleagues’ hurtful experiences at Yale.” …

In many ways, the Yale schism reflects the enormous growth social-emotional learning has experienced since the term’s first invocation at a 1994 conference. Today, the concept is ubiquitous. It is not unusual for large school districts to have whole departments devoted to helping students form positive relationships, manage difficult emotions and make sound decisions. It’s also big business, drawing $21 billion to $47 billion annually on programs and teacher training, according to a 2017 report.

Yowza. $21 billion to $47 billion here, $21 billion to $47 billion there …

While some criticize the field for “fuzzy” definitions and unclear targets, a formidable body of research now says social-emotional learning can improve social behavior and lead to long-term academic success.

I doubt that, but it sounds too boring to look into. In an era when practically anybody with anything on the ball is competing to be seen as hating white people the most, programs like Brackett’s that aren’t explicitly anti-white seem pretty anodyne even if they may be a waste of money.

… The Yale center, which sits in the medical school, draws in millions of dollars in grants, including at least $5 million in research funding from the U.S. Department of Education since 2012. It has even earned the endorsement of current Secretary Miguel Cardona. As state chief in Connecticut, he hired Brackett’s center to give all educators in the state access to a 10-hour course, funded in part with $500,000 from Dalio Education, a state foundation. CASEL cites RULER as an example of a program based on research, and Brackett sits on its board.

He has also brought to the field pop-culture cachet. He teamed up with Lady Gaga in 2015 for a summit on how teens feel about school and appears frequently on TV talk shows. Even parents who don’t know RULER or recognize Brackett’s name are familiar with the “Mood Meter,” which teaches children to associate feelings with colors. The resulting boards of multi-hued Post-it Notes produced by parents and teachers have become mainstays on Pinterest.

A former middle school math and English teacher in the Bronx, Simmons joined the center in 2014. She believed in its mission and called the opportunity “a dream come true.” Her doctoral studies had focused on how middle school teachers can address bullying. Now, she wanted to help schools become more compassionate places for marginalized students.

But as the program grew, so did Simmons’s view that the center’s leaders saw equity as an “add-on.” She became convinced that common practices in social-emotional learning, such as taking deep breaths in times of stress, wouldn’t serve students of color well.

“Try telling a child in poverty to breathe through racism,” she said in an interview. “That is insulting.”

Would you have wanted Trayvon Martin or Michael Brown or George Floyd or Philip Adams or Noah Green or Ahmad Al Aliwi Alissa to have controlled their emotions? I don’t think so.

She recruited others with classroom experience to the center and blended Learning for Justice’s Social Justice Standards — like showing “empathy when people are excluded or mistreated” — into RULER materials.

Susan Rivers, who co-founded the center with Brackett in 2013, recalled that Simmons “emerged as an education leader, despite not having the support, encouragement or collaboration to do anti-racist, inclusive work while at Yale.”

“She asks really tough and essential questions about equity in education, and she has the courage and conviction to do and lead the work,” said Rivers, who left the center in 2016 and now runs iThrive Games, a foundation that supports game-based learning for teens.

That quality often put Simmons at odds with the center’s leadership. In commentaries such as 2019’s “Why We Can’t Afford Whitewashed Social-Emotional Learning,” she argued that sidestepping the “larger sociopolitical context” in which students live keeps them from developing skills to confront hate and injustice. Ignoring that background, she said, could turn their teachings into “white supremacy with a hug.” That statement, she said, earned her a warning from Linda Mayes, director of the Yale Child Study Center that oversees the emotional intelligence program, to be more careful with her words. …

Medved-Wu noted the irony of a workplace devoted to emotional intelligence where many workers felt uncomfortable sharing their emotions.

“If Black employees, non-Black employees of color, employees who have self-identified as LGBTQ+and employees with disabilities do not feel safe, valued or heard in-house,” she asked, “then what biases and messaging are being sent locally and globally?”

She also proposed a fifth-grade lesson about The Other Boy, the book about a transgender child that sparked pushback from Brackett. “We can’t be in a position that our curriculum is banned,” he wrote in an email to Simmons and other staff members. “We have to be neutral.”

