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Christopher Chantrill on a member of the Establishment who tried, and tried, and tried again–in vain–to tell that Establishment it was steering the ship of state into an iceberg:

They can’t admit that conservatives are right, because it destroys their politics.

E.g, Charles Murray in Losing Ground: Great Society programs didn’t work. Ignore him.

Charles Murray in The Bell Curve: modern era benefits cognitive elite and hurts low IQ people. Racist!

Charles Murray in Coming Apart: Top 25% doing fine; middle 50% so-so. Bottom 25%, men don’t work much and women don’t marry much. Ignore him.

How can they change now?

He gave them an answer predating Andrew Yang by over a decade. Instead of following his advice and instituting a UBI, they’re going to raise the federal minimum wage.

This will make things worse. A UBI lifts the bottom up. An increased minimum wage cuts the bottom off. With a UBI and the ability to earn a $10/hour wage, those at the bottom of the economic ladder have prospects for climbing up and the means to survive until they do. With no UBI and the skills commensurate with a $10/hour wage, a $15/hour minimum wage leaves those at the bottom too far down to grab the bottom rung of the economic ladder and nothing to live on.

A dissident leftist tries to offer a dissident rightist a way out of a self-isolating virtual ghetto. From dfordoom’s lips to God’s ears:

If you have a problem with someone who is Jewish you will in every case find that the person is a member of the elite, so focus your attacks on the elites. Very few people outside the far right hate Jews but almost everybody hates the elites. Almost everybody hates bankers and billionaires. Hollywood moguls, tech monopolists, elite academics, politicians, media tycoons and journalists are pretty generally despised.

So focus on attacking people for being bankers, billionaires, Hollywood moguls, tech monopolists, elite academics, politicians, media tycoons and journalists.

It’s highly likely that in most cases the reasons these people are enemies of society is that they’re bankers, billionaires, Hollywood moguls, tech monopolists, elite academics, politicians, media tycoons and journalists.

Paperback Writer on the Capitol riot:

Support was higher at first because all we saw was the LARPers. Then the cop died, and footage came out of the violence.

The riot was WRONG, dammit. It was a riot. It wasn’t a damned insurrection. It was stupid. And it gave the gov’t every chance to crush dissent.

Any support of this is crazy and WRONG.

Ashli Babbit’s death was tragic, but it was the saving grace of what the Establishment is now referring to as “1/6” in a galling attempt to elevate its severity to that of 9/11. Had she not paid the ultimate price, all ambiguity about the outcome would have been wiped away. As it stands, she makes things a little more complicated:

The incursion into the Capitol Building was a depressingly fitting end for the Trump presidency–a theatric display that antagonized the Establishment without doing a thing to challenge its hold on power. To the contrary, both have provided pretenses for the Establishment to consolidate its grip with the support of most of the public. Kind of like 9/11 and the Patriot Act. They aren’t subtle about these things.

Unlike those who celebrated months of rioting over the summer before trying to scrub evidence of those celebrations at they clutched their pearls a few weeks ago, nebulafox is consistent:

I agree with them on the assessment of “these people were scumbag rioters who should have the book thrown at them and Trump is a pathological liar who egged them on”. Not disputing that. Might not win me a lot of fans here to say that, but there you go.

Why I go from that to “still, **** you people and the horse you rode in on” is because of three factors:

1) The Democrats and their media allies simped for, lied on the behalf of, covered up for, apologized and gaslighted for the worst riots in American history *less than a year ago*. The new President’s staffers still are providing money to bail out people responsible for that. There’s a certain point where your sheer hypocrisy is going to undermine everything you touch, even the accurate stuff. Let alone the flatly dishonest stuff, like the notion that this was an attempted coup or that Americans should not fear the corporate censorship they are embracing.

2) The sanctimony of the GOP Establishment wears extremely thin when they are busy feting the same people who launched the Iraq War as advisors for the new “domestic war on terror”, helped get us to the point of corporate control of public life as much as anybody, flat out stated that millions of Americans were not worth spending 2,000 dollars on, and were themselves happy to work with Trump for four years as long he passed their stupid tax cuts and appointed the judges they wanted. Enough with the moralism. Revival of public respect for institutions requires the institutions themselves to admit where they’ve failed and change first.

3) And no, this wasn’t a “coup attempt”: this was a bunch of obese LARPers throwing a collective tantrum and forming a lynch mob on the behalf of a narcissist who cowardly disposed of them when he was done with them, like everything else he’s touched in life. But an insurrection? A coup? As someone originally from Pakistan presumably old enough to remember military rule, I’m sure know you better than most online commentators what a real coup actually is. You know, tanks in the capital, the military hijacking radio stations, high profile disappearances, that kind of thing.

The distinction is important because this is the justification that our elites-media, economic, bureaucratic, and political-are going to use for Patriot Act 2.0, Jack Dorsey edition. At what point over the last 12 months have they demonstrated that we should trust them in… anything?

Intelligent Dasein suspects the attempt to cast 1/6 as a day that will live in infamy will fail:

These events will be forgotten in the ensuing months. Sadly, America has become a place where mass shootings, bombings, stolen elections, Capitol stormings, and the grossest perversions of justice no longer even merit a passing yawn. I believe we are starting to enter a post-hyperrealistic age where media sensationalism has run its course and where significant events aren’t even noticed anymore. The whole point is just to amble aimlessly around and around Piccadilly Circus whether London Bridge falls down or the bombs rain down on St. Paul’s.

Perhaps in what Karl Rove allegedly referred to as the “reality-based community”, but the bipartisan war criminals assembled on the West Front to bear witness to Biden’s inauguration view that as a mere obstacle to be navigated. How many tens of thousands of people have been tortured because of John Brennan, and he has the nerve to pretend that a goofball in a goatskin walking around the Capitol Building is the worst thing America has ever done? Yes, he does. They all do.

Arclight on how the GOP, if it was serious about restoring its electoral competitiveness, could outflank the Democrats on the campaign finance issue that used to animate the party’s base before the Democrats became corporate America’s senior partner a generation ago:

A lot of donations to the parties just go to various parasitic consultants on messaging and so on, so my guess is there is a lot of fat that could be cut without really damaging the party’s prospects, so long as they have the brains to run on the issues normal people care about rather than a thinly-disguised Chamber of Commerce policy platform.

But yes, this also opens the door for the GOP to highlighting just how much money the Democrats take from huge companies while claiming to be the party of the unheard. They could be even bolder and outflank the left if they proposed a Constitutional amendment to address campaign finance, but my guess is that the Paul Ryan/Mitch McConnell faction is still way too strong to contemplate anything that would turn down the spigot when it comes to the constellation of political consultants and lobby shops that employ their former aides.

With regards to the Paul Ryan faction, sure, it’d be an instance of turning a weakness into a virtue rather than anything like a genuine conviction that putting politicians on sale makes a mockery of the democratic process, but it would work.

It’s not called the Cynical Party, though. It’s called the Stupid Party. Stupid is as stupid does, so it won’t happen.

Chrisnonymous on the unsettling potential of the lockdowns transforming a long vacation into long-term unemployment:

In reality, many people are enjoying the lockdowns. They don’t have to go to work. I am in the same situation. My work has been reduced from 8+ hours 6 days a week to about 6 hours 3-4 days a week. I’m loving it for now, but of course, I know there is a price to pay in the future. Also, if my employer goes under, I’m screwed. But there are probably many people, especially in western Europe, who feel like they are simply living the European welfare state lifestyle on steroids. This is very dangerous for society as it’s unsustainable and is one of the main reasons the lockdowns need to end.

This provides an opportunity to reiterate a fear I have of a fundamental change the Covid response may have set in motion. If an employer doesn’t need an employee at the office in person and is able to function just fine interacting with that employee remotely, why does the employee need to be living in America on an American middle class salary? If the work can be outsourced across town, why can’t it be outsourced across the globe?

 
• Category: Culture/Society, Economics, Ideology • Tags: COTW 
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  1. If the work can be outsourced across town, why can’t it be outsourced across the globe?

    It can be and it will be. The world is changing. There is a great reshuffling of the deck going on, and you can’t change it.

    You can go on writing about it, though. If this is how you make your living, you’d better hope you can continue this gig as long as you need to — if you are not old enough and established enough to retire early like me and just live it out.

    Best of luck to you.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Buzz Mohawk

    You wrote my comment. Only people with security clearances will continue to have a right to work as Americans. DC is completely insulated from economic competition by being connected to the profits from debt issuance, and by the requirement for security clearances for a lot of work which foreigners cannot obtain. The top 10 wealthiest counties in the USA are almost all the for that reason.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

  2. Clickbait. Again.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Too Long Didn't Read

    It's good bait and nebulafox never disappoints.

    Although


    Enough with the moralism. Revival of public respect for institutions requires the institutions themselves to admit where they’ve failed and change first.
     
    That's a weird way for writing "they need to be drenched in much blood or we will never get out of there".

    A interesting psychological effect of the lockdown is that it slows you down to contemplate the kafkaesque daily hamster treading. Seeing an "advertisement" for whatever great new stuff the western capitalist systems has managed to extrude and you are supposed to buy just makes me barf now.

    It also gives you more time to read the news and admire the complete artificiality of what's being presented.
    , @Audacious Epigone
    @Too Long Didn't Read

    The post titles are taken directly from the comment of the week excerpts.

  3. focus on attacking people for being bankers, billionaires, Hollywood moguls, tech monopolists, elite academics, politicians, media tycoons and journalists.

    LOL. dfordoom has spent too much time in this free speech venue where people actively criticize minorities if they want. He has forgotten that in mainstream culture, when a right-winger criticizes bankers, professors, etc, the response is usually to accuse them of covert anti-Simitism!

    • Agree: Kratoklastes
    • Replies: @brabantian
    @Chrisnonymous

    Correct ... Critiqueing elites but never mentioning Jews, does NOT save you from being accused of being 'anti-semitic' because you are STILL using 'anti-semitic dog-whistles and tropes'

    To criticise the 1% is 'anti-semitic dog-whistling' because so many of the 1% are Jews ... To criticise 'bankers' is using 'Third-Reich-style anti-semitic tropes' ... to mention George Soros negatively is 'encouraging an attack on all Jews merely because one is prominent' etc'
    https://i.ibb.co/P11Yr37/Hawley-vs-elites-anti-semitic.jpg

    Replies: @Jay Fink, @Paperback Writer

    , @Rosie
    @Chrisnonymous


    LOL. dfordoom has spent too much time in this free speech venue where people actively criticize minorities if they want. He has forgotten that in mainstream culture, when a right-winger criticizes bankers, professors, etc, the response is usually to accuse them of covert anti-Simitism!
     
    Indeed. Another frequent response: Those are all White people! (Not that that would help even if true.)
    , @Audacious Epigone
    @Chrisnonymous

    And there is a lot of pushback and incredulity from the broad middle. When instead people say, "It's the Jews!!!", others point to certain non-Jews screwing people over and other Jews fighting the good fight and dismiss the obsessors as bigoted nuts.

  4. In reality, many people are enjoying the lockdowns.

    Teachers loved being home and paid. They raised hell about having to go back to classes this year, too. Covid and all. As they rake in pay and bennies to sit home on their ever-fattening asses, at least there is a little less indoctrination going on.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jim Christian

    That is a partial [Agree], Jim, only because I don't see that last line about the indoctrination coming true. Our elementary school kid's only real book to read now is some deal about some little slave girl and her being freed. I tell him it's not that the book is a lie, but all the important history that's left out is where the lie is. I have to fight this stuff almost every day, Jim. Homeschooling is looking like a more likely option every day, and even this boy is on board, due to the real school days requiring face diaper wearing and 6ft distancing, EVEN DURING RECESS OUTSIDE. #Moronic!

    I guess it's a little better on-line. The boy can write his friend on the computer arranging time to meet at the park, he can hang with the cat, as the teacher can't see everything, and we can both make fun of the BS out of the teacher even during class (he's usually muted).

    Replies: @dfordoom

    , @RadicalCenter
    @Jim Christian

    There is only less indoctrination going on if at least one parent or grandparent can sit with all online-schooling children all the time and interject when the teacher tries to insert her own (or the State’s own) political, racial, and sexual views. This is not practical for many families.

    Also, we should not assume that government schools will “tolerate” parents “disrupting” instruction to cut off or counter propaganda. They will ultimately keep such children’s Zoom feeds muted, then send a warning letter to the “offending” parent, then take legal action against the parent.

    In any event, a very low percentage of parents have the trifecta of knowledge, time, and courage to interject in their children’s Zoom classes when they hear propaganda. This will be especially true of the tens of millions of parents who were not raised in the USA and do not have even the limited, inconsistent tradition of thinking independently and challenging rather than blindly “respecting” authority that we have (or had).

    Systematic indoctrination is still going on, and for almost all children and almost all classes probably just as much as before the plandemic.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter, @Corvinus

  5. If an employer doesn’t need an employee at the office in person and is able to function just fine interacting with that employee remotely, why does the employee need to be living in America on an American middle class salary? If the work can be outsourced across town, why can’t it be outsourced across the globe?

    Agreed. And if employers discover that people who used to work eight hours a day six days a week in an office are now working only half those hours at home they might draw the conclusion that they could halve their office workforce, and force those people to work ten hours a day seven days a week at home. Or they could employ all their office drones as casuals, working from home, and not have to provide any benefits to the employees at all.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @dfordoom

    Yes, this is more like what will happen. The ability to outsource globally will bring the same effect as immigration--driving down wages. In the future, you may be forced to simply accept lower compensation or be fired and replaced.

    If I had the ability to do it (like the capital and knowledge), I think I would start a farm now.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @neutral, @El Dato

  6. Very few people outside the far right hate Jews but almost everybody hates the elites.

    Always the same nonsense, people want to be gutmenschen and avoid mentioning the jews at all costs. The reality is that it is not the elite/liberals/SJWs/Muslims/Illuminati/etc, it really is the jews, if you refuse you acknowledge the root cause of all the malaise then you will never make progress.

    This is the problem that the types that follow Alex Jones and Qanon have, they can correctly spot that the democracy is a sham and that they are run by an unaccountable elite, they however are too afraid to ever dare call out the jews (or blacks and other non white groups), which is why they have to resort to ever more crackpot ideas to explain the world.

    • Replies: @DanHessinMD
    @neutral

    "The reality is that it is not the elite/liberals/SJWs/Muslims/Illuminati/etc, it really is the jews, if you refuse you acknowledge the root cause of all the malaise then you will never make progress."

    Jack Dorsey, who kicked off the Trump social media bans is 0% Jewish.

    Jeff Bezos, whose Washington Post runs the left wing show in Washington, DC, is 0% Jewish.

    Bill Gates, the lockdown king, the essence of globalist thinking (his wife grieved on TV that American-bought vaccines might be used to help -- horror of horrors -- Americans -- instead of say Africans) -- is not Jewish.

    Canada's prime minister Justin Trudeau, loved icon of the left, isn't Jewish.

    You will obviously find plenty of Jewish influence if you look for it, but England is the most pozzed nation in the world and it has a small Jewish population that is mostly right wing.

    It is total idiocy to go on endlessly about the Jews, for two reasons:

    (1) It is strategically the dumbest strategy imaginable. You will alienate everyone with influence and guarantee failure.

    As dfordoom notes:
    "By mentioning Jews or attacking people simply for being Jewish you make defeat an absolute certainty.

    You simply have to decide if you want to win or lose. If you want to lose, focus on the Jews. If you want to win, try a smarter strategy."

    Yes.

    (2) It isn't even especially accurate. Religious Jews are usually right wing while non-religious Jews are mostly left wing. But non-religious people everywhere are mostly left wing.

    Training one's ire on elites is better on both of these points.

    It is far, far better strategically as dfordoom explains. Also it is way more accurate. Leftism really is an elitism problem, most of all. Harvard, DC, Big Tech and the NY Times are all well above 90% leftist -- perhaps in the range of 95%. Jewish people are perhaps 65% or 70% leftist which means there is a far healthier diversity of viewpoint among a cross section of Jewish people will have far greater diversity of opinion than a cross section of elites.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @neutral

    , @Audacious Epigone
    @neutral

    And that's why the Daily Stormer is so much more influential than InfoWars! Uh huh.

  7. @Chrisnonymous

    focus on attacking people for being bankers, billionaires, Hollywood moguls, tech monopolists, elite academics, politicians, media tycoons and journalists.
     
    LOL. dfordoom has spent too much time in this free speech venue where people actively criticize minorities if they want. He has forgotten that in mainstream culture, when a right-winger criticizes bankers, professors, etc, the response is usually to accuse them of covert anti-Simitism!

    Replies: @brabantian, @Rosie, @Audacious Epigone

    Correct … Critiqueing elites but never mentioning Jews, does NOT save you from being accused of being ‘anti-semitic’ because you are STILL using ‘anti-semitic dog-whistles and tropes’

    To criticise the 1% is ‘anti-semitic dog-whistling’ because so many of the 1% are Jews … To criticise ‘bankers’ is using ‘Third-Reich-style anti-semitic tropes’ … to mention George Soros negatively is ‘encouraging an attack on all Jews merely because one is prominent’ etc’

    • Replies: @Jay Fink
    @brabantian

    The word cosmopolitan has a long history as a code word to describe Jews. Stalin famously described Jews as "rootless cosmpolitans". I don't take offense to that, it was accurate. Jews were rootless in the sense that they were travelers, moving to whatever few places would accept them, which was mostly parts of Eastern Europe at the time. Cosmopolitan because we thrive in big cities and have a city mentality.

    I ordered a tshirt online I found that says "Proud to be a rootless cosmopolitan". Even if I strongly disagree with most other Jews politically, I can still relate to the rootless cosmopolitan label. I am rootless, I have no roots to the community I live in and I am cosmopolitan in the sense that I am not a rugged survivalist type. I couldn't survive long without the conveniences of modern society.

    As for Josh Hawley. Not only am I not offended at what he said. He is one of the few politicians I have passionately positive opinions of.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    , @Paperback Writer
    @brabantian

    Brush it off and double down.

    I do think that cosmopolitan is kind of a stupid word, though. When it's the name of your daughter's favorite magazine, it's hard to smear people with it.

    I'm also against using the word or phrase "the elites" as an insult. Wasn't Chuck Yeager an elite pilot?

    Let's be a bit more creative about wording, but I'd start with this:

    Democrats.

  8. Why shouldn’t we be able to mention the Jews?

    We do not need to resort to “anti-semitism” (which is in any case a stupid concept – is there “anti-goyism”, or “anti-whiteism”?), we don’t need to hate Jews (I know I don’t, I even like a few of them), but they need to be treated like any other group of people, responsible for good or bad things, and not sacrosanct.

    As for the Capitol rising, I think it was a trap. What were they planning to do, anyway? I think they were purposely led in by the police. The shooting of Babbit might or might not have been real (did we find who was the shooter yet?), but it was pretty stupid. Didn’t the shooter see that there were armed cops behind?

    People enjoying the lockdowns? Well, I guess it depends on your personal situation. Those who can use the time to be more with their families, perhaps yes. Those who are single or old/retired or away from their families, not so much.

    UBI is not the problem, or not the main problem. The problem is the “stay home and do as told” part.

    • Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @Dumbo


    did we find who was the shooter yet?
     
    No official confirmation yet, but /pol/ types think it was one David Bailey, who was also the cop who was guarding Steve Scalise when he got shot.

    While we're on the subject of wild conspiracy shit, it's worth pointing out that some of the more far-out types think the whole thing was faked, and that therefore she's still alive. I don't know about that, but (a) she was allegedly part of a group that included gov't agitator John Sullivan, (b) she was ex-military, and (c) she was allegedly polygamous or some shit, which doesn't sound like your typical Trump supporter.

    Who knows?

    Replies: @El Dato

    , @RadicalCenter
    @Dumbo

    Appreciate the comment. I would note, however, that most people, old or otherwise, who remain isolated from their families for months on end complying with governors’ “orders” have only themselves to blame. Grow up, calmly assess the medical evidence, defy these slavemasters, and live your lives.

    With rare exceptions, a person allowing his mother, father, or grandparent to live and then die alone to “obey lockdown” is being a coward and doing this loved ones a grave dis-service.

    Go visit your families and have them visit you, just as you normally would. Just about anyone who is not in a hospital or nursing home still has the ability to do this. (And if a nursing home refuses to allow visitation, get out of that place if at all possible.)

    My mother is approaching eighty years old and has refused to give up the joy of her remaining time on earth to obey these absurd edicts. She visits us and her grandchildren, as well as her many fellow non-hysterics, all the time, and we visit her. In fact, my wife and children have basically been living with Grandma since shortly after their school went all online.

    As for younger people living far from their parents and siblings, well, they can do something about that too, before, during, or after the plandemic. It may take a while to find a comparable job closer to family, but they can at least make it a priority. We have re-evaluated our own priorities in this respect, and a year from now we will all be living near each other full-time in a different State.