No one is allowed to be neutral.

… To the bewilderment of some staffers, Brackett appeared to have no resistance to such themes in his personal life. Brackett, who is gay, supports finding ways for young people “pushing the boundaries of gender/sexual identity” to feel accepted, and he recently completed a documentary with his cinematographer husband on a camp for youth devoted to “exploring gender diversity.”

But inside the center, staff members say they heard a different message. “I recall him frequently emphasizing … that the appeal of our work had to be for everyone,” said Sarah Kadden, a former program manager for early childhood.

The I in DIE doesn’t mean “inclusion” for the Wrong People, just for the Right People.

Simmons and Medved-Wu suspect Brackett’s motivation for keeping the lessons free of controversy was financial.

Ya think?

Could it also be true that Ms. Simmons is projecting her own financial motivations?

A six-week training institute for three district staff members costs $6,000.

“If RULER were to be banned, it would impact the bottom line,” Simmons said.

The issue most important to Simmons — equity — was where she felt the least support. She had been pushing for years to brand the term into the center’s mission statement. In 2019, Brackett proposed in an email that she “create the vision … for how we infuse equity/culturally responsive practices, etc. into our training and curriculum.” By that point, Simmons said, the center was sending mixed messages, pushing inclusion while resisting her attempts to broaden the curriculum. In one email, she told Brackett that she did not want to become “a prop” for the center’s work on diversity.

“We were discouraged from raising equity issues, such as the school-to-prison pipeline, racist discipline practices [and] the cultural mismatch often found between students and teachers,” said Kadden, now a social worker in Connecticut’s New London Public Schools.

Then came the Zoom bomb.

On May 25, the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody sparked an outcry in cities and campuses across the country. In early June, thousands of Black Lives Matter protesters flooded the streets of New Haven, where Yale is located, presenting a list of demands, including the removal of resource officers from local schools. Weeks later, during an online event devoted to racial healing held by Yale’s Child Study Center, Simmons was reading a poem when several anonymous gate-crashers interrupted her with racial slurs, both verbally and in the chat field. Simmons logged off of the event, which was not password protected, but returned at the urging of colleagues. The harassment resumed.

In its statement, the Yale emotional intelligence center decried the “horrific, racist Zoom bombing” and said it had taken steps to curb its online “vulnerabilities.” Leaders have offered workshops on cultural sensitivity, hired a chief diversity officer and scrutinized RULER to “ensure it is equitable and inclusive,” the statement said.

It sounds like Zoom bombers may have gotten what they wanted …

But Simmons, who took a seven-month medical leave

The emotional labor left her exhausted.

, said the experience followed a pattern of incidents in which she felt dehumanized, such as colleagues touching her hair and calling it exotic. She left the university Jan. 19, the day she was supposed to return.

For those who view Simmons as a leader, not only in social-emotional learning but in the broader anti-racist movement, her departure raises troubling questions. …

With Yale behind her, Simmons is free to approach social-emotional learning her way.

She has launched LiberatED — a curriculum with equity at the center — and next year, St. Martin’s Press will publish her book, White Rules for Black People. “I needed my voice to ring louder than other people’s doubts, slights and limitations,” she wrote recently. “I left so that I could save myself, so that I could dream. And I left so that I could invest my time into changing the very system that failed me and is failing so many others.”

… Echoing Simmons’s concerns, Drummond-Forrester said the responsibility for equity work fell on her shoulders because she is Black.

“I was burned out,” she said.

 

From WSBTV:

ADL: Fox should fire Carlson for white-supremacist rhetoric

April 09, 2021 at 6:16 pm EDT
By TALI ARBEL

The Anti-Defamation League has called for Fox News to fire prime-time opinion host Tucker Carlson because he defended a white-supremacist theory that says whites are being “replaced” by people of color.

In a letter to Fox News CEO Suzanne Scott on Friday, the head of the ADL, Jonathan Greenblatt, said Carlson’s “rhetoric was not just a dog whistle to racists — it was a bullhorn.”