    Replies: @Saint Louis

  9. @Dumbo
    Why shouldn't we be able to mention the Jews?

    We do not need to resort to "anti-semitism" (which is in any case a stupid concept - is there "anti-goyism", or "anti-whiteism"?), we don't need to hate Jews (I know I don't, I even like a few of them), but they need to be treated like any other group of people, responsible for good or bad things, and not sacrosanct.

    As for the Capitol rising, I think it was a trap. What were they planning to do, anyway? I think they were purposely led in by the police. The shooting of Babbit might or might not have been real (did we find who was the shooter yet?), but it was pretty stupid. Didn't the shooter see that there were armed cops behind?

    People enjoying the lockdowns? Well, I guess it depends on your personal situation. Those who can use the time to be more with their families, perhaps yes. Those who are single or old/retired or away from their families, not so much.

    UBI is not the problem, or not the main problem. The problem is the "stay home and do as told" part.

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account, @RadicalCenter

    did we find who was the shooter yet?

    No official confirmation yet, but /pol/ types think it was one David Bailey, who was also the cop who was guarding Steve Scalise when he got shot.

    While we’re on the subject of wild conspiracy shit, it’s worth pointing out that some of the more far-out types think the whole thing was faked, and that therefore she’s still alive. I don’t know about that, but (a) she was allegedly part of a group that included gov’t agitator John Sullivan, (b) she was ex-military, and (c) she was allegedly polygamous or some shit, which doesn’t sound like your typical Trump supporter.

    Who knows?

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    > some of the more far-out types think the whole thing was faked

    Why would one fake a killing (for what purpose as it could go either way in respect to optics) when it would be easier to just actually kill the cut-out? People come up with the weirdest Hollywood bullshit scenarios (remember the Antifa guy from Kenosha who lost a muscle? Lack of blood and the first thing you hear is "fake! crisis actor"; not caring for the fact that the blood comes out later when the arteries start to relax)

    What really happened:

    Black Security got nervous and twitchy, probably got a bit upset at all those racist Trump Nazis banging at the door. Karen gets into the firing line of the Glock, so Karen gets it. There is nothing mysterious here.

    And maybe it cooled people down enough to avoid even further escalation. We will never know.

    It's good that SWAT guy behind her didn't have PTSD disorder. That AR-15 looked ready to fire.

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

  10. People Are Enjoying the Lockdowns

    I thought you were referring to something else. I’ve observed a weird kind of Stockholm Syndrome, “learned to love Big Brother” kind of thing going on with people who’ve been locked down a lot, wearing the masks.

    The whole regimen is debasing and emasculating; even if you support those measures under pandemic circumstances, it’s only natural to resent them. But, having knuckled under, many people are likely to try to find a way to convince themselves that, actually, they feel great about wearing that mask and staying home all day.

    (The tell, for me, was how they reacted to the prospect of more or increasing lockdowns (badly), and that they’re coping by being judgmental about people who aren’t wearing masks, as if the whole thing is their fault.)

  11. @dfordoom

    If an employer doesn’t need an employee at the office in person and is able to function just fine interacting with that employee remotely, why does the employee need to be living in America on an American middle class salary? If the work can be outsourced across town, why can’t it be outsourced across the globe?
     
    Agreed. And if employers discover that people who used to work eight hours a day six days a week in an office are now working only half those hours at home they might draw the conclusion that they could halve their office workforce, and force those people to work ten hours a day seven days a week at home. Or they could employ all their office drones as casuals, working from home, and not have to provide any benefits to the employees at all.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    Yes, this is more like what will happen. The ability to outsource globally will bring the same effect as immigration–driving down wages. In the future, you may be forced to simply accept lower compensation or be fired and replaced.

    If I had the ability to do it (like the capital and knowledge), I think I would start a farm now.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Chrisnonymous


    If I had the ability to do it (like the capital and knowledge), I think I would start a farm now.
     
    Borrow the money ... you’ll be paying it back with inflated currency. You can learn as you go. You don’t want to be a farmer, per se, rather to grow enough to feed your family and have stuff to barter for stuff you can’t produce. Big Ag, particularly people like Bill Gates buying up all the farmland, means you’ll never have a chance at success as a crop farmer. Not even with Belgian Endive (h/t Michael Dukakis).

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @TomSchmidt

    , @neutral
    @Chrisnonymous


    In the future, you may be forced to simply accept lower compensation or be fired and replaced.
     
    I can already foresee the establishment narrative for people objecting to ever diminishing wages as perpetuating white privilege. Of course they will at the same time argue that the ultra billionaires deserve all their money for their hard work, and as usual should anyone point out such glaring contradictions they will be called terrorist or other such things.
    , @El Dato
    @Chrisnonymous

    Outsourcing doesn't really work even now.

    Never have in-house knowledge, get your IP stolen, get bad quality goods, get no permanent memory or living organization for the company.

    It's basically setting oneself up to be the middleman. Who is dumb enough to do that except an MBA?

    Maybe Boeing management.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @nebulafox, @Daniel Chieh

  12. @Chrisnonymous
    @dfordoom

    Yes, this is more like what will happen. The ability to outsource globally will bring the same effect as immigration--driving down wages. In the future, you may be forced to simply accept lower compensation or be fired and replaced.

    If I had the ability to do it (like the capital and knowledge), I think I would start a farm now.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @neutral, @El Dato

    If I had the ability to do it (like the capital and knowledge), I think I would start a farm now.

    Borrow the money … you’ll be paying it back with inflated currency. You can learn as you go. You don’t want to be a farmer, per se, rather to grow enough to feed your family and have stuff to barter for stuff you can’t produce. Big Ag, particularly people like Bill Gates buying up all the farmland, means you’ll never have a chance at success as a crop farmer. Not even with Belgian Endive (h/t Michael Dukakis).

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @The Alarmist

    I don't think a bank would give anyone a loan to purchase enough land to grow just their own food. That doesn't seem like a winner for the bank.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @RadicalCenter

    , @TomSchmidt
    @The Alarmist

    You're confusing farmers with soil miners. Much of big ag is soil mining, taking an asset that pre-existed the "farm" and turning it into commodity crops using chemical fertilizers and herbicides. There are places in Iowa with hundreds of feet of beautiful black loess that can erode six inches of soil every year for centuries and still be fertile, but there aren't a lot of them.

    Polyface farm seems to be real farming: using hard work and knowledge to increase fertility and overall food, and ultimately wealth.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

  13. “a theatric display that antagonized the Establishment without doing a thing to challenge its hold on power”

    As Machiavelli put it – “men avenge slight injuries, not grave ones“.

    • Replies: @Athletic and Whitesplosive
    @YetAnotherAnon

    But a grave wound would have been an actual insurrection, although this would have been basically impossible since there was no elite support.

    Sometimes I don't know what the hell people here want, I expect they don't either.

    Without someone opposing them with a credible threat of force, exploitation and terrible governance will never stop, the threat of force is what they use to sustain it. This is self evident. If a better elite starts taking power even through insitutional capture, people will still get killed in the power struggle even if it's relatively low-intensity, this is always true but especially true for regimes whose favored tactic is street theatre.

    So there are 2 options:

    1) Nothing "violent" happens and the regime with associated mass bombing of uppity foreigners, deaths of despair and the occasional execution of hapless theatrical rioters at home continues either forever or until it collapses under mismanagement. Collapse would be totally disastrous for everyone with many, many dead.

    2) A focused counter elite uses opportunistic tools complete with violence and the threat thereof to somehow defuse the powder keg that is the American empire. Every way this could happen will certainly involve violence (including AE's favored outcome of regional parition), you'd be an idiot to think otherwise.

    But as we see, all violence under any circumstance is "WRONG, WRONG, WRONG, NOOOOOOOOO!!!!" As if violence were avoidable in principle. It isn't, so you'd better start thinking of ways in which it can be lessened, rather than raging at it's inevitability.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

  14. @Chrisnonymous
    @dfordoom

    Yes, this is more like what will happen. The ability to outsource globally will bring the same effect as immigration--driving down wages. In the future, you may be forced to simply accept lower compensation or be fired and replaced.

    If I had the ability to do it (like the capital and knowledge), I think I would start a farm now.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @neutral, @El Dato

    In the future, you may be forced to simply accept lower compensation or be fired and replaced.

    I can already foresee the establishment narrative for people objecting to ever diminishing wages as perpetuating white privilege. Of course they will at the same time argue that the ultra billionaires deserve all their money for their hard work, and as usual should anyone point out such glaring contradictions they will be called terrorist or other such things.

  15. @The Alarmist
    @Chrisnonymous


    If I had the ability to do it (like the capital and knowledge), I think I would start a farm now.
     
    Borrow the money ... you’ll be paying it back with inflated currency. You can learn as you go. You don’t want to be a farmer, per se, rather to grow enough to feed your family and have stuff to barter for stuff you can’t produce. Big Ag, particularly people like Bill Gates buying up all the farmland, means you’ll never have a chance at success as a crop farmer. Not even with Belgian Endive (h/t Michael Dukakis).

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @TomSchmidt

    I don’t think a bank would give anyone a loan to purchase enough land to grow just their own food. That doesn’t seem like a winner for the bank.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Chrisnonymous

    I forgot what its like to be asset poor.

    , @RadicalCenter
    @Chrisnonymous

    You’re probably right. But if it’s truly small-scale, get on the Kiva peer-to-peer lending website as a zero-interest borrower if possible. Definitely get on there and lend at zero interest to our fellow Americans.

    You will notice an extremely obvious bias in favor of Africans and non-whites generally on Kiva. But you can simply wait for a borrower that is to your liking and then lend to him or her only.

    Notice, as well, that Kiva provides us with borrowers from a number of Eastern European and central Asian countries but refuses to help us lend to people in Russia. I have contacted them about this and they respond in a weasely way, sometimes implying that Russia just is too corrupt and not stable enough — as opposed to the s—-holes they do let you lend to.

    Anyway, you can find European-American people on Kiva looking to borrow small amounts to start or expand very small organic gardening or farming enterprises.

  16. @Chrisnonymous
    @The Alarmist

    I don't think a bank would give anyone a loan to purchase enough land to grow just their own food. That doesn't seem like a winner for the bank.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @RadicalCenter

    I forgot what its like to be asset poor.

  17. Hasn’t it already been established that words like globalist, elite, and (especially) banker are code words for Jewish?

  18. @Jim Christian

    In reality, many people are enjoying the lockdowns.
     
    Teachers loved being home and paid. They raised hell about having to go back to classes this year, too. Covid and all. As they rake in pay and bennies to sit home on their ever-fattening asses, at least there is a little less indoctrination going on.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @RadicalCenter

    That is a partial [Agree], Jim, only because I don’t see that last line about the indoctrination coming true. Our elementary school kid’s only real book to read now is some deal about some little slave girl and her being freed. I tell him it’s not that the book is a lie, but all the important history that’s left out is where the lie is. I have to fight this stuff almost every day, Jim. Homeschooling is looking like a more likely option every day, and even this boy is on board, due to the real school days requiring face diaper wearing and 6ft distancing, EVEN DURING RECESS OUTSIDE. #Moronic!

    I guess it’s a little better on-line. The boy can write his friend on the computer arranging time to meet at the park, he can hang with the cat, as the teacher can’t see everything, and we can both make fun of the BS out of the teacher even during class (he’s usually muted).

    • Agree: Realist, RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Homeschooling is looking like a more likely option every day
     
    Which is why it's an absolute certainty that steps will be taken to make homeschooling impossible.

    Stand by for stories about homeschooling encouraging extremism and domestic terrorism. And stories about homeschooling encouraging racism, homophobia, transphobia, etc.
  19. I agree for the most part with everyone but Paperback Writer. This:

    The riot was WRONG, dammit. It was a riot. It wasn’t a damned insurrection. It was stupid. And it gave the gov’t every chance to crush dissent.

    It comes across like the words of a 5 y/o in a kindergarten class taught by an Ed-School tyrant. “Now, none of us can have our valentines hearts because YOU ruined it for everybody!”

    Yeah, it was silly, I’d say, not even stupid. It was unplanned. This was minor compared to most of the BLM/Antifa riots with their deliberated destruction and looting. So, are we supposed to just take it up the ass from the US Feral Gov’t, so they don’t punish everybody? What kind of American are you, Paperback Writer? The American Founders would be sickened by this attitude, as I am.

    I hope what I.D. wrote is indeed the case. That all depends on how many Americans still spend lots of their time in front of the idiot plate blasting out its barrage of Infotainment. I walk by one only rarely, say once a week, and I’m always baffled “what?? I can’t believe they’re still going on about this shit!”(Russia collusion, “insurrection” “CASES!”… etc.)

    • Agree: Catdog, El Dato, Charlotte
    • Replies: @Catdog
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Right. These jokers act like the magnaminous globo homo state would have let us alone if not for 1/6. Even if they did leave us alone, what would that say about how threatening your alternative strategy is to them?

    It's sad and cucked to see our own side still whining about it. Do you see the left ever condemn their own side? That is, condemn them for going too far, rather than not far enough?

    And indeed, it was unplanned, which is another reason the complaints are so stupid. There was no leader making a tactical decision. People were mad, and from ground-level with sight lines blocked by the crowd nobody knew what was going on. The left is right that Trump was inciting, and the people reasonably thought they were doing what Trump wanted. He must have known that many people would be in a riotous mood. He could have had his own people there to organize and direct the crowd. But apperantly he didn't. Trump was the leader and he was MIA except to post a few tweets and then disappeared from the public eye for a week.

    Trump's supporters were great people and they showed their bravery and dedication. The only failure was from Trump and the rest of the cucked R's. If Trump supporters can be faulted for anything its only for thinking Trump is a better man than he's proven to be.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @DanHessinMD

  20. @Achmed E. Newman
    I agree for the most part with everyone but Paperback Writer. This:

    The riot was WRONG, dammit. It was a riot. It wasn’t a damned insurrection. It was stupid. And it gave the gov’t every chance to crush dissent.
     
    It comes across like the words of a 5 y/o in a kindergarten class taught by an Ed-School tyrant. "Now, none of us can have our valentines hearts because YOU ruined it for everybody!"

    Yeah, it was silly, I'd say, not even stupid. It was unplanned. This was minor compared to most of the BLM/Antifa riots with their deliberated destruction and looting. So, are we supposed to just take it up the ass from the US Feral Gov't, so they don't punish everybody? What kind of American are you, Paperback Writer? The American Founders would be sickened by this attitude, as I am.

    I hope what I.D. wrote is indeed the case. That all depends on how many Americans still spend lots of their time in front of the idiot plate blasting out its barrage of Infotainment. I walk by one only rarely, say once a week, and I'm always baffled "what?? I can't believe they're still going on about this shit!"(Russia collusion, "insurrection" "CASES!"... etc.)

    Replies: @Catdog

    Right. These jokers act like the magnaminous globo homo state would have let us alone if not for 1/6. Even if they did leave us alone, what would that say about how threatening your alternative strategy is to them?

    It’s sad and cucked to see our own side still whining about it. Do you see the left ever condemn their own side? That is, condemn them for going too far, rather than not far enough?

    And indeed, it was unplanned, which is another reason the complaints are so stupid. There was no leader making a tactical decision. People were mad, and from ground-level with sight lines blocked by the crowd nobody knew what was going on. The left is right that Trump was inciting, and the people reasonably thought they were doing what Trump wanted. He must have known that many people would be in a riotous mood. He could have had his own people there to organize and direct the crowd. But apperantly he didn’t. Trump was the leader and he was MIA except to post a few tweets and then disappeared from the public eye for a week.

    Trump’s supporters were great people and they showed their bravery and dedication. The only failure was from Trump and the rest of the cucked R’s. If Trump supporters can be faulted for anything its only for thinking Trump is a better man than he’s proven to be.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Catdog

    Trump’s supporters were great people and they showed their bravery and dedication. The only failure was from Trump and the rest of the cucked R’s. If Trump supporters can be faulted for anything its only for thinking Trump is a better man than he’s proven to be.

    This is what has me completely disgusted with DJT. He is going to suffer as contracts are canceled with his organization around NYC. A few dollars. He is, after all, a "billionaire."

    The people who charged into the Capitol are going to be crucified. Some have already killed themselves. Trump might have issued a blanket pardon for everyone who was non-violent. Instead, in the end, he encouraged a large rally in DC which served no purpose that I can see, and destroyed the lives of many people who showed up.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Freedom Awaits

    , @DanHessinMD
    @Catdog

    Trump made more effort than anyone. Those who think someone else will come along and fight for Americans harder than he did are deluded.

    Right wingers hating on Trump are out of their minds. Most would not last a day in his shoes. He had to fight his battles mostly alone.

    No other conservative in living memory fought 1/10 as hard, against worse odds. Every day Trump was in office was a war of him against the world. And he was genuinely successful. The economy soared in ways that were deemed impossible. Unemployment was at record lows. There was peace in the world. The border was more secure than it had been in decades.

    Every part of the better, populist Republican platform was his doing, from fighting illegal immigration to bringing manufacturing back to America to supporting police to recognizing that China, not Russia, is our rival, to staying out of wars and using economic measures instead. And hardly anyone helped. Which other powers on the right drove America First policy?

    Then COVID came and the powers that be shut down the world and locked everyone in their homes. Many of us including myself and our blog host were certain of rapid economic collapse. Mother of God, was their ever a more crazy and bizarre policy than to lock down the whole population for a year?

    And still Trump persisted, with triumphant optimism, always looking for a way. The market would crash and Trump would then talk the market back up, again and again. Mega rally after mega rally, he fought against the stiff gale of the pandemic, falling from COVID and then getting to his feet from his hospital bed and rushing forward again. The number and size and spread of Trump's rallies during his final two weeks was way beyond anything history has seen and that schedule of rallies will never be matched in the future. One huge event per day would be an impossible schedule for any other world leader or pop star. Trump often had four and five rallies per day, spanning multiple states.

    He garnered a record number of votes but everyone was able to vote from home and voting was easier than ever with turnout of the tens of millions of the lowest information new voters. Every death from a disease was blamed on Trump and schools and churches were cancelled indefinitely and all the cities and Democrat wrecked their economies in defiance of Trump's wish not to lock down. The discovery of a cure through Trump's Operation Warp Speed was kept secret until the day after the election. In the debates, the moderator Chris Wallace attacked Trump brutally in defiance of every norm. In the final weeks of the campaign, news of Biden's crimes was literally censored by big tech.

    Trump was impeached for abuse of power at the beginning of the pandemic simply for calling for Biden's crimes to be investigated. Needless to say they never were. Then Trump, freshly impeached for abusing his power when he had exercised very little power, was blamed for not shutting down the entire country. Oh and the majority of the population of America completely lost their minds in a panic and embraced permanent house arrest for everyone.

    Almost Trump's entire Presidency was wrapped in the manufactured scandal that was Russiagate as both parties tried their best to cripple him. The media discarded all objectivity to make every story an attack on Trump. Tech tycoons, whose wealth grew by hundreds of billions because of Trump, committed their wealth to the political ground game in urban population centers in swing states to defeat him.

    Meanwhile a solid third of the right wing, including Vox Day and frequently Alex Jones, were completely lost in a Q-Anon fantasy land where conservatives don't have to do anything because everything was going according to plan. Others on the right engaged idiotic Nazi playacting that forced Trump to push mightily in the other direction, so politically destructive is the stench of those fools.

    Eventually all this felled Trump and the election didn't go his way. And yet he continued fighting on, against all hope, to keep the dream alive because he didn't want to let his supporters down.

    In the end, they defeating him by cutting off all channels of communication, cutting off Trump from his one hundred million followers on Twitter, cutting him off from Facebook and the rest, and branding the greatest American patriot of our lifetimes as a terrorist ringleader for an riot at Capitol Hill by unarmed protesters that didn't leave a scratch on any member of Congress. Amid all this, he couldn't defend himself because his voice was taken away. He tried to use the Official White House channels and those too were censored. Even his calls for peace were cut off by the Big Tech overlords.

    And all the while as their undisputed leader was destroyed, the Republican establishment stood aside or actively participated in the blows.

    In the end, Trump is Christlike tragic hero: unprecedented seemingly miraculous efforts but an end of betrayal, abandonment and crucifixion.

    I would have liked it if Trump pardoned Assange and Snowden. But about that:
    (1) It wouldn't have made a practical difference because the Deep State would just bring new charges against Assange and Snowden in about a day.
    (2) With the whole power structure conspiring to destroy him already such pardons would have jammed a giant stick in the hornets nest, there is no doubt, at the moment when Trump loses all his Presidential immunity.
    (3) Holding the knife up to Trump's throat was Mitch McConnell, the most powerful figure in Trump's own party, threating to continue destroying Trump even after Trump leaves office. After all Trump did, from placing thousands of judges and three justices to saving Mitch's own hide in the election? Are you kidding me?

    God Bless Donald Trump and God save us America, somehow.

    Replies: @Clyde

  21. This will make things worse. A UBI lifts the bottom up.

    UBI hastens cost of living increases because the money has to come from somewhere. Whomever has to pay for the money that UBI is generated from is not going to take the losses without a fight (unless it’s the middle class.) Rent will go up, food will go up, healthcare will go up. UBI is just a technocratic money shifting concept that is easily defeated by corporations who can tell their drones to raise prices.

    Likewise, welfare has taught us that you don’t give money to room temperature IQ people. If the black community has taught us anything, it’s that people of low IQ average have minimal fiscal responsibility or discipline. When they get free money, they have an overwhelming tendency to blow it within the first few days on frivolous shit and then whine about how they’re poor and society doesn’t help them. Natural selection has to take place in these circumstances. or else the bottom bloats with genetic rejects that wouldn’t survive without the generosity of others.

    You want to help the deserving poor? Lower taxes across the board, stop spending on federal money on wasteful, ill-managed shit like Soc-Sec, Medicare and wars for Israel, control cheap labor immigration and outsourcing and introduce price controls on systems that have been bloated by government interference, i.e., healthcare.

    That’s how you fix the problem.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Wyatt

    • Fuckin' A!: @ Achmed E. Newman

    , @RadicalCenter
    @Wyatt

    Definitely the super-rich elites who gouge us for housing and medical treatment / pharmaceuticals / devices must be prevented from simply raising prices even further to soak up our UBI payments for themselves.

    What is the best way to do this? Perhaps fund the UBI in part with a tax that is levied only on very high annual household incomes — with no credits or exemptions or loopholes, no preferential treatment of any kind of income, no exceptions or deductions for money “donated” to “foundations” and the like.

    Require that large corporate landlords offer their apartment units for sale to the tenants — only non-felon US Citizens — at some reasonable multiple of the median income in the locality, with zero-interest financing provided by a Public Bank. Now the landlords can’t just hike rents even further to get our UBI payments.

    (While we’re at it, have the Public Bank refinance all residential mortgage loans, SMALL-business debt, medical debt, student loans, vehicle loans, and credit-card debt at zero percent. Now the banks can’t just take our UBI payments through high interest rates,)

    Another way would be to create a system of publicly owned factories to manufacture the most widely used pharmaceuticals and medical devices and provide them to all US Citizens at cost. Now the medical profiteers can’t raise drug and device prices to soak up our UBI payments.

    Buy out the energy corporations and place our God-given natural resources under public ownership. Small stockholders get full market-value compensation, while huge wealthy stockholders do not. All profit from the sale of oil, natural gas, metals, minerals and spring water under the earth get paid in equal shares to all non-incarcerated adult US Citizens age 21 and over each year. In other words, a more generous national version of the State of Alaska’s resource dividend program.

    We cannot continue the way we have been going. We must cut out the big banks and big corporate exploiters of real estate and natural resources. Housing and medical/dental care especially must be made more affordable, and obscene profits from the owners and providers thereof very heavily taxed and paid back to the people. Create a system where price-gougers trying to get our UBI money without providing additional value or care have to give it all back.

  22. If an employer doesn’t need an employee at the office in person and is able to function just fine interacting with that employee remotely, why does the employee need to be living in America on an American middle class salary? If the work can be outsourced across town, why can’t it be outsourced across the globe?

    Or across the country. This could be very good for certain parts, not so good for others. We had a discussion on DSL about people enjoying the lockdown. I think it’s mostly just virtue-signalling:

    https://www.datasecretslox.com/index.php/topic,1679.msg67297.html#msg67297

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Alexander Turok

    Weren't you one of the hardcore pro-lockdown people?

    Replies: @Alexander Turok

  23. @Buzz Mohawk

    If the work can be outsourced across town, why can’t it be outsourced across the globe?
     
    It can be and it will be. The world is changing. There is a great reshuffling of the deck going on, and you can't change it.

    You can go on writing about it, though. If this is how you make your living, you'd better hope you can continue this gig as long as you need to -- if you are not old enough and established enough to retire early like me and just live it out.

    Best of luck to you.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    You wrote my comment. Only people with security clearances will continue to have a right to work as Americans. DC is completely insulated from economic competition by being connected to the profits from debt issuance, and by the requirement for security clearances for a lot of work which foreigners cannot obtain. The top 10 wealthiest counties in the USA are almost all the for that reason.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @TomSchmidt

    Excellent points. I would add: we should expect our rulers to increasingly deny security clearance to people due to their online commentary or real-world political activism and donations.

    They may also create something like a security clearance requirement for whole classes of government jobs that aren’t currently subject to such clearances.

  24. @The Alarmist
    @Chrisnonymous


    If I had the ability to do it (like the capital and knowledge), I think I would start a farm now.
     
    Borrow the money ... you’ll be paying it back with inflated currency. You can learn as you go. You don’t want to be a farmer, per se, rather to grow enough to feed your family and have stuff to barter for stuff you can’t produce. Big Ag, particularly people like Bill Gates buying up all the farmland, means you’ll never have a chance at success as a crop farmer. Not even with Belgian Endive (h/t Michael Dukakis).

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @TomSchmidt

    You’re confusing farmers with soil miners. Much of big ag is soil mining, taking an asset that pre-existed the “farm” and turning it into commodity crops using chemical fertilizers and herbicides. There are places in Iowa with hundreds of feet of beautiful black loess that can erode six inches of soil every year for centuries and still be fertile, but there aren’t a lot of them.

    Polyface farm seems to be real farming: using hard work and knowledge to increase fertility and overall food, and ultimately wealth.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @TomSchmidt

    I take your point.

    BTW, I thought small-time farming was about fixing machines and building and repairing things. ;)

  25. @Wyatt

    This will make things worse. A UBI lifts the bottom up.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=McAeQiLmEYU

    UBI hastens cost of living increases because the money has to come from somewhere. Whomever has to pay for the money that UBI is generated from is not going to take the losses without a fight (unless it's the middle class.) Rent will go up, food will go up, healthcare will go up. UBI is just a technocratic money shifting concept that is easily defeated by corporations who can tell their drones to raise prices.

    Likewise, welfare has taught us that you don't give money to room temperature IQ people. If the black community has taught us anything, it's that people of low IQ average have minimal fiscal responsibility or discipline. When they get free money, they have an overwhelming tendency to blow it within the first few days on frivolous shit and then whine about how they're poor and society doesn't help them. Natural selection has to take place in these circumstances. or else the bottom bloats with genetic rejects that wouldn't survive without the generosity of others.

    You want to help the deserving poor? Lower taxes across the board, stop spending on federal money on wasteful, ill-managed shit like Soc-Sec, Medicare and wars for Israel, control cheap labor immigration and outsourcing and introduce price controls on systems that have been bloated by government interference, i.e., healthcare.

    That's how you fix the problem.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @RadicalCenter

    • Fuckin’ A!: @ Achmed E. Newman

  26. @Catdog
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Right. These jokers act like the magnaminous globo homo state would have let us alone if not for 1/6. Even if they did leave us alone, what would that say about how threatening your alternative strategy is to them?

    It's sad and cucked to see our own side still whining about it. Do you see the left ever condemn their own side? That is, condemn them for going too far, rather than not far enough?

    And indeed, it was unplanned, which is another reason the complaints are so stupid. There was no leader making a tactical decision. People were mad, and from ground-level with sight lines blocked by the crowd nobody knew what was going on. The left is right that Trump was inciting, and the people reasonably thought they were doing what Trump wanted. He must have known that many people would be in a riotous mood. He could have had his own people there to organize and direct the crowd. But apperantly he didn't. Trump was the leader and he was MIA except to post a few tweets and then disappeared from the public eye for a week.

    Trump's supporters were great people and they showed their bravery and dedication. The only failure was from Trump and the rest of the cucked R's. If Trump supporters can be faulted for anything its only for thinking Trump is a better man than he's proven to be.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @DanHessinMD

    Trump’s supporters were great people and they showed their bravery and dedication. The only failure was from Trump and the rest of the cucked R’s. If Trump supporters can be faulted for anything its only for thinking Trump is a better man than he’s proven to be.

    This is what has me completely disgusted with DJT. He is going to suffer as contracts are canceled with his organization around NYC. A few dollars. He is, after all, a “billionaire.”

    The people who charged into the Capitol are going to be crucified. Some have already killed themselves. Trump might have issued a blanket pardon for everyone who was non-violent. Instead, in the end, he encouraged a large rally in DC which served no purpose that I can see, and destroyed the lives of many people who showed up.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @TomSchmidt


    Instead, in the end, he encouraged a large rally in DC which served no purpose that I can see

     

    It showed the public displeasure with the fake and gay elector count scheduled for that day, and also demonstrated that the great and powerful enemy turned out to be a paper tiger. We also got to see the empty streets of the Blue Zone as the most popular president ever slobbered his way through some sort of speech. Have some courage.

    https://spectator.us/topic/welcome-harris-presidency-biden-inauguration/

    Also:


    “And how we burned in the camps later, thinking: What would things have been like if every Security operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say good-bye to his family? Or if, during periods of mass arrests, as for example in Leningrad, when they arrested a quarter of the entire city, people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling with terror at every bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing left to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers, or whatever else was at hand?... The Organs would very quickly have suffered a shortage of officers and transport and, notwithstanding all of Stalin's thirst, the cursed machine would have ground to a halt! If...if...We didn't love freedom enough. And even more – we had no awareness of the real situation.... We purely and simply deserved everything that happened afterward.”

     

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    , @Freedom Awaits
    @TomSchmidt

    Trump did exactly what he was told and or allowed to do. Anyone who still believes that "national" elections are anything more than theatrics is either 1: willfully ignorant or
    2: just plain ignorant.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

  27. @Jim Christian

    In reality, many people are enjoying the lockdowns.
     
    Teachers loved being home and paid. They raised hell about having to go back to classes this year, too. Covid and all. As they rake in pay and bennies to sit home on their ever-fattening asses, at least there is a little less indoctrination going on.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @RadicalCenter

    There is only less indoctrination going on if at least one parent or grandparent can sit with all online-schooling children all the time and interject when the teacher tries to insert her own (or the State’s own) political, racial, and sexual views. This is not practical for many families.

    Also, we should not assume that government schools will “tolerate” parents “disrupting” instruction to cut off or counter propaganda. They will ultimately keep such children’s Zoom feeds muted, then send a warning letter to the “offending” parent, then take legal action against the parent.

    In any event, a very low percentage of parents have the trifecta of knowledge, time, and courage to interject in their children’s Zoom classes when they hear propaganda. This will be especially true of the tens of millions of parents who were not raised in the USA and do not have even the limited, inconsistent tradition of thinking independently and challenging rather than blindly “respecting” authority that we have (or had).

    Systematic indoctrination is still going on, and for almost all children and almost all classes probably just as much as before the plandemic.

    • Agree: Realist
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @RadicalCenter

    PS In fairness to Mr. Christian, the lockdown may have made some parents more amenable to taking their kids out of government schools. To the extent that the parents follow through and find a suitable school not beset by the same brainwashing, that could reduce the number of kids being indoctrinated contrary to the families’ views and values.

    First, the switch to all-online schooling for a period of months — or in the case of Los Angeles County an entire year soon — got them accustomed to this way of doing things. This is important, because online private schooling is usually far cheaper than in-person private schooling.

    Second, many parents found themselves at home (either working from home or unemployed) and able to listen in on their children’s classes to a degree that they could never do before. In some cases, the parents are overhearing some pretty misleading, inaccurate, or simply offensive material passed off to their impressionable, inexperienced, trusting children as “education.” That has dispelled naivete about “neutral” education in some parents and confirmed the existing suspicions of other parents.

    Third, parents already uncomfortable with school propaganda and bullying government have witnessed (and experienced) the police-state tactics used to enforce lockdown, and the increased promotion of mindless fear and group-think. That can further motivate parents to take their kids out of government school.

    We know one couple who removed their child from Los Angeles Unified (sic) School District elementary school before the start of the 2020-21 year. This is an encouraging development and they are not alone in recent months. But they are also not representative of the mass of parents. They are more intelligent and earn a much higher income than most other parents, they come from traditional and independent-thinking families, and they were already rightly inclined to distrust the LAUSD or any other government school before the lockdown.

    In short, we hope that more parents will withdraw their kids from government schools — or, failing that, do some research and make the sacrifice to move to an area where the indoctrination in gov schools is less severe, as we are planning to do. But the end result may be “merely” 80% of US kids remaining in government schools and learning only the Party Line, as opposed to 90% in 2019-20. A welcome improvement, to be sure, but not enough.

    , @Corvinus
    @RadicalCenter

    "when the teacher tries to insert her own (or the State’s own) political, racial, and sexual views. "

    LOL, that doesn't happen as often as you have been led to believe it does.

    "They will ultimately keep such children’s Zoom feeds muted, then send a warning letter to the “offending” parent, then take legal action against the parent."

    Citations, please.

  28. @TomSchmidt
    @The Alarmist

    You're confusing farmers with soil miners. Much of big ag is soil mining, taking an asset that pre-existed the "farm" and turning it into commodity crops using chemical fertilizers and herbicides. There are places in Iowa with hundreds of feet of beautiful black loess that can erode six inches of soil every year for centuries and still be fertile, but there aren't a lot of them.

    Polyface farm seems to be real farming: using hard work and knowledge to increase fertility and overall food, and ultimately wealth.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    I take your point.

    BTW, I thought small-time farming was about fixing machines and building and repairing things. 😉

  29. @YetAnotherAnon
    "a theatric display that antagonized the Establishment without doing a thing to challenge its hold on power"

    As Machiavelli put it - "men avenge slight injuries, not grave ones".

    Replies: @Athletic and Whitesplosive

    But a grave wound would have been an actual insurrection, although this would have been basically impossible since there was no elite support.

    Sometimes I don’t know what the hell people here want, I expect they don’t either.

    Without someone opposing them with a credible threat of force, exploitation and terrible governance will never stop, the threat of force is what they use to sustain it. This is self evident. If a better elite starts taking power even through insitutional capture, people will still get killed in the power struggle even if it’s relatively low-intensity, this is always true but especially true for regimes whose favored tactic is street theatre.

    So there are 2 options:

    1) Nothing “violent” happens and the regime with associated mass bombing of uppity foreigners, deaths of despair and the occasional execution of hapless theatrical rioters at home continues either forever or until it collapses under mismanagement. Collapse would be totally disastrous for everyone with many, many dead.

    2) A focused counter elite uses opportunistic tools complete with violence and the threat thereof to somehow defuse the powder keg that is the American empire. Every way this could happen will certainly involve violence (including AE’s favored outcome of regional parition), you’d be an idiot to think otherwise.

    But as we see, all violence under any circumstance is “WRONG, WRONG, WRONG, NOOOOOOOOO!!!!” As if violence were avoidable in principle. It isn’t, so you’d better start thinking of ways in which it can be lessened, rather than raging at it’s inevitability.

    • Agree: Catdog
    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @Athletic and Whitesplosive

    If there must be violence, don't be the one who draws first blood. Going to a blue stronghold and being violent is a really, really bad idea. Even with the cultural winds at their back, the left doesn't go into red places and do that. In the rare instances that they do, they get BTFO in a day as happened in Lancaster PA.

    Congress is working on passing a blatantly unconstitutional federal mandate for how states conduct elections, ie no voter ID. Red states should simply refuse to abide by that law if it passed. Dare the feds to try and militarily enforce it. They won't, and from that red states can become bolder in their defiance. There are going to be many similar opportunities in the coming years.

  30. @Chrisnonymous
    @The Alarmist

    I don't think a bank would give anyone a loan to purchase enough land to grow just their own food. That doesn't seem like a winner for the bank.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @RadicalCenter

    You’re probably right. But if it’s truly small-scale, get on the Kiva peer-to-peer lending website as a zero-interest borrower if possible. Definitely get on there and lend at zero interest to our fellow Americans.

    You will notice an extremely obvious bias in favor of Africans and non-whites generally on Kiva. But you can simply wait for a borrower that is to your liking and then lend to him or her only.

    Notice, as well, that Kiva provides us with borrowers from a number of Eastern European and central Asian countries but refuses to help us lend to people in Russia. I have contacted them about this and they respond in a weasely way, sometimes implying that Russia just is too corrupt and not stable enough — as opposed to the s—-holes they do let you lend to.

    Anyway, you can find European-American people on Kiva looking to borrow small amounts to start or expand very small organic gardening or farming enterprises.

  31. The fake “elite” are the Jews. No one else would be as Anti-White.
    Whites represent freedom and abolishing slavery.
    Globalism is neo-feudalism and Marxism is slavery.

    UBI isn’t on the tale, because they want you to be poor.
    The government wants you to be helpless and dependent.
    They do not want you to be independent.

    Stupid Joe Biden won’t be helping the poor.
    As a creature of the swamp, he’ll help the Rich get Richer.
    Mark my words. He’s business as usual.

    Hopefully, he’ll overextend the Zionist Empire and cause its collapse.

  32. @RadicalCenter
    @Jim Christian

    There is only less indoctrination going on if at least one parent or grandparent can sit with all online-schooling children all the time and interject when the teacher tries to insert her own (or the State’s own) political, racial, and sexual views. This is not practical for many families.

    Also, we should not assume that government schools will “tolerate” parents “disrupting” instruction to cut off or counter propaganda. They will ultimately keep such children’s Zoom feeds muted, then send a warning letter to the “offending” parent, then take legal action against the parent.

    In any event, a very low percentage of parents have the trifecta of knowledge, time, and courage to interject in their children’s Zoom classes when they hear propaganda. This will be especially true of the tens of millions of parents who were not raised in the USA and do not have even the limited, inconsistent tradition of thinking independently and challenging rather than blindly “respecting” authority that we have (or had).

    Systematic indoctrination is still going on, and for almost all children and almost all classes probably just as much as before the plandemic.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter, @Corvinus

    PS In fairness to Mr. Christian, the lockdown may have made some parents more amenable to taking their kids out of government schools. To the extent that the parents follow through and find a suitable school not beset by the same brainwashing, that could reduce the number of kids being indoctrinated contrary to the families’ views and values.

    First, the switch to all-online schooling for a period of months — or in the case of Los Angeles County an entire year soon — got them accustomed to this way of doing things. This is important, because online private schooling is usually far cheaper than in-person private schooling.

    Second, many parents found themselves at home (either working from home or unemployed) and able to listen in on their children’s classes to a degree that they could never do before. In some cases, the parents are overhearing some pretty misleading, inaccurate, or simply offensive material passed off to their impressionable, inexperienced, trusting children as “education.” That has dispelled naivete about “neutral” education in some parents and confirmed the existing suspicions of other parents.

    Third, parents already uncomfortable with school propaganda and bullying government have witnessed (and experienced) the police-state tactics used to enforce lockdown, and the increased promotion of mindless fear and group-think. That can further motivate parents to take their kids out of government school.

    We know one couple who removed their child from Los Angeles Unified (sic) School District elementary school before the start of the 2020-21 year. This is an encouraging development and they are not alone in recent months. But they are also not representative of the mass of parents. They are more intelligent and earn a much higher income than most other parents, they come from traditional and independent-thinking families, and they were already rightly inclined to distrust the LAUSD or any other government school before the lockdown.

    In short, we hope that more parents will withdraw their kids from government schools — or, failing that, do some research and make the sacrifice to move to an area where the indoctrination in gov schools is less severe, as we are planning to do. But the end result may be “merely” 80% of US kids remaining in government schools and learning only the Party Line, as opposed to 90% in 2019-20. A welcome improvement, to be sure, but not enough.

  33. @Dumbo
    Why shouldn't we be able to mention the Jews?

    We do not need to resort to "anti-semitism" (which is in any case a stupid concept - is there "anti-goyism", or "anti-whiteism"?), we don't need to hate Jews (I know I don't, I even like a few of them), but they need to be treated like any other group of people, responsible for good or bad things, and not sacrosanct.

    As for the Capitol rising, I think it was a trap. What were they planning to do, anyway? I think they were purposely led in by the police. The shooting of Babbit might or might not have been real (did we find who was the shooter yet?), but it was pretty stupid. Didn't the shooter see that there were armed cops behind?

    People enjoying the lockdowns? Well, I guess it depends on your personal situation. Those who can use the time to be more with their families, perhaps yes. Those who are single or old/retired or away from their families, not so much.

    UBI is not the problem, or not the main problem. The problem is the "stay home and do as told" part.

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account, @RadicalCenter

    Appreciate the comment. I would note, however, that most people, old or otherwise, who remain isolated from their families for months on end complying with governors’ “orders” have only themselves to blame. Grow up, calmly assess the medical evidence, defy these slavemasters, and live your lives.