The white-nationalist “great replacement theory,” otherwise known as “white genocide,” says people of color are replacing white people through immigration in the Western world, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. Some white supremacists also say that Jews and progressive politicians are furthering this change, the civil rights group says. …

He said Thursday during a guest appearance on “Fox News Primetime” that “the left and all the little gatekeepers on Twitter become literally hysterical if you use the term ‘replacement,’ if you suggest that the Democratic Party is trying to replace the current electorate of voters now casting ballots with new people, more obedient voters from the Third World.”

Carlson said he was concerned about his “voting rights,” and that he had “less political power because they are importing a brand new electorate,” but said it’s not a racial issue.

From the Anti-Defamation League:

Response To Common Inaccuracy: Bi-National/One-State Solution

… The proposal of a bi-national state, or a “one-state solution,” is nothing less than an indirect attempt to bring about an end to the State of Israel as the national homeland of the Jewish people.

… A bi-national state, in principle and in practice, would mean the ideological end of the Jewish State of Israel and lead to the forsaking of Jewish nationalism and identity, along with its special status as a refuge for Jews fleeing persecution.

Furthermore, bi-nationalism is unworkable given current realities and historic animosities. With historically high birth rates among the Palestinians, and a possible influx of Palestinian refugees and their descendants now living around the world, Jews would quickly be a minority within a bi-national state, thus likely ending any semblance of equal representation and protections. In this situation, the Jewish population would be increasingly politically – and potentially physically – vulnerable.

It is unrealistic and unacceptable to expect the State of Israel to voluntarily subvert its own sovereign existence and nationalist identity and become a vulnerable minority within what was once its own territory. …

 

From CNN:

Concerns mount that US withdrawal from Afghanistan could risk progress on women’s rights

By Jennifer Hansler, CNN

Updated 1:53 PM ET, Sat April 10, 2021

(CNN) Concerns are mounting from bipartisan US lawmakers and Afghan women’s rights activists that the hard-won gains for women and civil society in Afghanistan could be lost if the United States makes a precipitous withdrawal from the country.

President Joe Biden has suggested it will be difficult to meet the May 1 deadline for US troops to leave the country as dictated in the deal the Trump administration signed with the Taliban. However, there are fears that if the US withdraws troops before the conditions on the ground are right — regardless of the date on the calendar

It might take until August or even December of this year before women could achieve full equality in Pashtun culture, so we can’t be hasty.

— there will be a sharp and possibly catastrophic backslide.

Ya think?

But, anyway, women’s rights are so 2012…

Instead of keeping the war in Afghanistan going for another score years in the name of feminism, the US should instead bomb all of Central Asia flat in the name of fighting transphobia.

Update: iSteve commenter Redneck Farmer points out the flaw in my grand strategy: Iran is a world leader in castrating transitioning effeminate boys.

 

From the New York Times news section:

Inside the Fight for the Future of The Wall Street Journal

A special team led by a high-level manager says Rupert Murdoch’s paper must evolve to survive. But a rivalry between editor and publisher stands in the way.

By Edmund Lee
April 10, 2021

The Wall Street Journal is a rarity in 21st-century media: a newspaper that makes money. A lot of money. But at a time when the U.S. population is growing more racially diverse, older white men still make up the largest chunk of its readership, with retirees a close second.

“The No. 1 reason we lose subscribers is they die,” goes a joke shared by some Journal editors.

Is the New York Times endorsing the factual validity of the Great Replacement Theory?

No, it’s in favor of the Great Replacement, which means the NYT is good. All that matters these days is who are the good guys and who are the bad guys. Of course, people who know the factual truth, such as by paying a lot of money to subscribe to the WSJ, are likely to make even more money.

But who cares? Money printer go BRRRRRRR.