    With rare exceptions, a person allowing his mother, father, or grandparent to live and then die alone to “obey lockdown” is being a coward and doing this loved ones a grave dis-service.

    Go visit your families and have them visit you, just as you normally would. Just about anyone who is not in a hospital or nursing home still has the ability to do this. (And if a nursing home refuses to allow visitation, get out of that place if at all possible.)

    My mother is approaching eighty years old and has refused to give up the joy of her remaining time on earth to obey these absurd edicts. She visits us and her grandchildren, as well as her many fellow non-hysterics, all the time, and we visit her. In fact, my wife and children have basically been living with Grandma since shortly after their school went all online.

    As for younger people living far from their parents and siblings, well, they can do something about that too, before, during, or after the plandemic. It may take a while to find a comparable job closer to family, but they can at least make it a priority. We have re-evaluated our own priorities in this respect, and a year from now we will all be living near each other full-time in a different State.

    • Agree: Daniel Williams
    • Thanks: Dumbo
    • Replies: @Saint Louis
    @RadicalCenter

    Absolutely. My parents live a half mile away and are in their late 70s. My wife is a SAHM so we generally don't need my parents for childcare reasons, but my mom comes over to our house probably 2-3 times a week to have tea with my wife and see the grandkids (my dad usually doesn't come, but only because he has a walker and isn't very mobile, not because of COVID). And my wife takes the kids over to their house at least once a week so my dad can see them, too. You really can just ignore big brother.

  34. @TomSchmidt
    @Catdog

    Trump’s supporters were great people and they showed their bravery and dedication. The only failure was from Trump and the rest of the cucked R’s. If Trump supporters can be faulted for anything its only for thinking Trump is a better man than he’s proven to be.

    This is what has me completely disgusted with DJT. He is going to suffer as contracts are canceled with his organization around NYC. A few dollars. He is, after all, a "billionaire."

    The people who charged into the Capitol are going to be crucified. Some have already killed themselves. Trump might have issued a blanket pardon for everyone who was non-violent. Instead, in the end, he encouraged a large rally in DC which served no purpose that I can see, and destroyed the lives of many people who showed up.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Freedom Awaits

    Instead, in the end, he encouraged a large rally in DC which served no purpose that I can see

    It showed the public displeasure with the fake and gay elector count scheduled for that day, and also demonstrated that the great and powerful enemy turned out to be a paper tiger. We also got to see the empty streets of the Blue Zone as the most popular president ever slobbered his way through some sort of speech. Have some courage.

    https://spectator.us/topic/welcome-harris-presidency-biden-inauguration/

    Also:

    “And how we burned in the camps later, thinking: What would things have been like if every Security operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say good-bye to his family? Or if, during periods of mass arrests, as for example in Leningrad, when they arrested a quarter of the entire city, people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling with terror at every bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing left to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers, or whatever else was at hand?… The Organs would very quickly have suffered a shortage of officers and transport and, notwithstanding all of Stalin’s thirst, the cursed machine would have ground to a halt! If…if…We didn’t love freedom enough. And even more – we had no awareness of the real situation…. We purely and simply deserved everything that happened afterward.”

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Pericles

    I've always loved Solzhenitsyn's take on Etienne de la Boetie and consent of the governed. Were any organs of the state made afraid to confront people on the 6th? I suspect BLM made every cop in the USA know he'd best not enforce any laws on blacks who don't want to comply. By contrast, the 6th will only encourage the people using terms like "domestic terrorism." They have their Reichstag Fire now, and they're gonna use it.

    I suspect they were going to use something in any case. But now it was handed to them, gift-wrapped.

    At some point, people in Republican-governed states with Democratic senators (and vice versa) might take more direct action to overturn the election results. Heck, Pelosi cannot suffer the loss of more than 4 Representatives without losing the majority. Of the 5 oldest members of the House, minimum age 83, 4 are Democrats.

    Replies: @Pericles

  35. What really matters is how the world remembers the election of 2020.

    The storming of the Capitol, with people literally scaling its walls, is an image for the history books. Following that are the photos of the heavily militarized inauguration.

    The stolen election produced no enduring memories, except for the graphs of the late night ballot stuffing. If Americans had done nothing and quietly accepted the results, the world would have carried on thinking Americans were ‘ok with it’. Trump boarding a helicopter for the last time, or smiling Biden would have been it.

    Like the picture of the lone protestor staring down a tank a Tiananmen Square, or Czech civilians surrounding Red Army tanks in Prague, the election of 2020 has produced an image for the ages.

    The world knows that Americans are not ok with their rulers, and the rulers are pissed.

  36. @TomSchmidt
    @Buzz Mohawk

    You wrote my comment. Only people with security clearances will continue to have a right to work as Americans. DC is completely insulated from economic competition by being connected to the profits from debt issuance, and by the requirement for security clearances for a lot of work which foreigners cannot obtain. The top 10 wealthiest counties in the USA are almost all the for that reason.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

    Excellent points. I would add: we should expect our rulers to increasingly deny security clearance to people due to their online commentary or real-world political activism and donations.

    They may also create something like a security clearance requirement for whole classes of government jobs that aren’t currently subject to such clearances.

  37. During the 1860’s, the U.S., Germany, and Italy fought wars of national unification in which the more “dynamic” part of the country subjugated the more traditional and rural parts. History now repeats, and the lockdowns are one component of the subjugation.

    • Agree: Kratoklastes
  38. My work has been reduced from 8+ hours 6 days a week to about 6 hours 3-4 days a week. I’m loving it for now, but of course, I know there is a price to pay in the future. Also, if my employer goes under, I’m screwed. But there are probably many people, especially in western Europe, who feel like they are simply living the European welfare state lifestyle on steroids. This is very dangerous for society as it’s unsustainable and is one of the main reasons the lockdowns need to end.

    I am in a similar situation with a lighter work schedule and I share his concerns. I do have one counterpoint, however. What if workers realize that- much like public schools- a significant amount of time at work is wasted on unnecessary procedural BS that doesn’t contribute to productivity? They could make a strong case for flexible work schedules, reduced hours, etc. Of course, most American corporations would probably respond with lay offs and work the remaining employees to death, but one can hope that some worker-focused reforms might come of this.

  39. This will make things worse. A UBI lifts the bottom up. An increased minimum wage cuts the bottom off. With a UBI and the ability to earn a $10/hour wage, those at the bottom of the economic ladder have prospects for climbing up and the means to survive until they do. With no UBI and the skills commensurate with a $10/hour wage, a $15/hour minimum wage leaves those at the bottom too far down to grab the bottom rung of the economic ladder and nothing to live on.

    It does not have to be one or the other, you know; you can combine elements of both. I have written about this several times before.

    My proposal would be, go ahead and raise the minimum wage but do not make the employer pay the difference. The employer can pay whatever he was paying before and the government can add a multiplier that raises the wage to $15.00/hr. This keeps some of the benefits of UBI but still ties it to productive activity (you have to have a job to get the multiplier).

    A similar multiplier ought to be added to money in savings accounts. This would incentivize people to save as much as possible, thus reducing debt loads and credit expansion. It would force interest rates up and force publicly traded companies to offer steep dividends in order to coax money out of savings and into investment.

    These two measures would jointly have the effect of monetizing debt and reducing credit expansion, while not reducing the purchasing power of ordinary people and drying up the sources of financialization. It directs the monetary whip hand away from Wall Street and the banks and towards workers and savers, which is what we need.

    • Replies: @SafeNow
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Suppose I am an employee who is ALREADY earning $15 per hour. I worked my way up there, as I gained experience. This is $5 per hour more than new hires, who get $10. But now, under your plan, a new employee is hired at $15. Will the government pay the employer to give me a raise to $20? And so on, up the ladder. How would your plan handle this?

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

  40. @Intelligent Dasein

    This will make things worse. A UBI lifts the bottom up. An increased minimum wage cuts the bottom off. With a UBI and the ability to earn a $10/hour wage, those at the bottom of the economic ladder have prospects for climbing up and the means to survive until they do. With no UBI and the skills commensurate with a $10/hour wage, a $15/hour minimum wage leaves those at the bottom too far down to grab the bottom rung of the economic ladder and nothing to live on.
     
    It does not have to be one or the other, you know; you can combine elements of both. I have written about this several times before.

    My proposal would be, go ahead and raise the minimum wage but do not make the employer pay the difference. The employer can pay whatever he was paying before and the government can add a multiplier that raises the wage to $15.00/hr. This keeps some of the benefits of UBI but still ties it to productive activity (you have to have a job to get the multiplier).

    A similar multiplier ought to be added to money in savings accounts. This would incentivize people to save as much as possible, thus reducing debt loads and credit expansion. It would force interest rates up and force publicly traded companies to offer steep dividends in order to coax money out of savings and into investment.

    These two measures would jointly have the effect of monetizing debt and reducing credit expansion, while not reducing the purchasing power of ordinary people and drying up the sources of financialization. It directs the monetary whip hand away from Wall Street and the banks and towards workers and savers, which is what we need.

    Replies: @SafeNow

    Suppose I am an employee who is ALREADY earning $15 per hour. I worked my way up there, as I gained experience. This is $5 per hour more than new hires, who get $10. But now, under your plan, a new employee is hired at $15. Will the government pay the employer to give me a raise to $20? And so on, up the ladder. How would your plan handle this?

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @SafeNow

    Everybody who works gets a multiplier. The more you make, the more the federal government tops you off. In the job market, this would also have the effect of incentivizing employers to raise wages as much as they possibly can, because employees would naturally gravitate to whoever is paying the most, in order to get the biggest multiplier. It would turbocharge competition and put a quick end to the zombie companies of the QE boom.

    Again, I've already said all this multiple times.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

  41. @SafeNow
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Suppose I am an employee who is ALREADY earning $15 per hour. I worked my way up there, as I gained experience. This is $5 per hour more than new hires, who get $10. But now, under your plan, a new employee is hired at $15. Will the government pay the employer to give me a raise to $20? And so on, up the ladder. How would your plan handle this?

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    Everybody who works gets a multiplier. The more you make, the more the federal government tops you off. In the job market, this would also have the effect of incentivizing employers to raise wages as much as they possibly can, because employees would naturally gravitate to whoever is paying the most, in order to get the biggest multiplier. It would turbocharge competition and put a quick end to the zombie companies of the QE boom.

    Again, I’ve already said all this multiple times.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @Intelligent Dasein

    That's just a pea and thimble trick.

    It has the same effect as adding a tax-credit overlay to the tax system - effectively, a progressive, negative taxation (hopefully you would envisage that your 'multiplier' phased down to zero for people with wage rates above some level).

    Why would any government want to do that? It's giving money to the schlubs, rather than to the desired beneficiaries of the State (i.e., court hangers-on).

    It would be the same thing as giving tax cuts to the middle quintile, plus a tax credit to the bottom 2 quintiles: that's the exact opposite of what generally happens, and that's a hint that what generally happens is what is intended by your political overlords.

    The benefits of tax cuts are usually effectively regressive - putting more post-tax income in the hands of people who already have 'supernumerary' post-tax income (i.e., a post-tax income that enables very high savings rates).

    Think of what it will do to some combination of the budget deficit and total bond issuance: not just as a one-off, but every year without fail... trillions more debt that everyone has to hope will be absorbed with no inflationary side-effects (i.e., no repudiation of investment merits of things denominated in USD).

    Who's going to pay for all the Death Machinery? Bond-buyers? What happens when all that liquidity can't be absorbed at zero real interest rates? (Leave aside that in reality, real interest rates are already solidly negative - because the CPI is more finagled than a Soviet industrial production report).

    What happens if the increase in the rate of growth of liquidity, causes a 500bp uptick at the long end of the yield curve?

    Western governments have painted themselves into a corner - a 500bps increase in long bond rates would crater pretty much every Western economy, solely because of its effect on property prices... because the mouth-breathers think that the appreciation in their house price is actually the same thing as an increase in wealth.

    That's because the political and bureaucratic classes are not some pack of far-sighted visionaries obsessed with 'public service': they are motivated by short-run personal returns.

    pace The Lord Pederast (Keynes) and his camp-followers, the long-run is not simply a series of short-runs sticky-taped together.

  42. Thanks for the great recap on the various highlight comments.

    Peace.

  43. @Too Long Didn't Read
    Clickbait. Again.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Audacious Epigone

    It’s good bait and nebulafox never disappoints.

    Although

    Enough with the moralism. Revival of public respect for institutions requires the institutions themselves to admit where they’ve failed and change first.

    That’s a weird way for writing “they need to be drenched in much blood or we will never get out of there”.

    A interesting psychological effect of the lockdown is that it slows you down to contemplate the kafkaesque daily hamster treading. Seeing an “advertisement” for whatever great new stuff the western capitalist systems has managed to extrude and you are supposed to buy just makes me barf now.

    It also gives you more time to read the news and admire the complete artificiality of what’s being presented.

  44. @Chrisnonymous
    @dfordoom

    Yes, this is more like what will happen. The ability to outsource globally will bring the same effect as immigration--driving down wages. In the future, you may be forced to simply accept lower compensation or be fired and replaced.

    If I had the ability to do it (like the capital and knowledge), I think I would start a farm now.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @neutral, @El Dato

    Outsourcing doesn’t really work even now.

    Never have in-house knowledge, get your IP stolen, get bad quality goods, get no permanent memory or living organization for the company.

    It’s basically setting oneself up to be the middleman. Who is dumb enough to do that except an MBA?

    Maybe Boeing management.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @El Dato


    Never have in-house knowledge, get your IP stolen, get bad quality goods, get no permanent memory or living organization for the company.
     
    All of those things are long-term negatives, but are simply not on the radar of the C-suite, whose compensation is tied to 10Qs.

    I've banged the table on this shit for two decades, and frankly now I just think


    "Fuck it. These cunts are not stupid: if they're setting their firms up to get ass-raped by any 17 year old who spends a fortnight on UDemy... so be it."
     
    *

    In a similar vein: in the leadup to the GFC, the entire finance sector knew that MBSs were a nightmare waiting to happen; they knew that the ratings were inflated (by depressing covariance across mortgage bundles, esp subprime); they knew it would end in tears.

    Bond managers literally had no choice but to include MBS (and other CDOs) in portfolios to the maximum allowed by mandates: the alternative was to consistently underperform... and get sacked.

    They knew the 'facts on the ground': you can't go back to investors month after month and say "Our portfolios have lower return and higher volatility at present, but we are aiming for full-cycle alpha", because mutual fund investors think that 'full-cycle' refers to the news cycle (i.e., 72 hours).

    Besides, all the semi-numerates (MBA-types; dickheads at big$ consulting firms) advising the C-suite, had memorised two paragraphs about the Turnpike Theorem in the leadup to exams. They told the C-suite that their bond managers should have CDO/MBS exposure because if they were any good they would get off the turnpike at the right point in time.

    *

    All that said: people who think that cross-border labour arbitrage drives down global wages, need to explain to me why cross-border capital arbitrage doesn't drive down return on capital.

    The reason that capital likes closed borders for labour, is that it creates labour pens that can be exploited. Labour in low-living-standard economies can be 'augmented' (through education and training, for example) at relatively low cost, and has a work ethic that Western labour has become too comfortable to exhibit. Asian 'grinders' are a good example.

    It takes more than a generation for 'augmented' labour to find its hind legs and demand that it be remunerated in accordance with its productivity - because it's in a pen; it knows its mobility is limited; it can't go to another pen where labour remuneration is in line with productivity.

    Preventing cross-border labour arb, while permitting cross-border capital arb... well, by working out whose benefit that enhances, it tells you who is driving policy.

    Remote working within a given jurisdiction - the original "geo-arb" - is the original use-case for enhanced labour mobility... and I've been for it since the 90s.

    For those with high levels of human capital, the reduction of commute times (often to zero) and the ability to live where e.g., housing is inexpensive, are part of the rewards to that higher inherent productivity.

    This is another thing I've been on about for the best part of 2 decades: people with high levels of human capital have nothing to fear from competition.

    As for the Deltas - the mooks, schlubs and mutts - frankly who gives a fuck. Let them eat COVID (what a fucking massive disappointment that has been... the DNA pool still needs a gigantic rinse).

    But back to geo-arb.

    Contrast it with the 'labour pen' version, even for high-human-K types -

    There has been a long-standing 'rite of passage' in big-firm lawyers in Australia - getting a position in a big London firm, which invariably included moving to the UK for a few years (London, with eye-watering rents, expensive food and transport, and low-quality fresh produce).

    The payoff happened when they arrived back in Oz, having accumulated experience in big deals that were useful to the local market.

    It would have been far better for everybody concerned - the London firm; the Aussie legal market; the aspiring young Associate - if the young Associate was able to live wherever they like, and accumulate the same experience.

    This worked for us: way back in 2004 The Lovely and I relocated to regional Australia because she had had a gutful of big-firm hours and getting sexually harassed by superiors (including a vulgar cunt called Marko Misko).

    She was offered the chance to work remotely rather than completely pulling the pin, and drafted the contract for $250m bond issue for ADI (a munitions factory), while sitting upstairs in my parents' country pub in her pyjamas.

    By 2006 we were living in the French countryside (after she got a secondment to Paris to try to get her back into the fold) and she was drafting major - Australian - BOOT/PPP contracts.

    Only dummies fear open competition - even though they would be beneficiaries, because they would face less competition for positions in the non-traded sector (because high-IQ labour would migrate to higher-return alternatives).

    Note I'm parcelling all sectors in which geo-arb is not possible into 'non-traded' - you can't 'geo arb' if you're a vehicle assembly-line worker, or a welder, or a plumber or electrician or carpenter or glazier... or any of a very large number of medium-skilled occupations that can yield a very good living.

    The cognitive élite (IQ > 130) faces the greatest competition from their foreign counterparts if cross-border arb is permitted, and is not against it: it's better than having to up sticks and move countries just to do stuff that requires a desk and an internet connection.

    "Skilled migrant" programs are a case in point on this - the Deltas only start getting pissy about it when the definition of "skilled" is ratcheted down.

    , @nebulafox
    @El Dato

    >It’s basically setting oneself up to be the middleman. Who is dumb enough to do that except an MBA?

    Good thing we don't live in an economy that MBAs created or something like that. ;) Or a culture dominated by HR.

    >That’s a weird way for writing “they need to be drenched in much blood or we will never get out of there”.

    I keep hearing endless whining from everything "mainstream" in the United States that people Just Don't Trust The Institutions. I'm offering them a simple way to fix that.

    But this solution would put at risk not just their whole world-view, but the foundations of the world they've created. So they won't.

    , @Daniel Chieh
    @El Dato


    Outsourcing doesn’t really work even now.
     
    Looking forward to hearing of your adventures at growing your own food and building your own cars.
  45. @Alexander Turok

    If an employer doesn’t need an employee at the office in person and is able to function just fine interacting with that employee remotely, why does the employee need to be living in America on an American middle class salary? If the work can be outsourced across town, why can’t it be outsourced across the globe?
     
    Or across the country. This could be very good for certain parts, not so good for others. We had a discussion on DSL about people enjoying the lockdown. I think it's mostly just virtue-signalling:

    https://www.datasecretslox.com/index.php/topic,1679.msg67297.html#msg67297

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Weren’t you one of the hardcore pro-lockdown people?

    • Replies: @Alexander Turok
    @Anonymous

    I've changed my mind somewhat and now regard the lockdowns we did as not being worth the cost compared to doing nothing at all. Hanson was right, I was wrong.(See https://www.overcomingbias.com/2020/03/do-you-feel-lucky-punk.html) None of the floomers were right and as far as policy goes I've favored a libertarian solution to end the lockdowns since the beginning:

    https://alexanderturok.wordpress.com/2020/05/01/corona-my-liberty-restoration-plan/

  46. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @Dumbo


    did we find who was the shooter yet?
     
    No official confirmation yet, but /pol/ types think it was one David Bailey, who was also the cop who was guarding Steve Scalise when he got shot.

    While we're on the subject of wild conspiracy shit, it's worth pointing out that some of the more far-out types think the whole thing was faked, and that therefore she's still alive. I don't know about that, but (a) she was allegedly part of a group that included gov't agitator John Sullivan, (b) she was ex-military, and (c) she was allegedly polygamous or some shit, which doesn't sound like your typical Trump supporter.

    Who knows?

    Replies: @El Dato

    > some of the more far-out types think the whole thing was faked

    Why would one fake a killing (for what purpose as it could go either way in respect to optics) when it would be easier to just actually kill the cut-out? People come up with the weirdest Hollywood bullshit scenarios (remember the Antifa guy from Kenosha who lost a muscle? Lack of blood and the first thing you hear is “fake! crisis actor”; not caring for the fact that the blood comes out later when the arteries start to relax)

    What really happened:

    Black Security got nervous and twitchy, probably got a bit upset at all those racist Trump Nazis banging at the door. Karen gets into the firing line of the Glock, so Karen gets it. There is nothing mysterious here.