Now a special innovation team and a group of nearly 300 newsroom employees are pushing for drastic changes at the paper, which has been part of Rupert Murdoch’s media empire since 2007. They say The Journal, often Mr. Murdoch’s first read of the day, must move away from subjects of interest to established business leaders and widen its scope if it wants to succeed in the years to come. The Journal of the future, they say, must pay more attention to social media trends and cover racial disparities in health care, for example, as aggressively as it pursues corporate mergers.

In other words, the Wall Street Journal should abandon its near monopoly on America’s high-earning white male decision-makers and instead compete with Jezebel, The Root, and Teen Vogue for the Woke barista audience.

Sounds like a plan!

It’s like how the Masters golf tournament should have Cardi B perform on the 12th green between shots. Sure, they might lose commercials for why you should buy Boeings instead of AirBuses, but they’d make up for it on volume of spots for weed delivery services.

That argument has yet to convince executives in the top ranks of the company. …

As the team was completing a report on its findings last summer, Mr. Murray found himself staring down a newsroom revolt. Soon after the killing of George Floyd, staff members created a private Slack channel called “Newsroomies,” where they discussed how The Journal, in their view, was behind on major stories of the day, including the social justice movement growing in the aftermath of Mr. Floyd’s death. Participants also complained that The Journal’s digital presence was not robust enough, and that its conservative opinion department had published essays that did not meet standards applied to the reporting staff. The tensions and challenges are similar to what leaders of other news organizations, including The Times, have heard from their staffs.

The obvious solution is to give in to the genius business intuitions of 20-something interns on the staff.

In July, Mr. Murray received a draft from Ms. Story’s team, a 209-page blueprint on how The Journal should remake itself called The Content Review. It noted that “in the past five years, we have had six quarters where we lost more subscribers than we gained,” and said addressing its slow-growing audience called for significant changes in everything from the paper’s social media strategy to the subjects it deemed newsworthy.

The report argued that the paper should attract new readers — specifically, women, people of color and younger professionals — by focusing more on topics such as climate change and income inequality.

After all, where else besides the WSJ can you find content on those topics?

Among its suggestions: “We also strongly recommend putting muscle behind efforts to feature more women and people of color in all of our stories.”

And, of course, more stories about women of color and their hair.

The Content Review has not been formally shared with the newsroom and its recommendations have not been put into effect, but it is influencing how people work: An impasse over the report has led to a divided newsroom, according to interviews with 25 current and former staff members.

The only solution is to increase the race and sex quotas for the kind of employees who are dividing the newsroom. Once all the Bad People are gone, then divisiveness will be over, forever.

 

I don’t know what that means, but it sounds racist.

 

From Vox:

The effects of Black Lives Matter protests

Research shows places with BLM protests from 2014 to 2019 saw a reduction in police homicides but an uptick in murders.

By Jerusalem Demsas @JerusalemDemsas Apr 9, 2021, 8:30am EDT

There’s long been a fierce debate about the effect of Black Lives Matter protests on the lethal use of force by police. A new study, one of the first to make a rigorous academic attempt to answer that question, found that the protests have had a notable impact on police killings. For every 4,000 people who participated in a Black Lives Matter protest between 2014 and 2019, police killed one less person.

Travis Campbell, a PhD student in economics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, released his preliminary findings on the Social Science Research network as a preprint, meaning the study has yet to receive a formal peer review.

While Campbell’s research does not encompass the events of summer 2020, George Floyd’s killing and the subsequent wave of protests became potentially the largest movement in American history, the sudden growth of which relied on a wave of anger and grief at the police homicides Americans are continually greeted with on the news. Opinion columnists, activists, lawmakers, and even the president of the United States (current and former) have weighed in on these protests and what the appropriate policy changes should be. But first, it’s important to grapple with how the protests have already changed policing.

From 2014 to 2019, Campbell tracked more than 1,600 BLM protests across the country, largely in bigger cities, with nearly 350,000 protesters. His main finding is a 15 to 20 percent reduction in lethal use of force by police officers — roughly 300 fewer police homicides — in census places that saw BLM protests.