    And maybe it cooled people down enough to avoid even further escalation. We will never know.

    It’s good that SWAT guy behind her didn’t have PTSD disorder. That AR-15 looked ready to fire.

    • Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @El Dato


    Why would one fake a killing (for what purpose as it could go either way in respect to optics) when it would be easier to just actually kill the cut-out?
     
    Well, I'm only exercising my imagination - by the way, optics-wise, we're talking about a scenario where they control the media, so that's no problem, as far as they're concerned - but I suppose it makes it difficult to recruit people for these hoaxes if you're actually killing them all. You'd need to be able to show some of these people that their predecessors in the job, whom they previously thought were dead or in jail, were secretly alive:

    "Okay gang, welcome to Crisis Actor orientation. Let's hear it for our guest speakers - Sharon Tate and Sirhan Sirhan!"

    What really happened...
     
    Yeah, maybe. There ought to be an investigation, of course. Personally, if this is the same guard at the Scalise shooting, then that's extremely fishy. I'm not good with the numbers, but there's 2,200 USCP per Wikipedia, so what with staff turnover, the idea that the same guy would've been at the heart of things for two separate DNC conspiracies (or crazy white terrorist actions, take your pick) is pretty unlikely.
  47. @Anonymous
    @Alexander Turok

    Weren't you one of the hardcore pro-lockdown people?

    Replies: @Alexander Turok

    I’ve changed my mind somewhat and now regard the lockdowns we did as not being worth the cost compared to doing nothing at all. Hanson was right, I was wrong.(See https://www.overcomingbias.com/2020/03/do-you-feel-lucky-punk.html) None of the floomers were right and as far as policy goes I’ve favored a libertarian solution to end the lockdowns since the beginning:

    https://alexanderturok.wordpress.com/2020/05/01/corona-my-liberty-restoration-plan/

    • Thanks: Chrisnonymous
  48. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jim Christian

    That is a partial [Agree], Jim, only because I don't see that last line about the indoctrination coming true. Our elementary school kid's only real book to read now is some deal about some little slave girl and her being freed. I tell him it's not that the book is a lie, but all the important history that's left out is where the lie is. I have to fight this stuff almost every day, Jim. Homeschooling is looking like a more likely option every day, and even this boy is on board, due to the real school days requiring face diaper wearing and 6ft distancing, EVEN DURING RECESS OUTSIDE. #Moronic!

    I guess it's a little better on-line. The boy can write his friend on the computer arranging time to meet at the park, he can hang with the cat, as the teacher can't see everything, and we can both make fun of the BS out of the teacher even during class (he's usually muted).

    Replies: @dfordoom

    Homeschooling is looking like a more likely option every day

    Which is why it’s an absolute certainty that steps will be taken to make homeschooling impossible.

    Stand by for stories about homeschooling encouraging extremism and domestic terrorism. And stories about homeschooling encouraging racism, homophobia, transphobia, etc.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  49. @brabantian
    @Chrisnonymous

    Correct ... Critiqueing elites but never mentioning Jews, does NOT save you from being accused of being 'anti-semitic' because you are STILL using 'anti-semitic dog-whistles and tropes'

    To criticise the 1% is 'anti-semitic dog-whistling' because so many of the 1% are Jews ... To criticise 'bankers' is using 'Third-Reich-style anti-semitic tropes' ... to mention George Soros negatively is 'encouraging an attack on all Jews merely because one is prominent' etc'
    https://i.ibb.co/P11Yr37/Hawley-vs-elites-anti-semitic.jpg

    Replies: @Jay Fink, @Paperback Writer

    The word cosmopolitan has a long history as a code word to describe Jews. Stalin famously described Jews as “rootless cosmpolitans”. I don’t take offense to that, it was accurate. Jews were rootless in the sense that they were travelers, moving to whatever few places would accept them, which was mostly parts of Eastern Europe at the time. Cosmopolitan because we thrive in big cities and have a city mentality.

    I ordered a tshirt online I found that says “Proud to be a rootless cosmopolitan”. Even if I strongly disagree with most other Jews politically, I can still relate to the rootless cosmopolitan label. I am rootless, I have no roots to the community I live in and I am cosmopolitan in the sense that I am not a rugged survivalist type. I couldn’t survive long without the conveniences of modern society.

    As for Josh Hawley. Not only am I not offended at what he said. He is one of the few politicians I have passionately positive opinions of.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Jay Fink


    Stalin famously described Jews as “rootless cosmpolitans”.
     
    But Stalin isn't our English professor. I think it's perfectly reasonable to describe rootless cosmopolitans as such, and they don't map straight on to Jewish.

    Boris Alexander de Pfeffel Johnson is a classic rootless cosmopolitan. By rights his surname should be Kemal, his paternal grandfather changed names from Osman Kemal to Wilfred Johnson. Born in the USA.

    https://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/1156775/Boris-Johnson-family-tree-children-dad-Stanley-Johnson-great-grandfather-new-prime-ministe

    A rootless cosmopolitan who is Jewish is David Miliband. His grandfather, born in Poland, moved to Holland after fighting with the Red Army against the Poles, his father Ralph came to England in WW2, and David, after attempting to become Labour leader and then leader of the UK, moved to the US, such was his love for Britain.
  50. @El Dato
    @Chrisnonymous

    Outsourcing doesn't really work even now.

    Never have in-house knowledge, get your IP stolen, get bad quality goods, get no permanent memory or living organization for the company.

    It's basically setting oneself up to be the middleman. Who is dumb enough to do that except an MBA?

    Maybe Boeing management.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @nebulafox, @Daniel Chieh

    Never have in-house knowledge, get your IP stolen, get bad quality goods, get no permanent memory or living organization for the company.

    All of those things are long-term negatives, but are simply not on the radar of the C-suite, whose compensation is tied to 10Qs.

    I’ve banged the table on this shit for two decades, and frankly now I just think

    “Fuck it. These cunts are not stupid: if they’re setting their firms up to get ass-raped by any 17 year old who spends a fortnight on UDemy… so be it.”

    *

    In a similar vein: in the leadup to the GFC, the entire finance sector knew that MBSs were a nightmare waiting to happen; they knew that the ratings were inflated (by depressing covariance across mortgage bundles, esp subprime); they knew it would end in tears.

    Bond managers literally had no choice but to include MBS (and other CDOs) in portfolios to the maximum allowed by mandates: the alternative was to consistently underperform… and get sacked.

    They knew the ‘facts on the ground’: you can’t go back to investors month after month and say “Our portfolios have lower return and higher volatility at present, but we are aiming for full-cycle alpha“, because mutual fund investors think that ‘full-cycle’ refers to the news cycle (i.e., 72 hours).

    Besides, all the semi-numerates (MBA-types; dickheads at big$ consulting firms) advising the C-suite, had memorised two paragraphs about the Turnpike Theorem in the leadup to exams. They told the C-suite that their bond managers should have CDO/MBS exposure because if they were any good they would get off the turnpike at the right point in time.

    *

    All that said: people who think that cross-border labour arbitrage drives down global wages, need to explain to me why cross-border capital arbitrage doesn’t drive down return on capital.

    The reason that capital likes closed borders for labour, is that it creates labour pens that can be exploited. Labour in low-living-standard economies can be ‘augmented’ (through education and training, for example) at relatively low cost, and has a work ethic that Western labour has become too comfortable to exhibit. Asian ‘grinders’ are a good example.

    It takes more than a generation for ‘augmented’ labour to find its hind legs and demand that it be remunerated in accordance with its productivity – because it’s in a pen; it knows its mobility is limited; it can’t go to another pen where labour remuneration is in line with productivity.

    Preventing cross-border labour arb, while permitting cross-border capital arb… well, by working out whose benefit that enhances, it tells you who is driving policy.

    Remote working within a given jurisdiction – the original “geo-arb” – is the original use-case for enhanced labour mobility… and I’ve been for it since the 90s.

    For those with high levels of human capital, the reduction of commute times (often to zero) and the ability to live where e.g., housing is inexpensive, are part of the rewards to that higher inherent productivity.

    This is another thing I’ve been on about for the best part of 2 decades: people with high levels of human capital have nothing to fear from competition.

    As for the Deltas – the mooks, schlubs and mutts – frankly who gives a fuck. Let them eat COVID (what a fucking massive disappointment that has been… the DNA pool still needs a gigantic rinse).

    But back to geo-arb.

    Contrast it with the ‘labour pen’ version, even for high-human-K types –

    There has been a long-standing ‘rite of passage’ in big-firm lawyers in Australia – getting a position in a big London firm, which invariably included moving to the UK for a few years (London, with eye-watering rents, expensive food and transport, and low-quality fresh produce).

    The payoff happened when they arrived back in Oz, having accumulated experience in big deals that were useful to the local market.

    It would have been far better for everybody concerned – the London firm; the Aussie legal market; the aspiring young Associate – if the young Associate was able to live wherever they like, and accumulate the same experience.

    This worked for us: way back in 2004 The Lovely and I relocated to regional Australia because she had had a gutful of big-firm hours and getting sexually harassed by superiors (including a vulgar cunt called Marko Misko).

    She was offered the chance to work remotely rather than completely pulling the pin, and drafted the contract for $250m bond issue for ADI (a munitions factory), while sitting upstairs in my parents’ country pub in her pyjamas.

    By 2006 we were living in the French countryside (after she got a secondment to Paris to try to get her back into the fold) and she was drafting major – Australian – BOOT/PPP contracts.

    Only dummies fear open competition – even though they would be beneficiaries, because they would face less competition for positions in the non-traded sector (because high-IQ labour would migrate to higher-return alternatives).

    Note I’m parcelling all sectors in which geo-arb is not possible into ‘non-traded’ – you can’t ‘geo arb’ if you’re a vehicle assembly-line worker, or a welder, or a plumber or electrician or carpenter or glazier… or any of a very large number of medium-skilled occupations that can yield a very good living.

    The cognitive élite (IQ > 130) faces the greatest competition from their foreign counterparts if cross-border arb is permitted, and is not against it: it’s better than having to up sticks and move countries just to do stuff that requires a desk and an internet connection.

    “Skilled migrant” programs are a case in point on this – the Deltas only start getting pissy about it when the definition of “skilled” is ratcheted down.

  51. @RadicalCenter
    @Dumbo

    Appreciate the comment. I would note, however, that most people, old or otherwise, who remain isolated from their families for months on end complying with governors’ “orders” have only themselves to blame. Grow up, calmly assess the medical evidence, defy these slavemasters, and live your lives.

    With rare exceptions, a person allowing his mother, father, or grandparent to live and then die alone to “obey lockdown” is being a coward and doing this loved ones a grave dis-service.

    Go visit your families and have them visit you, just as you normally would. Just about anyone who is not in a hospital or nursing home still has the ability to do this. (And if a nursing home refuses to allow visitation, get out of that place if at all possible.)

    My mother is approaching eighty years old and has refused to give up the joy of her remaining time on earth to obey these absurd edicts. She visits us and her grandchildren, as well as her many fellow non-hysterics, all the time, and we visit her. In fact, my wife and children have basically been living with Grandma since shortly after their school went all online.

    As for younger people living far from their parents and siblings, well, they can do something about that too, before, during, or after the plandemic. It may take a while to find a comparable job closer to family, but they can at least make it a priority. We have re-evaluated our own priorities in this respect, and a year from now we will all be living near each other full-time in a different State.

    Replies: @Saint Louis

    Absolutely. My parents live a half mile away and are in their late 70s. My wife is a SAHM so we generally don’t need my parents for childcare reasons, but my mom comes over to our house probably 2-3 times a week to have tea with my wife and see the grandkids (my dad usually doesn’t come, but only because he has a walker and isn’t very mobile, not because of COVID). And my wife takes the kids over to their house at least once a week so my dad can see them, too. You really can just ignore big brother.

  52. Why is everyone so down? The last two and a half weeks are the best and biggest opportunity in at least 150 years for constructing a narrative of federal government overreach. But all I see is the complete and total adoption of the mainstream narrative surrounding the events of 1/6 and its aftermath.

    Stop being such defeatists!

    The unstated subtext seems to be that the poor optics (which I don’t even think is true) of the protest and storming of the Capitol will allow a massive backlash against red blooded Americans, and you seem resigned to compliance.

    If America has died, it has as much to do with the willing embrace of decline from the right as it does with the victory of the left.

  53. @neutral

    Very few people outside the far right hate Jews but almost everybody hates the elites.
     
    Always the same nonsense, people want to be gutmenschen and avoid mentioning the jews at all costs. The reality is that it is not the elite/liberals/SJWs/Muslims/Illuminati/etc, it really is the jews, if you refuse you acknowledge the root cause of all the malaise then you will never make progress.

    This is the problem that the types that follow Alex Jones and Qanon have, they can correctly spot that the democracy is a sham and that they are run by an unaccountable elite, they however are too afraid to ever dare call out the jews (or blacks and other non white groups), which is why they have to resort to ever more crackpot ideas to explain the world.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD, @Audacious Epigone

    “The reality is that it is not the elite/liberals/SJWs/Muslims/Illuminati/etc, it really is the jews, if you refuse you acknowledge the root cause of all the malaise then you will never make progress.”

    Jack Dorsey, who kicked off the Trump social media bans is 0% Jewish.

    Jeff Bezos, whose Washington Post runs the left wing show in Washington, DC, is 0% Jewish.

    Bill Gates, the lockdown king, the essence of globalist thinking (his wife grieved on TV that American-bought vaccines might be used to help — horror of horrors — Americans — instead of say Africans) — is not Jewish.

    Canada’s prime minister Justin Trudeau, loved icon of the left, isn’t Jewish.

    You will obviously find plenty of Jewish influence if you look for it, but England is the most pozzed nation in the world and it has a small Jewish population that is mostly right wing.

    It is total idiocy to go on endlessly about the Jews, for two reasons:

    (1) It is strategically the dumbest strategy imaginable. You will alienate everyone with influence and guarantee failure.

    As dfordoom notes:
    “By mentioning Jews or attacking people simply for being Jewish you make defeat an absolute certainty.

    You simply have to decide if you want to win or lose. If you want to lose, focus on the Jews. If you want to win, try a smarter strategy.”

    Yes.

    (2) It isn’t even especially accurate. Religious Jews are usually right wing while non-religious Jews are mostly left wing. But non-religious people everywhere are mostly left wing.

    Training one’s ire on elites is better on both of these points.

    It is far, far better strategically as dfordoom explains. Also it is way more accurate. Leftism really is an elitism problem, most of all. Harvard, DC, Big Tech and the NY Times are all well above 90% leftist — perhaps in the range of 95%. Jewish people are perhaps 65% or 70% leftist which means there is a far healthier diversity of viewpoint among a cross section of Jewish people will have far greater diversity of opinion than a cross section of elites.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @DanHessinMD


    It is total idiocy to go on endlessly about the Jews, for two reasons:

    (1) It is strategically the dumbest strategy imaginable. You will alienate everyone with influence and guarantee failure.
     
    My theory, which I've expressed before, is that there are a lot of people on the far right who don't want to win. They just want to whine. They're more interested in trying to prove their conspiracy theories than in winning. They'd prefer to go on about Jewish conspiracies and then lose rather than adopt a smarter strategy and have a chance of winning.

    It's a kind of self-pity thing.

    Replies: @utu, @neutral

    , @neutral
    @DanHessinMD


    has a small Jewish population that is mostly right wing.
     
    First of all, "right wing" in Britain is in reality leftist, they support all things gay, Muslim, anti white, etc.

    As for mentioning good goyim such as Dorsey or Bezos, what of it? Do you seriously believe that any of them could defy the will of the likes the ADL or AIPAC? They can only operate under the strict woke confines that are designed by jews.

    And when I say jews are the problem, I mean all jews. The elite as you call them, are all ultimately spawned via the Orthodox types, this is why the talk of the secular jews vanishing via intermarriage is always a total lie.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD

  54. @El Dato
    @Chrisnonymous

    Outsourcing doesn't really work even now.

    Never have in-house knowledge, get your IP stolen, get bad quality goods, get no permanent memory or living organization for the company.

    It's basically setting oneself up to be the middleman. Who is dumb enough to do that except an MBA?

    Maybe Boeing management.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @nebulafox, @Daniel Chieh

    >It’s basically setting oneself up to be the middleman. Who is dumb enough to do that except an MBA?

    Good thing we don’t live in an economy that MBAs created or something like that. 😉 Or a culture dominated by HR.

    >That’s a weird way for writing “they need to be drenched in much blood or we will never get out of there”.

    I keep hearing endless whining from everything “mainstream” in the United States that people Just Don’t Trust The Institutions. I’m offering them a simple way to fix that.

    But this solution would put at risk not just their whole world-view, but the foundations of the world they’ve created. So they won’t.

  55. @Intelligent Dasein
    @SafeNow

    Everybody who works gets a multiplier. The more you make, the more the federal government tops you off. In the job market, this would also have the effect of incentivizing employers to raise wages as much as they possibly can, because employees would naturally gravitate to whoever is paying the most, in order to get the biggest multiplier. It would turbocharge competition and put a quick end to the zombie companies of the QE boom.

    Again, I've already said all this multiple times.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    That’s just a pea and thimble trick.

    It has the same effect as adding a tax-credit overlay to the tax system – effectively, a progressive, negative taxation (hopefully you would envisage that your ‘multiplier’ phased down to zero for people with wage rates above some level).

    Why would any government want to do that? It’s giving money to the schlubs, rather than to the desired beneficiaries of the State (i.e., court hangers-on).

    It would be the same thing as giving tax cuts to the middle quintile, plus a tax credit to the bottom 2 quintiles: that’s the exact opposite of what generally happens, and that’s a hint that what generally happens is what is intended by your political overlords.

    The benefits of tax cuts are usually effectively regressive – putting more post-tax income in the hands of people who already have ‘supernumerary’ post-tax income (i.e., a post-tax income that enables very high savings rates).

    Think of what it will do to some combination of the budget deficit and total bond issuance: not just as a one-off, but every year without fail… trillions more debt that everyone has to hope will be absorbed with no inflationary side-effects (i.e., no repudiation of investment merits of things denominated in USD).

    Who’s going to pay for all the Death Machinery? Bond-buyers? What happens when all that liquidity can’t be absorbed at zero real interest rates? (Leave aside that in reality, real interest rates are already solidly negative – because the CPI is more finagled than a Soviet industrial production report).

    What happens if the increase in the rate of growth of liquidity, causes a 500bp uptick at the long end of the yield curve?

    Western governments have painted themselves into a corner – a 500bps increase in long bond rates would crater pretty much every Western economy, solely because of its effect on property prices… because the mouth-breathers think that the appreciation in their house price is actually the same thing as an increase in wealth.

    That’s because the political and bureaucratic classes are not some pack of far-sighted visionaries obsessed with ‘public service’: they are motivated by short-run personal returns.

    pace The Lord Pederast (Keynes) and his camp-followers, the long-run is not simply a series of short-runs sticky-taped together.

  56. I’m going to assume ‘distance learning’ will be found a colossal failure. I suppose a few dedicated high IQ students with help from their parents may have stayed at grade level but for most they just lost a year of education. Psychologists have long known that children pay closer attention to a live person speaking to them than a video image.

    The interesting thing might be that many parents have discovered home schooling works if they take charge of their children’s education. We might find, when schools finally reopen, many parents will not be sending their children back to the public “Lord of The Flies’ feeding centers laughingly called ‘schools’ by the educrats. Leave them to the children of the underclass and refuse to fund the bond issues and tax hikes that the educrats use to pad payrolls and pensions for themselves and the teachers unions.

  57. I myself do want to work from home.

    Fuck going to work.

    Too bad Viet Nam’s lockdown ended pretty soon so I didn’t have that grand time working from home.

  58. @Catdog
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Right. These jokers act like the magnaminous globo homo state would have let us alone if not for 1/6. Even if they did leave us alone, what would that say about how threatening your alternative strategy is to them?

    It's sad and cucked to see our own side still whining about it. Do you see the left ever condemn their own side? That is, condemn them for going too far, rather than not far enough?

    And indeed, it was unplanned, which is another reason the complaints are so stupid. There was no leader making a tactical decision. People were mad, and from ground-level with sight lines blocked by the crowd nobody knew what was going on. The left is right that Trump was inciting, and the people reasonably thought they were doing what Trump wanted. He must have known that many people would be in a riotous mood. He could have had his own people there to organize and direct the crowd. But apperantly he didn't. Trump was the leader and he was MIA except to post a few tweets and then disappeared from the public eye for a week.

    Trump's supporters were great people and they showed their bravery and dedication. The only failure was from Trump and the rest of the cucked R's. If Trump supporters can be faulted for anything its only for thinking Trump is a better man than he's proven to be.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @DanHessinMD

    Trump made more effort than anyone. Those who think someone else will come along and fight for Americans harder than he did are deluded.

    Right wingers hating on Trump are out of their minds. Most would not last a day in his shoes. He had to fight his battles mostly alone.

    No other conservative in living memory fought 1/10 as hard, against worse odds. Every day Trump was in office was a war of him against the world. And he was genuinely successful. The economy soared in ways that were deemed impossible. Unemployment was at record lows. There was peace in the world. The border was more secure than it had been in decades.

    Every part of the better, populist Republican platform was his doing, from fighting illegal immigration to bringing manufacturing back to America to supporting police to recognizing that China, not Russia, is our rival, to staying out of wars and using economic measures instead. And hardly anyone helped. Which other powers on the right drove America First policy?

    Then COVID came and the powers that be shut down the world and locked everyone in their homes. Many of us including myself and our blog host were certain of rapid economic collapse. Mother of God, was their ever a more crazy and bizarre policy than to lock down the whole population for a year?

    And still Trump persisted, with triumphant optimism, always looking for a way. The market would crash and Trump would then talk the market back up, again and again. Mega rally after mega rally, he fought against the stiff gale of the pandemic, falling from COVID and then getting to his feet from his hospital bed and rushing forward again. The number and size and spread of Trump’s rallies during his final two weeks was way beyond anything history has seen and that schedule of rallies will never be matched in the future. One huge event per day would be an impossible schedule for any other world leader or pop star. Trump often had four and five rallies per day, spanning multiple states.

    He garnered a record number of votes but everyone was able to vote from home and voting was easier than ever with turnout of the tens of millions of the lowest information new voters. Every death from a disease was blamed on Trump and schools and churches were cancelled indefinitely and all the cities and Democrat wrecked their economies in defiance of Trump’s wish not to lock down. The discovery of a cure through Trump’s Operation Warp Speed was kept secret until the day after the election. In the debates, the moderator Chris Wallace attacked Trump brutally in defiance of every norm. In the final weeks of the campaign, news of Biden’s crimes was literally censored by big tech.

    Trump was impeached for abuse of power at the beginning of the pandemic simply for calling for Biden’s crimes to be investigated. Needless to say they never were. Then Trump, freshly impeached for abusing his power when he had exercised very little power, was blamed for not shutting down the entire country. Oh and the majority of the population of America completely lost their minds in a panic and embraced permanent house arrest for everyone.

    Almost Trump’s entire Presidency was wrapped in the manufactured scandal that was Russiagate as both parties tried their best to cripple him. The media discarded all objectivity to make every story an attack on Trump. Tech tycoons, whose wealth grew by hundreds of billions because of Trump, committed their wealth to the political ground game in urban population centers in swing states to defeat him.

    Meanwhile a solid third of the right wing, including Vox Day and frequently Alex Jones, were completely lost in a Q-Anon fantasy land where conservatives don’t have to do anything because everything was going according to plan. Others on the right engaged idiotic Nazi playacting that forced Trump to push mightily in the other direction, so politically destructive is the stench of those fools.

    Eventually all this felled Trump and the election didn’t go his way. And yet he continued fighting on, against all hope, to keep the dream alive because he didn’t want to let his supporters down.

    In the end, they defeating him by cutting off all channels of communication, cutting off Trump from his one hundred million followers on Twitter, cutting him off from Facebook and the rest, and branding the greatest American patriot of our lifetimes as a terrorist ringleader for an riot at Capitol Hill by unarmed protesters that didn’t leave a scratch on any member of Congress. Amid all this, he couldn’t defend himself because his voice was taken away. He tried to use the Official White House channels and those too were censored. Even his calls for peace were cut off by the Big Tech overlords.

    And all the while as their undisputed leader was destroyed, the Republican establishment stood aside or actively participated in the blows.

    In the end, Trump is Christlike tragic hero: unprecedented seemingly miraculous efforts but an end of betrayal, abandonment and crucifixion.

    I would have liked it if Trump pardoned Assange and Snowden. But about that:
    (1) It wouldn’t have made a practical difference because the Deep State would just bring new charges against Assange and Snowden in about a day.
    (2) With the whole power structure conspiring to destroy him already such pardons would have jammed a giant stick in the hornets nest, there is no doubt, at the moment when Trump loses all his Presidential immunity.
    (3) Holding the knife up to Trump’s throat was Mitch McConnell, the most powerful figure in Trump’s own party, threating to continue destroying Trump even after Trump leaves office. After all Trump did, from placing thousands of judges and three justices to saving Mitch’s own hide in the election? Are you kidding me?

    God Bless Donald Trump and God save us America, somehow.

    • Agree: iffen, YetAnotherAnon
    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @Clyde
    @DanHessinMD

    You gave a great history of President Trump. He worked mostly alone and did his own PR via twitter. I will say that Mike Pompeo, Steven Mnuchin and Peter Navarro were effective and loyal to the end. He was offered up as a human sacrifice by Deep State as a warning to all others. Not to try what Trump did. It was dismaying hearing all the parrots on the left screaming insurrection. They had to look up the word to know for sure what it meant.

    Republicans too screeching about an insurrection. Then the Trump era ended. Now we go back to normal, meaning selling out to China and allowing in tens of millions of third worlders.

  59. @Pericles
    @TomSchmidt


    Instead, in the end, he encouraged a large rally in DC which served no purpose that I can see

     

    It showed the public displeasure with the fake and gay elector count scheduled for that day, and also demonstrated that the great and powerful enemy turned out to be a paper tiger. We also got to see the empty streets of the Blue Zone as the most popular president ever slobbered his way through some sort of speech. Have some courage.

    https://spectator.us/topic/welcome-harris-presidency-biden-inauguration/

    Also:


    “And how we burned in the camps later, thinking: What would things have been like if every Security operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say good-bye to his family? Or if, during periods of mass arrests, as for example in Leningrad, when they arrested a quarter of the entire city, people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling with terror at every bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing left to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers, or whatever else was at hand?... The Organs would very quickly have suffered a shortage of officers and transport and, notwithstanding all of Stalin's thirst, the cursed machine would have ground to a halt! If...if...We didn't love freedom enough. And even more – we had no awareness of the real situation.... We purely and simply deserved everything that happened afterward.”

     

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    I’ve always loved Solzhenitsyn’s take on Etienne de la Boetie and consent of the governed. Were any organs of the state made afraid to confront people on the 6th? I suspect BLM made every cop in the USA know he’d best not enforce any laws on blacks who don’t want to comply. By contrast, the 6th will only encourage the people using terms like “domestic terrorism.” They have their Reichstag Fire now, and they’re gonna use it.

    I suspect they were going to use something in any case. But now it was handed to them, gift-wrapped.

    At some point, people in Republican-governed states with Democratic senators (and vice versa) might take more direct action to overturn the election results. Heck, Pelosi cannot suffer the loss of more than 4 Representatives without losing the majority. Of the 5 oldest members of the House, minimum age 83, 4 are Democrats.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @TomSchmidt

    Note that BLM and antifa are only untouchable because the police chiefs and political bosses and tech oligarchs say so, not because they're such powerful and righteous warriors. It's a bit of political theatre, so kneel or dance the macarena, brave blue line. And how many Reichstags fires have there been already? I've lost count. (9/11 was the big one, wasn't it?)

    However, there are still about 75 million voters, perhaps more, who think the election was stolen and, funnily enough, Trump was more popular on his exit than Most Popular President Ever Joe Biden on his entrance. All their evil tricks just delegitimize the system.

  60. @Chrisnonymous

    focus on attacking people for being bankers, billionaires, Hollywood moguls, tech monopolists, elite academics, politicians, media tycoons and journalists.
     
    LOL. dfordoom has spent too much time in this free speech venue where people actively criticize minorities if they want. He has forgotten that in mainstream culture, when a right-winger criticizes bankers, professors, etc, the response is usually to accuse them of covert anti-Simitism!

    Replies: @brabantian, @Rosie, @Audacious Epigone

    LOL. dfordoom has spent too much time in this free speech venue where people actively criticize minorities if they want. He has forgotten that in mainstream culture, when a right-winger criticizes bankers, professors, etc, the response is usually to accuse them of covert anti-Simitism!

    Indeed. Another frequent response: Those are all White people! (Not that that would help even if true.)

  61. You simply have to decide if you want to win or lose. If you want to lose, focus on the Jews. If you want to win, try a smarter strategy.”

    Hmmm. I don’t recall you objecting to rampant misogyny around here on optics grounds.

    But nevermind that. Jared Taylor has been pretending not to notice Jewish influence for like 25 years. He has precious little winning to show for it.

  62. But there are probably many people, especially in western Europe, who feel like they are simply living the European welfare state lifestyle on steroids. This is very dangerous for society as it’s unsustainable and is one of the main reasons the lockdowns need to end.

    The destruction of the labor market and UBI go hand in hand. The true purpose of UBI is to indefinitely sedate a large segment of the labor market who are pushed out of jobs because of the lockdowns and elite-initiated technological changes. Lots of bloggers (especially libertarian ones) have seen the connection.

  63. @brabantian
    @Chrisnonymous

    Correct ... Critiqueing elites but never mentioning Jews, does NOT save you from being accused of being 'anti-semitic' because you are STILL using 'anti-semitic dog-whistles and tropes'

    To criticise the 1% is 'anti-semitic dog-whistling' because so many of the 1% are Jews ... To criticise 'bankers' is using 'Third-Reich-style anti-semitic tropes' ... to mention George Soros negatively is 'encouraging an attack on all Jews merely because one is prominent' etc'
    https://i.ibb.co/P11Yr37/Hawley-vs-elites-anti-semitic.jpg

    Replies: @Jay Fink, @Paperback Writer

    Brush it off and double down.

    I do think that cosmopolitan is kind of a stupid word, though. When it’s the name of your daughter’s favorite magazine, it’s hard to smear people with it.

    I’m also against using the word or phrase “the elites” as an insult. Wasn’t Chuck Yeager an elite pilot?

    Let’s be a bit more creative about wording, but I’d start with this:

    Democrats.

  64. Has anyone here read Gulliver’s Travels? Remember the Lilliputians?

    If the Republicans were listening to me, we’d focus 100% on the House, then state legislatures. Governorships. Mayoral candidates of big cities. Don’t laugh. Republicans have won in NYC (LaGuardia, Giuliani, Bloomberg.) Doesn’t have to be conservative Christians. Just the label Republican. RINO is good enough for NYC. NYC would be symbolic. The House & State leg. are substance.

    Forget the Senate, forget the Presidency.

    Does anyone here get my point?

    Call it the Gulliver Plan.

  65. @DanHessinMD
    @neutral

    "The reality is that it is not the elite/liberals/SJWs/Muslims/Illuminati/etc, it really is the jews, if you refuse you acknowledge the root cause of all the malaise then you will never make progress."

    Jack Dorsey, who kicked off the Trump social media bans is 0% Jewish.

    Jeff Bezos, whose Washington Post runs the left wing show in Washington, DC, is 0% Jewish.

    Bill Gates, the lockdown king, the essence of globalist thinking (his wife grieved on TV that American-bought vaccines might be used to help -- horror of horrors -- Americans -- instead of say Africans) -- is not Jewish.

    Canada's prime minister Justin Trudeau, loved icon of the left, isn't Jewish.

    You will obviously find plenty of Jewish influence if you look for it, but England is the most pozzed nation in the world and it has a small Jewish population that is mostly right wing.

    It is total idiocy to go on endlessly about the Jews, for two reasons:

    (1) It is strategically the dumbest strategy imaginable. You will alienate everyone with influence and guarantee failure.

    As dfordoom notes:
    "By mentioning Jews or attacking people simply for being Jewish you make defeat an absolute certainty.

    You simply have to decide if you want to win or lose. If you want to lose, focus on the Jews. If you want to win, try a smarter strategy."

    Yes.

    (2) It isn't even especially accurate. Religious Jews are usually right wing while non-religious Jews are mostly left wing. But non-religious people everywhere are mostly left wing.

    Training one's ire on elites is better on both of these points.

    It is far, far better strategically as dfordoom explains. Also it is way more accurate. Leftism really is an elitism problem, most of all. Harvard, DC, Big Tech and the NY Times are all well above 90% leftist -- perhaps in the range of 95%. Jewish people are perhaps 65% or 70% leftist which means there is a far healthier diversity of viewpoint among a cross section of Jewish people will have far greater diversity of opinion than a cross section of elites.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @neutral

    It is total idiocy to go on endlessly about the Jews, for two reasons:

    (1) It is strategically the dumbest strategy imaginable. You will alienate everyone with influence and guarantee failure.

    My theory, which I’ve expressed before, is that there are a lot of people on the far right who don’t want to win. They just want to whine. They’re more interested in trying to prove their conspiracy theories than in winning. They’d prefer to go on about Jewish conspiracies and then lose rather than adopt a smarter strategy and have a chance of winning.

    It’s a kind of self-pity thing.

    • Replies: @utu
    @dfordoom

    "They just want to whine. They’re more interested in trying to prove their conspiracy theories than in winning." - Like this: "Which is why it’s an absolute certainty that steps will be taken to make homeschooling impossible."

    , @neutral
    @dfordoom

    More nonsense, it is absolutely not a conspiracy theory in pointing out who runs society. I am fully aware that jews would like to equate people believing the Queen is a lizard to saying that jews run Hollywood.

    If you believe that jews are not dominant in things like online censorship (ADL), running the mass media outlets (look at the senior staff of Disney/Warner/etc), owning politicians (look at the biggest sponsors of US parties), running foreign policy (are you seriously going to argue that Israel is not what dominates US foreign policy) - then you are retarded. The evidence is absolutely overwhelming that it is jews.

  66. Comic books taught me to embrace radioactivity; it can only bring about latent super powers that I possess.

    Video games also taught me lessons. I share with you, the prescient political wisdom (so relevant to our times) that was earned by plunking at least $10 worth of quarters into “Ninja Warriors”:

    Peace.

  67. Despite the bleating from this blogger and other conservatives, in the US the minimum wage has been used primarily to suppress wages. Because of this unofficial policy, you rarely hear libertarians whining about it these days (except when people want to raise it, of course).

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @Nodwink

    Please explain.

  68. @dfordoom
    @DanHessinMD


    It is total idiocy to go on endlessly about the Jews, for two reasons:

    (1) It is strategically the dumbest strategy imaginable. You will alienate everyone with influence and guarantee failure.
     
    My theory, which I've expressed before, is that there are a lot of people on the far right who don't want to win. They just want to whine. They're more interested in trying to prove their conspiracy theories than in winning. They'd prefer to go on about Jewish conspiracies and then lose rather than adopt a smarter strategy and have a chance of winning.

    It's a kind of self-pity thing.

    Replies: @utu, @neutral

    “They just want to whine. They’re more interested in trying to prove their conspiracy theories than in winning.” – Like this: “Which is why it’s an absolute certainty that steps will be taken to make homeschooling impossible.”

  69. @DanHessinMD
    @neutral

    "The reality is that it is not the elite/liberals/SJWs/Muslims/Illuminati/etc, it really is the jews, if you refuse you acknowledge the root cause of all the malaise then you will never make progress."

    Jack Dorsey, who kicked off the Trump social media bans is 0% Jewish.

    Jeff Bezos, whose Washington Post runs the left wing show in Washington, DC, is 0% Jewish.

    Bill Gates, the lockdown king, the essence of globalist thinking (his wife grieved on TV that American-bought vaccines might be used to help -- horror of horrors -- Americans -- instead of say Africans) -- is not Jewish.

    Canada's prime minister Justin Trudeau, loved icon of the left, isn't Jewish.

    You will obviously find plenty of Jewish influence if you look for it, but England is the most pozzed nation in the world and it has a small Jewish population that is mostly right wing.

    It is total idiocy to go on endlessly about the Jews, for two reasons:

    (1) It is strategically the dumbest strategy imaginable. You will alienate everyone with influence and guarantee failure.

    As dfordoom notes:
    "By mentioning Jews or attacking people simply for being Jewish you make defeat an absolute certainty.

    You simply have to decide if you want to win or lose. If you want to lose, focus on the Jews. If you want to win, try a smarter strategy."

    Yes.

    (2) It isn't even especially accurate. Religious Jews are usually right wing while non-religious Jews are mostly left wing. But non-religious people everywhere are mostly left wing.

    Training one's ire on elites is better on both of these points.

    It is far, far better strategically as dfordoom explains. Also it is way more accurate. Leftism really is an elitism problem, most of all. Harvard, DC, Big Tech and the NY Times are all well above 90% leftist -- perhaps in the range of 95%. Jewish people are perhaps 65% or 70% leftist which means there is a far healthier diversity of viewpoint among a cross section of Jewish people will have far greater diversity of opinion than a cross section of elites.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @neutral

    has a small Jewish population that is mostly right wing.

    First of all, “right wing” in Britain is in reality leftist, they support all things gay, Muslim, anti white, etc.

    As for mentioning good goyim such as Dorsey or Bezos, what of it? Do you seriously believe that any of them could defy the will of the likes the ADL or AIPAC? They can only operate under the strict woke confines that are designed by jews.

    And when I say jews are the problem, I mean all jews. The elite as you call them, are all ultimately spawned via the Orthodox types, this is why the talk of the secular jews vanishing via intermarriage is always a total lie.

    • Disagree: Audacious Epigone
    • LOL: 36 ulster
    • Replies: @DanHessinMD
    @neutral

    neutral -- Just had a glance at your comment history. You are probably why all links on Unz.com are banned on Facebook.

    You seem to go from article to article just taking a dump in one pool after another.

    I am big on free speech and people like you are a big part of why free speech keeps losing.

    Replies: @neutral

  70. @dfordoom
    @DanHessinMD


    It is total idiocy to go on endlessly about the Jews, for two reasons:

    (1) It is strategically the dumbest strategy imaginable. You will alienate everyone with influence and guarantee failure.
     
    My theory, which I've expressed before, is that there are a lot of people on the far right who don't want to win. They just want to whine. They're more interested in trying to prove their conspiracy theories than in winning. They'd prefer to go on about Jewish conspiracies and then lose rather than adopt a smarter strategy and have a chance of winning.

    It's a kind of self-pity thing.

    Replies: @utu, @neutral

    More nonsense, it is absolutely not a conspiracy theory in pointing out who runs society. I am fully aware that jews would like to equate people believing the Queen is a lizard to saying that jews run Hollywood.

    If you believe that jews are not dominant in things like online censorship (ADL), running the mass media outlets (look at the senior staff of Disney/Warner/etc), owning politicians (look at the biggest sponsors of US parties), running foreign policy (are you seriously going to argue that Israel is not what dominates US foreign policy) – then you are retarded. The evidence is absolutely overwhelming that it is jews.

    • LOL: 36 ulster
  71. @El Dato
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    > some of the more far-out types think the whole thing was faked

    Why would one fake a killing (for what purpose as it could go either way in respect to optics) when it would be easier to just actually kill the cut-out? People come up with the weirdest Hollywood bullshit scenarios (remember the Antifa guy from Kenosha who lost a muscle? Lack of blood and the first thing you hear is "fake! crisis actor"; not caring for the fact that the blood comes out later when the arteries start to relax)

    What really happened:

    Black Security got nervous and twitchy, probably got a bit upset at all those racist Trump Nazis banging at the door. Karen gets into the firing line of the Glock, so Karen gets it. There is nothing mysterious here.

    And maybe it cooled people down enough to avoid even further escalation. We will never know.

    It's good that SWAT guy behind her didn't have PTSD disorder. That AR-15 looked ready to fire.

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Why would one fake a killing (for what purpose as it could go either way in respect to optics) when it would be easier to just actually kill the cut-out?

    Well, I’m only exercising my imagination – by the way, optics-wise, we’re talking about a scenario where they control the media, so that’s no problem, as far as they’re concerned – but I suppose it makes it difficult to recruit people for these hoaxes if you’re actually killing them all. You’d need to be able to show some of these people that their predecessors in the job, whom they previously thought were dead or in jail, were secretly alive:

    “Okay gang, welcome to Crisis Actor orientation. Let’s hear it for our guest speakers – Sharon Tate and Sirhan Sirhan!”

    What really happened…

    Yeah, maybe. There ought to be an investigation, of course. Personally, if this is the same guard at the Scalise shooting, then that’s extremely fishy. I’m not good with the numbers, but there’s 2,200 USCP per Wikipedia, so what with staff turnover, the idea that the same guy would’ve been at the heart of things for two separate DNC conspiracies (or crazy white terrorist actions, take your pick) is pretty unlikely.

  72. If you want to win, you have to choose up sides in such a way that you have the best chance of winning.

    In the fight for political power in the US, guaranteed losing side members are misogynists, libertarians, white nationalists of any flavor, conspiracy theory aficionados of any type, monarchists, anti-Semites of any flavor, “small government” fanatics, and lastly, “little platoons will conquer all” types.