Campbell’s research also indicates that these protests correlate with a 10 percent increase in murders in the areas that saw BLM protests. That means from 2014 to 2019, there were somewhere between 1,000 and 6,000 more homicides than would have been expected if places with protests were on the same trend as places that did not have protests.

So call the most likely figure in that 1,000 to 6,000 range to be 3,000. Therefore, Black Lives Matter led to about 300 fewer killings by police and 3,000 more killings by criminals, meaning Black Lives Matter got an order of magnitude more people killed than it saved.

Heckuva job, BLMie!

Campbell’s research does not include the effects of last summer’s historic wave of protests because researchers do not yet have all the relevant data.

I’ve got the relevant data.

The main difference between the Ferguson Effect of the First Era of BLM of 2014-2019 and the Minneapolis Effect of the Second Era of BLM of May 25, 2020-? is that the Ferguson Effect tended to be more localized to where BLM triumphed politically (e.g., it emerged first in St. Louis after Michael Brown’s death, then in Baltimore in April 2015 after Freddie Gray’s death, then in the winter of 2015-2016 in Chicago after video of Laquan MacDonald’s death was released). In contrast, the Minneapolis Effect has been much more national and thus even larger.

… The good news is that even if Campbell’s finding about the increase in murders following BLM protests holds up to further scrutiny, the effect doesn’t appear to last for long. By year four, Campbell no longer observes a statistically significant increase in murders, indicating that whatever is going on with murders is hopefully not long term.

Yeah, what appears to have stopped the 22.9% rise in murders nationally in the last two years of the Obama Administration, was, after the Dallas and Baton Rouge BLM massacres of cops in July 2016, the election of Donald Trump and his selection of Jeff Sessions as Attorney General. Meanwhile, the Establishment chose to downplay BLM’s grievances after Dallas and Baton Rouge.

But then thinking that BLM was needed to beat Trump, the Establishment blasted BLM’s anti-white hate rhetoric via their Media Megaphone from May 2020 onward during the so-called Racial Reckoning that saw blacks shoot each other in very large numbers, and almost cost Joe Biden the election.

 

Here are two interesting examples of how the New York Times covers mass murderers when they aren’t dread white males.

From the New York Times news section:

The Mystery of Why a Foundering Football Player Killed a Family

A small city that bills itself as Football City U.S.A. is grappling with the shooting deaths of members of a prominent local family by Phillip Adams who, many say, had been adrift after his N.F.L. career ended.

By Jonathan Abrams, Ken Belson and John Jeter
April 9, 2021

He struggled to find work. His last-ditch chance to make an N.F.L. team fizzled. He had a child to support and little apparent direction in a life freighted with high expectations. His behavior was increasingly erratic. Then on Wednesday, for reasons no one yet knows for sure, Phillip Adams, a former N.F.L. cornerback, went to the Rock Hill, S.C., home of a prominent doctor and shot everybody he saw before fatally turning the gun on himself.

Now, the football-loving community of 65,000 that bills itself as Football City U.S.A. is struggling to contend with Adams’s suddenly violent turn and its aftermath.

Before he killed five people, including two children, and critically wounded a sixth person,

The cornerback’s six victims were all white, but who is counting?

Adams, 32, who shot and killed himself several hours after his rampage, had seemed adrift since he last played N.F.L. football almost six years ago, friends and associates said. He remained close to home, caring for his mother, Phyllis, a former high school teacher who became a paraplegic after a car accident a decade ago.

This story sounds rather like the Black Muslim ex-college football player who went crazy and murdered the white Capitol cop last week. Like I wondered then: lots of people go nuts or break down, especially black males, but is the Racial Reckoning making them more murderous?

Meanwhile, the NYT runs an article about the victims in Boulder of the Muslim immigrant terrorist. But this article refuses to even mention the shooter’s glaringly Arabic name.

‘I Know She’s Gone, but Why?’: Love and Loss at a Boulder Grocery Store

Funerals for the victims of the mass shooting in Colorado were being held this week. Teri Leiker, a beloved employee at the King Soopers store for 31 years, was among them.