    • Replies: @Mark G.
    @iffen


    If you want to win, you have to choose up sides in such a way that you have the best chance of winning.
     
    You want to decide what is the morally right side and then find other people who want to join in a coalition with you on that side. What do you do, though, if there are not enough people on the right side to win at this point? I think it's better to be on the right side and go down fighting than join the side you know is wrong. I'm a libertarian who believes in freedom and individual rights and even if I thought it was "the guaranteed losing side" I would still be on that side. I don't actually think it is going to be the losing side in the long run because totalitarian collectivism is unworkable whether it takes the Nazi Germany form or the Soviet Union form. As the U.S. moves in that direction, the same failure will eventually take place here and I don't think it is a long ways off.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @DanHessinMD

  73. @Jay Fink
    @brabantian

    The word cosmopolitan has a long history as a code word to describe Jews. Stalin famously described Jews as "rootless cosmpolitans". I don't take offense to that, it was accurate. Jews were rootless in the sense that they were travelers, moving to whatever few places would accept them, which was mostly parts of Eastern Europe at the time. Cosmopolitan because we thrive in big cities and have a city mentality.

    I ordered a tshirt online I found that says "Proud to be a rootless cosmopolitan". Even if I strongly disagree with most other Jews politically, I can still relate to the rootless cosmopolitan label. I am rootless, I have no roots to the community I live in and I am cosmopolitan in the sense that I am not a rugged survivalist type. I couldn't survive long without the conveniences of modern society.

    As for Josh Hawley. Not only am I not offended at what he said. He is one of the few politicians I have passionately positive opinions of.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    Stalin famously described Jews as “rootless cosmpolitans”.

    But Stalin isn’t our English professor. I think it’s perfectly reasonable to describe rootless cosmopolitans as such, and they don’t map straight on to Jewish.

    Boris Alexander de Pfeffel Johnson is a classic rootless cosmopolitan. By rights his surname should be Kemal, his paternal grandfather changed names from Osman Kemal to Wilfred Johnson. Born in the USA.

    https://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/1156775/Boris-Johnson-family-tree-children-dad-Stanley-Johnson-great-grandfather-new-prime-ministe

    A rootless cosmopolitan who is Jewish is David Miliband. His grandfather, born in Poland, moved to Holland after fighting with the Red Army against the Poles, his father Ralph came to England in WW2, and David, after attempting to become Labour leader and then leader of the UK, moved to the US, such was his love for Britain.

    • Thanks: Mr. Rational
  74. @Wyatt

    This will make things worse. A UBI lifts the bottom up.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=McAeQiLmEYU

    UBI hastens cost of living increases because the money has to come from somewhere. Whomever has to pay for the money that UBI is generated from is not going to take the losses without a fight (unless it's the middle class.) Rent will go up, food will go up, healthcare will go up. UBI is just a technocratic money shifting concept that is easily defeated by corporations who can tell their drones to raise prices.

    Likewise, welfare has taught us that you don't give money to room temperature IQ people. If the black community has taught us anything, it's that people of low IQ average have minimal fiscal responsibility or discipline. When they get free money, they have an overwhelming tendency to blow it within the first few days on frivolous shit and then whine about how they're poor and society doesn't help them. Natural selection has to take place in these circumstances. or else the bottom bloats with genetic rejects that wouldn't survive without the generosity of others.

    You want to help the deserving poor? Lower taxes across the board, stop spending on federal money on wasteful, ill-managed shit like Soc-Sec, Medicare and wars for Israel, control cheap labor immigration and outsourcing and introduce price controls on systems that have been bloated by government interference, i.e., healthcare.

    That's how you fix the problem.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @RadicalCenter

    Definitely the super-rich elites who gouge us for housing and medical treatment / pharmaceuticals / devices must be prevented from simply raising prices even further to soak up our UBI payments for themselves.

    What is the best way to do this? Perhaps fund the UBI in part with a tax that is levied only on very high annual household incomes — with no credits or exemptions or loopholes, no preferential treatment of any kind of income, no exceptions or deductions for money “donated” to “foundations” and the like.

    Require that large corporate landlords offer their apartment units for sale to the tenants — only non-felon US Citizens — at some reasonable multiple of the median income in the locality, with zero-interest financing provided by a Public Bank. Now the landlords can’t just hike rents even further to get our UBI payments.

    (While we’re at it, have the Public Bank refinance all residential mortgage loans, SMALL-business debt, medical debt, student loans, vehicle loans, and credit-card debt at zero percent. Now the banks can’t just take our UBI payments through high interest rates,)

    Another way would be to create a system of publicly owned factories to manufacture the most widely used pharmaceuticals and medical devices and provide them to all US Citizens at cost. Now the medical profiteers can’t raise drug and device prices to soak up our UBI payments.

    Buy out the energy corporations and place our God-given natural resources under public ownership. Small stockholders get full market-value compensation, while huge wealthy stockholders do not. All profit from the sale of oil, natural gas, metals, minerals and spring water under the earth get paid in equal shares to all non-incarcerated adult US Citizens age 21 and over each year. In other words, a more generous national version of the State of Alaska’s resource dividend program.

    We cannot continue the way we have been going. We must cut out the big banks and big corporate exploiters of real estate and natural resources. Housing and medical/dental care especially must be made more affordable, and obscene profits from the owners and providers thereof very heavily taxed and paid back to the people. Create a system where price-gougers trying to get our UBI money without providing additional value or care have to give it all back.

  75. @iffen
    If you want to win, you have to choose up sides in such a way that you have the best chance of winning.

    In the fight for political power in the US, guaranteed losing side members are misogynists, libertarians, white nationalists of any flavor, conspiracy theory aficionados of any type, monarchists, anti-Semites of any flavor, "small government" fanatics, and lastly, "little platoons will conquer all" types.

    Replies: @Mark G.

    If you want to win, you have to choose up sides in such a way that you have the best chance of winning.

    You want to decide what is the morally right side and then find other people who want to join in a coalition with you on that side. What do you do, though, if there are not enough people on the right side to win at this point? I think it’s better to be on the right side and go down fighting than join the side you know is wrong. I’m a libertarian who believes in freedom and individual rights and even if I thought it was “the guaranteed losing side” I would still be on that side. I don’t actually think it is going to be the losing side in the long run because totalitarian collectivism is unworkable whether it takes the Nazi Germany form or the Soviet Union form. As the U.S. moves in that direction, the same failure will eventually take place here and I don’t think it is a long ways off.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Mark G.


    I think it’s better to be on the right side and go down fighting than join the side you know is wrong.
     
    Life isn't as simple as that. There's no morally right or morally wrong side. There are degrees of moral rightness and moral wrongness. There are people and political movements that are entirely morally wrong but most people are in the middle. When it comes to morality there's black and white but there are lots of shades of grey.

    And there are people who are not morally wrong but simply hold political views that are unrealistic and unworkable.

    So what you need is a coalition of groups who are morally reasonably acceptable and also basically sane and sensible. You can't choose political allies with whom you entirely agree because then you'll end up with no political allies.

    It's important to avoid the danger of being obsessed with moral or ideological purity. Being morally and ideologically pure and losing is futile. It's better to be prepared to make some compromises and have a chance of winning. Winning a partial victory is better than losing.

    Replies: @Mark G.

    , @DanHessinMD
    @Mark G.

    " I would still be on that side. I don’t actually think it is going to be the losing side in the long run because totalitarian collectivism is unworkable whether it takes the Nazi Germany form or the Soviet Union form. As the U.S. moves in that direction, the same failure will eventually take place here and I don’t think it is a long ways off."

    And that is the key point. The Left is heady with their wins. But these wins are in the realm of power, not success.

    In the Soviet Union, the left got all the power imaginable, but they could not win. The God of Nature always gets the final say, and the left has more problems than they can possibly come to grips with.

    Most especially:
    (1) The lack of family formation in the developed world, a trend that they drove
    (2) The surge of crime, a trend that they drove
    (3) Enormous debt and deficits, a trend that they are driving with socialism and lockdowns
    (4) Leftist cities are being gutted by crime and the lockdowns.

    The right should not feel defeated or hopeless. They will be asked to lead again. The Trump era had high economic growth, low unemployment and broad success.

    Now the left is in charge. That will suck for them. They wanted all the power. But the greater power still is GNON.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  76. @neutral
    @DanHessinMD


    has a small Jewish population that is mostly right wing.
     
    First of all, "right wing" in Britain is in reality leftist, they support all things gay, Muslim, anti white, etc.

    As for mentioning good goyim such as Dorsey or Bezos, what of it? Do you seriously believe that any of them could defy the will of the likes the ADL or AIPAC? They can only operate under the strict woke confines that are designed by jews.

    And when I say jews are the problem, I mean all jews. The elite as you call them, are all ultimately spawned via the Orthodox types, this is why the talk of the secular jews vanishing via intermarriage is always a total lie.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD

    neutral — Just had a glance at your comment history. You are probably why all links on Unz.com are banned on Facebook.

    You seem to go from article to article just taking a dump in one pool after another.

    I am big on free speech and people like you are a big part of why free speech keeps losing.

    • Agree: iffen
    • Replies: @neutral
    @DanHessinMD

    Yes, it's all my fault. If only people did not speak about jews, then they would stop censoring, that is basically your reasoning - idiotic.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD

  77. @RadicalCenter
    @Jim Christian

    There is only less indoctrination going on if at least one parent or grandparent can sit with all online-schooling children all the time and interject when the teacher tries to insert her own (or the State’s own) political, racial, and sexual views. This is not practical for many families.

    Also, we should not assume that government schools will “tolerate” parents “disrupting” instruction to cut off or counter propaganda. They will ultimately keep such children’s Zoom feeds muted, then send a warning letter to the “offending” parent, then take legal action against the parent.

    In any event, a very low percentage of parents have the trifecta of knowledge, time, and courage to interject in their children’s Zoom classes when they hear propaganda. This will be especially true of the tens of millions of parents who were not raised in the USA and do not have even the limited, inconsistent tradition of thinking independently and challenging rather than blindly “respecting” authority that we have (or had).

    Systematic indoctrination is still going on, and for almost all children and almost all classes probably just as much as before the plandemic.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter, @Corvinus

    “when the teacher tries to insert her own (or the State’s own) political, racial, and sexual views. ”

    LOL, that doesn’t happen as often as you have been led to believe it does.

    “They will ultimately keep such children’s Zoom feeds muted, then send a warning letter to the “offending” parent, then take legal action against the parent.”

    Citations, please.

  78. @DanHessinMD
    @neutral

    neutral -- Just had a glance at your comment history. You are probably why all links on Unz.com are banned on Facebook.

    You seem to go from article to article just taking a dump in one pool after another.

    I am big on free speech and people like you are a big part of why free speech keeps losing.

    Replies: @neutral

    Yes, it’s all my fault. If only people did not speak about jews, then they would stop censoring, that is basically your reasoning – idiotic.

    • Replies: @DanHessinMD
    @neutral

    "If only people did not speak about Jews, then they would stop censoring"

    You see Jews under your bed and in every closet. That is top tier paranoia.

    But censorship is worst in the UK where they arrest and jail people for comments on the Internet. The UK is less than 0.5% Jewish. Meanwhile the United States, which has 10 times the share of Jewish people in the population, has free speech in the law.

    The clearest 'hate speech' decision in the Supreme Court was Snyder v. Phelps of 2011.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snyder_v._Phelps

    From Wikipedia, this is was Westboro Baptist Church's message at a funeral of a fallen soldier:

    "Picketers displayed placards such as “God Hates the USA/Thank God for 9/11,” “America is Doomed,” “Don’t Pray for the USA,” “Thank God for IEDs,” “Thank God for Dead Soldiers,” “Pope in Hell,” “Priests Rape Boys,” “God Hates Fag,” “You’re Going to Hell,” and “God Hates You.”, "Fag troops", "Semper fi fags" and "Thank God for dead soldiers"."

    The result was an 8-1 decision in favor of extreme free speech, with all three Jewish justices, Ginsberg, Breyer and Kagan coming down in favor of the most extreme speech imaginable.

    Much of Congress filed amicus briefs *against* speech in that instance including the leaders of both parties. In addition 48 of 50 states and DC filed briefs *against* that speech.

    But the Jewish Supreme Court justices all held their ground as hardcore advocates of the most extreme speech you can think of (at a funeral!).

    So will you thank the Jews that you get to defecate in every comment section you can find?

    Jewish people have often been very leftist -- it's true. And leftism has produced a lot of problems in the world -- that is true too. But the idea that everything you hate is due to Jews is straight paranoia, and there are meds for that.

    Persuading you is probably pointless though, because you are an automaton, as far as I can tell.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @iffen

  79. @TomSchmidt
    @Catdog

    Trump’s supporters were great people and they showed their bravery and dedication. The only failure was from Trump and the rest of the cucked R’s. If Trump supporters can be faulted for anything its only for thinking Trump is a better man than he’s proven to be.

    This is what has me completely disgusted with DJT. He is going to suffer as contracts are canceled with his organization around NYC. A few dollars. He is, after all, a "billionaire."

    The people who charged into the Capitol are going to be crucified. Some have already killed themselves. Trump might have issued a blanket pardon for everyone who was non-violent. Instead, in the end, he encouraged a large rally in DC which served no purpose that I can see, and destroyed the lives of many people who showed up.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Freedom Awaits

    Trump did exactly what he was told and or allowed to do. Anyone who still believes that “national” elections are anything more than theatrics is either 1: willfully ignorant or
    2: just plain ignorant.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Freedom Awaits

    You're not cynical enough. Trump in the cynical version, as from Realist, was a setup by the elite to defuse the anger of the working class while doing nothing for them.

    Do you think Hillary could have gotten a bump stock ban through Congress?

  80. @Mark G.
    @iffen


    If you want to win, you have to choose up sides in such a way that you have the best chance of winning.
     
    You want to decide what is the morally right side and then find other people who want to join in a coalition with you on that side. What do you do, though, if there are not enough people on the right side to win at this point? I think it's better to be on the right side and go down fighting than join the side you know is wrong. I'm a libertarian who believes in freedom and individual rights and even if I thought it was "the guaranteed losing side" I would still be on that side. I don't actually think it is going to be the losing side in the long run because totalitarian collectivism is unworkable whether it takes the Nazi Germany form or the Soviet Union form. As the U.S. moves in that direction, the same failure will eventually take place here and I don't think it is a long ways off.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @DanHessinMD

    I think it’s better to be on the right side and go down fighting than join the side you know is wrong.

    Life isn’t as simple as that. There’s no morally right or morally wrong side. There are degrees of moral rightness and moral wrongness. There are people and political movements that are entirely morally wrong but most people are in the middle. When it comes to morality there’s black and white but there are lots of shades of grey.

    And there are people who are not morally wrong but simply hold political views that are unrealistic and unworkable.

    So what you need is a coalition of groups who are morally reasonably acceptable and also basically sane and sensible. You can’t choose political allies with whom you entirely agree because then you’ll end up with no political allies.

    It’s important to avoid the danger of being obsessed with moral or ideological purity. Being morally and ideologically pure and losing is futile. It’s better to be prepared to make some compromises and have a chance of winning. Winning a partial victory is better than losing.

    • Agree: iffen
    • Replies: @Mark G.
    @dfordoom


    There’s no morally right or morally wrong side. There are degrees of moral rightness and moral wrongness.
     
    There is a gray but since gray is a mixture of black and white there also needs to be a black and a white. You need to think what the ideal is. If you don't, then you don't know what direction you should be going in.

    Once you know that, it helps in picking candidates. Political candidates are a package deal. Voters don't vote on each issue but vote for someone to represent them. Since a candidate takes some positions you like and some you don't, you need to put a weight on the importance of each issue. Some voters are litmus test voters and will even vote for a candidate based on one issue.

    I'm a libertarian but know I need to pick a party that can cobble together a coalition that wins. If there is a party that wants to cut government by five percent and another that wants to increase it by five percent neither party is libertarian but I still know who to vote for since I know the direction I want to go in. I also hold some positions that I think are libertarian and are important but most libertarians would not agree with, for example in the area of immigration. That means I might not even be voting for the candidate of most self-identified libertarians. A lot of libertarians hated Trump but overall I considered him to be marginally better than Hillary or Biden and voted for him twice.
  81. @dfordoom
    @Mark G.


    I think it’s better to be on the right side and go down fighting than join the side you know is wrong.
     
    Life isn't as simple as that. There's no morally right or morally wrong side. There are degrees of moral rightness and moral wrongness. There are people and political movements that are entirely morally wrong but most people are in the middle. When it comes to morality there's black and white but there are lots of shades of grey.

    And there are people who are not morally wrong but simply hold political views that are unrealistic and unworkable.

    So what you need is a coalition of groups who are morally reasonably acceptable and also basically sane and sensible. You can't choose political allies with whom you entirely agree because then you'll end up with no political allies.

    It's important to avoid the danger of being obsessed with moral or ideological purity. Being morally and ideologically pure and losing is futile. It's better to be prepared to make some compromises and have a chance of winning. Winning a partial victory is better than losing.

    Replies: @Mark G.

    There’s no morally right or morally wrong side. There are degrees of moral rightness and moral wrongness.

    There is a gray but since gray is a mixture of black and white there also needs to be a black and a white. You need to think what the ideal is. If you don’t, then you don’t know what direction you should be going in.

    Once you know that, it helps in picking candidates. Political candidates are a package deal. Voters don’t vote on each issue but vote for someone to represent them. Since a candidate takes some positions you like and some you don’t, you need to put a weight on the importance of each issue. Some voters are litmus test voters and will even vote for a candidate based on one issue.

    I’m a libertarian but know I need to pick a party that can cobble together a coalition that wins. If there is a party that wants to cut government by five percent and another that wants to increase it by five percent neither party is libertarian but I still know who to vote for since I know the direction I want to go in. I also hold some positions that I think are libertarian and are important but most libertarians would not agree with, for example in the area of immigration. That means I might not even be voting for the candidate of most self-identified libertarians. A lot of libertarians hated Trump but overall I considered him to be marginally better than Hillary or Biden and voted for him twice.

  82. @TomSchmidt
    @Pericles

    I've always loved Solzhenitsyn's take on Etienne de la Boetie and consent of the governed. Were any organs of the state made afraid to confront people on the 6th? I suspect BLM made every cop in the USA know he'd best not enforce any laws on blacks who don't want to comply. By contrast, the 6th will only encourage the people using terms like "domestic terrorism." They have their Reichstag Fire now, and they're gonna use it.

    I suspect they were going to use something in any case. But now it was handed to them, gift-wrapped.

    At some point, people in Republican-governed states with Democratic senators (and vice versa) might take more direct action to overturn the election results. Heck, Pelosi cannot suffer the loss of more than 4 Representatives without losing the majority. Of the 5 oldest members of the House, minimum age 83, 4 are Democrats.

    Replies: @Pericles

    Note that BLM and antifa are only untouchable because the police chiefs and political bosses and tech oligarchs say so, not because they’re such powerful and righteous warriors. It’s a bit of political theatre, so kneel or dance the macarena, brave blue line. And how many Reichstags fires have there been already? I’ve lost count. (9/11 was the big one, wasn’t it?)

    However, there are still about 75 million voters, perhaps more, who think the election was stolen and, funnily enough, Trump was more popular on his exit than Most Popular President Ever Joe Biden on his entrance. All their evil tricks just delegitimize the system.

  83. @Mark G.
    @iffen


    If you want to win, you have to choose up sides in such a way that you have the best chance of winning.
     
    You want to decide what is the morally right side and then find other people who want to join in a coalition with you on that side. What do you do, though, if there are not enough people on the right side to win at this point? I think it's better to be on the right side and go down fighting than join the side you know is wrong. I'm a libertarian who believes in freedom and individual rights and even if I thought it was "the guaranteed losing side" I would still be on that side. I don't actually think it is going to be the losing side in the long run because totalitarian collectivism is unworkable whether it takes the Nazi Germany form or the Soviet Union form. As the U.S. moves in that direction, the same failure will eventually take place here and I don't think it is a long ways off.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @DanHessinMD

    ” I would still be on that side. I don’t actually think it is going to be the losing side in the long run because totalitarian collectivism is unworkable whether it takes the Nazi Germany form or the Soviet Union form. As the U.S. moves in that direction, the same failure will eventually take place here and I don’t think it is a long ways off.”

    And that is the key point. The Left is heady with their wins. But these wins are in the realm of power, not success.

    In the Soviet Union, the left got all the power imaginable, but they could not win. The God of Nature always gets the final say, and the left has more problems than they can possibly come to grips with.

    Most especially:
    (1) The lack of family formation in the developed world, a trend that they drove
    (2) The surge of crime, a trend that they drove
    (3) Enormous debt and deficits, a trend that they are driving with socialism and lockdowns
    (4) Leftist cities are being gutted by crime and the lockdowns.

    The right should not feel defeated or hopeless. They will be asked to lead again. The Trump era had high economic growth, low unemployment and broad success.

    Now the left is in charge. That will suck for them. They wanted all the power. But the greater power still is GNON.

    • Agree: Mark G.
    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @DanHessinMD


    and the left has more problems than they can possibly come to grips with.

    Most especially:
    (1) The lack of family formation in the developed world, a trend that they drove
     
    I don't think the Left can be blamed for that one. It's just the nature of the modern world. The Economic Right has if anything done more harm in that area than the Left.

    You're right in the sense that it's a problem to which the modern so-called Left has no answer. Mind you, the modern Right has no answer to it either.

    Now the left is in charge. That will suck for them.
     
    It's laughable to describe the Biden Administration as leftist but you're correct that that Administration is going to find that being in office will be a lot less fun than they thought. They're facing problems that they will most likely prove to be ludicrously incapable of dealing with. The Biden Administration is certainly likely to turn out to be a train wreck.

    Replies: @Talha

  84. @DanHessinMD
    @Catdog

    Trump made more effort than anyone. Those who think someone else will come along and fight for Americans harder than he did are deluded.

    Right wingers hating on Trump are out of their minds. Most would not last a day in his shoes. He had to fight his battles mostly alone.

    No other conservative in living memory fought 1/10 as hard, against worse odds. Every day Trump was in office was a war of him against the world. And he was genuinely successful. The economy soared in ways that were deemed impossible. Unemployment was at record lows. There was peace in the world. The border was more secure than it had been in decades.

    Every part of the better, populist Republican platform was his doing, from fighting illegal immigration to bringing manufacturing back to America to supporting police to recognizing that China, not Russia, is our rival, to staying out of wars and using economic measures instead. And hardly anyone helped. Which other powers on the right drove America First policy?

    Then COVID came and the powers that be shut down the world and locked everyone in their homes. Many of us including myself and our blog host were certain of rapid economic collapse. Mother of God, was their ever a more crazy and bizarre policy than to lock down the whole population for a year?

    And still Trump persisted, with triumphant optimism, always looking for a way. The market would crash and Trump would then talk the market back up, again and again. Mega rally after mega rally, he fought against the stiff gale of the pandemic, falling from COVID and then getting to his feet from his hospital bed and rushing forward again. The number and size and spread of Trump's rallies during his final two weeks was way beyond anything history has seen and that schedule of rallies will never be matched in the future. One huge event per day would be an impossible schedule for any other world leader or pop star. Trump often had four and five rallies per day, spanning multiple states.

    He garnered a record number of votes but everyone was able to vote from home and voting was easier than ever with turnout of the tens of millions of the lowest information new voters. Every death from a disease was blamed on Trump and schools and churches were cancelled indefinitely and all the cities and Democrat wrecked their economies in defiance of Trump's wish not to lock down. The discovery of a cure through Trump's Operation Warp Speed was kept secret until the day after the election. In the debates, the moderator Chris Wallace attacked Trump brutally in defiance of every norm. In the final weeks of the campaign, news of Biden's crimes was literally censored by big tech.

    Trump was impeached for abuse of power at the beginning of the pandemic simply for calling for Biden's crimes to be investigated. Needless to say they never were. Then Trump, freshly impeached for abusing his power when he had exercised very little power, was blamed for not shutting down the entire country. Oh and the majority of the population of America completely lost their minds in a panic and embraced permanent house arrest for everyone.

    Almost Trump's entire Presidency was wrapped in the manufactured scandal that was Russiagate as both parties tried their best to cripple him. The media discarded all objectivity to make every story an attack on Trump. Tech tycoons, whose wealth grew by hundreds of billions because of Trump, committed their wealth to the political ground game in urban population centers in swing states to defeat him.

    Meanwhile a solid third of the right wing, including Vox Day and frequently Alex Jones, were completely lost in a Q-Anon fantasy land where conservatives don't have to do anything because everything was going according to plan. Others on the right engaged idiotic Nazi playacting that forced Trump to push mightily in the other direction, so politically destructive is the stench of those fools.

    Eventually all this felled Trump and the election didn't go his way. And yet he continued fighting on, against all hope, to keep the dream alive because he didn't want to let his supporters down.

    In the end, they defeating him by cutting off all channels of communication, cutting off Trump from his one hundred million followers on Twitter, cutting him off from Facebook and the rest, and branding the greatest American patriot of our lifetimes as a terrorist ringleader for an riot at Capitol Hill by unarmed protesters that didn't leave a scratch on any member of Congress. Amid all this, he couldn't defend himself because his voice was taken away. He tried to use the Official White House channels and those too were censored. Even his calls for peace were cut off by the Big Tech overlords.

    And all the while as their undisputed leader was destroyed, the Republican establishment stood aside or actively participated in the blows.

    In the end, Trump is Christlike tragic hero: unprecedented seemingly miraculous efforts but an end of betrayal, abandonment and crucifixion.

    I would have liked it if Trump pardoned Assange and Snowden. But about that:
    (1) It wouldn't have made a practical difference because the Deep State would just bring new charges against Assange and Snowden in about a day.
    (2) With the whole power structure conspiring to destroy him already such pardons would have jammed a giant stick in the hornets nest, there is no doubt, at the moment when Trump loses all his Presidential immunity.
    (3) Holding the knife up to Trump's throat was Mitch McConnell, the most powerful figure in Trump's own party, threating to continue destroying Trump even after Trump leaves office. After all Trump did, from placing thousands of judges and three justices to saving Mitch's own hide in the election? Are you kidding me?

    God Bless Donald Trump and God save us America, somehow.

    Replies: @Clyde

    You gave a great history of President Trump. He worked mostly alone and did his own PR via twitter. I will say that Mike Pompeo, Steven Mnuchin and Peter Navarro were effective and loyal to the end. He was offered up as a human sacrifice by Deep State as a warning to all others. Not to try what Trump did. It was dismaying hearing all the parrots on the left screaming insurrection. They had to look up the word to know for sure what it meant.

    Republicans too screeching about an insurrection. Then the Trump era ended. Now we go back to normal, meaning selling out to China and allowing in tens of millions of third worlders.

  85. @neutral
    @DanHessinMD

    Yes, it's all my fault. If only people did not speak about jews, then they would stop censoring, that is basically your reasoning - idiotic.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD

    “If only people did not speak about Jews, then they would stop censoring”

    You see Jews under your bed and in every closet. That is top tier paranoia.

    But censorship is worst in the UK where they arrest and jail people for comments on the Internet. The UK is less than 0.5% Jewish. Meanwhile the United States, which has 10 times the share of Jewish people in the population, has free speech in the law.

    The clearest ‘hate speech’ decision in the Supreme Court was Snyder v. Phelps of 2011.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snyder_v._Phelps

    From Wikipedia, this is was Westboro Baptist Church’s message at a funeral of a fallen soldier:

    “Picketers displayed placards such as “God Hates the USA/Thank God for 9/11,” “America is Doomed,” “Don’t Pray for the USA,” “Thank God for IEDs,” “Thank God for Dead Soldiers,” “Pope in Hell,” “Priests Rape Boys,” “God Hates Fag,” “You’re Going to Hell,” and “God Hates You.”, “Fag troops”, “Semper fi fags” and “Thank God for dead soldiers”.”

    The result was an 8-1 decision in favor of extreme free speech, with all three Jewish justices, Ginsberg, Breyer and Kagan coming down in favor of the most extreme speech imaginable.

    Much of Congress filed amicus briefs *against* speech in that instance including the leaders of both parties. In addition 48 of 50 states and DC filed briefs *against* that speech.

    But the Jewish Supreme Court justices all held their ground as hardcore advocates of the most extreme speech you can think of (at a funeral!).

    So will you thank the Jews that you get to defecate in every comment section you can find?

    Jewish people have often been very leftist — it’s true. And leftism has produced a lot of problems in the world — that is true too. But the idea that everything you hate is due to Jews is straight paranoia, and there are meds for that.

    Persuading you is probably pointless though, because you are an automaton, as far as I can tell.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @DanHessinMD


    But the idea that everything you hate is due to Jews is straight paranoia, and there are meds for that.
     
    The meds can help but the people that need the need the meds most are those least likely to take them. That's what makes paranoid schizophrenia such a tragedy.

    The worst thing the Right can do at this point in time is to disappear down the paranoia rabbit hole.
    , @iffen
    @DanHessinMD

    But the Jewish Supreme Court justices all held their ground as hardcore advocates of the most extreme speech you can think of (at a funeral!).

    Let's wait and see where they fall out with cases involving Woke Capital doing the censorship on behalf of the Woke Government.

  86. @DanHessinMD
    @Mark G.

    " I would still be on that side. I don’t actually think it is going to be the losing side in the long run because totalitarian collectivism is unworkable whether it takes the Nazi Germany form or the Soviet Union form. As the U.S. moves in that direction, the same failure will eventually take place here and I don’t think it is a long ways off."

    And that is the key point. The Left is heady with their wins. But these wins are in the realm of power, not success.

    In the Soviet Union, the left got all the power imaginable, but they could not win. The God of Nature always gets the final say, and the left has more problems than they can possibly come to grips with.

    Most especially:
    (1) The lack of family formation in the developed world, a trend that they drove
    (2) The surge of crime, a trend that they drove
    (3) Enormous debt and deficits, a trend that they are driving with socialism and lockdowns
    (4) Leftist cities are being gutted by crime and the lockdowns.

    The right should not feel defeated or hopeless. They will be asked to lead again. The Trump era had high economic growth, low unemployment and broad success.

    Now the left is in charge. That will suck for them. They wanted all the power. But the greater power still is GNON.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    and the left has more problems than they can possibly come to grips with.

    Most especially:
    (1) The lack of family formation in the developed world, a trend that they drove

    I don’t think the Left can be blamed for that one. It’s just the nature of the modern world. The Economic Right has if anything done more harm in that area than the Left.

    You’re right in the sense that it’s a problem to which the modern so-called Left has no answer. Mind you, the modern Right has no answer to it either.

    Now the left is in charge. That will suck for them.

    It’s laughable to describe the Biden Administration as leftist but you’re correct that that Administration is going to find that being in office will be a lot less fun than they thought. They’re facing problems that they will most likely prove to be ludicrously incapable of dealing with. The Biden Administration is certainly likely to turn out to be a train wreck.

    • Replies: @Talha
    @dfordoom


    It’s just the nature of the modern world.
     
    At some point the culture around natalism changes; when exactly that happens and what is the threshold a modern society can bear to be pro-natal before the culture swings in the opposite direction is something I don’t think anyone has good answers to.

    I’m reminded of a Mexican convert sister who follows my account on Twitter who recently had this to say as she married a brother from Yemen and moved to Sanaa from Mexico:
    https://www.twitter.com/alaztekiyyah/status/1354323000309506049

    That is still a society/culture that very much looks forward to children - and fast - even in the midst of a civil war. When will that start changing? It will be interesting to track in real time.

    Peace.
  87. @DanHessinMD
    @neutral

    "If only people did not speak about Jews, then they would stop censoring"

    You see Jews under your bed and in every closet. That is top tier paranoia.

    But censorship is worst in the UK where they arrest and jail people for comments on the Internet. The UK is less than 0.5% Jewish. Meanwhile the United States, which has 10 times the share of Jewish people in the population, has free speech in the law.

    The clearest 'hate speech' decision in the Supreme Court was Snyder v. Phelps of 2011.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snyder_v._Phelps

    From Wikipedia, this is was Westboro Baptist Church's message at a funeral of a fallen soldier:

    "Picketers displayed placards such as “God Hates the USA/Thank God for 9/11,” “America is Doomed,” “Don’t Pray for the USA,” “Thank God for IEDs,” “Thank God for Dead Soldiers,” “Pope in Hell,” “Priests Rape Boys,” “God Hates Fag,” “You’re Going to Hell,” and “God Hates You.”, "Fag troops", "Semper fi fags" and "Thank God for dead soldiers"."

    The result was an 8-1 decision in favor of extreme free speech, with all three Jewish justices, Ginsberg, Breyer and Kagan coming down in favor of the most extreme speech imaginable.

    Much of Congress filed amicus briefs *against* speech in that instance including the leaders of both parties. In addition 48 of 50 states and DC filed briefs *against* that speech.

    But the Jewish Supreme Court justices all held their ground as hardcore advocates of the most extreme speech you can think of (at a funeral!).

    So will you thank the Jews that you get to defecate in every comment section you can find?

    Jewish people have often been very leftist -- it's true. And leftism has produced a lot of problems in the world -- that is true too. But the idea that everything you hate is due to Jews is straight paranoia, and there are meds for that.

    Persuading you is probably pointless though, because you are an automaton, as far as I can tell.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @iffen

    But the idea that everything you hate is due to Jews is straight paranoia, and there are meds for that.

    The meds can help but the people that need the need the meds most are those least likely to take them. That’s what makes paranoid schizophrenia such a tragedy.

    The worst thing the Right can do at this point in time is to disappear down the paranoia rabbit hole.

  88. @El Dato
    @Chrisnonymous

    Outsourcing doesn't really work even now.

    Never have in-house knowledge, get your IP stolen, get bad quality goods, get no permanent memory or living organization for the company.

    It's basically setting oneself up to be the middleman. Who is dumb enough to do that except an MBA?

    Maybe Boeing management.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @nebulafox, @Daniel Chieh

    Outsourcing doesn’t really work even now.

    Looking forward to hearing of your adventures at growing your own food and building your own cars.

  89. @dfordoom
    @DanHessinMD


    and the left has more problems than they can possibly come to grips with.

    Most especially:
    (1) The lack of family formation in the developed world, a trend that they drove
     
    I don't think the Left can be blamed for that one. It's just the nature of the modern world. The Economic Right has if anything done more harm in that area than the Left.

    You're right in the sense that it's a problem to which the modern so-called Left has no answer. Mind you, the modern Right has no answer to it either.

    Now the left is in charge. That will suck for them.
     
    It's laughable to describe the Biden Administration as leftist but you're correct that that Administration is going to find that being in office will be a lot less fun than they thought. They're facing problems that they will most likely prove to be ludicrously incapable of dealing with. The Biden Administration is certainly likely to turn out to be a train wreck.

    Replies: @Talha

    It’s just the nature of the modern world.

    At some point the culture around natalism changes; when exactly that happens and what is the threshold a modern society can bear to be pro-natal before the culture swings in the opposite direction is something I don’t think anyone has good answers to.

    I’m reminded of a Mexican convert sister who follows my account on Twitter who recently had this to say as she married a brother from Yemen and moved to Sanaa from Mexico:

    That is still a society/culture that very much looks forward to children – and fast – even in the midst of a civil war. When will that start changing? It will be interesting to track in real time.

    Peace.

  90. @DanHessinMD
    @neutral

    "If only people did not speak about Jews, then they would stop censoring"

    You see Jews under your bed and in every closet. That is top tier paranoia.

    But censorship is worst in the UK where they arrest and jail people for comments on the Internet. The UK is less than 0.5% Jewish. Meanwhile the United States, which has 10 times the share of Jewish people in the population, has free speech in the law.

    The clearest 'hate speech' decision in the Supreme Court was Snyder v. Phelps of 2011.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snyder_v._Phelps

    From Wikipedia, this is was Westboro Baptist Church's message at a funeral of a fallen soldier:

    "Picketers displayed placards such as “God Hates the USA/Thank God for 9/11,” “America is Doomed,” “Don’t Pray for the USA,” “Thank God for IEDs,” “Thank God for Dead Soldiers,” “Pope in Hell,” “Priests Rape Boys,” “God Hates Fag,” “You’re Going to Hell,” and “God Hates You.”, "Fag troops", "Semper fi fags" and "Thank God for dead soldiers"."

    The result was an 8-1 decision in favor of extreme free speech, with all three Jewish justices, Ginsberg, Breyer and Kagan coming down in favor of the most extreme speech imaginable.

    Much of Congress filed amicus briefs *against* speech in that instance including the leaders of both parties. In addition 48 of 50 states and DC filed briefs *against* that speech.

    But the Jewish Supreme Court justices all held their ground as hardcore advocates of the most extreme speech you can think of (at a funeral!).

    So will you thank the Jews that you get to defecate in every comment section you can find?

    Jewish people have often been very leftist -- it's true. And leftism has produced a lot of problems in the world -- that is true too. But the idea that everything you hate is due to Jews is straight paranoia, and there are meds for that.

    Persuading you is probably pointless though, because you are an automaton, as far as I can tell.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @iffen

    But the Jewish Supreme Court justices all held their ground as hardcore advocates of the most extreme speech you can think of (at a funeral!).

    Let’s wait and see where they fall out with cases involving Woke Capital doing the censorship on behalf of the Woke Government.

  91. @Freedom Awaits
    @TomSchmidt

    Trump did exactly what he was told and or allowed to do. Anyone who still believes that "national" elections are anything more than theatrics is either 1: willfully ignorant or
    2: just plain ignorant.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    You’re not cynical enough. Trump in the cynical version, as from Realist, was a setup by the elite to defuse the anger of the working class while doing nothing for them.

    Do you think Hillary could have gotten a bump stock ban through Congress?

  92. @Too Long Didn't Read
    Clickbait. Again.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Audacious Epigone

    The post titles are taken directly from the comment of the week excerpts.

  93. @Chrisnonymous

    focus on attacking people for being bankers, billionaires, Hollywood moguls, tech monopolists, elite academics, politicians, media tycoons and journalists.
     
    LOL. dfordoom has spent too much time in this free speech venue where people actively criticize minorities if they want. He has forgotten that in mainstream culture, when a right-winger criticizes bankers, professors, etc, the response is usually to accuse them of covert anti-Simitism!

    Replies: @brabantian, @Rosie, @Audacious Epigone

    And there is a lot of pushback and incredulity from the broad middle. When instead people say, “It’s the Jews!!!”, others point to certain non-Jews screwing people over and other Jews fighting the good fight and dismiss the obsessors as bigoted nuts.

  94. @neutral

    Very few people outside the far right hate Jews but almost everybody hates the elites.
     
    Always the same nonsense, people want to be gutmenschen and avoid mentioning the jews at all costs. The reality is that it is not the elite/liberals/SJWs/Muslims/Illuminati/etc, it really is the jews, if you refuse you acknowledge the root cause of all the malaise then you will never make progress.

    This is the problem that the types that follow Alex Jones and Qanon have, they can correctly spot that the democracy is a sham and that they are run by an unaccountable elite, they however are too afraid to ever dare call out the jews (or blacks and other non white groups), which is why they have to resort to ever more crackpot ideas to explain the world.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD, @Audacious Epigone

    And that’s why the Daily Stormer is so much more influential than InfoWars! Uh huh.

    • LOL: iffen
  95. @Athletic and Whitesplosive
    @YetAnotherAnon

    But a grave wound would have been an actual insurrection, although this would have been basically impossible since there was no elite support.

    Sometimes I don't know what the hell people here want, I expect they don't either.

    Without someone opposing them with a credible threat of force, exploitation and terrible governance will never stop, the threat of force is what they use to sustain it. This is self evident. If a better elite starts taking power even through insitutional capture, people will still get killed in the power struggle even if it's relatively low-intensity, this is always true but especially true for regimes whose favored tactic is street theatre.

    So there are 2 options:

    1) Nothing "violent" happens and the regime with associated mass bombing of uppity foreigners, deaths of despair and the occasional execution of hapless theatrical rioters at home continues either forever or until it collapses under mismanagement. Collapse would be totally disastrous for everyone with many, many dead.

    2) A focused counter elite uses opportunistic tools complete with violence and the threat thereof to somehow defuse the powder keg that is the American empire. Every way this could happen will certainly involve violence (including AE's favored outcome of regional parition), you'd be an idiot to think otherwise.

    But as we see, all violence under any circumstance is "WRONG, WRONG, WRONG, NOOOOOOOOO!!!!" As if violence were avoidable in principle. It isn't, so you'd better start thinking of ways in which it can be lessened, rather than raging at it's inevitability.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    If there must be violence, don’t be the one who draws first blood. Going to a blue stronghold and being violent is a really, really bad idea. Even with the cultural winds at their back, the left doesn’t go into red places and do that. In the rare instances that they do, they get BTFO in a day as happened in Lancaster PA.

    Congress is working on passing a blatantly unconstitutional federal mandate for how states conduct elections, ie no voter ID. Red states should simply refuse to abide by that law if it passed. Dare the feds to try and militarily enforce it. They won’t, and from that red states can become bolder in their defiance. There are going to be many similar opportunities in the coming years.

  96. @Nodwink
    Despite the bleating from this blogger and other conservatives, in the US the minimum wage has been used primarily to suppress wages. Because of this unofficial policy, you rarely hear libertarians whining about it these days (except when people want to raise it, of course).

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    Please explain.

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