By Jack Healy
April 9, 2021

BOULDER, Colo. — Teri Leiker and Clint Ponsford shared a love story that began and ended at the grocery store.

They spent more than 30 years working at the same King Soopers supermarket in Boulder, where Ms. Leiker charmed customers with her big laugh and Mr. Ponsford could spot the peaks of the Flatirons when he went outside to wrangle shopping carts. They had both competed in Colorado’s Special Olympics and helped each other get through a lot: deaths, a breakup and the challenges of navigating this world as two people with cognitive disabilities.

About a year and a half ago, their friendship turned into something deeper. They went on karaoke dates. They watched Disney movies that Ms. Leiker adored. On workdays, they would get up at 3:30 a.m. in Ms. Leiker’s condo to make coffee, trade kisses and watch reruns of “Murder, She Wrote” before Mr. Ponsford left for the early shift.

And on March 22, they were both at work when it was all blasted apart.

For a few fleeting days, the country’s horrified gaze was fixed on Boulder after Ms. Leiker, 51, and nine other people at the King Soopers were killed by a 21-year-old gunman whose motives remain a mystery.

But that’s it: the entire article doesn’t mention the identity of the shooter.

Say his name: Ahmad Al Alawi Alissa.

That reminds me: I run iSteve fundraisers in April, August, and December.

Me and William Mulholland’s aqueduct (defunct)

Large or small, I find each donation to be a personal message of encouragement to keep doing what I’m doing. I more or less figured out the basic logic of the 21st Century, which hasn’t made me popular, but with your support I can keep on keeping on pointing out how the world works.

Here are eight ways for you to contribute:

First: You can use Paypal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. Paypal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual. (Monthly is nice.)

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:

Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA 91617

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution via VDARE by clicking here.

Please don’t forget to click my name at the VDARE site so the money goes to me: first, click on “Earmark your donation,” then click on “Steve Sailer:”

VDARE has been kiboshed from use of Paypal for being, I dunno, EVIL. But you can give via credit cards, Bitcoin, Ethereum and Litecoin, check, money order, or stock.

Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

Fourth: Most banks now allow fee-free money transfers via Zelle.

If you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay/Zelle. Just tell WF SurePay/Zelle to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) Please note, there is no 2.9% fee like with Paypal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Fifth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay/Zelle (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay/Zelle to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with Paypal or Google Wallet, so this is also good for large contributions.

Zelle might work with other banks too. Here’s a Zelle link for CitiBank. And Bank of America.

Zelle is really a good system: easy to use and the fees are nonexistent, unlike, say, Paypal.

Sixth: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address (that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Seventh: You can use Bitcoin using Coinbase. Coinbase payments are not tax deductible. Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Eighth: At one reader’s request, I recently added Square as an 8th fundraising medium, although I’m vague on how it works. If you want to use Square, send me an email telling me how much to send you an invoice for. Or, if you know an easier way for us to use Square, please let me know.

Thanks.

 

DMX, the aspiring rapper/stick-up man turned actual rapper, has expired at age 50. He leaves behind 15 children. From a March 14, 2008 interview with DMX:

Q. Are you following the presidential race?
A. Not at all.

Q. You’re not? You know there’s a black guy running, Barack Obama, and then there’s Hillary Clinton.
A. His name is Barack?!

Q. Barack Obama, yeah.
A. Barack?!

Q. Barack.
A. What the f— is a Barack?! Barack Obama. Where he from, Africa?

Q. Yeah, his dad is from Kenya.
A. Barack Obama?

Q. Yeah.
A. What the f—?! That ain’t no f—–’ name, yo. …. You can’t be serious. Barack Obama. Get the f— outta here.

Q. You’re telling me you haven’t heard about him before.
A. I ain’t really paying much attention.

 
Steve Sailer
About Steve Sailer

Steve Sailer is a journalist, movie critic for Taki's Magazine, VDARE.com columnist, and founder of the Human Biodiversity discussion group for top scientists and public intellectuals.


PastClassics
Becker update V1.3.2
The JFK Assassination and the 9/11 Attacks?